NEIGHBORHOOD IMPLICATIONS FOR THE BALTIMORE RED LINE

COMMUNITIES

Presented by: Tracee Strum-Gilliam, AICP
National Environmental Justice Conference
March 9, 2016
Howard University

Traceé Strum-Gilliam, AICP
National Environmental Justice Practice Lead

Parsons Brinckerhof
20 Years Experience




LA Congestion Pricing Plan
Corridor Cities Transitway
Baltimore Red Line Transit
Study
I-270 / US 15 Multi-Modal
Corridor Study

NEPA Practitioner
Environmental Justice
Analysis and Outreach
Specialist
Member TRB Committee
on Environmental Justice
Member TRB SubCommittee on Community
Impact Assessment

Project Background

The Baltimore Red Line (BRL) Corridor highest priority corridor within Baltimore
Region for potential transit improvements.

Identified and prioritized in 2002 Baltimore
Region Rail System Plan.

6 lines
Access to jobs, education, shopping, recreation,
and medical care.

Purpose and Need:
Improve transit mobility, help relieve
congestion, and support economic development
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Project Goals and Benefits

Encourage transit ridership.

Improve transit service (including connections) for
transit-dependent users and others who choose to
use transit as an option.

Support community revitalization and economic
development.

Address air quality issues and environmental
stewardship.

Minimize impacts to the natural and human
environment.

Project Goals and Benefits

Improve east-west public transit for Baltimore City
and Baltimore County residential neighborhoods
Provide connections to existing Metro, Light Rail
and MARC stations
Better connectivity to leisure activity points of
interest





Oriole Park at Camden Yards,
M&T Bank Stadium,
Inner Harbor,
Fells Point,
Canton areas, and
Hippodrome Theater.

Increase transit mobility, efficiency and
accessibility
Reduce transit travel times in the corridor

Project Overview





October 2008
Alternative Analysis/Draft
Environmental
Impact Statement (DEIS)
released for public comment
November 2008
Public hearings completed
January 2009
Public comment period
closed for DEIS
August 2009
Governor O’Malley
recommended the
Locally Preferred
Alternative
July 2011
Preliminary Engineering &
Final
Environmental
Impact Statement (FEIS)
February 2013
Record of Decision
July 2013
2015

Final Design
Begin Construction

Alignment

The Red Line Corridor Transit Study Engaged
Minority & Low-Income Neighborhoods


Impacted Several Minority and Lowincome Neighborhoods
Opposition was at a boiling point
Strategic Recommendations
included:


“Walk Through” Visualization Simulations
Small Group Meeting (Perceived Impacts
vs. Actual Concerns)

Locally Preferred Alternative was
Selected in August 2009
Preferred Alternative Assessed in
2012 FEIS
Community Compact
Community Liaisons and Advisory
Committees
Competed for Federal Funding with
Full Support from Community and
Elected Officials

Baltimore Red Line A “Grassroots”
Outreach Approach

Grassroots Outreach
Strategies




Walking Tours
Door-to-Door Outreach
Transit Center Outreach
Transit Card Stations and
Offices
Programs for Seniors and LEP
Populations
School-age Outreach

Press Kits/Newsletters
Material Development

Pens, Shirts, Sticker, Bags
Branding

CommunityJobsCompact

Workforce Development
Strategy/Internship
 DBE Outreach
Environment
 Sustainability goals incorporated in
design criteria
 LEED Silver facilities
 Green track
 Pedestrian and bike access
Station Area Planning
 Station Area Advisory Committees
 Community Liaisons
Manage Impacts
 Alignment refinements
 Pre-construction piloting of
communications strategies

Station Area Advisory Committees

Commitment under Community
Compact
17 committees covering 20
stations
More than 250 members; selfnominated and selected by
City/MTA panel
Scope of work




Station area vision
Platform locations
Priorities for station access routes
Urban design
Sustainability features

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