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School of Education

The University of
Manchester
Oxford Road
Manchester M13 9PL
www.manchester.ac.uk

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Primary Course Handbook

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Computing

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2015-2016

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All courseiresources available on Blackboard
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http://online.manchester.ac.uk
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CONTENTS
Introduction

Your Showcase Blog Site

Assessment

The Journey

Computing course online


Teacher standards

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Resources
University facilities

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Bibliography

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Appendix A Self Assessment

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Appendix B Pledge
Appendix C Personal Security
Appendix D Computing Toolkit
Appendix E National Curriculum
Appendix F Assessment Criteria

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Introduction
AIMS
The aim of the course is that all trainees:
- will have sufficient knowledge and understanding to teach computing to the age
range 5-11 years;
- will know how to use technology, reflectively, discriminately and effectively, both to
teach core and non-core subjects, and to support their wider professional role;
We aim to ensure that all trainees leave the course secure in their own computing skills and that
more experienced students are challenged to acquire advanced personal and pedagogic skills.

Computing in Schools
In the proposed National
Curriculum ICT is renamed
computing and can be found on
p 188 of the document.
Th e Ne w Cu r r icu lu m
www.gov.uk/government/consult
ations/national-curriculumreview-new-programmes-ofstudy-and-attainment-targetsfrom-september-2014
Recommended Viewing
Computing at School

The National Curriculum has two complementary


perspectives of computing: as a subject in its own right
with knowledge, understanding and skills that pupils are
expected to study and as a tool to support learning.
Computing is seen as a key skill and is compulsory for
children in Key Stages 1 & 2. It contributes greatly to the
other key skills of literacy, numeracy, communication and
study skills etc. Far from reducing children's need to speak
and listen, primary computing applications: talking books,
historical simulations, browsing the Internet, planning a short
film, sending emails etc. can greatly encourage children's
speaking and listening, reading and writing. Computing in
primary schools has been transformed in recent years to
include the use of blogs, wikis, video-conferences,
podcasting and, interactive whiteboards. The latter
particularly have become part of the everyday toolkit of
primary teachers.

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It is important, however, for children to understand that not


all computing skills relate to the computer. Other examples
include mobile phones, digital cameras, voice mail, audio
recording and programming a variety of media devices
commonly used at home. It is important that children see you using this technology with
confidence and that you make use of such technology in the classroom when it enhances
learning.

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Computing Course on the PGCE


This element of the PGCE is self-directed but computing tutors and professional tutors monitor
progress. It is designed to augment and enhance your personal computing skills and the
computing pedagogy integral to all curricular areas. The whole course will help you develop
both the personal and the pedagogic computing skills that you will need to be an effective
primary school teacher. Your objective is to become a confident, competent and appropriate
user of technology as an individual, as a professional and as a teacher of Computing in Key
Stages 1 and 2. You cannot rely solely on your experience in school or sessions at the
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University to provide you with the capability to teach Computing in the primary years. You will
need to commit some of your study and personal time to become familiar and increasingly
confident with the various applications.
COURSE TUTORS
John Bidder, Primary Computing Course Leader
johnbidder@pgcemanchester.co.uk
Alan Cross PGCE Computing Course Leader
alan.cross@manchester.ac.uk
Jonathon Chippindall, Learning Resource Developer
jchippindall@googlemail.com
MODE OF PROVISION
The Computing course is mainly web-based with all resources available on BlackBoard but will
use a number of other commonly used platforms including Google Docs. Access is via the
University Portal or through your University home at My Manchester.
You will set up a Blog Site (see page 5) which will showcase your skills, knowledge and
capability in computing. Where your teaching experience allows it you will also include
evidence of your practice and importantly demonstrate your ability to think critically about your
experiences.

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INDUCTION
The initial induction to the computing course will be on 15th or 16th September 2015. This will
introduce the course, its expectations, resources and the wider department, University and
primary school resources.

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Your Showcase Blog Site


Your showcase Blog Site will be publicly accessible and needs to be accessible without a
password to course tutors (computing tutors and your personal tutor) and to other students
on the programme. If you change your sites web address you must let us know by updating
our spreadsheet yourself.

Add your showcase blog site to our list here

You can use any free platform for your showcase site, most students have in the past used
weebly.com or moonfruit.com
Your site should not give personal details but should include your name (first name and initial)
and a summary of previous experience (keep schools and individuals anonymous e.g. a
Roman Catholic Primary school in Fallowfield, M/c.. Over the period until February 2016 you
should establish sections showcasing your growing capability.

Example showcase Blog Site


hannahc.moonfruit.com/
claireh-mcrpgce.moonfruit.com/#/my-work/4555290861
http://www.jenniferspgcejourney.blogspot.co.uk/

Your showcase site should include

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Your name and your tutors (first name & initials only please)
- a personal profile page summarising
o previous experience
o academic expertise
o school placements (as the year progresses)
o educational interests
o a disclaimer that that you cannot be held responsible for content encountered on websites
lionked from your blog (see point 15 on the ICT Pledge Appendix B)
o other interests
your Computing audit results and dates your regularly updated action plan with dates,
actions

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- sections on specific aspects of Primary Computing to showcase your skills such as


o coding, programming e.g. Beebot, Scratch Jnr*
o E-safety and Computing Pledge*
o interactive whiteboards*
o blogging by children
o web page publishing
o app making e.g. Blippit
o podcasting* e.g audioboom.com
o data handling
o classroom voting systems
o reward systems e.g. Class Dojo
o presentational applications e.g. Powerpoint, Prezi

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video
game design
green screen
video conferencing, e,g. Skype, Blippit Spotlight
animation
sensing and data logging*
iPhone, iPad and/or Android educational apps*
educational websites you recommend*
reference to written sources of research, evaluation, thought/reflection relating to
computing*
you are expected to contribute to the PGCE BlackBoard discussion areas.

* above are compulsory, you are expected to demonstrate a broad range of skills and so we
expect you to showcase a minimum of a further four or more examples from above (a minimum
of around 14 elements).
Each section should show the result of your skill development using text (50-150 words),
pictures, video, audio, links to internet resources, presentation applications e.g. ppt, Prezi. You
can include text, images, screenshots, audio to demonstrate your achievement.

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Where possible you should include a short summary of how you have used this in the
classroom or if you are yet to have the opportunity to use it in the classroom, how you might.
When you are applying for jobs you may chose to include the URL for your site in your letter of
application. Employing Head Teachers have been very impressed by this. However if you do
this please ensure your site is professional from a teacher perspective, organised and contains
only suitable material, please avoid links to uncontrolled content.
Google Hangouts

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Hangout 1: Introduction to Computational Thinking


Date: 23rd September @ 7pm
Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4L6qopG-F7o

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Hangout 2: Introduction to Programming at Key Stage 1 (Bee Bot, Bee Bot App, Daisy the Dino,
ScratchJr)
Date: 14th of October @ 7pm
Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8jg570ZvpF0

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Hangout 3: Introduction to Programming at Key Stage 2 (Creating a game in Scratch to cover key
programming concepts: sequence, repetition, selection)
Date: 14th of January @ 7pm
Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=edftPz-vjCg

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Hangout 4:
Either
Scratch goes further (variables)
Date: 28th of January @ 7pm
Link: to follow

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Reflective engagement in Computing


For example, in each section, after describing and illustrating what you have done and have
learned, write a short critical reflection including references to published and other writing.
An example
I trialled a datalogger this week which allows children to sense and then electronically record
data such as temperature. It is easy to use, clearly presenting data, though the decimal place
may mean that some children could be confused (Hicks, L. 2015 PGCE Maths Lecture Children
and Number). It does allow children to gather data and not go through the sometimes laborious
process of gathering data, where can often be made (Ward, Helen, 2005). Helen Ward presents
a balanced case for teachers considering use of Computing pointing out that the case for
Computing in classroom is not proven. Interestingly she quotes Susan Greenfield on brain
development, this is a source I now intend to follow up as it links with a module on my first
degree Learners and learning.

Assessment
Assessment of your personal Computing skills will be initially by self assessment which we
wish you to record on your showcase Blog Sites. .
See grade criteria

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Criteria for Assessment of the showcase Blog Site:


overall level of professionalism of the site in relation to primary teaching rather than web
designer terms

confidence in a range of applications;


a critical approach to the educational value of computing and ICT;
a breadth of computing skills demonstrated including writing short algorithms;
high commitment to the teaching of computing and its use in teaching other subjects;
high commitment to collaborative work.
You will use the audits you have received (see attachment or ideally complete online) to
determine your level of confidence either A, B, C or D. Whatever self-grade you give we
require an action plan and evidence of independent learning. Those self graded at A or B
may be able to move more quickly from a main focus on personal skills towards a greater focus
on pedagogy/ how to teach computing.
Those who self grade initially at C and D may have to spend more time working on personal
skills before moving to a greater focus on pedagogy. As the course progresses Computing
tutors will monitor your Computing Showcase Blog Sites and in a proportion of cases feedback
will be given specifically on the accuracy of self-grading. Final assessment will occur in March
2016.

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On school placement your use of computing and ICT to teach will be assessed by your school
accredited tutor and your University personal tutor. This will usually occur during the
observation and consideration of general teaching.

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Final assessment will occur on 9th March please see the assessment criteria in the
appendix.

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Espresso
As a student on the primary PGCE you have access to Espresso which is a leading but
expensive set of Computing based teaching resources used by many primary schools.

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You dont need access codes for Espresso.


Click on the URL below and link directly to the server.

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espresso.humanities.manchester.ac.uk (secondary)
espresso.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/espresso/modules (primary)
If you want full access at home then install VPN on your computer and you can access it as if
you are on site at the University.
If you need to use the VPN service.
See http://it.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/ithelp/remote/vpn/index.html which links you to the
software at http://www.itservices.manchester.ac.uk/vpn/

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Computing Course Outline The Journey


September

self-assess confidence post on your Blog


establish personal computing action plan
begin first set of actions e.g sign pledge give this to Alan Cross, skills audit, have a quick
look around Black Board Computing, begin to study Pick n Mix 4
engage with computing and ICT in all taught courses
first Google hangout

October

continue to study Pick N Mix 4 - Computing e.g. demonstrate progression from Bee Bot,
personalise you experience by using other Pick n Mix resources
collect examples of Computing in schools
computing tutors to monitor progress (we may ask to meet you)
review your computing action plan
another Google hangout

November December

use of computing on Guided Professional Placement


save and record examples of computing and ICT in class
personal tutors to check progress

Early January

review your personal action plan post GPP


add material to your blog from GPP
wee feedback to 50% + trainees
more Google hangouts

January and February

broaden scope of your computing independent learning actions


ensure Blog Site covers Computing
computing tutors to monitor progress
personal tutor to check progress
engage with Computing on PGCE taught courses

March

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Computing and personal tutors assess attainment/achievement to date


9th March 2016

March/April June

use Computing on Final Professional Placement

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Teacher Standards
Your Computing/ICT showcase site will evidence Part One S1, 2, 3, 7 and Part Two.

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As in all subjects you must show that you can achive S1, S2, S3, S4 , S6 and part 2 in specific
relation to Computing

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Resources
University Facilities
In the first week of the course, at the time indicated on the programme, you will have an
induction to the Department of Education and University wide computer facilities, electronic
resources, VLE (BlackBoard) and will be allocated an email account.
IT Service Desk
Blackboard Help
IT Advice virus

0161 306 5544 or go online


elearning@manchester.ac.uk
protection/encryption/secure memory & antivirus

IT Shop
www.studentnet.manchester.ac.uk/it-services/buying-equipment/
John Rylands Library
www.library.manchester.ac.uk/
JRL catalogue search
www.library.manchester.ac.uk/searchresources/librarysearch/
COMPUTING COURSE SUPPORT

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Should you need any support during your course at Manchester you should approach either Alan
Cross or John Bidder. Support with using or accessing BlackBoard should go direct to
elearning@manchester.ac.uk

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Bibliography

Allen, J., Potter, J. Sharp, J. and Turvey, K. (2000)


Primary Computing:Knowledge, Understanding and Practice, Exeter: Learning Matters.*

Baguley, T. et. al. (2007) Impact 007:


Personalised Learning with Technology

Bennett, R. (2004)
Using Computing in Primary English Teaching, Buckingham : Open University Press.*

Briggs, M. and Pritchard, A. (2002) Using Computing in primary mathematics teaching, Exeter
: Learning Matters.

Byrne, J. and Sharp, J. (2002) Using Computing in primary science teaching, Exeter: Learning
Matters.

Clarke, A. (2004) E-Learning Skills (2nd Edition), London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Crook, C., Harrison, C., Farrington-Flint, L., Tomas, C. and Underwood, J. (2010) The Impact of
Technology: Value-added classroom practice Final report, Coventry: Becta.

Hammond, M. (2014) Introducing Computing in schools in England: Rationale and consequences.


British Journal of Educational Technology, 45: 191-201

Jarvis, G. (2003) Using Computing in primary humanities teaching, Exeter : Learning Matters.

Leask M and John Meadows J (2000) Teaching and learning with Computing in the primary
school, London: Routledge.

Loveless, A. and Dore, B. (2002) Computing in the Primary School, Buckingham: Open
University Press.

McFarlane, a. (ed.) (1997) Information Technology and Authentic Learning. London;


Routledge.

Ofsted (2011) Computing in Schools, London: Ofsted


http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/ict-schools-2008-11

Mackay, F. (2000) Information and communication technology : key stage 2, Leamington Spa:
Hopscotch Educational

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Monteith, M. (2002) Teaching Primary Literacy with Computing, Buckingham : Open University
Press

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Appendices

Appendix A: Self Assessment


This short audit helps us to tweak the course where needed and be more aware of student needs.
Please complete online.

A I am very competent and confident. (add a star if you would be prepared to offer support to other trainees)
B I am competent and confident.
C I have an adequate level of competence but wish to strengthen my skills.
D I feel competent at few or no aspects and need considerable training and support.
Use the results to establish personal targets and record these with others on your Showcase Blog Site.
FOR INFO ONLY
Level

First name and last initial .


Expertise/Experience/Skill

Level of knowledge and skill in using the following:


coding/programming
database
spreadsheet
presentation eg PowerPoint, Prezi
video/Computing/graphics
wordprocessing
logs
Wikis
Twitter

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Facebook
Mobile App Publishing e.g. Blippit
Website Creation

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Music Composition (use of software e.g. Garage Band, Sybalius)

Ability to demonstrate and use the following Computing hardware and equipment:
Tablet/Mobile Devices
Video Recording/Cameras
Printers (Trouble shooting)
Interactive Whiteboard/Projectors
Voting/handheld devices

Ability to harness technology as a primary teacher


Identify areas of the curriculum that could be enhanced by Computing
Use Computing so that it does not obscure the subject content/message
Access information relevant to teaching from the internet

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Locate and access computer and non-computer materials, resources, support


Use Computing to prepare and adapt teaching materials.

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Use Computing for administration systems for recording progress.

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Ability to develop lesson plans that integrate the effective use of computing across the curriculum to:
Support teaching and learning

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Cover the programmes of study of the National Curriculum for computing


Teach computing elements of the other core and foundation curriculum
subjects
Identify and detail the resources, software /hardware to support the lessons
Improve learning of able children and those with special educational needs

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Knowledge and s kills relating to classroom management of Computing including:


How to organise and manage group work
How to approach whole class teaching
How to organise computing equipment to allow pupils access

Ability to monitor and assess childrens use of Computing:


Identifying where they need extending and supporting
Identifying how computing influences objectives and outcomes
Deciding whether or not all pupils have access to the objectives and outcomes
Determining how group work may affect pupil capability

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Awareness of issues and legislation relating to pupils access to information:

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Awareness of the role of the teacher in respect of child protection and Computing.
Protection of pupils from unsuitable areas of the internet.
Copyright regulations
The Data Protection Act
Health and Safety regulations

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Appendix B PGCE Primary Computing Pledge


It is a condition of the PGCE Programme that all Students must sign and adhere to this Computing Pledge.
1. To adhere to national and school policies regarding child protection and online safety.
2. To adhere to the national CEOP guidelines see http://www.ceop.police.uk/ and thinkuknow.co.uk
3. Not to make images of learners, students, school or University staff without permission from the school in
the case of pupils or the individual in the case of adults.
4. Not to publish, circulate or use for course or none course related purposes any image or information about
a child or professional practitioner encountered as part of the PGCE programme without permission.
5. Not to expose pupils to inappropriate materials or details which would allow them access such materials.
6. To always anonymise material included in course related tasks and assignments.
7. Not to give learners any details of personal telephone numbers, Email accounts or access to social
networking accounts.

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8. Not to engage with learners encountered on the primary PGCE within any form of social networking.
9. To report to an appropriate authority any suspicious or suspected activity encountered which might be
considered to be bullying, grooming of a young person or a threat to young person.
10. To act to discourage and if encountered report any form of cyberbullying.

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11. To promote ESafety and responsible use of ICT and web based resources so as to enable young people
to interact at an appropriate level.

12. If a school requires you to support homework by Email set up a separate professional account for this
purpose.

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13. If you load sensitive pupil data onto your laptop please ensure that it is encrypted www.truecrypt.org

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14. My showcase Blog Site will be my own work and will accurately reflect my personal capability in
Computing.

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15. On the first page of your showcase blog include a disclaimer to say the author is not responsible for any
content which may be encountered on internet sites linked from this site e.g. You Tube.

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I , the undersigned, understand and agree to the terms of this pledge


and will act in every way possible in a responsible and professional manner towards the safeguarding and
Esafety of all individuals encountered on the PGCE. If I break the terms of the pledge I will inform the course
director immediately.
Signed . Date
Please give a signed copy to the Computing course leaders; John Bidder or Alan Cross.
Also copy and paste the 15 bullet points page into your Showcase Blog Site.

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Appendix C Computer Use - Security Advice


There are some general points that if followed should help to keep your machine reasonably secure
against viruses and hack attacks.
The advice applies to all your computers whether used for work or at home.
1.

Never reveal or share your passwords, refrain from writing them down carelessly, if
necessary, record them securely.

2.

Lock your computer or completely log off whenever you leave your workstation; do not rely
on it to screenlock on its own.

3.

Never store personal information about students or staff on your local drives; use network
storage instead.

4.

Turn off file and printer sharing on your computer.

5.

Any kind of personal data sent by e-mail must be encrypted.

6.

Encrypt all sensitive data held on USB sticks, CDs or laptops.

7.

Immediately report lost or stolen items like laptops, mobiles, USB keys and ID cards through
the appropriate channels.

8.

Verify the security of online payment systems you use.

9.

Limit your printouts to information that is not sensitive.

10.

Secure your computer by configuring it to automatically check for software updates especially up-to-date antivirus software.

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Appendix D Computing Toolkit


Your showcase Blog Site will illustrate your Computing skills and your personal capability
toolkit. Your toolkit includes all the applications and skills you have developed to date for
teaching
All of these resources feature in the Pick n Mix sections on BlackBoard.
Resource

Link

Function

Application to
primary
education

Internet safety

www.thinkuknow.co.uk

UK centre to spread
good practice for
Internet safety for
children.

Computing at
School

http://www.computingatschool.org.uk/prima
ry

Practical guidance
and resource
signposting for
primary computing

An ideal
accompaniment for
you professional
development

Computer
Science
Unplugged

http://csunplugged.org

Free learning
activities & resources
for learning
challenging concepts
without a computer

An ideal
accompaniment for
you professional
development

Barefoot
Computing

http://barefootcas.org.uk

helping primary
school teachers get
ready for the
computer science
element of the new
computing
curriculum

An ideal
accompaniment for
you professional
development

www.prometheanplanet.com/en-gb/
or
http://smarttech.com/gutube

Allows interactive
presentation

Used across the


curriculum for
displaying audio
and visual
resources

OpenOffice free
Google Drive

Wordprocessing,
publishing, data
handling

Essential
resources for a
teacher.

Interactive
whiteboards
(IWB)
MS Office 365 or
equivalent

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Essential
knowledge and
protocols for
teachers.

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Audioboom

audioboom.com

Allows recording of
audio by children
and teachers
publishing it to the
web.

Teachers and
children can make
and share
recordings

Wikis

Many free available - try searching for free


education wiki

Allows communities
to create information
sources.

Allows teachers
and children to
create information
sources.

Blogs

Many free available - try searching for free


education blog

Allow individuals to
share information
and interact with
others.

Excellent for
literacy, provides
an audience for
writing.

Teacher Tube

www.teachertube.com

Shares videos
targeted at teachers
needing resources

Inspiration & ideas

Blippits App
Maker

www.blippit.co.uk

Allows teachers and


children to create an
mobile apps

Useful for literacy


and many other
subjects. Open
ended

Splashtop

http://www.splashtop.com/personal

Access IWB from


tablet devices

Useful if you IPad


or mobile device

Drop box

www.dropbox.com

Skype

https://education.skype.com/mysteryskype

Bee Bot

www.kenttrustweb.org.uk/kentict/kentict_ct
_bee.cfm

Scratch

scratch.mit.edu

Scratch Junior

Daisy the
Dinosaur

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Allows you to save


and share large
computer files

Link your learners to


other classes

Using technology
responsibly and
safely

Pupils give it
instructions to move
around the floor.

Useful for teaching


coding.

Widely used
introduction to
programming on
screen using blocks

Commonly used
for teaching coding

http://www.scratchjr.org

iPad App

New for 2014


Commonly used
for teaching coding

http://www.daisythedinosaur.com

iPad App

Learn the basics of


computer
programming
including
sequencing, loops
and more

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Logo

www.transum.org/software/logo/
www.mathplayground.com/mathprogrammi
ng.html

Social media

Twitter is a well used and valuable tool that


will support you in finding new resources
and indeed people already in education

Computer
programming
language for drawing
graphics on screen

Useful for teaching


programming using
the language of
Logo

Communication with
friends and others

Useful for comms.


With teacher
communities.

Interactive
Whiteboard
Software
Espresso

CEOP

You should register with CEOP

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* we do not advise that you use with children and parents


** caution required when sharing You Tube videos with others especially children

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Appendix E Computing in the National Curriculum - A Guide for Primary


Teachers
The new national curriculum for computing has been developed to equip young
people in England with the foundational skills, knowledge and of computing they will
need for the rest of their lives. Through the new programme of study for computing,
they will learn how computers and computer systems work, they will design and build
programs, develop their ideas using technology and create a range of content. But
what does this mean for primary schools? How should school leaders be planning for
the new curriculum and how can teachers develop the additional skills they will need?
Recommended

Download the source of the above quote via www.computingatschool.org.uk/primary


You may also like Computer Science Unplugged online here at csunplugged.org , ideal if
your school has limited resources or you need to use less abstract models for learning.

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Appendix F The Computing Curriculum


For the new September 2014 Computing Curriculum visit this link to download the full pdf.
If you are on a mobile device you may want to make sure you are using a wireless network to avoid possible
impact to your data charges.

Purpose of Study
A high-quality computing education equips pupils to use computational thinking and creativity
to understand and change the world. Computing has deep links with mathematics, science
and design and technology, and provides insights into both natural and artificial systems. The
core of computing is computer science, in which pupils are taught the principles of information
and computation, how digital systems work and how to put this knowledge to use through
programming. Building on this knowledge and understanding, pupils are equipped to use
information technology to create programs, systems and a range of content. Computing also
ensures that pupils become digitally literate able to use, and express themselves and
develop their ideas through, information and communication technology at a level suitable
for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world.

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Aims
The national curriculum for computing aims to ensure that all pupils:
can understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science,
including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation
can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of
writing computer programs in order to solve such problems
can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies,
analytically to solve problems
are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication
technology

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Attainment targets
By the end of each key stage, pupils are expected to know, apply and understand the
matters, skills and processes specified in the relevant programme of study.
Schools are not required by law to teach the example content in [square brackets].

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Subject content
Key stage 1
Pupils should be taught to:
understand what algorithms are, how they are implemented as programs on digital devices,
and that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions
create and debug simple programs
use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs
use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital
content
recognise common uses of information technology beyond school
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use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where
to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the
internet or other online technologies
Key stage 2
Pupils should be taught to:
design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or
simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts
use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms
of input and output
use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct
errors in algorithms and programs
understand computer networks, including the internet; how they can provide multiple
services, such as the World Wide Web, and the opportunities they offer for
communication and collaboration
use search technologies effectively, appreciate how results are selected and ranked, and
be discerning in evaluating digital content
select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of
digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that
accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data
and information
use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly; recognise acceptable/unacceptable
behaviour; identify a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact

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Appendix F
PGCE Primary Computing Assessment Showcase Website
inadequate
Limited evidence of
computing or ICT
being taught
satisfactorily or used
to teach other
subjects. Limited
examples of
Computing.

satisfactory
Evidence of
commitment to teaching
computing as a discrete
subject. Evidence that
the student has planned
and led satisfactory ICT
learning experiences.

good
Evidence that the student
has planned and taught
successful computing
learning experiences for
pupils. Clear commitment
to ICT and its role as a
key skill across a range of
subjects.

Confidence in a
range of
applications

Limited of confidence
with applications.
Unwillingness to try
new applications and
to engage with the
computing course or
with computing in
school

Willingness to trial new


applications and to
initiate and evaluate
their use in class. Some
enthusiasm is evident.

Increasingly confident use


of computing resources
both in the classroom and
non- classroom settings.

Breadth of
Computing and
ICT skills and
understanding.

Limited range of
computing/ICT skills
evidenced.

Computing/ICT skills are


adequate for basic
functions related to
classroom teaching.

Personal computing/ICT
skills evidenced are
strong or developing
strongly. They enable a
growing range of
classroom approaches.

Computing/ICT skills and


understanding are evidenced
are secure in many areas or
are developing very strongly.
They enable innovation and
challenge to student and
pupils.

Critical and
reflective
approach to the
educational value
of computing and
ICT.

Limited evidence of
critical and reflective
approaches to the use
of either computing or
ICT in educational
settings.

Examples of the
consideration of pros
and cons of applications
and approaches. Some
reference to the
contribution of
Computing/ICT to
inclusion.

Regular review of
applications in terms of
their educational value.
Recognition of the pros
and cons of
applications/software.
References to published
and unpublished sources.

Thoughtful consideration of
the contribution of
applications to learning and
learners of all kinds.
Reference to and
engagement with critical
thinking relating to the use of
ICT in primary classrooms.

Overall
professionalism
of the site

The site is not well


organised, elements
are missing or
incomplete, there is
little evidence of
regular updating.
Action planning is not
fully utilised. There is
little or no positive
response to feedback.

The blog/site is
structured and is
straightforward to
access. There is
evidence of regular use
of the site, self
assessment, action
planning and a positive
response to feedback.

Commitment to
the teaching &
learning of
Computing

Adherence to the
PGCE Primary
ICT Pledge

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Successful site
The site looks for the most
organisation enables easy part like a professionally
access to and navigation
created website. It is easy to
of site elements. The
navigate, elements are well
blog/site structure is
presented and would be
coherent and its content
highly valued by other
would be valued by other
teachers. Action planning
teachers. Action
has been used to focus and
planning is used
strengthen with blog/site.
effectively. Feedback is
clearly valued and utilised.
The site and practice reflects and adheres to the PGCE Primary ICT pledge available
in the Primary PGCE Computing handbook.

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There is evidence that


the ICT Pledge has
not been adhered to.

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outstanding
Evidence that the student
has taught meaningful,
engaging and well-managed
Computing learning
experiences for pupils. Very
strong evidence of
computing and ICT being
integrated and utilised in a
broad range of subjects (core
and foundation).
High level of confidence with
a range of computing
applications (CS, IT and DL)
in and out of school.
Personal enthusiasm is well
evidenced.

Alan Cross and John Bidder 2015

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