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Week 10 Reflection

Week 10 Reflection

Amy Chacon

EDUC 525 900

March 14, 2016

Week 10 Reflection

Using multi-media in designing an active training course had many facets that stood out
to me. One element that stood out the most was the benefits to using the DDD-E model when
creating a multimedia learning product. From the reading, and from the research experience, I
found that using the model can be a very powerful way of learning, while inspiring creativity
among students, enhancing social interactions, and testing technical skills (Ivers and Barron, p.
119).
Garners theory of multiple intelligences in the classroom also stood out to me. The
statements from the reading, from his book Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom, Armstrong
(2000), state that people possess 8 intelligences, and each can be developed to an adequate level
of competency, working together in complex ways; and there are many ways to be intelligent
within each category, stood out particularly. I find when working with adult learners that there
are times where the learner feels they only learn one way, or that the traditional classroom is the
only way they will effectively learn. Although everyone learns in a multitude of different ways,
at times, fear to try something new in the way of multimedia/technology usage can prevent the
learner from exploring learning experiences outside of their comfort zone or of their norm. I
found creating a multi-media project helped me to learn things in technology that I otherwise
would not have known. It forced positive social interaction, while the grouping helped me to rely
on my strengths individually, as well as the strengths of others; learning from each other along
the way; relating back to the benefits of the DDD-E model.
Sites that I had the opportunity to use and to create multi-media aspects of a design, were
simpler than I would have imagined, and extremely helpful. Using Jing for a screenshot was
easy, yet I can see the effectiveness in a design. For example, to create a job aid, or to help a

Week 10 Reflection

student that may learn best visually, to see a screen shot with an arrow pointing to the right path
would be helpful in my current facilitation. I will use this to create a job aid for learning our new
credit card application system. Using Audacity to do a voice over will also be something that I
can incorporate into my everyday facilitation and designs. This will greatly benefit those who
learn better when hearing in addition to reading content.
I have found during the span of this course that I have already begun to design projects
with an attempt to follow NET-S standards. Ensuring, as with the week 2 example of the student
multimedia science project, that the learning is interactive, has elements such as video, audio,
assessment, job aids, etc, and have, in my current role, added a blog and a feedback page using a
website to one of our courses instead of a standard, handwritten scorecard sheet. We are living in
a world where technology is rapidly changing, and students are using technology at home, and in
their personal lives every day. I have a 6 year-old that reads books using an I-Pad, and can
design, what he calls a castle on the popular game MineCraft, making it functional, and
explaining to me what par core means. Using NET-S standards, we can ensure that we are
keeping up with technology and meeting the demands of the learner. My son for example, can
pick up a paper/hardcover book, however, he is more likely to go to the IPad, and read. It is
preferred learning method using technology. We must keep up. The learning styles may stay the
same, spatial, kinesthetic, etc, but how we deliver the learning experience using technology will
help to determine if we can pique the interest of the technological learner.

Week 10 Reflection

References
Armstrong, T. (2000). Multiple intelligences in the classroom. Alexandria, VA: Association for
Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Ivers, K. S., & Barron, A. E. (2006). Multimedia projects in education: Designing, producing,
and assessing (3rd ed.). Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited.