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Name of Lesson: What is Advocacy?

Counselor: Breanna Butler


UNIT/TOPIC:
(If unit, note how
many lessons in unit):

Unit: Self advocacy


Topic: Self Advocacy (7 of 8)

DOMAIN:
(academic, career,
personal/social)

Social

GRADE LEVEL(S):

9-12

GUIDANCE
STANDARD(S):
ASCA Standards
Addressed:

Demonstrate social maturity and behaviors appropriate to the situation and


environment
Demonstrate advocacy skills and ability to assert self, when necessary
Demonstrate empathy
Use effective oral and written communication skills and listening skills

INDIANA STANDARDS
ADDRESSED:
*If this lesson is
crosswalked with other
academic areas, please
list here.

Applies effective communication skills in school, life, and career settings.


Demonstrates care and ethical responsibility to peers, teachers, and school
community.
Demonstrates a respect for multiple perspectives;
*English; students can create journal entries to all discussion questions

DIFFERENTIATED
INSTRUCTION
STRATEGIES:

n/a

DEVELOPMENTAL
ASSET(S)
ADDRESSED: This
section only needs
completed if you have
taken ED 671

Caring school climate, positive peer influence, caring, equality and social
justice,

SCHOOL
IMPROVEMENT
GOAL(S): This section
only needs completed if
you have taken ED 671

provide a customized 21st century learning experience that


insures maximum student growth leading to productive citizenship
in the world community

LEARNING
OBJECTIVES

TIME REQUIRED
MATERIALS NEEDED

SWBAT
demonstrate empathy
define advocacy
express various communities or types of individuals that can benefit from
advocacy
describe self-advocacy
verbalize the importance of advocacy
50m
Marker, dry erase board (all materials optional)

ACTIVITY SUMMARY

Greetings
Review Group norms
Facilitate group discussion

1. Review group norms (marker and dry erase board can be used to
write group norms)
2. What does it mean to be an advocate? A person who speaks or
writes in support or defense of a person, cause, etc. (usually
followed by of): an advocate of peace.
a. What kind of people can be advocates?
b. Who needs to be advocated for?
c. Name examples of times an advocate can be necessary?
d. Name people who advocate for you? Parents, friends, teachers,
counselors.
e. Do you advocate for you? When? Why? Why not?
f. Talk about a time when you wanted someone to have your back
or support you?
3. Closing

PROCEDURE

EVALUATION:
What data will you
collect and How will
you collect data to
show:
Post Unit Questionnaire
1. impact on K-12
students
2. feedback on
lesson

FOLLOW-UP PLAN:

Have a closing discussion with students at the end of the semester.

CITATION(S)
References/Resources
Used:
Cite copyrighted
materials, but do not
reproduce copyrighted
materials in your lesson
plan. Non-copyrighted
materials must be
reproduced and
included in your lesson
plan.

n/a