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Corona Business Monthly - April 2010

Corona Business Monthly - April 2010

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Corona Business Monthly is the official publication of the Corona Chamber of Commerce. It features articles about local businesses, government officials and local events.
Corona Business Monthly is the official publication of the Corona Chamber of Commerce. It features articles about local businesses, government officials and local events.

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M C N 1 n L ¥

Volume 10 | Number 3 | April 2010 | $4
CoronaBUSINESS
INSIDE: How to Go Green Guide | Green Vehicles | Green Business Profile | Santiago High School Green Project | More
www.CoronaChamber.org
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE CORONA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
AT VALENCIA TERRACE, we’ve
created a warm and welcoming
dining experience that you’ll
enjoy every day:
• Delicious cuisine expertly
prepared by our very own
Chef Philip.
• A wide variety of menu
choices to delight your palate.
• Flexibility to choose when and
where you want to dine and
how often.
• Lots of friends to socialize with
over a shared meal.
• Smiling associates that show
they care.
Put it all together and you’ll
discover what we call
The Art of Living Well.
SM
2300 South Main Street | Corona, CA 92882
(951) 273-1300 | WWW.KISCOSENIORLIVING.COM
Lic #336424105
SLICES
OF
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Experience a Slice of Life at Valencia Terrace.
Call Today to Join Us for Lunch and a
Free Personal Consultation.
2 www.CoronaChamber.org
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
Table of Contents
Volume 10 | Number 3 | April 2010
CoronaBUSINESS
On the Cover
Spring is the perfect season to go
green. Inside our April issue you’ll
find ideas about more environmentally
healthy choices for your business
- and life!
Feature Stories
Green Business: USA Energy 10
Membership Recognition Luncheon 12
How to “Go Green” 18
Green Vehicles: Walter’s Automotive Group 20
New Board Member, Douglas C. Smith 23
Sales Discipline – Not Art or Science 24
Six-Pac Recycling Corporation 26
Santiago High School: Building a Green Future 28
Monthly Articles
Message from the Chairman 4
Message from the President 5
Legislative Update 6
Building Business Relationships 8
Long-Time Chamber Member 14
Anniversary Recognition 15
Allan Borgen’s Restaurant Review 16
Legal Opinions 22
2010 Publications Committee Jason Kimes, Chairman
Phil Adishian Jim Dorsey Bobby Spiegel
Linda Carlberg Phyllis Russell Casie Tryon
Pam Cunningham Stephanie Shapiro
Publication Staff
Publisher BrandLand Marketing
Advertising Sales Casie Tryon
Printing/Mailing Advantage Mailing
Corona Business Monthly is owned and published by the Corona Chamber of Commerce, which is solely responsible for
its content. It is mailed monthly to all Corona Chamber of Commerce members and to all non-member Corona businesses.
Total circulation: 8,100 copies. For information about advertising, call the Chamber at (951) 737-3350.
Page 16
Page 20
Page 26
Page 28
New in Town 30
New Chamber Members 31
In Our Community 32
Ambassadors’ Committee Report 33
Calendar of Events 34
Corona Business Archive 36
Referrals 36
M C N 1 n L ¥
www.CoronaChamber.org 3 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
4 www.CoronaChamber.org
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
hile there is still a long way to go,
it is undeniable that we are undergoing a quite
green transformation. You may even call it
green awakening. A new economic
development model based on renewable
energy is slowly but surely replacing an old
one based on fossil fuels. While the impact of
this tremendous phenomenon has been muted
by the economic crisis we're embroiled in,
needless to say, we are at the cusp of a green
revolution that is undoubtedly creating
unprecedented economic opportunities.
Generally speaking, there are two aspects to
reap the rewards of this emerging economy.
The first and obvious one is about tapping into
the marketplace trend towards greener
products and services. We all know that most
small businesses are limited in the time and
resources they have to dedicate to cutting
down their environmental impacts.
But entrepreneurs should always take
advantage of opportunities to cut unnecessary
costs and reduce waste. Through out this
issue, you will find examples and stories of
how simple steps can translate into big profits.
The second aspect of profiting from this
emerging trend requires some creative
on sustainable practices and will continue our
outreach to the larger business community.
After all, “going green” is not an only a matter
of dollars and cents, it also makes good sense
to embrace the virtues of being good stewards
of our Earth. When it comes to contributing
for the common good, there is not such thing
as a small deed, so we are proud of our efforts
thus far and I believe our message is on the
right path.
As they say, luck is what happens when
preparation meets opportunity.
So, I encourage you to prepare your
businesses to ride this wave and take full
advantages of the opportunities that are being
created. In this regard, you may have to do
some of your own research and knock on
relevant doors. I also hope you find the
articles and stories contained in this issue
both informative and inspirational.
Lastly, if you have new ideas and success
stories you would like your fellow members to
know, your Chamber of Commerce is always
ready to listen and share.
- Kerry L. Pendergast, Chairman of the Board
thinking and possibly retooling existing
business strategies. It's about taking the lead in
the economic recovery and doing it with green
jobs and clean energy innovation.
Where the Opportunities Are
For flexible companies that are willing to make
the necessary changes and adopt this new
phenomenon, opportunities are abundant.
Governments both at the federal and state level
are creating incentives for both long and short
term job creation. The American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act of 2009 (also know as the
stimulus package), provides tens of billions of
dollars earmarked for renewable energy,
mass transit, wind systems, retrofitting
buildings and the updating of electrical grids.
The State of California also provides tax credits
for similar projects. Needless to say, there
is an immediate benefit from tapping into the
funds designated to jump start the economy.
What Your Chamber of Commerce
is Doing
Here at the Corona Chamber of Commerce, we
are committed to educating our membership
MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIRMAN
kerry Þendergast
Capitalizing on the Green Economy
W
Io|n us for our next
Mega M|xer at 5pm
Wednesday, May 5th
at A|varez L|nco|n /
Mercury / Iaguar,
8501 Auto Dr.,
k|vers|de, CA 92504.
Contact Denea at the
Corona Chamber for more
deta||s (951) 737-3350
www.CoronaChamber.org 5 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
oing green has become a common
two-word phrase that many businesses are
using to promote themselves. Searching 'going
green' on the internet through Google,
a very green company, you find various listings
from tips to going green to eco friendly green
hotels and most everything between.
Most of us want to become good corporate
stewards and contribute to the overall
environmental health of Southern California.
The Corona Chamber is far from a 'green
facility,' however we are continually searching
for ways to improve our carbon footprints for
future generations. Changes can be as simple
as reviewing your current activities - if you are
similar to me, I need help in this area - so
solicit input from friends, coworkers, etc. that
are in tune with eco friendly ideas. Other areas
to turn to include the utility companies, who
will come and evaluate your energy usage and
ways to help you conserve. Learn how to read
and monitor all utility bills to identify possible
problems. Set your computers to hibernate
during the day. Turn desktop computers off at
night and on weekends. Wherever possible,
change 50% of the lighting to energy efficient
types; utilize day lighting (open those drapes /
window coverings, etc.); change air filters
and furnace filters monthly; use energy
efficient thermostat settings and monitor daily
(on colder days, if doable, dress with layers
of clothing); when offices are closed, set back
air conditioning / heating; if there are cracks
in the building, repair them.
Earlier this year I received a call from Santiago
High School instructor Bill Brown. One of the
classes he teaches at the school deals with
architecture and green buildings. Inside this
issue you will find an expanded story about the
class project, which they have chosen to be a
new 'green building' design for our future
home. As for operations or events, we can
learn a lot from those who offer a solution in
going green - jokingly it was suggested we not
print or mail this issue, we simply email it or
have it as a download for readers.
While making visits throughout the business
community, I have been pleased to hear that
businesses involved in green technology are
experiencing growth and it is profitable
growth. The 'green industry' is truly untapped
at this time; there are grants, special funding
and incentives available for these projects.
I would encourage you to consider expanding
your portfolio into this arena. Those large
windmills along the Interstate became the new
landscape - for years, when first constructed,
there were incentives galore, followed by tax
credits for investors. The automobile industry
is reshaping itself. I remember when muscle
cars (powerful engines) were really popular;
now we focus on miles per gallon or
completely gas free usage.
Throughout this issue, there are snippets
of tips and articles about members who are
succeeding in the green arena. We cannot
possibly highlight all of our Chamber
businesses, however feel free to check out
all of our green companies on our website,
www.CoronaChamber.org.
MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT
8obby 5p|ege|
Could We Just Be a Little More Green?
G
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CCkCNA CnAM8Lk
MLM8Lk 1CDA¥!
Io|n our 900-p|us members
and see for yourse|f why |t's
the best bus|ness |nvestment
you can make to grow
your bus|ness!
Contact the Corona Chamber
(951) 737-3350
6 www.CoronaChamber.org
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
he Corona Chamber of Commerce has
announced its opposition to legislation that
would block the channeling of water from
the Sacramento River to Southern California,
more importantly to the City of Corona.
"Enacting AB 1594 would undermine water
supply reliability throughout Southern
California and Corona, threatening jobs and
the economic health of three quarters of the
state's population residing south of the Delta,"
said Cynthia Schneider, Chair of the Chamber's
Legislative Action Committee (LAC).
"In this case, it would be a major mistake
to benefit the particular at the expense of the
general," continued Schneider.
region's water supply reliability," continued
Schneider.
Log on to: www.CoronaChamber.org and
click on the Corona Advocacy link for more
information on this and other items of
importance tracked by the Corona Chamber
of Commerce.
If passed, the legislation would revise
a historic compromise and a series of laws
that were passed just last year that addressed
the prevention of water flow to other regions
throughout the state. The Chamber believes
that the compromise and laws appropriately
addressed the matter and should not be
revisited. Part of the compromise is a bond,
slated for the November 2010 ballot in which
voters will decide to spend the necessary
money to fix California's broken water system
to the north.
"AB 1594 would cause a technical decision
to evolve into a political one, which will surely
delay the timing and process of securing the
LEGISLATIVE UPDATE
Historic Legislative Water Package
Attacks Corona's Water Reliability
1
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PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT
www.CoronaChamber.org 7 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
he Corona Chamber of Commerce has
voiced its opposition to SB 518. The legislation
would reduce the availability of free parking
that helps to attract customers to local shops
and businesses in certain communities.
"SB 518 would stall economic recovery
and push potential foot traffic out of
downtown communities that desperately need
consumers," said Cynthia Schneider,
Chair of the Chamber's Legislative Action
Committee (LAC). "This regulation would
directly impact small businesses and would
hurt Main Street. This is a terrible time to
deter behavior of the customers that small
businesses rely upon to grow."
The proposed bill is sponsored by State
Senator Alan Lowenthal (D-Long Beach)
and would, through a series of credits and
points, incentivize city and county governments
to stop providing free parking on the street
and at government offices and to reduce the
amount they require businesses to provide.
The Chamber believes that in jurisdictions that
provide reliably funded public transit systems,
reductions in parking availability may be
a viable alternative and some of these
communities have begun to independently
explore that option. However, due to a lack
of reliable funding, limited schedules, lack of
freedom of mobility and possible health
concerns of some at-risk individuals,
public transit is not always a viable option
throughout Corona.
"We need our elected officials to focus on
policies that will help the economy,"
said Schneider, "and spend a little less time
inventing new government programs based on
point systems, credit processes, and
regulations that nobody really understands."
Log on to: www.CoronaChamber.org and
click on the Corona Advocacy link for more
information on this and other items of
importance tracked by the Corona Chamber
of Commerce.
Businesses Cannot Offer Free Parking?
1
LEGISLATIVE UPDATE
PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT
8 www.CoronaChamber.org Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
8u||d|ng 8us|ness ke|at|onsh|ps
Above: Keynote Speaker
Congressman Ken
Calvert gives
attendees an update
on what's happening
in Washington.
Right: Award of Excellence in Manufacturing winner Proformance
Manufacturing receive their award from 2010 Chairman of the Board Kerry
Pendergast (Premier Service Bank). Left to right: Mike McGowan, Maria Reyes,
Proformance President Bob Morales, Kerry Pendergast and Eleanor Morales.
Back: Dagoberto Paniagua, Tim Borth, Dan Worley, Oscar Jimenez and Ryan Morales.
Left: The Award of Excellence in Retail is presented to Connie Kong of Golden
China Restaurant, who is flanked by 2010 Chairman of the Board Kerry
Pendergast (Premier Service Bank) and Congressman Ken Calvert.
Above: The choir from Norco College entertained guests with
their melodic voices.
Above: Eagle Glen Golf Club was the sponsor for our first
Quarterly Membership Meeting of the year.
Right: February Good Morning Corona sponsors Nancee and Mike Zeller
of Primerica receive a plaque from 2010 Chairman of the Board Kerry
Pendergast (Premier Service Bank) for their sponsorship.
Join us for our next Good Morning Corona on April 29th at Eagle Glen
Golf Club, sponsored by imortgage. Call the Chamber at (951) 737-3350
or visit us online at www.CoronaChamber.org to register today!
Left: Volunteer of the Quarter winner Shawn York of Chick-Fil-A at the Crossings
(center) receives his award from first Quarterly Membership Luncheon Keynote
Speaker Congressman Ken Calvert and 2010 Chairman of the Board Kerry
Pendergast (Premier Service Bank).
www.CoronaChamber.org 9 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
8u||d|ng 8us|ness ke|at|onsh|ps
(more Building Business Relationships on page 23)
Left: Led by Executive Director Deborah Sutton (center) CASA (Court Appointed
Special Advocates) of Riverside County receive the Outstanding Non-Profit
Award for their efforts in helping children who are affected by the judicial system.
Left to right: Brianna Miller, 2010 Chairman of the Board Kerry Pendergast
(Premier Service Bank), Deborah Sutton and Marly Barkey. Back: Corona City
Council member Eugene Montanez, Tom Thornton, Judge C.J. Sheldon, Tanya Chavez,
Gina Baker, Denise Chavez and Julia Belcher.
Right: Kaiser Permanente
receives the Award of Excellence
in Service for their contribution
in the medical industry.
Left to right: Morelle Earl, Ruth
Garcia-Jaffe and 2010 Chairman
of the Board Kerry Pendergast
(Premier Service Bank).
2nd row: Corona City Council
member Jason Scott,
Karen Roberts and Jill Duplechan.
Back: Raquel Jackson, Elizabeth
Hayden and Pamela Coleman-Snow.
Left: City of Corona Redevelopment Director Darrell Talbert gives Good Morning Corona
attendees a much-needed economic update.
Photos by Jim Dorsey Photography
10 www.CoronaChamber.org
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
How green is your home?
That question used to be a matter of mere
curiosity until, some years ago, a series of
widely publicized photos pinpointed
heat/energy escaping from a house -
through the roof, windows, chimney, walls
and doors - confirming that most homes
are not at all energy efficient. As the U.S.
becomes increasingly environmentally
conscious, the question of wasted energy
has become more pertinent. In the not too
distant future, for example, it's expected
that all properties for sale will require
an energy efficient inspection rating,
to be used by mortgage lenders in their
criteria for loans. A home with a good
rating could qualify for a mortgage more
easily, due to the lowered yearly cost of
utilities.
and others, is making energy efficiency
increasingly attractive to homeowners.
Our company's Sacramento office is a
green partner with Sacramento Municipal
Utility District's Greenergy program.”
For homeowners interested in saving
energy, Chris said there are several
technologies to consider, all of which USA
Energy distributes and installs for both
commercial and residential markets:
• Photo Voltaic (PV) solar panels can
decrease electricity intake by 100%,
plus homeowners can take advantage of
the California Solar Initiative (CSI) program.
According to Chris, the PV panels qualify
for up to 30% Federal Tax Rebates and up
to 22% State Municipality rebates.
“They are easy to install and require little
maintenance,” he added. Solar water
heating also provides reductions of 600
pounds per day of lung-damaging PM2.5,
Nox, and other unhealthy emissions.
• Universal Coating - a water resistant and
fire retardant exterior coating - offers
ultraviolet ray protection that keeps the
home cooler - saving significantly on air
conditioning costs.
• Low E-366 Windows are designed to
lower energy bills and offer a stylish
improvement for green homes.
• KVAR Energy Controller optimizes the
power that comes into a home, increasing
the life of appliances and reducing
electricity usage.
• High maintenance landscaping is a prime
cause of wasted utilities and water, and
To assist homeowners in evaluating the
energy waste in a home, the California
Energy Commission established a
statewide program for training and
certifying inspectors/raters to perform
third-party inspections. The program,
known as Home Energy Rating System
(HERS), uses approved providers such
as CalCertified Energy Rating and
Testing Services.
A local leader in HERS inspections and
energy-efficient makeovers is Universal
Solutions for Alternative Energy, Inc.
(USA Energy). Chris Curtis, CEO, said:
“Energy-efficient products reduce the
carbon footprint and dependence on dirty
fossil fuel by using clean alternative
technologies. The savings in utility bills,
plus rebates offered by utility companies
Green Business
Universal Solutions for
Alternative Energy, Inc. (USA Energy)
by Hollie Davies
www.CoronaChamber.org 11 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
USA Energy's alternative is artificial turf,
which reduces water usage by thousands
of gallons a year. The artificial turf looks
realistic, and Chris said it's “easy to clean
for pet owners.”
The company is certified with The League
of California Homeowners and holds a B-1
Business License and a C-46 Solar License
that, according to California State
Regulation, a solar installer must have in
order for a homeowner to receive a
California Solar Initiative rebate.
It has an “A” Rating from the Better
Business Bureau.
To make going green even more
convenient, USA Energy handles permits
and planning, and most products include
warranties ranging from 10 years to
lifetime. Chris said the company “offers
100% Guaranteed Satisfaction, financing,
and leasing options.”
Universal Solutions for Alternative Energy,
Inc. is located at 1101 California Ave.,
Ste. 204 in Corona. Contact Chris Curtis
at (951) 280-5295, and for details of
products and services, go to
www.usaenergyonline.net.
Another view of one of USA Energy's projects
Right: Installing solar panels is just one
way USA Energy makes buildings more
environmentally friendly
Our Volunteer of the Quarter Award
will be presented to Mike Ryan of
Prudential Financial Services. Since
first joining the Corona Chamber,
Mike has become highly involved and
is the roll-up your sleeves type of
person. You will see him at many
Grand Opening Ribbon Cutting
ceremonies as well as other events,
including our monthly Good Morning
Corona breakfast and Government
and Transportation luncheons.
Sporting the maroon Ambassador
jacket or polo shirt, Mike optimizes
the meaning of volunteer - he takes
time to give back, not just with the
Chamber, but he is active in Rotary
and other worthwhile organizations.
Mike's clientele (through Prudential
Financial Services) consists of
individuals ranging from teens to
retirees. His youngest client is three
month old. Mike's philosophy is to
help people take the uncertainty out of life. His passion for life and assisting others
led him into this career seven years ago. Prior to that, Mike was in the
transportation industry for over 30 years. Mike has been married for 34 years;
they have four children, seven grandchildren, and one great grandchild.
You can contact Mike by calling (951) 479-1022.
The Corona Chamber of Commerce honors
businesses quarterly with the coveted Award of
Excellence (A of E) recognition. The recipients will be:
Kobelco EDTI Compressors, Inc. (A of E in Manufacturing);
BlackWood American Grill (A of E in Retail); Inland Audio
Visual (A of E in Service); Corona Symphony Orchestra
(Outstanding Non-Profit) and Mike Ryan of Prudential
Financial Services (Volunteer of the Quarter). Our sponsor
is Altek Media Group.
Join us on Thursday, April 22 when Corona Mayor Karen
Spiegel shares the State of the City address. It will be held
at Crossroads Church (2331 Kellogg Ave).
The buffet opens at 11:30am and reservations are highly
recommended. Visit www.CoronaChamber.org or call
(951) 737-3350 to reserve your spot today!
Receiving the Award of
Excellence in Retail is
BlackWood American Grill.
Recently voted "Best New
Restaurant in the Inland Empire,"
the citation states: "In a day and
age when gimmicks and themes
overwhelm more than entertain,
and quantity takes precedence
over sheer quality, BlackWood
American Grill is a throwback
to classic sensibilities with
a contemporary new twist.
Intent on introducing an upscale
dining establishment meant to
invite rather than intimidate,
BlackWood American Grill's
dynamic menu features
innovative takes on contemporary
American cuisine in a sultry,
warm and inviting atmosphere.
Their wine list supports the
extensive menu that BlackWood
offers, ranging from imports and
rare gems to local blue
ribbon-winners and consistent
best sellers. BlackWood signature
cocktails and martinis complement their full bar selections. Truly intent on
providing the best in food, ambiance and service, BlackWood American Grill
demonstrates the perfect balance of decorum and comfort, making it the perfect
place to put the doldrums of the day behind you with a glass of wine or signature
cocktail and some great jazz. Indeed, whether you want to take in a casual lunch
with business associates, friends, enjoy a sultry dinner with your beloved or host
a holiday celebration, BlackWood American Grill provides the ideal setting for
your dining experience." Located at 980 Montecito Dr. in Corona. You can
reach them by calling (951) 549-7998.
AWARD of EXCELLENCE: Retail
AWARD of EXCELLENCE: Outstanding Non-Profit
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
MEMBERSHIP RECOGNITION LUNCHEON
VOLUNTEER of the QUARTER
12 www.CoronaChamber.org
With many non-profit organizations serving the greater Corona area, the Corona
Chamber continues to be the leader in recognizing a different non-profit organization
quarterly. In April, the Corona Symphony Orchestra will receive the honor.
Recognizing the convergence of musical and artistic talent in a region with a growing
appetite for quality entertainment, the Corona Symphony Orchestra is a welcome
addition to the growing cultural wealth of our region and will promote "the Circle
City" as a thriving hub for music and the arts. The Corona Symphony Orchestra
creates expanding musical, cultural, and educational programs that not only
entertain, but also enrich our community. The Corona Symphony Orchestra promises
to offer a uniquely rich experience for qualified musicians who are either on their
way to a career in music, or to those of similar caliber who have chosen other career
paths. It is an environment for serious musicians to develop, enjoy, and share their
gifts with the community around them, to the mutual benefit of all. Most recently,
they performed at the opening of the Fox Theatre in Riverside with Natalie Cole.
You can reach them by calling Lestia Straiton at (951) 314-0924.
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www.CoronaChamber.org 13 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
The Award of Excellence in Service
goes to Inland Audio Visual
(IAV). Jim Mullennix, owner of IAV,
is often a business partner with our
various Chamber events.
Members of the Corona Chamber of
Commerce since 1995, Jim and his
team are actively involved with our
organization. When your event
needs that extra pizzazz, or taken to
the next level, a phone call to IAV
will ensure quality equipment with
personal service. IAV receives
positive marks from venues who
often have narrowed down their
referral base for audio visual
companies to one - Inland Audio
Visual. Often they are the behind the
scenes personnel that work out the
details of your event. Their positive
approach and customer service is
highly appreciated. IAV works with
event planners as well as with
independent clients - whatever the needs for audio, large screens, pipe and
drape, Jim and his team can assist you. Servicing the southern California region,
IAV often works unusual hours, so it is best to contact them
by calling (909) 798-3336.
AWARD of EXCELLENCE: Service AWARD of EXCELLENCE: Manufacturing
KEC, formerly EDTI (Engineering Designs Transfers, Inc.) is a world leader
in the application of rotary screw compressor technology. Since its inception,
KEC has specialized in compression systems for use in petrochemical process
and related heavy industrial applications. Their clientele span four continents.
Manufacturing to rigid API Standards and Petrochemical Industry specifications,
their team of engineering and technical professionals strive to provide the finest
gas compression systems available. KEC is committed to being a specialized,
efficient, and innovative organization. They provide customers with superior
products and creative services in the field of Process Gas Compression,
and similar specialized engineered systems. KEC routinely designs and
manufactures compression systems for application with the gases (argon,
carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, coke oven gas, commercial refrigeration,
syngas, vapor recovery, helium, hydrogen, liquefaction, methane, natural gas
and nitrogen). Located at 301 N. Smith Ave. in Corona - KEC is another
example of a great company headquartered in Corona. You can reach them
by calling (951) 279-9400.
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14 www.CoronaChamber.org
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
Alumni of St. Edward include Bishop Flores,
auxiliary Bishop of the Diocese of Orange,
Congressman Ken Calvert, orthodontist Dr. Jack
Kavanaugh, City Council member Eugene
Montanez, Sylvia Fleming, entertainment lawyer
Ben Hofilena, All American Karate owner John
Lipari, as well as several Corona police officers
and administrators and teachers in the
Corona-Norco Unified School District.
The school has two school-wide service
projects: during the Advent season they collect
food for food banks in the area and in the
Lenten season they collect toiletries for the
homeless and funds for Holy childhood around
the world. Each class takes on a service project
(for example, the kindergarteners collect food
for The Settlement House monthly). They also
have Denim Days, where students donate $1 for
people suffering from natural disasters like the
floods in Samoa and the earthquakes in Haiti
and Chile. Between $700 and $1200 is raised
each Denim Day.
The school will hold a fundraising golf
tournament on May 7 at Eagle Glen Golf Club.
For more information on the school or golf
tournament, contact them at (951) 737-2530.
St. Edward School is located at 500 S. Merrill
St. in Corona. Information about the school can
also be obtained on the schools website at
www.stedwardeagles.com.
season hangs in Lister's office. The Ducks help
sponsor the school's street hockey program.
The Ducks also sponsor a reading program
with the school's fourth grade students.
Lister has worked at the school for 26 years,
the last nine as principal. The school currently
has about 400 students from pre-school
through eighth grade. The school has a staff of
42, including 26 teachers. The capacity is over
600 and enrollment has been hurt by the
recession, Lister said.
St. Edward School opened in 1947 and has
remained the only Catholic parochial school
in the fast growing Corona-Norco area. It was
originally founded as part of St. Edward parish.
There are now six parishes.
Lister said the school recently received a
$10,000 grant from the American Legion in
Sacramento, which will enable them to add
more computers to the school. She said the
school went online about 15 years ago.
The school remains open each school day from
6 a.m. to 6 p.m. so that working parents can
leave their child at the school and be assured
of his or her safety when they are picked up.
There are day care/summer camp-like activities
after classes end for the students. Classes start
at 8 a.m. and end at 2:45 p.m.
LONG-TIME CHAMBER MEMBER
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St. Edward Catholic School
by Jerry Soifer
st. Edward Catholic School, a private
institution in downtown Corona, and the
Corona Chamber of Commerce have an
unbreakable bond. When the Chamber needs
volunteers, the school provides students who
fulfill their community service requirements
by volunteering at the Chamber. St. Edward
students recently cracked 60 dozen eggs for the
Corona Kiwanis Club annual pancake breakfast.
Former Principal Marian Fairchild enrolled the
school in the Chamber 22 years ago.
"We make choices on spending dollars that will
be beneficial to the city," said current Principal
Leilani Lister. "We are a member of the city.
We want to support it any way possible.
The support from our school to the community
has been strong. The community has
responded to us in our various fundraising."
Lister said she attends Chamber meetings,
and when she needs to make a purchase for
the school, she looks at the Corona Chamber
Business Directory for a Chamber member that
has what the school needs.
When the school celebrated its 60th
anniversary in 2007, she said Chamber
members helped the school stage the function
at the Corona Civic Center.
A framed autographed Anaheim Ducks jersey
from its 2007 Stanley Cup championship
www.CoronaChamber.org 15 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
47-YEAR MEMBER
Corona Regional Medical Center
31-YEAR MEMBER
Best Western Kings Inn
23-YEAR MEMBERS
Corona Host Lions Club
Grady Garrison's Paint & Auto Body
21-YEAR MEMBER
Rex L. Bullock, DDS
16-19 YEAR MEMBER
Gary's Woodworks
11-15 YEAR MEMBERS
Green River Golf Club
Kerr & Company, Inc.
6-10 YEAR MEMBERS
Aflac - Milner
American Security Bank
Best Buy
Corona-Norco Day of the Child
Far More Transportation Services
NCH Galleries
Ram Plumbing Heating Air, Inc.
1-5 YEAR MEMBERS
BlackWood American Grill
California Recovery Clinics
Circle City Miss Corona
Scholarship Pageant
Cornerstone Escrow, Inc.
Inland Communications, Inc.
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation
Kathy Tank Independent Consultant
Tastefully Simple
Main Street Dental Group
Postal Annex #477
Rexco Real Estate Development
Smart Suites
TAPS Fish House & Brewery
Anniversary Recognition
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010 16 www.CoronaChamber.org
Corona Restaurant Review
Kabob Hutt
Allan is the host of the Let’s Dine Out Food, Travel &
Entertainment radio show that airs on News Talk 590,
KTIE every Saturday afternoon from 3 pm to 5 pm.
You can contact Allan at allan@ktie590.com or by phone
(909) 910-3463. You can also visit his website,
www.letsdineoutshow.com.
Open for 3 years, Kabob Hutt is a delightful family restaurant,
serving some of the best Persian dishes in the Inland Empire.
The two dining rooms are tastefully decorated in colors of gold
and maroon while festive Middle Eastern music filters throughout
the dining rooms, creating the perfect setting for a most relaxing
dining experience.
The menu features many of the traditional dishes that Persian
restaurants are known for, but Kabob Hutt prepares their dishes
a little differently than other Persian restaurants in the area.
For starters, I ordered the Tadigh ($6.00). The Tadigh featured three
nice size fried and extremely crispy rice cakes topped with three
stews; the Ghormeh Sabzi, a delicious blend of fresh parsley,
cilantro, chives, beans and herbs, a marvelous Fesenjon, pureed
walnuts and sweet pomegranate sauce and the Gheimeh
Bademjan, fried eggplant cooked with yellow split peas in a rich
tomato sauce. All three stews were distinctively different and
delicious, creating the ultimate taste and textural experience.
Next came the Borani ($5.00), the Adas Polo ($10.00) and the Fresh
White Fish with Sabzi Polo ($14.00). The Borani consisted of
sautéed eggplant with yogurt, topped with sautéed garlic, onions,
mint and whey. The eggplant mixture had a thick pureed texture
to it and the topping of crispy sautéed garlic, onion, and mint made
this dish oh so good, especially when smeared on the flatbread
served at the beginning of the meal. The Adas Polo was yet another
stunning dish. Imagine a large portion of basmati rice with raisins,
lentils and cut up dates, with a Cornish hen cooked in a delicate
tomato sauce served in a bowl on the side. I loved the sweet
overtones of the aromatic rice and the simple yet tasty Cornish hen
was very good. The final dish in this flight of courses was my
favorite, fresh White Fish which was seasoned lightly with lemon
juice and olive oil and gently charbroiled until the exterior was
slightly charred, while the interior of the fish was flaky.
A large portion of basmati rice seasoned with chives, parsley,
cilantro and leek and a refreshing salad with Persian cucumbers
and sliced tomatoes was also served with the fish.
No Persian restaurant would be complete without kabobs and boy,
do they know how to make kabobs here! The Filet Mignon Soltani
($17.00) featured a large flat marinated filet mignon steak along
with a long and tubular grilled seasoned ground beef. Both of these
meats were charbroiled to perfection. The steak had a delicious
pronounced onion flavor and was very tender and tasty, as was the
ground beef. The same could be said of the Chicken Barg ($15.00),
Kabob Hutt
165 Washburn Circle / Corona, 92882
(951) 279-6696
Hours: Sunday -Thursday 9am to 10pm
Friday & Saturday 9am to 11pm
Closed on Sundays
Price Range: Lunch $6.00 & $7.00
Dinner $9.00 to $18.00
Persian Cuisine
Allan Borgen’s
Right: The Fresh White
Fish with Sabzi Polo,
fresh charbroiled White
Fish with basmati rice
seasoned with chives,
parsley, cilantro and
leek and a salad with
Persian cucumbers and
sliced tomatoes
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Above: Kabob Hutt entrance and patio
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www.CoronaChamber.org 17 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
long flat pieces of boneless marinated
charbroiled chicken breast and the Lamb
Shish Kabob ($18.00), boneless marinated
lamb served with charbroiled onions,
tomatoes and green bell peppers.
Both the Chicken Barg and the Lamb Shish
Kabob were excellent and like almost all
of the other entrees, that great basmati rice
with saffron came with all of these dishes.
Kabob Hutt can accommodate small and
large parties as well as provide excellent
catering options. In closing, Kabob Hutt is
a real culinary find and one that I will
remember for many meals to come.
Shame on you, the fine residents of
Corona, for not telling me sooner about
this restaurant!!!
Local Restaurants to Try This Month
18 www.CoronaChamber.org
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
now to "Go Green"
by Phyllis Russell
In general, you can make your business more
eco-friendly by:
Complying with existing environmental regulations for your business
Taking further steps to save energy, water and material goods,
and cut down on waste and pollution
Different industries vary in the specific steps they
need to implement to become green, but here are
some general steps and sample actions that most
businesses could use as a starting point:
Determine usage rates of water, energy, and solid and
hazardous waste generation (with an eye toward reducing all
of the above)
• Assess the amount of waste your business produces
• Establish recycling program (paper, phone books,
newspapers and magazines, cardboard / packing
materials, beverage containers, toner cartridges, or
other recyclable materialsthat your business generates)
• Reduce paper waste
Request removal from unwanted mailing lists
Keep your business mailing lists updated
Reduce printing (such as emails)
Send faxes from your computer without printing
Design mailings that do not require an envelope
• Reduce product / other waste
Purchase in bulk or refillable containers
(reduces packaging waste)
Maintain storage conditions to prevent material degradation
Reduce unnecessary or duplicate purchases
Replace redundant products (i.e. use a single multi-task
cleaner instead of three or four one-task cleaners)
Identify materials that can be reused, if not by your business,
then by another business, school, or returned to the vendor
Switch to reusable products instead of single-use disposables
(mugs, batteries, pens, etc.)
“Going green" is a concept being embraced by
business for a variety of reasons. The benefits are clear:
saving money often tops the list, followed by consumer
demand and the chance to reach a new market.
So you're interested in greening up your business. That's
great, but where do you start? The good news is you are
probably already doing a lot of things to make your
business greener.
Many cities in California have established voluntary
"green business" certification programs. Completing the
certification process helps participating businesses take
concrete steps toward becoming environmentally friendly,
and also lets their customers know about their green
credentials through use of the "Green Business" logo
and website listing.
The Bay Area Green Business Program is one of the largest
such programs, and was developed by local governments,
environmental agencies and the business community.
www.CoronaChamber.org 19 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
Donate unused / underutilized supplies
or furniture to a charity organization
(Goodwill, Salvation Army, etc.)
• Make changes to conserve
energy and water, reduce pollution
Install motion-sensor light switches in
infrequently used rooms (store rooms,
restrooms, break rooms, etc.)
Install low-water use fixtures,
inside and for landscaping
Replace older equipment and lighting
with more energy efficient equipment
Set thermostat at reasonable
temperature (78 for cooling,
68 for heating)
Turn off all electronics and lighting
at night, and whenever rooms are
not occupied
Establish training practices and
incentives for employees and
management to support your efforts
• Incorporate green practices into
company policy
• Encourage conservation
suggestions from employees
• Train employees in more
efficient business practices to
reduce waste
• Establish cleaning procedures
using environmentally friendly
products/practices
• Encourage employees to adopt
green practices outside of work
Let your customers know about your
efforts to meet Green Business Standards
These are just a few general things you can do.
To see what Corona is doing to help the planet,
check out www.DiscoverCorona.com.
20 www.CoronaChamber.org
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
In its quest to innovate green cars, the automotive
industry has done the equivalent of 0 - 60 in two
seconds. It seems only yesterday that the industry
was focused on how to recharge electric car
batteries, and yet this year manufacturers have
unveiled green cars offering an impressive
combination of style, safety, fuel options,
affordability and luxury.
The benefits of green cars - for consumers and the
planet - are too numerous to list in detail,
but in addition to reducing our dependence on oil,
green cars improve the environment, reduce health
risks from toxic emissions, and result in significant
financial savings for owners. Hybrid batteries
are recyclable, and some carmakers are also
incorporating eco-friendly materials in the
manufacture of their cars. Alternative fuels include
ethanol, hydrogen (which emits only oxygen and
water vapors), natural gas, and biodiesels made
from sources such as soybean.
The popularity of green cars is most evident at
Walter's Automotive Group, which offers a diverse
range of German-engineered green cars. At the top
is arguably one of the most beautiful cars ever
designed, green or otherwise: the Porsche 918
Spyder; a 500-horsepower V8 that, according to
Porsche, gets 78 MPG. As a concept car costing
several hundred thousands dollars, don't expect to
see many of those on the road. At the affordable
end of luxury green choices is the Mercedes-Benz
gasoline-electric hybrids to clean diesel,
from convertibles to SUVs. Extremely popular are
the Mercedes S Class hybrids, along with Porsche's
Cayenne S Hybrid SUV. Audi's A3 TDI, which gets 42
MPG and runs on clean diesel, was voted Green Car
of the Year 2010.
"It doesn't matter what model you buy, you are
sacrificing very little in performance and comfort to
Smart Car starting at around $12,000,
and guaranteed to turn heads wherever it goes.
The Smart Car comes in different models,
including a two-passenger version.
The mid-range of green cars by Mercedes,
Porsche and Audi features dozens of choices that
meet the best in green criteria yet maintain
expected performance and comfort-from
Green Vehicles
Walter's Automotive Group
by Hollie Davies
Above: Guests of Walter's Automotive Group's grand opening marvel at the cars on display
www.CoronaChamber.org 21 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
give back to Mother Earth," commented Steve
Kienle, General Manager of Walter's Automotive
Group. "Our three dealerships are close together,
within walking distance of each other, so it's like
one-stop shopping in an environmentally-friendly
center. Buyers can test drive all the green options
they might be considering."
To understand the popularity of Walter's, you have
to know there really is a Walter. Almost 50 years
ago at the legendary Riverside Raceway, mechanic
Walter Kienle - known for his perfection among
a peer group that included Carol Shelby and Dan
Gurney - dreamed of owning a dealership selling
the finest luxury cars. Today, Walter's
Mercedes-Benz is one of Mercedes-Benz' "top ten
percent" dealers in the country, and year after year
the company has received Mercedes' Best-of-the-
Best award.
In addition to Mercedes, Walter's has also become
the dealership of choice for Porsche and Audi.
Since it opened for business in 1964, Walter's has
expanded 11 times to become the multi-faceted
sales and service group it is today. Walter continues
to work every day, and his son Steve Kienle is
General Manager.
Steve and his wife Cathy have greatly expanded the
company's contributions to the community.
The annual Walter's Children's Charity Golf
Tournament has contributed approximately $2
million to the Loma Linda University Children's
Hospital, and the company has received dozens of
philanthropic awards.
In addition to green cars, Walter's Automotive
Group offers a huge inventory of new and pre-owned
cars by Mercedes, Porsche and Audi at their three
dealerships. To view inventory, locations and hours
of business, visit www.waltersautogroup.com
and www.smartcenterriverside.com, or phone
(951) 688-3332.
Photos by Jim Dorsey Photography
Left: The 2010 Green
Car of the Year, the
Audi A3 TDI
When the applicable statute of limitations in these cases typically runs
three to four years, and the employee claims that they have been
working 30 minutes to an hour every day without receiving overtime
compensation, these amounts, when spread out among all of your
employees, can add up to a substantial sum. The bottom line,
make sure you use time clocks that cannot be altered.
The average work week prior to 1861 was 11 hours a day at 6 days a week.
Geoffrey H. Hopper, an attorney with the law firm of
Hopper & Associates in Redlands, has practiced more than 25 years
in the area of labor and employment law and has received the highest
independent evaluation available for attorneys in the United States.
It is always advisable to consult with legal counsel about your own
situation, since matters can vary in degree and nature.
Hopper can be reached at (909) 798-9800
22 www.CoronaChamber.org Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
requently claims are brought by employees asserting that they
are not paid all the overtime to which they are entitled, nor are they
given their full lunch or the two 10 minute breaks to which they are
entitled under applicable law, and/or related hourly claims.
When these arise, employees often file claims with local
governmental agencies, alleging violation of wage and hour laws
wherein they can recover not only for the hours for which they were
not compensated, but also the penalties for the failure to timely pay
such wages. In some instances, the employees can recover their
attorney's fees. Oftentimes the penalties in these types of cases
outweigh substantially the amount of the actual overtime that was
not paid.
It also is not unusual for these types of actions to be brought as
a class action, which can get quite expensive. (Imagine all of the
employees who have worked for you for the last four years receiving
a notice that they are entitled to recover money against you if you did
not pay them all the money to which they were entitled for overtime,
etc.) When this occurs by way of a class action, all the employees
who have been disgruntled over the last three or four years are
climbing out of the woodwork to come after you, and therefore the
best defense in this situation is avoidance.
The judges and the administrative officers handling these type of
cases take the position that the burden is upon the employer for
failure to pay overtime and/or all of the wages and compensation
to which the employee is entitled. For a variety of reasons,
employers do not use time clocks. One reason is that either they
or their employees feel that such is demeaning to the employees.
In such cases, either no time cards are kept, or the time frames are
simply written in on the time cards and initialed by the supervisor.
Employees voice complaints that for them to have to fill out a time
card, means that the employer does not trust them. While without
being too blunt, the reality is that most employers and supervisors
do not trust employees when it comes to this topic and/or frequently
employers and supervisors abuse the overtime laws.
If as an employer or supervisor you are required to defend yourself
for failure to pay overtime, and you do not use a system that cannot
be altered, such as a time clock, then usually the judge or the
administrative judge will take the position that you, the employer
or supervisor, have failed to meet the burden required by law.
Often the judge or jury will find in favor for the employee, especially
in those situations wherein the employee brings in a calendar
wherein they claim that they have been writing down for their own
records, the amount of hours that they have normally worked.
LEGAL OPINIONS
Using Time Clocks
for Hourly Employees
F
www.CoronaChamber.org 23
Douglas C. Smith is the managing partner at Smith
Mitchellweiler, LLP, a law firm with its principal office
in Riverside. He has extensive experience in both state and
federal court, and has won over 95% of his jury trials.
His emphasis is on business litigation, civil rights, medical
malpractice and healthcare, labor and employment law,
personal injury and military law, and his firm also counsels
clients in many operational and management areas, as well
as providing representation in the area of contracts and
transactional law, estate planning and probate matters. He is a veteran of the United States
Marine Corp. and currently serves as a Lieutenant Colonel in the California Air National
Guard with the 163rd Reconnaissance Wing, where he is the Staff Judge Advocate of the
wing's legal office. Douglas will be joining us as our legal counsel.
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Above: Mantra Indian Cuisine & Banquet
owners Nidhi and Sumit Sharma (center) are
flanked by their chef, Ajit Singh (left),
Corona City Council member Eugene Montanez
and Corona Mayor Karen Spiegel (right). Their
daughter, Sania Sharma, stands in front.
Located at 480 N. Main St. in Corona, they offer
a daily lunch buffet and extensive menu. Stop by
today or give them a call at (951) 739-9401.
Above: The friendly staff of Allstar
Collision are ready to help with whatever
your auto body or paint needs may be.
Headed by owner Dean Seif (far left),
they have served Corona and the
surrounding area for 15 years and have built
a reputation around excellent customer
service and quality work. Allstar Collision is
located at 522 Railroad St. in Corona and
can be reached at (951) 279-9161 or
viewed online at www.allstarci.com.
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(continued from page 9)
Introducing New Board Member
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
Douglas C. Smith
24 www.CoronaChamber.org
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
The term discipline is often applied to the way we raise our kids,
and as it applies to our daily struggles with 'self-control'.
But what if we applied it to our business?
Some experts argue whether selling is an art or science.
I claim that it's neither. It is, and forever shall be, a discipline that
is executed using art (selling skills) and science (sales process).
The discipline part of the equation is this: dedicated application day
after day, week after week, will yield results.
Sound monotonous? Monotony is an important attribute of a proven
system that works and is successfully applied time & again.
To avoid becoming perfunctory, your system requires the “art”
of providing exceptional quality service with a smile, your unique
personality, and a custom-tailored approach for each client.
In my 18+ years in sales, one fact has become more and more clear:
the best sales people are also the most disciplined.
They let nothing come in the way of achieving their goals.
Dedicated application is the key to success. We can say we
understand sales process, but do we actually carry out our process with
the daily discipline it requires? We can be the most skilled
presenter and closer, but without the discipline to deliver the
message consistently and accurately, success could be thwarted.
Here's how to more completely apply yourself to the discipline of sales:
Learn and Apply a Specific Sales Process
The same sales process will not work for everyone. Industries,
personalities, preferences for technology vs. hand-written
are different. Each requires a variation on the sales discipline theme.
What works best for you?
Build Your Sales Skills
This can be done in many ways, but the most beneficial methods
I've found are:
• Find a mentor
Connect with someone who has 'been there & done that'
• Do a personal SWOT Analysis
Find out your personal and company's Strengths, Weaknesses,
Opportunities & Threats. “Where does it hurt and how do we fix it?”
• Peak Performance Time
Understand when you're at your best. For example, if you're a
morning person, you should attend the early-morning networking
www.CoronaChamber.org 25 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
breakfast (e.g. Good Morning Corona) or if
you're a night owl, go to evening events;
realize that it's up to you to determine what
activities done at which times will yield the
highest payoffs.
• Read books
Visit the library, borrow one from a friend,
or visit www.SalesBooks.com for some
great books from top-selling authors and
industry-leading experts. Challenge yourself.
Read different kinds of books, and grow.
• Attend seminars
Online, teleseminars, live events, etc. are
available almost every day. Find topics that
help you strengthen areas where you feel
you could/should be stronger.
• Hire a sales or business coach
Someone who can be a confidante,
encourager, and accountability partner
As you search for a sales process that works,
understand that you will discover for yourself,
perhaps through trial and error, a process that
works. The elements of the process may be
similar to those of others, but the dedicated
application is the key to success.
Stuck? Look for new ideas. Chamber Events,
SCORE Counseling Sessions, and public forum
seminars from folks like Zig Ziglar are all
wonderful for motivation, direction,
and information. Take that information, piece it up
with your personality and preferences, and you'll
discover how the Science, Art, and Discipline of
Sales will help you improve your performance,
confidence, and earnings.
Bradford Moore, MBA and Kerry Martin-Moore of
3:17 Consulting Services provide valuable sales
training and proven sales resources to help sales
teams and companies increase sales and improve
profitability. Contact Brad@317consulting.com.
Long before recycling became a movement and long before the word
green was more than a color, there was Six-Pac Recycling and Gilbert
Valenzuela, the man who founded the Corona-based company.
That was in 1984, and today he's still at the shop every day of the week.
At least his family isn't far away.
Two of Gilbert's sons, Roger, 33, and Omar, 29, are general managers.
Blanca, his wife of 35 years, is at the shop most of the time. A third son,
Mario, has a demolition business, so he's often around as well.
“We grew up at Six-Pac,” Roger said of his brothers. The boys worked
there as teens while attending Corona High School, then after college
Roger and Omar returned to the plant at their father's request.
“We had some bad years, then in 2003 business turned around with
a rise in commodity prices.”
The “bread and butter” for the consumer side of the recycling industry
has always been a limited number of materials such as aluminum cans,
plastic water bottles, glass bottles, newspaper and cardboard.
Describing commercial recycling, Roger used AmerisourceBergen,
Corona pharmaceutical company, as an example. “We'll pick up its recy-
clable materials and packaging, weigh it at our plant, and mail them a
check.” It's then repackaged and sold to a paper mill. “Most of it, about
80 percent, goes overseas to China, then it returns to the United States
during Christmas season in the form of gift packaging.”
A few years ago, Gilbert, 62, decided that Six-Pac would accept
polystyrene, more commonly known as Styrofoam, a trademark of Dow
Chemical. Styrofoam, for good reason, is one of the evil words in the
environmental world. Manufactured from petroleum, it is highly
flammable, and uses a chemical, benzene, which is a known human
carcinogen, in its production. It also takes a very long time to break
down in the environment.
Before 2005, Roger said, discarded Styrofoam found its final resting
place in landfills. “My father thought, 'Why not recycle it? It doesn't have
SIX-PAC
RECYCLING
CORPORATION
by Peter Fischetti
(Left to right) Blanca, Gilbert, Omar, Mario and Roger Valenzuela of Six-Pac
Recycling stand in front of blocks of recycled material at their Corona
recycling center.
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010 26 www.CoronaChamber.org
much value, but at least we can keep it out of
landfills.' His goal is to divert all material other
than hazardous waste from landfills. We don't make
any money from Styrofoam, but we'll find a home
for it.”
Technology has made a big difference in how
Six-Pac operates today, Roger said. “It used to be
that every transaction was written on a little piece
of paper; now our software gives us a statement at
the end of every day. There's also less labor because
our machinery today automatically separates and
bales the materials.”
And the perception of recycling has changed as
well. “Before, 'green' was there, but no one paid
much attention to it,” Roger said. “Now, every city
and county is going green.” And, he added, that's
good for the environment - and for Six-Pac.
Six-Pac Recycling is located at 1430 E. Sixth St.
in Corona. It is open Monday to Friday from 8 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m., and Saturday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
For more information, call (951) 734-2910.
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010 www.CoronaChamber.org 27
Santiago High School:
Building a Green Future
by Phyllis Russell
28 www.CoronaChamber.org
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
Seeing into the future is a tricky business.
However, understanding what is
important to the younger generation can
provide insight into where we are headed.
That young adults are concerned with the
environment is evidenced by the creation
of environmentally-focused curriculums.
Santiago High School is leading the way
with its Earth Academy, which is a
pioneering 4-year program focused on
sustainability, and all its social, legal and
practical implications.
Bill Brown teaches Architecture at
Santiago, and has selected the Chamber as
the special project for his Green Building
Design 1A/1B course. The classes' first
project was a residential design,
with the group of 12 students splitting
In late May or early June, the students will
present their designs, which will include a
scale concept plan, interior and exterior
elevation sketches, site plan and floor
plans, along with mechanical,
electrical and plumbing plans.
According to Bill, who is a member of the
Green Building Council, green building
standards are currently voluntary,
but will be transitioning to a mandatory
system. His class is designed to give the
students a step up over their future
competition, as they will graduate with
cutting-edge knowledge of the technology
and planning required to meet green
guidelines and requirements.
Building green is a trend we will be seeing
more of, with examples close at hand.
Very close, in Woodcrest, is Riverside
County's first green building - the
Woodcrest Community Library. Designed
by HMC Architects,** the library opened
in November of 2007 and features:
Natural light from large windows
and plentiful sky lights
Porous pavement parking lot
and walkways
into teams to create 6 different green
designs using the same infill site.
The Chamber is next on the list for a
theoretical redesign; the class will use the
Chamber as the subject for their
commercial design project. The class will
produce designs for In March,
the students met and interviewed
Chamber staff to determine the needs and
uses of the building. With this
information and the existing site plan in
hand, the students will use the LEED*
rating system to make their designs as
green as possible while meeting the needs
and desires of the Chamber.
The final step for the student teams is to
present their designs - to the class, and
also to their “client,” the Chamber.
Above: Joshua Massey, Kelsey Burkett and Chris
Hughes review their preliminary design for the
new Chamber floor plans with their Green
Building Design class instructor, Bill Brown.
Above: Santiago High School Green Building Design students Devin Pines,
James Josselyn, Chris Hughes, Kelsey Burkett, Joshua Massey, Gregory Tomlinson,
Tommy Rosales, Mario Garcia, Anthony Rodriguez, Cameron Marquez and
Adrian Martinez gather with their instructor, Bill Brown, as they begin their class
project, an eco-friendly building design for the Corona Chamber.
www.CoronaChamber.org 29 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
SImproves air and water quality
SEnhances and protects ecosystems and biodiversity
SConserves natural resources
SReduces operating costs
SImproves employee productivity and satisfaction
SMakes a statement to your clients and customers
SImproves air, thermal, and acoustic environments
SContributes to overall quality of life
i s p r o u d t o b e G R E E N
LLLu CĞƌƟĮĞĚ 8ƵŝůĚŝŶŐ ĂǁĂƌĚĞĚ ďLJ ƚŚĞ
u͘S͘ C8LLn 8ulLulnC CUunClL ϮϬϬϵ
Water-conserving plumbing fixtures
Low VOC building materials
(emit low levels of volatile
organic compounds)
Design elements intended to reduce
energy consumption and utility bills
Another civic project by HMC Architects
is The Frontier Project*** in Rancho
Cucamonga. The Frontier Project is
a 14,000 square foot multi-use
demonstration building with Platinum
LEED certification designed to showcase
environmentally-friendly technology
and building design. The building was
developed by of The Frontier Project
Foundation and Cucamonga Valley Water
District with the goal of influence and
advance building technologies toward the
sustainable and environmentally-friendly.
So, while our Santiago High School
students are practicing on the Chamber
building now, we can perhaps look forward
to a time when they will design our future
home, office building or library.
* Leadership in Energy and Environmental
Design, U.S. Green Building Council:
www.usgbc.org
** www.hmcarchitects.com
*** www.frontierproject.com
30 www.CoronaChamber.org Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
In 1656 Thomas Ady, physician, loved his bed
so much, he said: “The bed be blest that I lie
on,” despite the fact that his mattress
contained horsehair and sacking, a little straw
thrown in for good measure, and gave him an
aching back every morning. A few hundred
years later - recognizing the value of a good
night's sleep - physicians and consumers
expect a whole lot more from our blest beds
than horsehair; we want cloud soft comfort,
total body support, and eco-friendly products
that won't hurt the planet. And that's just what
Anatomic Global, Inc. has been providing for
the past 20 years with their EcoMemoryFoam
mattresses, pillows and pads.
“When Anatomic first opened in Corona in
1991, we specialized in manufacturing for the
medical industry,” said David Farley, CEO,
“but a few years ago we moved permanently
into consumer products. We now employ 130
people and have distribution throughout the
U.S. and Canada.”
In the past, memory foam has provided
comfort but not support, but Anatomic's
products are very different, created with
several layers and seven zones that conform to
the natural shape of the body, providing
built-in lumbar support. Ady would
undoubtedly bless these beds a few times over,
as do consumers who use them.
'Eco' isn't just a gratuitous part of the product
name. “It's in our roots,” explained David.
“We do more than follow a trend.
EcoMemoryFoam sets the industry standard
for minimal petroleum use and replaces it
with 100% plant-based oils, such as soy and
castor, that use less energy to process.
When you add the fact that EcoMemoryFoam
is manufactured in the U.S. in a patented zero
emissions chamber, you can see how we have
developed innovative processes that truly limit
our carbon footprint and impact on the
environment.” Consumers of traditional
memory foam often complain of “sleeping
hot,” but David explained that
EcoMemoryFoam's open-cell surface resists
body heat retention. “Our product dissipates
heat nine times faster than other products,
so you sleep cooler throughout the night.”
Even Anatomic's shipping is eco-friendly,
compressing the mattresses prior to shipping.
Anatomic Global's concern for the planet has
also set an awesome charitable example:
After Hurricane Katrina, Anatomic's WorldBed
non-profit initiative, along with business
partners and the Red Cross, provided over
11,000 hurricane victims with a better night's
sleep. In response to the devastating Haitian
earthquake, Anatomic has partnered with
businesses such as FXI Foamex Innovations,
UPS, Deslee Textiles, Royal Packaging,
and Brookwood Companies to deliver 200,000
field beds to the people of Haiti.
Anatomic
Global, Inc.
by Hollie Davies
NEW IN TOWN
“When one has lost so much, the ability to
sleep should not be amongst the missing,”
David observed. “From the beginning of this
effort it has been my personal concern that
our response to the Haitian disaster be
properly timed and that there be confirmation
that everything we send into Haiti is going to
be truly used and useful. So we are taking our
time and doing due diligence with CARE,
World Vision, and Catholic Relief Services.”
The WorldBed program is open to outside
participation and Anatomic can help other
Corona businesses become an advocate and
realize their vision to help out. To make
a corporate donation or services to this
program, contact David at (951) 371-8101
or visit the website at www.worldbed.org.
Anatomic Global, Inc. is located at 1241 Old
Temescal Rd. in Corona. For a full
description of the company's products,
see www.ecomfortmattress.com. Email
David at anatomicdlfarley@cs.com.
Photo provided by Anatomic Global, Inc.
Above: A woman displaced by the recent earthquake in Haiti shows off the World Bed she received from
Anatomic Global.
www.CoronaChamber.org 31 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
Vocational Training - Special Needs
The Arc of Riverside County
8138 Mar Vista Ct.
Riverside, CA 92504
James Stream (951) 688-5141
New Chamber Members
Attorney
Smith Mitchellweiler, LLP
4204 Riverwalk Pkwy., Ste. 250
Riverside, CA 92505
Douglas Smith (951) 509-1355
Automobile - Repair & Service
B & D Automotive
1210 E. 6th St., Ste. C
Corona, CA 9287982
Brian Hazelwood (951) 279-5082
Bookkeeping Service
Accurate Bookkeeping Services
Corona, CA 92883
Joalene Rollison (619) 988-2095
Containers
Casillas Roll Off, Inc.
Corona, CA 92879
Sylvia Casillas (951) 415-0002
Contractor - General
1-800-24Seven Construction & Restoration
1353 Old Temescal Rd., Ste. 127
Corona, CA 92881
Michael Lancaster (800) 247-3836
Contractor - Painting
All Pro Painting, Inc.
19151 Diplomat Ave., Ste. 100
Corona, CA 92881
William Plaza (951) 340-1475
www.allpropaintinginc.com
Beauty Salon - Equipment & Supplies
Hair & Beyond Beauty Supply & Salon
1312 E. Ontario Ave., Ste. 108
Corona, CA 92881
Ricgh Wogoman (951) 582-9116
www.hairandbeyondsalonsupply.com
Insurance
Cornerstone Surety & Insurance Agency, Inc.
43391 Business Park Dr., Ste. C-6
Temecula, CA 92590
Tim Baker (951) 296-6800
www.cornerstonesurety.com
Landscape Maintenance
New Way Landscape and Tree Services, Inc.
21657 1/2 Temescal Canyon Rd.
Corona, CA 92883
Connie Clark (951) 722-6813
Manufacturers - Mattress
Anatomic Global, Inc.
1241 Old Temescal Rd.
Corona, CA 92881
Laura Castro (951) 371-8101
www.anatomicglobal.com
Optometrist
Corona Optometry
1501 Rimpau Ave., Ste. B104
Corona, CA 92880
Lupe Torres (951) 898-2010
www.coronaoptometric.com
Printing
Preferred Choice Printing
680 E Parkridge Ave., Ste. 100
Corona, CA 92879
Diane Barilone (951) 549-0951
www.preferredchoiceprinting.com
Real Estate
Jousting Real Estate
4160 Temescal Canyon Rd., Ste. 102
Corona, CA 92883
Ash Sater (951) 277-7770
www.jousting.com
Restaurant
Hacienda Guadalajara
1353 W. 6th St.
Corona, CA 92882
Carlos Rodriquez (951) 735-5946
S G C Japanese Restaurant
113 E. 6th St.
Corona, CA 92879
Steve Kim (951) 738-0650
Retail - Merchandise
Nordstrom
3601 Tyler St.
Riverside, CA 92503
Heather Lolli (951) 351-3190
Telecommunications Wiring
Omnicomm
609 Corona Ave.
Corona, CA 92879
Mark Rusler (951) 736-8107
Tree Trimmer
Circle City Tree Service
Corona, CA 92882
William McClain (951) 768-4564
32 www.CoronaChamber.org
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
In Our
Community
Airs on Time Warner Cable TV
(Channel 29) at 7 p.m.
April 2010
TV Guide
Produced by Tina Hunt
April 6
NBA Star Juaquin Hawkins
Host: Carissa Herrera
Guest: Houston Rockets
Juaquin Hawkins
“The benefits of playing basketball”
Sponsor: Today's Youth Non-Profit
Organization
Coming in May:
Mayor Karen Spiegel's State of the City Update
April 13
NBA Star Juaquin Hawkins
Host: Jeremy Hunt
Guest: Houston Rockets
Juaquin Hawkins
“Basketball -
A health benefit workout”
Sponsor: Today's Youth Non-Profit
Organization
April 20 & 27
NBA Star Juaquin Hawkins
Host: Today's Youth Cast Members
Guest: Houston Rockets
Juaquin Hawkins
“The secrets of becoming a great
basketball player”
Sponsor: Today's Youth Non-Profit
Organization
www.CoronaChamber.org 33 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
t's that time of the year again that we start preparing for our largest fundraiser "The Race to Monte Carlo."
This year your Ambassadors will be involved in helping to make the event even more successful.
We utilize the proceeds from this event to provide member services to the business community.
Through prior year's success, we have invested in creating our Legislative Action Committee. This group of
business leaders is the watchdog for business-friendly legislation as well as the voice for business regarding
any adverse job killers.
This year "The Race to Monte Carlo" will be chaired by Mark Neely (Windy Plum Farms). Mark is not only
an Ambassador, but also a Board Member. Mark currently has a few sponsorship opportunities still available,
and if you are interested, please contact him at (951) 272-9243 or the Chamber office at (951) 737-3350.
Therese Marquez (Gold Star Promotions) will be working with Mark and heading up the Silent Auction
items. If you have a service or product that you would like to donate for the auction, please do not hesitate
to contact Therese at (951) 741-0400. We are asking for your assistance in this area. Your aid and
partnership is important and vital to the Corona Chamber being able to offer these services as well as other
member benefits.
If you want to know how you or your company can get involved, join us at noon on the second Monday
of every month, or give me a call at (951) 707-9633. I look forward to hearing from you.
Ambassadors’ Committee Report:
by Jerry Wilson / Committee Chairman
Ambassadors
on the Move
I
Ambassador
Committee Chairman
Jerry Wilson
imortgage
(951) 707-9633
jerry.wilson@imortgage.com
Corona at Eagle Glen
2225 Eagle Glen Pkwy
NW Corner of I-15 & Cajalco
(951) 371- ENVY (3689)
34 www.CoronaChamber.org
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
Chamber Events
Thursday, April 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29 9 AM
S.C.O.R.E
Business counseling & advice
Cost: FREE
Location: Corona Chamber of Commerce
904 E. Sixth St.
Contact: Corona Chamber for appointments
at (951) 737-3350
Thursday, April 1, 8 and 15 11:30 AM
CORONA NETWORKING $OLUTIONS
Cost: $20 ($15 with RSVP)
Location: Golden China Restaurant
1185 Magnolia Ave. #G
Contact: Corona Chamber at (951) 737-3350
Monday, April 5 12 PM
COMMUNITY SERVICES NETWORK MEETING
Location: Corona Chamber of Commerce
904 E. Sixth St.
Contact: Corona Chamber at (951) 737-3350
Wednesday, April 14 2-5 PM
SEMINAR: HOW TO GET A JOB, KEEP A JOB &
CREATE A JOB
Speaker: Julie Austin
Cost: $59
Location: Corona Chamber of Commerce
904 E. Sixth St.
Contact: Julie at (310) 479-1600
Register online at www.jobsecurityseminar.com
Thursday, May 6, 13, 20 and 27 9 AM
S.C.O.R.E
Business counseling & advice
Cost: FREE
Location: Corona Chamber of Commerce
904 E. Sixth St.
Contact: Corona Chamber for appointments
at (951) 737-3350
Thursday, May 6, 13 and 20 11:30 AM
CORONA NETWORKING $OLUTIONS
Cost: $20 ($15 with RSVP)
Location: Mi Tortilla
487 Magnolia Ave.
Contact: Corona Chamber at (951) 737-3350
Tuesday, May 25 4:30 PM
NEW MEMBER RECEPTION
Cost: FREE to new members
Location: Backwoods BBQ & Steakhouse
370 N. McKinley St.
Contact: Corona Chamber at (951) 737-3350
Thursday, May 27 6:30 AM
GOOD MORNING CORONA
Sponsor: Peppermint Ridge
Speaker: Kenneth M. Young,
Riverside County Superintendent of Schools
Cost: $20 members ($15 if paid one week in
advance) / $30 non-members
Location: Eagle Glen Golf Club
1800 Eagle Glen Pkwy.
Contact: Corona Chamber at (951) 737-3350
Community Events
Thursday, April 1 All Day
CENSUS DAY 2010
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Contact: Ron Williams at (951) 952-6291
or ronald.l.williams@census.gov
for more information
Wednesday, April 7 9 AM-12 PM
“UP YOUR COMMUNICATION”
WORKSHOP FOR SUPERVISORS
Sponsor: Riverside Community College District
Speaker: Lee Lesser, MAOB
Cost: $75 or call for group and package rates
Location: Corona
Contact: (951) 571-6486 or 6456 for more
information and registration.
This is the first workshop in a series of seven.
Thursday, April 8 - Sunday, April 11
SPRING BREAK CARNIVAL
Location: The Promenade Shops at Dos Lagos
Call (951) 736-5003 or visit www.cnusd.org
for times and more information
Thursday, April 22 11:30AM
STATE OF THE CITY LUNCHEON
Sponsor: Altek Media
Speaker: Corona Mayor Karen Spiegel
Cost: $50 Chamber members or $450 for
a table of 10 $75 Non-members or $750
for a table of 10
Location: Crossroads Church
2331 Kellogg Ave.
Contact: Corona Chamber at (951) 737-3350
Thursday, April 29 6:30 AM
GOOD MORNING CORONA
Sponsor: imortgage
Speaker: Rob Field, Deputy Director,
Economic Development Agency
of Riverside County
Cost: $20 members ($15 if paid one week
in advance) / $30 non-members
Location: Eagle Glen Golf Club
1800 Eagle Glen Pkwy.
Contact: Corona Chamber at (951) 737-3350
Monday, May 3 12 PM
COMMUNITY SERVICES NETWORK MEETING
Location: Corona Chamber of Commerce
904 E. Sixth St.
Contact: Corona Chamber at (951) 737-3350
Thursday, May 5 5-7 PM
MEGA MIXER
Cost: FREE to attend
Location: Alvarez Lincoln/Mercury/Jaguar
8501 Auto Dr., Riverside
Co-host opportunities available!
Contact: Corona Chamber at (951) 737-3350
Calendar of Events
Events listed are open to the public. Call contact person before the event
to verify time and place. Some events are free, while others are not.
For a complete listing of community events, call the Chamber at
(951) 737-3350, or go to www.CoronaChamber.org for the latest updates.
www.CoronaChamber.org 35 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
Monday, April 26 8:30 AM
MAKING YOUR PRIVATE COMPANY BOARD OF
DIRECTORS MORE EFFECTIVE
Sponsor: Manufacturing Executive Institute
Cost: $349 for one person, $244 for
subsequent attendees
Location: 140 N. Maple St. #106
Contact: Maggie Watson at (951) 736-2114
or mwatson@mfgexecutive.com
Wednesday, April 28 5:30 PM
VOLUNTEER RECOGNITION BANQUET
Sponsor: Volunteer Center of Riverside County
Cost: FREE for nominated volunteers,
$40 for guests
Location: Moreno Valley Conference JRCC Center
Contact: Belinda Jones at (951) 328-8280
or bjones@vcrivco.org
Saturday, April 10 9 AM-1 PM
HEALTH & SAFETY EXPO
Sponsor: Corona-Norco PTA
Cost: FREE
Location: Lee Pollard High School
185 Magnolia Ave.
Contact: Mary Ybarra
at ptamary@sbcglobal.net
Sunday, April 11 2 PM
HOLOCAUST REMEMBRANCE DAY
YOM HASHOAH
Speakers: Holocaust survivors
Cost: FREE
Location: Congregation Beth Shalom
2790 California Ave.
Contact: (951) 733-1836 for information
Saturday, April 17 10 AM
COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE BACKYARD
COMPOSTING PROGRAM WORKSHOP
Cost: FREE
Location: Stratton Center
2008 Martin Luther King Blvd., Riverside
Contact: (951) 486-3200
Tuesday, April 20 9 AM-2 PM
CITY OF CORONA BLOOD DRIVE
Sponsor: City of Corona
Cost: FREE
Location: City Hall Multipurpose Room,
400 S. Vicentia Ave.
Contact: Lana Yoshimura at (951) 817-5824
or lana.yoshimura@ci.corona.ca.us
www.lstream.org
Wednesday, April 21 9 AM-12 PM
“HOW TO TURN GOOD EMPLOYEES
INTO GREAT EMPLOYEES” WORKSHOP
FOR SUPERVISORS
Sponsor: Riverside Community
College District
Speaker: Lee Lesser, MAOB
Cost: $75 or call for group and
package rates
Location: Corona
Contact: (951) 571-6486 or 6456 for more
information and registration.
This is the second workshop in a series
of seven.
Saturday, April 24 10 AM-2 PM
DAY OF THE CHILD
Cost: FREE
Location: City Park
930 E. Sixth St.
Contact: Tina Hunt at (951)340-9876
or tina.hunt@todaysyouthhq.com
Saturday, April 24 10 AM
COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE BACKYARD
COMPOSTING PROGRAM WORKSHOP
Cost: FREE
Location: Palm Desert Library
73-300 Fred Waring Dr.
Contact: (951) 486-3200
Larn $25 |n
Chamber Do||ars
and a IkLL Ad |n
Cur Magaz|ne
Are you doing business with a
non-Chamber business? Do you
have a friend who could benefit
from Chamber membership?
Of course you do!
The Chamber is providing some
motivation for you to refer
potential members:
First, when your prospect joins the
Chamber, your name, company and
phone number will be listed in the
Corona Business Monthly.
Second, you’ll receive $25 credit
towards up to half of any Chamber
purchase, such as your own
membership fees and attendance at
Chamber events.
Finally, when you refer five
applicants who become Chamber
members, you’ll receive a FREE
one-eighth page color ad in Corona
Business Monthly – a $480 value!
For a referral form and more
information about the program,
call the Chamber at (951) 737-3350.
Below is the newest list of members
who have referred new members:
Tamara Schaefer
Paychex, Inc.
(951) 202-3567
Karen Spiegel
Spiegel
Enterprises
(951) 737-4570
Mark Neely
Windy Plum
Farms
(951) 272-9243
Carolyn Couts
Couts Heating
& Cooling, Inc.
(951) 278-5560
Janet Rusler
Law Office
of Bradley
J. Hague
(951) 340-2842
Helen Cherry
Legacy Fine
Portraiture &
Videography
(951) 776-3003
Kerry Pendergast
Premier
Service Bank
(951) 274-2400
36 www.CoronaChamber.org Corona 8us|ness Month|y | Apr|| 2010
904 East Sixth Street
Corona, CA 92879
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