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Metallic mineral deposits can contain materials such as, lead, zinc, iron, gold,

silver, and even indium.

Non-metallic mineral deposits can contain minerals such as Marble,


granite, sandstone, porphyry, basalt, other ornamental or building
stone (excluding slate);

Chalk and dolomite;

Limestone and gypsum;

Slate;

Chemical and fertilizer minerals;

Salt;

Clays and kaolin;

Sand and gravel; and

Excavated earthen materials.


Being metallic resources these elements are melt able which gives them the
ability to be melted and formed into items used for construction, and in older
days non-metallic resources were used to make weapons. So the most major
difference between metallic and non-metallic mineral resources is the fact
that metallic mineral resources are pliable. If you compare iron and sulfur
you may find a different use for both of them. Iron of course would be made
into something as stated before, but sulfur is actually quite useful. Sulfur is
used in matches, but is most popular for its for its use as a hardening
component to rubber. Non-metallic mineral resources are usually found
deeper in the ground than metallic mineral resources
A raw material qualifying as a 'mineral resource' is a concentration or
occurrence of material of economic interest in or on the earth's crust in such
form, quality and quantity that there are reasonable prospects for eventual
economic extraction. Examples include:

Marble, granite, sandstone, porphyry, basalt, other ornamental or


building stone (excluding slate);

Chalk and dolomite;

Limestone and gypsum;

Slate;

Chemical and fertilizer minerals;

Salt;

Clays and kaolin;

Sand and gravel; and

Excavated earthen materials.