You are on page 1of 4

Note: Numbers correspond with the scoring system on the BIP Quality Evaluation Guide

This form
CO NFI DE NTI A L DO NOT DIS P LAY

B E H AVI O R I N T E R VE N T I O N P L AN
For Behavior Interfering with Students Learning or the Learning of His/Her Peers
This BIP attaches to:

Student Name Mark

IEP date: 2/3/16

Todays Date 02/3/16

504 plan date:

Team meeting date:

Next Review Date 05/3/16

1. The behavior impeding learning is (describe what it looks like) Off-task Jokes: talks out of turn, murmurs under
breath, makes inappropriate jokes, laughs and talks in louder than usual voice during instruction
2. It impedes learning because This behavior distupts instruction and impedes the learning of Mark and his
peers. The teacher is unable to refocus attention to the lesson while Mark remains off-task.
3. The need for a Behavior Intervention Plan
early stage intervention
moderate
serious
extreme
4. Frequency or intensity or duration of behavior Mark's behavior is most prevalent during math class and lunch
time. Data from observations shows that Mark displayed the problem behavior 90% of observed time frames
in math class over a two week period. The behavior is disruptive and interrupts learning.
reported by Mr. Jackson, Case Manager and/or
observed by Mr. Jackson, Case Manager
PREVENTION

PART I: ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AND NECESSARY CHANGES

What are the predictors for the behavior? (Situations in which the behavior is likely to occur: people, time, place, subject, etc.)
Analysis
Observation &

5. The behavior commonly occurs during whole group instruction, academic demands, and when the teacher has
his/her back turned away from Mark. Other times that the problem behavior is triggered occurs when the teacher
asks Mark to complete an independent assignment, when Mark turns around in his chair to look at and talk to other
classmates, or when his teachers are working with other students or completing other types of tasks such as taking
attendance. Highest level of occurance is from 9:30-10:30am in Mr. McGreevy's math class.
What supports the student using the problem behavior? (What is missing in the environment/curriculum or what is in the
environment curriculum that needs changing?)

6. The problem behavior is supported when Mark sits at a table instead of an individual desk. In addition, when Mark
does not take his Adderall for Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder, he demonstrates the problem behavior more.

Intervention

Remove students need to use the problem behavior----What environmental changes, structure and supports are needed to remove the students need to use this behavior?
(Changes in Time/Space/Materials/Interactions to remove likelihood of behavior)

7. Mark will be seated at an individual desk in each of his classrooms throughout the school day. He will not be seated
at a larger table with a group of his peers.
Who will establish? All Teachers

ALTERNATIVES

Who will monitor? All Teachers

Frequency? Throughout School Day

PART II: FUNCTIONAL FACTORS AND NEW BEHAVIORS TO TEACH AND SUPPORT

Analysis
Observation &

Team believes the behavior occurs because: (Function of behavior in terms of getting, protest, or avoiding something)

8. The data shows that the function of the behavior is receiving attention from teachers and peers.
Accept a replacement behavior that meets same need----What team believes the student should do INSTEAD of the problem behavior? (How should the student escape/protest/
avoid or get his/her need met in an acceptable way?)

9. Mark will remain on task (raising his hand to gain attention, speaking in an appropriate tone/level, making
comments related to classroom instruction, making age appropriate comments, and self- monitoring his
behavior) during seatwork.

Diana Browning Wright, Behavior/Discipline Trainings


1
For the electronic expandable version, see www.pent.ca.gov/forms.htm.

Intervention

What teaching Strategies/Necessary Curriculum/Materials are needed? (List successive teaching steps for student to learn
replacement behavior/s)

10. Mark will be provided with a self-check list of on-task behaviors that are expected of him. He will use this check list
to remind himself of how he is expected to behave during instructional time at school. He will carry this check list
with him to each class.

Intervention

Who will establish? Mrs. Johnston

Who will monitor? All Teachers

Frequency? Throughout School Day

What are reinforcement procedures to use for establishing, maintaining, and generalizing the replacement behavior(s)?

11. At the end of each class period, Mark's teachers will check off the positive behaviors that Mark displayed
throughout that class. These sucessfuly checked cards can then be submitted in exchange for a minute of free time
to interact with his peers, allowing Mark to gain attention from both his teachers and peers.
Selection of reinforcer based on: the desire for attention from teacher.
reinforcer for using replacement behavior
reinforcer for general increase in positive behaviors
By whom? All Teachers Frequency? Throughout School Day

EFFECTIVE REACTION

PART III: REACTIVE STRATEGIES

What strategies will be employed if the problem behavior occurs again?

12.
1.

Prompt student to switch to the replacement behavior

2.

Describe how staff should handle the problem behavior if it occurs again

3.

Positive discussion with student after behavior ends

Optional:
4. Any necessary further classroom or school consequences
Personnel?

Diana Browning Wright, Behavior/Discipline Trainings


2
For the electronic expandable version, see www.pent.ca.gov/forms.htm.

OUTCOME

PART IV: BEHAVIORAL GOALS

Behavioral Goal(s)

13.
Required: Functionally Equivalent Replacement Behavior (FERB) Goal
By
when
May
3,
2016

Who
Mark

Will do X
behavior
(line 9)
will remain
on task
(raising his
hand to gain
attention,
speaking in
an
appropriate
tone/level,
making
comments
related to
classroom
instruction,
making age
appropriate
comments,
and selfmonitoring
his behavior)
during
seatwork

For the
purpose
of y
(line 8)
for the
purpose
of
receiving
attention
from
teachers
and
peers

Instead of Z
behavior
(line 1)

For the
purpose of y
(line 8)

Under what
contingent
conditions

At what
level of
proficiency

instead of
making offtask jokes
(talking out of
turn,
murmuring
under breath,
making
inappropriate
jokes,
laughing and
talking in
louder than
usual voice
during
instruction)

for the
purpose of
learning how
to interact
appropriately
in a
classroom
setting

during
classroom
instructional
time

for 80
percent of
the time on 4
out of 5
observations
during a two
week period

As
measured
by whom
and how
as
measured
by the
teacher
through
data
collection.

Option 1: Increase General Positive or Decrease Problem Behavior


By when

Who

Will do what, or
will NOT do what

At what level of
proficiency

Under what
conditions

Measured by
whom and how

Option 2: Increase General Positive or Decrease Problem Behavior


By when

Who

Will do what, or
will NOT do what

At what level of
proficiency

Under what
conditions

Measured by
whom and how

The above behavioral goal(s) are to:


Increase use of replacement behavior and may also include:
Reduce frequency of problem behavior
Develop new general skills that remove students need to use the problem behavior
Observation and Analysis Conclusion:
Are curriculum accommodations or modifications also necessary? Where described: ..............................
Are environmental supports/changes necessary?.................................................................................................
Is reinforcement of replacement behavior alone enough (no new teaching is necessary)?..................................
Are both teaching of new replacement behavior AND reinforcement needed?.....................................................
This BIP to be coordinated with other agencys service plans?.............................................................................
Person responsible for contact between agencies ......................................................................................

Diana Browning Wright, Behavior/Discipline Trainings


3
For the electronic expandable version, see www.pent.ca.gov/forms.htm.

yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes

no
no
no
no
no
no

COMMUNICATION

PART V: COMMUNICATION PROVISIONS

Manner and content of communication

14.
1. Who?

1. Who?

1. Who?

2. Under what
condition(s)
(Contingent?
Continuous?)

2. Under what
condition(s)
(Contingent?
Continuous?)

2. Under what
condition(s)
(Contingent?
Continuous?)

PARTICIPATION
Student

3.
Delivery
Manner

4. Expected
Frequency?

3.
Delivery
Manner

Juan Villalobas

Parent/Guardian

Tatina Villaobas

Educator and Title

Mr. Jackson, Case Manager

Educator and Title

Mr. McGreevy, Math Teacher

Educator and Title

Mrs. Johnson, English Teacher

Other

Diana Browning Wright, Behavior/Discipline Trainings


4
For the electronic expandable version, see www.pent.ca.gov/forms.htm.

6. How will this be


two-way
communication

5. Content?

PART VI: PARTICIPANTS IN PLAN DEVELOPMENT

Parent/Guardian

Other

6. How will this be


two-way
communication

5. Content?

4. Expected
Frequency?

Mark Villalobas

Administrator

4. Expected
Frequency?

3.
Delivery
Manner

5. Content?

6. How will this be


two-way
communication