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CHAPTER 1

INTRODUCTION

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Introduction
The color television industry in India has seen a dramatic change during the past one decade
as liberalization and globalization showed its original face in full swing in the Indian subcontinent, making its market highly competitive and customer driven. A good number of TV
customers today face a lot of dilemma at the time of taking a purchase decision to choose the
brand because a number of substitutes available in the market. As a result of this, the
manufacturers are now forced to behave like price takers rather than price makers. Under the
circumstances, it is quite obvious that the companies will have to do more homework to
respond to the needs and tastes of the customers in order to survive in this competitive
market. When it comes to the purchase decision of the TV customers, it depends on various
product differentiation attributes such as price, game and goodwill of the company, design
and appearance, digital function, after sales service, durability and warranty, power
efficiency, financial incentives (free gifts, discounts and installments etc.), easy availability
and smooth functioning.
It is an accepted fact that the generation of information plays an important role in the field of
policy formation, marketing planning, strategy making and it also bridges the game between
the buyers and the sellers. This study may provide the TV companies with a launch pad and
act as a guide that can help same in chalking out strategies to enlarge the market share and
also enhance the level of awareness among customers. In short, it can be claimed to be an
accurate and timely report that may help them to gain a competitive edge over their
customers.
Therefore, the present study aims at ascertaining the television customers preference over the
various counts of T.V. brands they use. The study also throws light on the customers
purchase behavior with respect to color television. This study may provide the T.V.
companies with a launch pad and act as a guide that can help the same in chalking out
strategies to enlarge market share and also enhance the level of awareness among customers
and may help them to gain a competitive edge over their competitors.

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CUSTOMER:
Customers are the most important people for any organization. They are the resource on
which not only the success, but the entire existence of any business depends. A customer, also
client, buyer or purchaser is usually used to refer to a current or potential buyer or user of the
products of an individual or organization mostly called the supplier or seller. However the
term customer also includes by extension anyone who uses or experiences the services of
another. The word derives from " custom, " meaning "habit "; a customer was someone who
frequented a particular shop, who made it a habit to purchase goods of the sort the shop sold
their rather than elsewhere, and with whom the shopkeeper had to maintain a relationship to
keep his or her "custom, meaning expected purchases in the future. The clichs "customer is
king" or "customer is god" or "the customer is always right" are most frequently used in the
marketing world and also indicate the importance of customers to businesses.

DEFINITION OF CUSTOMER:
DEFINITION 1: According to Shri. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, the father of nation,
A customer is not an outsider to our business. He is a definite part of it. A customer is not an
interruption of our work. He is the purpose of it. A customer is doing us a favor by letting us
serve him. We are not doing him any favor. A customer is not a cold statistic; he is a flesh and
blood human being with feelings and emotions like our own. A customer is not someone to
argue or match wits with. He deserves courteous and attentive treatment. A customer is not
dependent on us. We are dependent on him. A customer brings us his wants. It is our job to
handle them properly and profitably both to him and us. A customer makes it possible to
pay our salary, whether we are a driver, plant or an office employee.
DEFINITION 2: Peter Drucker , A well-known management expert, defined customers as: A
person who purchases the product from the marketer or from the retailer or from the
wholesaler.

CUSTOMER SATISFACTION:
The word satisfaction come from the Latin words satis (enough) and facere (to do
or make). These words suggest the true satisfaction, which is fulfillment. Managerially,
fulfillment usually translate solve the problem & satisfying the customers is not enough. To
produce high level of loyalty, businesses need to move beyond more satisfaction, to customer
delight.
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MEASURING CUSTOMER SATISFACTION:


There are several ways to gather input from customer. The simplest way to find out, how
customer feel and what they want, is to ask them. If you have only 20 customers, you can talk
to each one personally. The advantage of this approach is that you will get a personal feel
for each customer. The disadvantage is you will gather different information from each
customer depending on how the conversation goes. Some of ways in which you can approach
the customer are listed below:

CUSTOMER SURVEY:
Customer surveys with standardized survey questions insure that you will collect the same
information from everyone. Remember that few of your customers will be interested in
filling out a questionnaire. Its work for them, without much reward. By launching a
customer survey as an attempt to find out how we can serve better your customers will
feel less put upon. Here are few of the possible dimensions you could measure:
Quality of service
Speed of service
Pricing
Complaints or problems
Trust in your employees

FOCUS GROUP:
Focus group is good ways to get informal input from group of customers or prospects.
You bring in 5-10 customers or prospects and ask them questions or have them react to
material. You can pay professional facilitator and video tape the whole session, or just lead an
informal discussion yourself. In either case, you have a chance to gather ideas about customer
needs, reactions to your company, suggestions for new services, and so forth. In additional to
individual responses, you get ideas that develop as the group reacts to each others responses.

CLIENT ADVISORY GROUP:


One way to get regular input from customers is to put together an advisory group. This can
act like a focus group, but is set up to provide input over time. You may pay members, or
simply buy them dinner every quarter. There are many benefits to such groups. They give
you a source of input from the customer viewpoint. They provide a sounding board for

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specific questions. They enhance your relationship with good customers who become more
committed to your success. And they can move relationship with prospects ahead

PROCESS OF CUSTOMER SATISFACTION:


Customer Satisfaction Process - Five Steps
Step 1 Understanding Customer Expectations
Step 2- Promises to Customers
Step 3 Execution
Step 4 - Ongoing Dialog with a Customer
Step 5 - Customer Satisfaction Surveys

PROBLEM DEFINITION:
The research has undertaken the study with an aim to ascertain the respondents preference
over the different color T.V. brands of customer perception towards the color T.V. brands and
the level of satisfaction of the customers.
The present study aims at ascertaining the television customers preference over the various
counts of T.V. brands they use. The study also throws light on the customers purchase
behavior with respect to color television. This study may provide the T.V. companies with a
launch pad and act as a guide that can help the same in chalking out strategies to enlarge
market share and also enhance the level of awareness among customers and may help them to
gain a competitive edge over their competitors.

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CHAPTER 2

LITERATURE REVIEW

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Internet for Educational Television: An Opportunity or Threat


The outcome of this study depicts that instead of threats, Internet offers more opportunities
for educational television. This analysis also leads the researcher to propose promotional
strategies to use Internet for creating more opportunities for educational television in global
perspectives
Author : Misra, Pradeep Kumar
Source : Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education (Oct 2010)
Volume 11
No 4
Pg 159-170
Place : India

Value Networks and Changing Business Models For the Digital Television
Industry
This article analyzes the impact of digitization on industry architectures and emphasizes one
of most obvious strategies set up in the digital broadcasting industry, i.e. the development of
conditional access systems for digital television content.
Author : Tom Evens, Ghent University
Source : Journal of Media Business Studies (2010)
Volume : 7
Number : 4
PG no : 41-58
Place : Chicago

The Effects of Television on Institutionalized Children.


A promising first step has been taken in determining a prosocial TV diet can be used as a
beneficial tool for shaping prosocial behavior in the institutionalized child. The data
confirmed that a prosocial diet can increase positive behaviors and decrease negative
behaviors. They also demonstrated that an adult-led discussion can minimize the impact of
more violent programming. However, such discussions seem to fail when they highlight the
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serious motivations for engaging in prosocial behaviors. This effect seems to be closely
related to the characteristics of the target population.
Author : Sprafkin, Joyce N
Source : Paper presented at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child
Development
(Boston , Massachusetts, April 1981)

Science on Television
Television is frequently blamed for the problems adults face with some young people. Does
television affect their understanding and behavior? Of course it does. BBC Schools
Television had set out to engage and educate and, because independent television later had a
similar brief to "entertain, educate and inform", people have enjoyed a rich range of schools
broadcasting in this country. This article takes a glance at its history.
Author : Stringer, John
Source : Education in Science, p16-17 Sep 2011
Place : United Kingdom

The Relation between Television Exposure and Executive Function among


Preschoolers

Nathanson, Amy I.; Alad, Fashina; Sharp, Molly L.; Rasmussen, Eric E.; Christy, Katheryn
Developmental Psychology, v50 n5 p1497-1506 May 2014
This study investigated the relations between television exposure during the preschool years
and the development of executive function (EF). Data were gathered from 107 parents of
preschoolers who provided information on children's television viewing, background
television exposure, exposure to specific televised content, and the age at which children
began watching television. Preschoolers' EF was assessed via one-on-one interviews. We
found that several indicators of television exposure were significantly related to EF. These
findings suggest that EF may be an important construct for continued research on the effects
of media on young children.

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Teaching with Television: New Evidence Supports an Old Medium


Linebarger, Deborah L.
Phi Delta Kappan, v93 n3 p62-65 Nov 2011
Television--public television, in particular--has come to be seen as a great educational
resource for the home, but it hasn't been as widely embraced in the classroom. Thanks to a
number of recent, large-scale research projects, it's time to put those concerns to rest. Not
only does educational television have powerful effects on children's learning at home, but
recent evidence documents how it can be a powerful learning resource in school.

Narrow Viewing: The Vocabulary in Related Television Programs

Rodgers, Michael P. H.; Webb, Stuart


TESOL Quarterly: A Journal for Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages and of
Standard English as a Second Dialect, v45 n4 p689-717 Dec 2011
In this study, the scripts of 288 television episodes were analyzed to determine the extent to
which vocabulary reoccurs in related and unrelated television programs, and the potential for
incidental vocabulary learning through watching one season (approximately 24 episodes) of
television programs. The scripts consisted of 1,330,268 running words and had a total
running time of 203 hours and 49 minutes with a mean running time of 42 minutes. The
vocabulary from a single season of six individual television programs (142 episodes) was
compared with six sets of random television programs (146 episodes). The results indicated
that, when there are an equivalent number of running words, related television programs are
likely to contain fewer word families than unrelated programs. The findings also indicated
that word families from the 4,000-14,000 levels were more likely to reoccur in a complete
season of a television program than in random television programs. The percentage of lowfrequency word families encountered 10 or more times was higher, and the percentage of
word families encountered once was fewer in all six programs than in the random television
programs.

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Parental Influence on Children during Educational Television Viewing in


Immigrant Families

Zhao, Yuting; Phillips, Beth M.


Infant and Child Development, v22 n4 p401-421 Jul-Aug 2013
It has been suggested by researchers that educational television programmes may support the
language and literacy development for children, especially those in immigrant families. In an
immigrant family, many family characteristics appear to be related to educational television
programme viewing of children at home, for example, parental acculturation (the process of
adapting to the new culture) and parental mediation (supervision and guidance) of television
viewing. In the present work, the parental influence on children during educational television
viewing was studied quantitatively, based on a sample (n?=?171) of immigrant families with
children aged 3-6?years collected across the U.S. The results have revealed that significant
differences existed between Asian and Hispanic groups in coviewing mediation and in their
children's educational television viewing. Furthermore, language in parental acculturation
significantly predicted instructive and restrictive parental mediation, and parental occupation
significantly predicted language in parental acculturation. This study initiates the attention to
the topic of educational television viewing in immigrant families, which warrants further
investigations in the future as the Asian and Hispanic immigrant population increases rapidly
in the U.S.

The Impact of Background Television on Parent-Child Interaction

Kirkorian, Heather L.; Pempek, Tiffany A.; Murphy, Lauren A.; Schmidt, Marie E.;
Anderson, Daniel R.
Child Development, v80 n5 p1350-1359 Sep-Oct 2009
This study investigated the hypothesis that background television affects interactions between
parents and very young children. Fifty-one 12-, 24-, and 36-month-old children, each
accompanied by 1 parent, were observed for 1 hr of free play in a laboratory space
resembling a family room. For half of the hour, an adult-directed television program played
in the background on a monaural television set. During the other half hour, the television was
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not on. Both the quantity and quality of parent-child interaction decreased in the presence of
background television. These findings suggest one way in which early, chronic exposure to
television may have a negative impact on development.

Making Sense of TV for Children: The Case of Portugal

Pereira, Sara; Pinto, Manuel


Journal of Media Literacy Education, v3 n2 p101-112 2011
Empowering children for a critical and judicious use and consumption of media is a main
objective of media literacy. This paper aims to examine the range of television programs
available for children in Portugal through a comparative analysis of the programming for
children broadcast by the four Portuguese terrestrial channels (RTP1, RTP2, SIC and TVI)
over the course of a year. A content analysis of 4,491 programs reveals that about one third
have an explicit educational goal and that preschool children are the primary target audience
for children's television. There are clear differences among Portuguese public and private
channels in the content and themes of children's television programming and little children's
television production comes from Portugal. Television itself could promote this aim through
the programs it provides to children, as established in the Agreement for Public Service
Television signed in 2008 by the Portuguese State and the public television channel, RTP, but
it has yet to be enforced.

Television Quiz Show Simulation


Hill, Jonnie Lynn
Simulation & Gaming, v38 n4 p536-545 2007
This article explores the simulation of four television quiz shows for students in China
studying English as a foreign language (EFL). It discusses the adaptation and implementation
of television quiz shows and how the students reacted to them.

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The Impact of Internet and Television Use on the Reading Habits and
Practices of College Students

Mokhtari, Kouider; Reichard, Carla A.; Gardner, Anne


Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, v52 n7 p609-619 April 2009
How much time do college students spend reading for recreational and academic purposes?
Do Internet and television use displace or interfere with reading time? In this study, we used
an innovative time-diary survey method to explore whether the time students spend on the
Internet or watching television displaces time that would be spent reading for academic or
recreational purposes.

Television in the Schools: Instructional Television and Educational Media


Resources at the National Public Broadcasting Archives
King, Karen
TechTrends: Linking Research and Practice to Improve Learning, v52 n4 p59-65 Jul 2008
In 1964, in "A Guide to Instructional Television," editor Robert M. Diamond defined
"educational television" as a "broad term usually applied to cultural and community
broadcasting which may include some programs for in-school use" (p. 278). His definition for
instructional television was "television used within the formal classroom context on any
educational level." Researchers interested in the history of instructional television can explore
many topics from program type to school involvement. In "Educational Telecommunications"
(1977), Donald N. Wood and Donald G. Wylie devoted a chapter to examining eight levels of
school television involvement: "single-classroom applications, school-level projects, district
administration, metropolitan ITV associations, statewide operations, regional activities,
national programs, and international developments" (1977, p. 193). This article summarizes
many collections and oral history interviews in the National Public Broadcasting Archives
(NPBA) which pertain to all the above levels except single-classroom applications and
international developments.

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What Television Can (and Can't) Do to Promote Early Literacy


Development

Moses, Annie
Young Children, v64 n2 p80-89 Mar 2009
Moses discusses research findings about television, young children, and literacy. She
addresses research on a number of topics: How much and what kind of programming do
children watch? What is the literacy content in popular children's programming? Does
programming send positive or negative messages about literacy? What is television's impact
on specific early literacy skills? What can teachers do to make the most of television in
promoting literacy development in young children? The author provides a list (by children's
ages) of popular children's programming that supports language and literacy, with brief
annotations and relevant Web sites. She supplies a teacher checklist for selecting
programming for young children.

Television Goes to School: The Impact of Video on Student Learning in


Formal Education

Education Development Center, Inc


This report focuses on key questions concerning the relationship of television to learning, and
provides examples drawn from current television research to demonstrate television's positive
effect on student achievement. A set of practical recommendations are also provided so that
broadcasters and educators can maximize the effectiveness of video in the classroom. This
document is organized in the following sections: (1) Executive Summary; (2) Report
Rationale; (3) A Brief Overview of the History of TV Research; (4) Watching Television; (5)
Learning from TV; (6) Classroom Uses of Video and Television; (7) Using Classroom
Television to Support Specific Academic Disciplines; (8) Teaching with Television; (9)
Helping Teachers Teach with Television; and (9) Looking Ahead.

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Television and Attitudes toward Mental Health Issues: Cultivation Analysis


and the Third-Person Effect

Diefenbach, Donald L.; West, Mark D.


Journal of Community Psychology, v35 n2 p181-195 Mar 2007
A television content analysis and survey of 419 community respondents supports the
hypothesis that media stereotypes affect public attitudes toward mental health issues. A
content analysis of network, prime-time television demonstrates that portrayals are violent,
false, and negative. The mentally disordered are portrayed as 10 times more likely to be a
violent criminal than nonmentally disordered television characters. A survey demonstrates
that as television viewing increases so does the belief among viewers that locating mental
health services in residential neighbourhoods will endanger the residents. Viewers who watch
television news are less likely to support living next to someone who is mentally ill. The
survey also tests the third-person effect, and finds that viewers believe television portrayals of
mental illness affect others more than themselves.

Parent and Adolescent Interaction in Television Advertisements as


Consumer Socialization Agents

Ozmete, Emine
Education, v129 n3 p372-381 Spr 2009
This study aimed at determining the interaction between parents and adolescents pertaining to
television advertisements as a consumer socialization agent and the effects of advertisements
on the purchasing decisions of adolescents. The effects of age and sex were also investigated.
The sample included 240 high school students in grades 9, 10 and 11 (100 girls; 140 boys). A
scale was used to collect data. The results showed that male adolescents were more heavily
affected by television advertisements and their parents' recommendations than female
adolescents. Also, adolescents aged between 16-18 enjoyed television advertisements more
and based their purchasing decisions on them. The age and gender of adolescents affected not
only their interaction with parents relating to television advertisements but also the way they
perceived advertisements.

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Teachers and Public Engagement: An Argument for Rethinking Teacher


Professionalism to Challenge Deficit Discourses in the Public Sphere

Thomas, Sue
Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, v32 n3 p371-382 2011
In the context of public debates on teacher quality, both media and education policy texts
construct deficit discourses about teachers, discourses that work together to inform public,
commonsense understandings of teacher quality. This paper explores the interrelationships
between discourses on teachers constructed on television and in policies in the Australian
policy context. Critical discourse analysis was employed to trace the links between the
discourses on teachers constructed in a television situation comedy and discourses in the
policy documents that inform the Australian Government Quality Teacher Programme. The
paper demonstrates the interdiscursivity of media and policy discourses on teacher quality by
analysing the ways that the television sitcom constructed a particular version of teachers
within the quality policy context. The analysis highlights the need for teachers to challenge
these deficit discourses. The paper concludes by arguing for a rethinking of teacher
professionalism in ways that include active engagement in public debates on education.

Teaching the Sociological Imagination: Learning from the Biggest Loser

Plymire, Darcy C.
Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, v83 n8 p23-26, 31 Oct 2012
The purpose of this article is to show how to use popular culture as a method of teaching
scientific concepts. Specifically, the reality-television program The Biggest Loser is used as
an example for teaching the concept of the sociological imagination by illustrating the
disconnect between personal solutions for weight loss and the demands of solving the social
issue of the obesity epidemic.

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Television, Video Game and Social Media Use among Children with ASD
and Typically Developing Siblings
Mazurek, Micah O.; Wenstrup, Colleen
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, v43 n6 p1258-1271 Jun 2013
This study examined the nature of television, video game, and social media use in children
(ages 8-18) with autism spectrum disorders (ASD, n = 202) compared to typically developing
siblings (TD, n = 179), and relative to other activities. Parents completed measures assessing
children's screen-based and other extracurricular activities. Children with ASD spent
approximately 62 % more time watching television and playing video games than in all nonscreen activities combined. Compared with TD siblings, children with ASD spent more hours
per day playing video games (2.4 vs. 1.6 for boys, and 1.8 vs. 0.8 for girls), and had higher
levels of problematic video game use. In contrast, children with ASD spent little time using
social media or socially interactive video games.

"Television" Artists
Szekely, George
Arts & Activities, v148 n2 p41-42 Oct 2010
In an art class, children browse through space-age knobs, robot antennas and gyroscopic
signal searchers. They extend space needle antennas before turning on an old TV. They
discover the sights and sounds of televisions past, hearing the hiss, the gathering power, and
seeing the blinking eye, the black-and-white light and blurry images projected on their skin.
In this lesson the author shares the bounty of a first-generation TV child, the visual interest
the new media held, and the fantasy the early days of television inspired in American
designers.

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Babies, Television and Videos: How Did We Get Here?


Wartella, Ellen; Richert, Rebekah A.; Robb, Michael B.
Developmental Review, v30 n2 p116-127 Jun 2010
Baby media have exploded in the past decade, and children younger than 2 are showing
increased use of these baby media. This paper examines the historical evidence of babies' use
of television since the 1950s as well as the various factors that have given rise to the current
increase in screen media for babies. We also consider the ubiquitous role of television in
American families, the impact of evidence regarding the educational benefits of educational
television on preschoolers, and positive parental beliefs about the usefulness of such
educational media in preparing young children for schooling. Finally, we examine the
theoretical issues of importance for guiding research into the interactions between media
exposure and cognitive development, including the role of media in changing the context of
children's development and constraints on the kinds of things babies can learn from screen
media. Lastly, we suggest that screen media may indeed be changing the nature of children's
development.

Suitability of AIOU Television and Its Impact on Students' Achievements


Siraj, Syed Abdul
Online Submission, Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education--TOJDE v9 n3 p99-111 Jul
2008
The requirement of television for educational purposes arises when specific educational
objectives are not achieved through traditional way of teaching. There are a number of things
television can do better than the average teacher and traditional educational institutions, but
situations where both teacher and educational institutions are not available, television is the
answer to obtain educational objectives, Lochte, (1993). This research paper investigates
relationship between TV broadcast time, day and duration and student achievement. Data was
collected from 197 from urban and rural, male and female students of the AllamaIqbal Open
University, enrolled in the spring 2006 Semester in the selected courses. No strong
relationship was found between Learning from TV and academic achievement in the AIOU
situation. Use of television in the AIOU Situation will be more effective if transmission day,

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time and duration are adjusted according to the students' demand and when students'
assignments are based on both textbook and TV programs.

Beyond Demographics: Understanding the College Experience through


Television

Tobolowsky, Barbara F.
New Directions for Student Services, n114 p17-26 Sum 2006
Understanding the prime-time television portrait of college helps educators better understand
the expectations our entering students may hold of college life.

The Viability of English Television Programs inside of South Korean


Classrooms
Kines, Scott Wayne
Journal of International Education Research, v8 n3 p183-196 2012
English television programs have been incorporated within public-school classrooms in
western countries for a long time to capture student interest in various subjects. Many
researchers favor English programs as a partner inside of classrooms while others hold
negative perceptions of the concept. However, there is little research to provide a better
understanding of how English television programs have been accepted within South Korean
public-school EFL classrooms by teachers and public administrative professionals. Since
South Korea's Ministry of Education is aggressively identifying alternative ways to reduce
household spending on private English education, this study attempts to determine if English
television programs can be a viable partner in South Korean EFL classrooms. Fifty publicschool EFL teachers covering schools in Seoul, Bucheon, Suwon, and Incheon were surveyed
to provide better insight. A majority of the participants indicated they instruct their students to
watch English programs as a part of their lesson plans, but this study also indicates the
strategy has been applied sparingly.

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Enhanced Television Strategy Models: A Study of TV Web Sites.


Ha, Louisa
Internet Research, v12 n3 p235-47 2002
Compares the use of enhanced television features and television commerce features on the
Web sites of cable and broadcast television networks. Shows differences in strategies and site
usability; proposes three enhanced television strategy models; and discusses implications on
television revenue and viewership.

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CHAPTER 3
RESEARCH OBJECTIVES

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Objectives:
Different Companies/brands are available in the consumer durable market to customers like
Sony, Samsung, LG, Philips, ONIDA etc.
The final decision of transaction is totally depend on the consumer, consumer
may have different perception for his satisfaction for particular brand and
company has to full fill consumer requirement. Hence the concerned project is
undertaken:
Primary Objectives
To ascertain the respondents preference over the different brands of color TV.
To measure the respondents degree of satisfaction over the various colors T.V. brands.
To measure the expectation and satisfaction gap between customers and company
delivering the product.

Secondary Objectives

Is there any specific feature that a consumer is looking for?

Is there a substitute for television?

To understand the obsolete features of television for cost cutting.

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CHAPTER 4
RESEARCH METHODOLGY

Research methodology
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Research methodology is considered as the nerve of the project. Without a proper wellorganized research plan, it is impossible to complete the project and reach to any conclusion.
The project was based on the survey plan. The main objective of survey was to collect
appropriate data, which work as a base for drawing conclusion and getting result.
Therefore, research methodology is the way to systematically solve the research
problem. Research methodology not only talks of the methods but also logic behind the
methods used in the context of a research study and it explains why a particular method has
been used in the preference of the other.

Research design
Research design is important primarily because of the increased complexity in the market as
well as marketing approaches available to the researchers. In fact, it is the key to the
evolution of successful marketing strategies and programmers. It is an important tool to study
buyers behavior, consumption pattern, brand loyalty, and focus market changes. A research
design specifies the methods and procedures for conducting a particular study. According to
Kerlinger, Research Design is a plan, conceptual structure, and strategy of investigation
conceived as to obtain answers to research questions and to control variance.

Statement of the problem:


The main aim is to find customers satisfaction and preference of color T.V. brands in Anand
city. It will help in finding out what different customer expects from color T.V. they purchase
and whether they are satisfied with the product or not.
The General study was converged as a specific study for different color TV brand. The study
was initiated to find out the consumer satisfaction and preference towards different color TV
brand. Our approach to the research design tasks went through the following tasks.

The researcher has adopted Descriptive Research Design for the purpose of this survey.

Descriptive Research
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This study is conducted using the descriptive research design method. This type of research is
also a grouping that includes many particular research methodologies and procedures, such as
observations, surveys, self-reports, and tests. Unlike qualitative research, descriptive research
may be more analytic. It often focuses on a particular variable or factor the data collection
procedures used in descriptive research may be very explicit.

Method of data collection:


To know the consumer switching cost between the different color TV brands, the study would
done on the consumer variables towards the buying decision process so the appropriate
Questionnaire would be done for the data collection on following variables
1) Income
2) Brand loyalty
3) Benefits

Sampling Design:

Sampling units: Customers who own color T.V.

Sample Size: The survey will be conducted for 100 respondents who own color T.V.

Sampling Technique: Convenient sampling technique will be used for collecting


information.

Source of data:
Data will be collected from both the sources primary sources as well as secondary sources.

Primary data: The primary data will be gathered with the help of well-structured
questionnaire and with the help of personal interview.

Secondary data: The secondary data will be gathered from internet, newspaper,
catalogues and brochures and magazines.

Sample drawn from: Anand city


Tools and Techniques:

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The data will be collected through questionnaire method from the respondents. The
respondents will be selected through the non random sampling plan. The collected data will
be analyzed by percentage Analysis method. Bar diagrams will also be used for better
pictorial understanding.

Questionnaire Design:
Questionnaire design was the critical issue as the questionnaire reflects the survey purpose
.The questionnaire was meticulously prepared by identifying the various variables. The same
scale of yes/no and very important, important and not so important was used throughout so as
to make the respondent comfortable.
Firstly a questionnaire was prepared and few people were surveyed. After this survey we
realized the flaws in the questionnaire and then a modified questionnaire was prepared and
people were surveyed on this modified questionnaire.

Data Analysis
The data of score of features and score of brand perception was fed in to the excel sheet.
Separate Excel sheets were employed for analysis of each brand and also to keep it concise
and unambiguous. For data analysis I use many types of charts:

Pie chart:
This is very useful diagram to represent data, which are divided into a number of categories.
This diagram consists of a circle of divided into a number of sectors, which are proportional
to the values they represent. The total value is represented by the full create. The diagram bar
chart can make comparison among the various components or between a part and a whole of
data

Bar chart:
This is another way of representing data graphically. As the name implies, it consist of a
number of whispered bar, which originate from a common base line and are equal widths.
The lengths of the bards are proportional to the value they represent.

Page | 25

CHAPTER 5
LIMITATION OF STUDY

Limitations

Page | 26

Response Errors
These may arise when the respondents give inaccurate or incomplete answers. For e.g. in our
survey a respondent may not mention that he had test driven a TV before purchasing it A
major problem faced in the survey involved the comparative ratings of various attributes for
all the brands of TV. Many of the respondents were not very willing to rank so many factors
as they perceived it to be time consuming.

Open Ended Questions


All the questions in the questionnaire were open-ended to avoid any kind of bias from the
respondents end. But a drawback of this approach is that there was an incomplete capture of
his responses, as the respondent could not always come out with the purchase steps and the
time taken in them. The reasons for such inaccuracy could be because of unfamiliarity,
fatigue, boredom, faulty recall and the Question format.

Non Random Sampling Errors


This can occur, as the particular sample elected is an imperfect representation of the
population of interest. The area covered in the survey was Bangalore region and the customer
preferences and tastes in different Regions could not be covered.

Page | 27

CHAPTER 6

DATA ANALYSIS
AND
INTERPRATATIONS

FREQUENCY:

Page | 28

Gender
Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative
Percent

male

67

67.0

67.0

67.0

female

33

33.0

33.0

100.0

100

100.0

100.0

Total

Gender
150
100

100

Percent

67
33

50
0
male

female

Total

From the above table we can see that the questioner filled by 100 respondent. Questioner
filled by 67 male and 33 female respondents.
occupation
Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative
Percent

36

36.0

36.0

36.0

8.0

8.0

44.0

student

27

27.0

27.0

71.0

housewife

13

13.0

13.0

84.0

businessman

16

16.0

16.0

100.0

100

100.0

100.0

services
self-employed

Total

Occupation
40
30
20
10
0

36

27
8

13

16

Percent

Page | 29

By seeing the occupation table, we find out that from 100 respondent 36 are from service
sector, 8 are self employed, 27 are students, 13 housewives and16 are businessmen.

annual income
Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative
Percent

Valid

less than 100000

24

24.0

24.0

24.0

100000-200000

21

21.0

21.0

45.0

200000-300000

20

20.0

20.0

65.0

above 300000

35

35.0

35.0

100.0

100

100.0

100.0

Total

Annual income
less than 100000
100000-200000

24

35

200000-300000
above 300000

21

20

From the above annual income table we got the information that out of 100 respondent 24 are
those whose income less than 1 lakh, 21 are those whose income is between 1 lakh to 2
lakh,20 are those whose income is between 2 lakh to 3 lakh and remaining 35 respondents
income is above 3 lakh.

NO OF TV
Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative
Percent

Valid

60

60.0

60.0

60.0

28

28.0

28.0

88.0

3 or more

12

12.0

12.0

100.0

100

100.0

100.0

Total

Page | 30

No of TV
80
60

60

Percent

40

28
12

20
0
1

3 or more

You can see in the above table and you can find out that 60 respondent have 60 televisions in
their home, 28 respondent having 2 televisions and 12 respondents having 3 or more
television.

Latest brand of color TV


Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative
Percent

Valid

Samsung

16

16.0

16.0

16.0

LG

23

23.0

23.0

39.0

Sony

25

25.0

25.0

64.0

8.0

8.0

72.0

Videocon

12

12.0

12.0

84.0

others

16

16.0

16.0

100.0

100

100.0

100.0

Onida

Total

Latest colour TV
30
25
20
15
10
5
0

23

25

16
8

Samsung

LG

Sony

12

16

Percent

Onida Videocon others

Page | 31

Above table shows that 16 respondents having Samsung brands TV. 23,25,8 and 12
respondents having LG, Sony, Onida, Videocon brands TV respectively and remaining 16
prefer other brands TV. Table also gives information that most favorable brand is Sony and
LG. in our research we find out that out of 100 respondent 25 and 23 respondents prefer Sony
and LG respectively.

Latest type of colour TV


Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative
Percent

Valid

CRT

13

13.0

13.0

13.0

LCD

31

31.0

31.0

44.0

LED

42

42.0

42.0

86.0

Others

14

14.0

14.0

100.0

100

100.0

100.0

Total

Latest type of TV
60
31

40
20

42

Percent
14

13

0
CRT

LCD

LED

Others

By seeing the Latest type of color TV table we see that 13 respondent has CRT type of TV, 31
respondent having LCD and 42 respondent which is highest in our research having LED type
of TV and remaining 14 prefer other type of TV.
From where you come to know about this brand
Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative
Percent

Valid

advertisement

50

50.0

50.0

50.0

dealers suggestion

12

12.0

12.0

62.0

friends & relative

30

30.0

30.0

92.0

newspaper

4.0

4.0

96.0

internet

4.0

4.0

100.0

100

100.0

100.0

Total

Page | 32

From where you come to know about this brand


44
30

50

advertisement

dealers suggestion

friends & relative

newspaper

internet

12

Above table shows that from where respondent know about the brand. In the above table we
got the information that 50 respondent came to know about particular brand from advertising
which is highest in our research and 13, 30, 4, and 4 respondents know about the particular
brand from dealers suggestion, friends and relatives, news papers and internet respectively.
who influences you more to purchase the particular brand
Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative
Percent

wife/husband

12

12.0

12.0

12.0

friend /relative

25

25.0

25.0

37.0

son/daughter

19

19.0

19.0

56.0

parents

4.0

4.0

60.0

my self

40

40.0

40.0

100.0

100

100.0

100.0

Total

who influences you more to purchase the particular brand


wife/husband

friends&relative

12
40

25
4

19

son/daughter
parents
my self

Page | 33

Above table shows that who influences respondent more to purchase the particular brand and
in that we find out that the 40% respondent influence by them self which is highest in our
research.
12%, 25%, 19%, and 4% respondents are satisfied by their wife/husband, friends & relative,
son/daughter, parents.

CROSSTAB:
Latest brand of color TV * Latest type of color TV Cross tabulation
Count
Latest type of color TV
CRT
Latest brand of color TV

Samsung
LG
Sony
Onida
Videocon
others
Total

LCD

LED

Others

Total

11

16

4
0
3
0
6
13

16
2
1
8
0
31

3
23
4
0
1
42

0
0
0
4
9
14

23
25
8
12
16
100

In the above table we do cross tab of Latest type of color TV and Latest brand of color TV
and we got the information that respondents of Sony brand which is 25 among them 23
respondent of Sony prefer LED and 2 prefer LCD. In case of Onida 3 respondent prefer CRT,
1 respondent prefer LCD and 4 respondents prefer LED.
Size of Latest TV * Latest type of color TV Cross tabulation
Count
Latest type of color TV
CRT
Size of Latest TV

less than 20"


20" to 40"
30 to 40"
40" above
Total

LCD

3
10
0
0
13

LED

4
25
2
0
31

Others

0
12
22
8
42

Total

4
6
4
0
14

11
53
28
8
100

We
do
cross tab in
the above
table
of
Size
of
Latest TV
and Latest
Page | 34

type of color TV. By doing this we find out 11 respondents whose size of Latest TV is having
less than 20 among them 3 respondent have 3 CRT type of TV, 4 respondent have LCD and
0 respondent have LED and other 4 respondent prefer other kind of TV. 53 respondents
whose size of Latest TV is having 20" to 40" among them 10 respondent have 10 CRT type of
TV, 25 respondent have LCD and 12 respondents have LED and other 6 respondent prefer
other kind of TV. 28 respondents whose size of Latest TV is having 30 to 40" among them no
respondent have CRT type of TV, 2 respondent have LCD and 22 respondents have LED and
other 4 respondent prefer other kind of TV. Remaining 8 respondents whose TV size is 40"
above all are prefer LED.

ANOVA FOR AGE GROUP:


H0: There is no significant difference between satisfaction levels of TV brand among different
age groups.
H1: There is significant difference between satisfaction levels of TV brand among different
age groups
Descriptive
N
satisfied factor :price

20-25 years
25-30 years
30-35 years
35 and above years
Total

Design of TV

20-25 years
25-30 years
30-35 years
35 and above years
Total

Features

20-25 years
25-30 years
30-35 years
35 and above years
Total

promotional tool

20-25 years
25-30 years
30-35 years
35 and above years
Total

after sales services

20-25 years

Mean

36
16
19
29
100
36
16
19
29
100
36
16
19
29
100
36
16
19
29
100
36

4.08
4.19
4.21
4.38
4.21
4.22
3.69
4.05
4.34
4.14
4.36
4.06
3.58
4.21
4.12
3.22
3.63
3.47
3.10
3.30
3.92

Std. Deviation

.604
.544
.419
.677
.591
.422
1.078
.621
.670
.697
.487
1.124
.769
.774
.795
.681
1.025
.905
1.235
.969
.874
Page | 35

25-30 years
30-35 years
35 and above years
Total
sound quality

20-25 years
25-30 years
30-35 years
35 and above years
Total

picture quality

20-25 years
25-30 years
30-35 years
35 and above years
Total

guarantee

20-25 years
25-30 years
30-35 years
35 and above years
Total

E.M.I

20-25 years
25-30 years
30-35 years
35 and above years
Total

16
19
29
100
36
16
19
29
100
36
16
19
29
100
36
16
19
29
100
36
16
19
29
100

4.00
4.26
3.59
3.90
4.78
4.75
4.47
4.38
4.60
4.78
4.38
4.32
4.66
4.59
3.58
3.88
3.74
4.00
3.78
2.83
3.06
2.74
2.72
2.82

.816
.733
1.181
.959
.422
.577
.772
.820
.667
.422
.885
1.108
.670
.753
.806
.806
.653
.802
.786
1.082
.680
.806
.996
.947

ANOVA
Sum of Squares
satisfied factor

Between Groups

df

Mean Square

1.417

.472

33.173
34.590
4.881
43.159
48.040
7.927
54.633
62.560
3.601

96
99
3
96
99
3
96
99
3

.346

89.399
93.000

96
99

Sig.

Result

1.367

.258

Insignifica
nt

1.627
.450

3.619

.016

Significant

2.642
.569

4.643

.004

Significant

1.200

1.289

.283

Insignifica
nt

:price
Within Groups
Total
Design of TV

Between Groups
Within Groups
Total

Features

Between Groups
Within Groups
Total

promotional tool

Between Groups

Within Groups
Total

.931

Page | 36

after sales services

Between Groups

Within Groups
Total
sound quality

Between Groups

Within Groups
Total
picture quality

Between Groups

Within Groups
Total
guarantee

Between Groups

Within Groups
Total
E.M.I

Between Groups

Within Groups
Total

5.531

1.844

85.469
91.000
3.213

96
99
3

.890

40.787
44.000
3.561

96
99
3

52.629
56.190
2.976

96
99
3

.548

58.184
61.160
1.345

96
99
3

.606

87.415
88.760

96
99

.911

1.071

2.071

.109

Insignifica
nt

2.521

.062

Insignifica
nt

2.165

.097

Insignifica
nt

1.637

.186

Insignifica
nt

.492

.688

Insignifica
nt

.425
1.187

.992

.448

It is concluded from ANOVA test that out of 9 factors, factors which are design of TV,
Features, have significant difference among different age groups. The rest of the factors like
price, Promotional tools, after sales services, sound quality, picture quality, guarantee &
E.M.I which do not have difference among different age groups. This study has been
conducted at a significance level of 5%. So that, the study confirmed the fact that age of
consumer may affect buying behavior of color TV due to some of the factors those are written
above. Therefore, consumers are more focusing on design of TV, Features, quality of picture
during buying of color TV.
ANOVA FOR OCCUPATION
H0: There is no significant difference between satisfaction level of TV brand among different
Occupation.
H1: There is significant difference between satisfaction level of TV brand among different
Occupation.
Descriptive
N

Mean

Std.

Page | 37

Deviation
satisfied factor

services

:price

self-

36
8

4.33
4.25

.535
1.035

27
13
16

4.11
4.23
4.06

.698
.439
.250

100
36
8

4.21
4.11
4.25

.591
.785
1.035

27
13
16

4.30
4.15
3.88

.465
.376
.806

100
36
8

4.14
4.00
4.25

.697
.828
1.035

27
13
16

4.37
4.15
3.88

.492
.689
1.025

100
36
8

4.12
3.47
3.00

.795
.941
1.069

27
13
16

2.96
3.62
3.38

.587
1.387
1.025

100
36
8

3.30
3.94
3.88

.969
.715
1.553

27
13
16

3.89
3.85
3.88

1.013
1.345
.719

100
36

3.90
4.50

.959
.561

employed
student
housewife
businessma
n
Total
Design of TV

services
selfemployed
student
housewife
businessma
n
Total

Features

services
selfemployed
student
housewife
businessma
n
Total

promotional tool

services
selfemployed
student
housewife
businessma
n
Total

after sales services

services
selfemployed
student
housewife
businessma
n
Total

sound quality

services

Page | 38

self-

4.25

1.035

27
13
16

4.81
4.92
4.38

.396
.277
1.025

100
36
8

4.60
4.44
4.25

.667
.695
1.035

27
13
16

4.81
4.92
4.44

.396
.277
1.209

100
36
8

4.59
3.64
4.63

.753
.867
.518

27
13
16

3.44
4.31
3.81

.751
.480
.403

100
36
8

3.78
2.75
3.38

.786
.874
.744

27
13
16

2.78
3.08
2.56

1.155
1.038
.629

100

2.82

.947

employed
student
housewife
businessma
n
Total
picture quality

services
selfemployed
student
housewife
businessma
n
Total

guarantee

services
selfemployed
student
housewife
businessma
n
Total

E.M.I

services
selfemployed
student
housewife
businessma
n
Total

ANOVA
Sum of Squares
satisfied factor :price

Between Groups
Within Groups
Total

1.178
33.412
34.590

df

Mean Square

4
95
99

.295
.352

Page | 39

Design of TV

1.913
46.127
48.040
3.321
59.239
62.560
6.238
86.762
93.000
.127
90.873
91.000
4.753
39.247
44.000
4.866
51.324
56.190
13.106
48.054
61.160
4.608
84.152
88.760

Between Groups
Within Groups
Total

Features

Between Groups
Within Groups
Total

promotional tool

Between Groups
Within Groups
Total

after sales services

Between Groups
Within Groups
Total

sound quality

Between Groups
Within Groups
Total

picture quality

Between Groups
Within Groups
Total

guarantee

Between Groups
Within Groups
Total

E.M.I

Between Groups
Within Groups
Total

4
95
99
4
95
99
4
95
99
4
95
99
4
95
99
4
95
99
4
95
99
4
95
99

.478
.486
.830
.624
1.559
.913
.032
.957
1.188
.413
1.217
.540
3.277
.506
1.152
.886

ANOVA
Sum of

df

Mean Square

Sig.

Result

Squares
satisfied factor :price

Between

1.178

.295

33.412
34.590
1.913

95
99
4

.352

46.127
48.040
3.321

95
99
4

.486

59.239
62.560
6.238

95
99
4

.624

.837

.505 Insignificant

.985

.420

Insignificant

1.332

.264

Insignificant

1.708

.155

Insignificant

Groups
Within Groups
Total
Design of TV

Between

.478

Groups
Within Groups
Total
Features

Between

.830

Groups
Within Groups
Total
promotional tool

Between

1.559

Page | 40

Groups
Within Groups
Total
after sales services

Between

86.762
93.000
.127

95
99
4

.913

90.873
91.000
4.753

95
99
4

.957

39.247
44.000
4.866

95
99
4

51.324
56.190
13.106

95
99
4

48.054
61.160
4.608

95
99
4

84.152
88.760

95
99

.032

.033

.998

Insignificant

2.876

.027

significant

2.252

.069

Insignificant

6.477

.000

significant

1.300

.275

Insignificant

Groups
Within Groups
Total
sound quality

Between

1.188

Groups
Within Groups
Total
picture quality

Between

.413
1.217

Groups
Within Groups
Total
guarantee

Between

.540
3.277

Groups
Within Groups
Total
E.M.I

Between

.506
1.152

Groups
Within Groups
Total

.886

It is concluded from ANOVA test that following factors (in statement form) have significance
difference among different cities:
Sound quality
Guarantee
The rest of the factors like Design of TV, price, Features , Promotional tools, After sales
services, picture quality, & E.M.I which do not have difference among different Occupation
groups. This study has been conducted at a significance level of 5%. So that, the study
confirmed the fact that Occupation of consumer may affect buying behavior of color TV due
to some of the factors those are written above. Therefore, consumers are more focusing on
Sound quality, Features, Guarantee during buying of color TV.

Page | 41

Page | 42

CHAPTER 7
FINDINGS, SUGGESTION AND
CONCLUSION

SUMMARY
36% of respondents are falls under the age 20-25 years; it clearly says that youngsters have
too much attraction towards different color TV brands.
We found that most of the respondents are students and some of the them are service
holder, so here company can understand who are their customer so that they can make
strategy before producing the product and they can also get some information about
their customers preference and their needs.
We observed that around 21% respondents are having income of RS 100000-200000,
some respondents having more than that, so it is clear that the customers income is not
high so they cannot afford costly TV. Before making TV Company should consider
the income level of the customer and they should produce difference range of color
TV, so that everyone can afford it.
From the study it is revealed that most of the respondents are having Sony TV and LG
TV compare to other brand like Onida etc. This study clear says that most of
customers preference to buy SONY TV. So we can observe that in the market the
demand of the SONY TV is more than the other.
Page | 43

We found that 42% respondents are using LED color TV. So it is revealed that the
customers are more likely to purchase LED rather than CRT and LCD. By this
company can understand which type of TV customer would prefer.
From the data we found that majority of the respondents (53%) are using 20 30
color TV which clearly indicates that customer are more prefer medium size of color
TV rather than too much big and too small size.
60% and above respondents are having 1 TV in their home but 28% are having 2 TV
in their home and 12% are having 3 or more than 3, which shows that some family
prefer to use TV personally.
We found that 50% respondents came to know about the different brand of colour TV
through advertisement. So we can easily observe that advertisement is main source for
reaching to the customers. In rural area people are not able to access internet but
advertisement can reach everywhere.
From the data we observed that most of the respondents are influenced by their self
friends and relatives. 40% and 25% are influenced by their own self and friends &
relatives respectively.
From the study it is revealed that 78 % respondents are agree to recommend to other
about the color TV brand which are using. By this company will get get benefit,
because it us one of product promotion. So by giving good service to the customers
company would get benefit.
From the data we observed that 53% respondents are willing change the color TV
brand which are using presently. So we can observe that respondents would like to
buy another brand of color TV. It will increase the competition in the market among
the different TV brand. Mostly the Samsung users are willing to switch to other brand.
From the above study we found that mostly the respondents are more inclined towards
the Sony TV brand about their future purchase decision of color TV. So Sony color
TV brand is imposing threat to the other TV brand.

Page | 44

CONCLUSION
From this study we can conclude that Sony is the most popular brand of color TV, most of the
respondents are using Sony, whereas the popularity of LG brand of color TV is at least level
in Anand, Gujarat. We can also observe that youngsters are more attracted towards different
color TV brand as compared to middle age men. The people whose age between the 20-25
and 25-30 years they are more attracted. Advertisement is the most popular source for
reaching to the customers. People are more influenced by the advertisement as compared to
the other sources like, internet. The users of Videocon and Onida TV are decreasing, so they
need to improve their advertisement strategies in order promote their brands. Quality and
Features of color TV brand is very much important to attract the customers towards their
brand, because the customers prefer to buy quality product with good features. Some of the
customers look for brand name of the color TV and also some of them consider price of the
color TV brand. Here the income level of the customer is average. So they will prefer to buy
low cost color TV brand. Among the different types of color TV, the most of the respondents
are using LED color TV. Customers are more prefer to buy LED TV than LCD and CRT. The
size of color TV brand also attracts the customers because most of the respondents are using
20- 40. The Size of the color TV is very important, If the size of the color TV is big then it
will take too much space and it will too costly, these are the reason customers are prefer to
buy medium size TV which price is affordable to the customer. By this study we can know
that customers are more influenced by their friends and parents. Most of the users of color TV
Page | 45

brand have consulted with their friends or parents before purchased the color TV. Discount
offer is the most attracted scheme for attracting to the customer. Almost all of respondents are
satisfied with their present brand of colour TV model and service provided by them. Only
very few of them are not satisfied. Most of the Videocon/ Onida users would like to switch to
other brand, so its a big threat for Videocon/ Onida Colour TV brand. Most of respondents
are inclined towards the Sony colour TV brand for their future purchasing decision.

SUGGESTIONS
By this study we came know most of the respondents are having less income and
some of them are having high income. So different color TV Brand Company should
have different price range of TV, So that customers can buy the color TV as per their
affordability.
From this study we can know that Very less number of respondents is having
Videocon and Onida TV
By this study it is revealed that only very less of customers are using LCD/CRT TV.
So TV company should think about it, how to increase the sales of LCD/CRT TV.
They should why customers are not preferred to buy LCD/CRT TV. Price of the
LCD/CRT TV is one of the important for not attracting to customers.
Most of the Onida users would like switch over to the other brand in future. So it is a
big threat for Onida color TV Company. So they need to understand why customers
want to switch over to the other brand of color TV and also need to improve their
product qualities and features.
Most of the respondents are willing to incline to the Sony color TV brands. It is a not
good sign other brand of color TV. They need to know why customers are willing to
buy Sony color TV rather than other brand of color TV. So that they can improve their
product.
By this study it is revealed that majority of respondents purchased different color TV
brand because of discount offer. Now a days discount offer on the product is a
powerful weapon to attract the customers.
Page | 46

From this study we can observe that advertisement is most important medium for
reaching to the customers. So Onida and Videocon color TV brand should spent more
on advertising to increase the brand awareness and also to show to the customers
about the features of the color TV and to inform about newly launch product.
By this study it is revealed that most of the respondents are preferred to buy quality
products with good features. So color TV Company should improve their quality of
their product and also introduce a new feature in the color TV for competing with the
other color TV brands.

CHAPTER 8
REFERENCE AND ANNEXURE

Page | 47

REFERENCES

Phillip Kotler, Marketing Management, Pearson Education, 13th Ed, 2011, Page No
142-171.

Rajendra Nargundkar, Marketing Research, McGraw-Hill, 3 rd Ed, 2011, Page No 1997.

Samik Shome &Aindrila Roy,Online Discount Couponing Industry in India, Indian


Journal of Marketing, Page No 4-10, October, 2012.

Sunil Giri & Vishal Sharma, Food Products Packagings effect on Consumer
Behaviour, Indian Journal of Marketing, Page No 39-45, May, 2012.

Marketing management by Kotler, Philip, 12th edition


Consumer behaviour: concepts and application By Loudon.
Statistics for management by Levin and Rubin

Internet sources:
www.wikipedia.org
www.google.com

http://www.articlesnatch.com/topic/consumer+buying+behavio
r
www.televisionpoint.com
http://www.learnmarketing.net/consumer.htm

Page | 48

Annexure:
Questionnaire
Dear respondent,
We are the students of G.H. Patel Postgraduate of Institute of Business Management,
Sardar Patel University. We are conducting the research on CUSTOMER
SATISFACTION AND PREFERENCE OF COLOUR TV BRANDS IN ANAND for
academic purpose. We assure you that all the information provided by you will be kept
confidential.
1. How
a.
b.
c.

many TV set do you have in your home?


1
2
3 or more

2. Which latest Brand of color TV do you have? (Single Choice)


a. Samsung
b. LG
c. Sony
d. Onida
e. Videocon
f. Others (specify)
3. Which latest type of color TV do you have? (single choice)
a. CRT
b. LCD
c. LED
d. Others
4. Which size of latest TV do you have?
a. Less than 20
b. 20 to 30
c. 30 to 40
d. 40 above

5. From where you come to know about this Brand?


i) Advertisement

ii) Dealer s Suggestion

iii) Friends & Relatives

iv) Newspaper

v) Internet

Page | 49

6. Which factors did you consider while buying a TV? (Tick mark appropriate
option )

Sr
no

Particular

Price

Design of a TV

Features

Promotional tools

After Sales Service

Sound Quality

Picture Quality

Providing maximum
Guarantee Period
E.M.I

Most
Importan
t

Importan
t

Undecide
d

Unimportan
t

Least
Importan
t

7. Who influences you more to purchase the particular Brand?


i) Wife/Husband
iii) Son / Daughter

ii) Friends & Relative


iv) Parents

v) My self
8. What attracts you more? (Single Tick)
a. Free gift.
b. Discount off e r.
c. Exchange off er.

9. Are you satisfied with the service and after sales service?
a) Yes

b) No

10. Are you satisfied with the present brand or models (tick appropriate
choice)
Sr

Particular

Highly

Satisfied

Neutral

Dissatisfied

Highly

Page | 50

no

satisfied

Price

Design of a TV

Features

Promotional tools

After Sales Service

Sound Quality

Picture Quality

Providing maximum
Guarantee Period
E.M.I

dissatisfie
d

11. What are the possible reasons for your dissatisfaction?


a) Poor services

b) Poor Quality

c) Lack of Awareness

d) Model looks outdated.

e) Satisfied by the current product


f) Any Other __________________________________________
12. Would you like to recommend this to others you know?
a. Yes.
b. No.
c. Not sure

13. Would you like to replace your present brand of TV set with some other brand, if you get
a satisfactory exchange price for it?
a. Yes.
b. No.

14. If Q.13 is yes, then which brand of color TV you would like to buy?
i) Sony

ii) Samsung

iii) LG

iv) Onida

Page | 51

v) Videocon

vi) other (specify)

PERSONAL INFORMATION:1. Name :


2. Email ID:
3. Age

i) 20-25 years

ii) 25- 30 years

iii) 30-35years

iv) 35 and above years

4. Occupation :
i.
Service
ii.
Sel f-Employed
iii.
Student
iv.
Housewife
v.
Businessman
vi.
Others____________
5. What is
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.

your Annual Income?


Less than 100000
100000-200000
200000-300000
Above 300000

Page | 52