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#MSUMRW16

MAKING RELATIONSHIPS WORK: A SUMMIT ON BLACK MALE ACADEMIC SUCCESS AND INCLUSION

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY | College of Education

MESSAGE FROM MSU PROVOST


I want to extend a warm welcome to all attendees of the Summit on Black Male Academic Success
and Inclusion. Michigan State University is very proud to be hosting this important event. We have
many students and faculty to thank for the planning and outreach involved in creating this summit.
Particularly noteworthy is the coming together of the campus and the local communities.
The relationships built in the process of planning this summit; those which will be built during
the summit; and those which will continue to grow following the summit, through ongoing
conversations and initiatives, focus on the academic success and inclusion of Black males. None of
us succeed alone; all of us succeed in community. Thank you for celebrating Black males for the
important roles they play in our communities. Thank you also for helping to foster the academic
success of our current and future Spartans.
Sincerely,
June Pierce Youatt
Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs

M E S S AG E F R O M T E D E PA R T M E N T C H A I R
Todays Black Male Summit is an important event aimed not only at acknowledging the need to
bolster the inclusion of young Black men in our nations schools and colleges but also at providing
a forum for sharing resources and strategies for accomplishing this goal. Framing this event as
about relationship building signifies the universal importance within education of the critical
connections to be made between student and teacher/professor. Relationship building is doubly
important in cases where the student is a young Black man who, for a variety of reasons, may not
find classrooms to be hospitable spaces.
I congratulate the three scholars from the Department of Teacher EducationDorinda Carter
Andrews, Terry Flennaugh, and Chezare A. Warrenwho developed the idea for this event and
secured funding to support it. As one of the sponsors of this event, the Department of Teacher
Education is proud to call these three professors our colleagues. We are grateful to them for investing
their energies and skills in bringing this event to fruition.
I am sorry that I cannot be with you today, but applaud your investment of time, caring, and
commitment to developing strategies for advancing the academic success of the young Black
men whose present and future contributions are essential to building more just and inclusive
communities.
Best,

Margaret S. Crocco, Ph.D.


Professor and Chairperson, Department of Teacher Education
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MAKING RELATIONSHIPS WORK: A SUMMIT ON BLACK MALE ACADEMIC SUCCESS AND INCLUSION

EVENT PURPOSE

Research in both P-12 school settings and higher education report greater student outcomes and improved
academic efficacy for Black males when they have strong, productive interpersonal connections with multiple
school stakeholders including peers, faculty, staff, and administrators (Carter Andrews, 2015; Cothran,
Kulinna, & Garrahy, 2003; Fergus, Noguera, & Martin, 2014; Flennaugh, 2015; Harper & Associates,
2014; Harper & Associates, 2014; Roderick, 2003; Strayhorn, 2008; Warren, 2015). Discussion centered on
developing and maintaining stakeholder relationships with Black male students is too often un(der)addressed
in conversations aimed at improving their achievement in school and sense of belonging. This includes
focused strategic planning and trans-contextual collaborations meant to develop the capacity of institutional
actors to establish environments that reduce threats to Black male academic success and inclusion. This
day-long summit brings together students, P-12 and postsecondary educational practitioners, community
stakeholders, academic professionals, and university faculty to interrogate the significance of interpersonal
relationships with Black male students, and strategies to cultivate those relationships across the P-20
educational pipeline.
This convening aims to provide multiple school stakeholders (i.e. faculty or teachers, professional staff such
as social workers, counselors, college advisors and student affairs professionals, and P-12 and university
administrators) with the practical knowledge and intellectual perspectives needed to develop approaches
for building and maintaining interpersonal relationships with Black male students and families. Our hope
is that the summit will lead to institutional practices that ultimately increase instances of Black males
success in school, broadly conceived, and affirmation of these young mens cultural brilliance in the
educational environment. Finally, we anticipate the summit will facilitate mentorship and relationshipbuilding opportunities between Black undergraduate men attending Michigan State and Black male students
attending local middle and high schools.

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CONVENERS

Chezare A. Warren, Ph.D.


Assistant Professor
Department of Teacher Education
Summit Chair

Dorinda Carter Andrews, Ed.D.


Associate Professor
Department of Teacher Education
Summit Co-Chair

Terry Flennaugh, Ph.D.


Assistant Professor
Department of Teacher Education
Summit Co-Chair

Chezare Warrens research interests


include urban teacher preparation,
culturally responsive teaching, and critical
race theory in education. He has studied
the utility of empathy for White female
teachers cross-cultural interactions with
Black boyswork for which he received
the 2014 Outstanding Dissertation
Award from the American Association for
Colleges of Teacher Education (AACTE).
Currently, he is looking to examine the
school conditions and teacher dispositions
that produce high academic outcomes for
students of color, particularly Black males
in K-12 education contexts.

Dorinda Carter Andrews is an associate


professor of race, culture and equity in
the Department of Teacher Education.
She is also a core faculty member in the
African American and African Studies
Program and co-director of the Graduate
Urban Education Certificate Program.
Her teaching and research focus on race
and equity in education, urban teacher
preparation and identity development,
Black student racial and achievement
ideologies, and critical race praxis with
in-service educators. She utilizes qualitative
methodologies and critical theories to
inform her work. Carter Andrews is coeditor of Contesting the Myth of a PostRacial Era: The Continued Significance
of Race in U.S. Education (2013) and
is a 2014 recipient of the Early Career
Contribution Award from the Committee
on Scholars of Color in Education of
the American Educational Research
Association. She has given two TEDx talks,
The Consciousness Gap in Education
and Teach Kids to be Eagles.

As the coordinator of urban education


initiatives for the College of Education,
Terry Flennaugh specializes in race, culture
and equity in education. His research
focuses primarily on the educational
experiences of Black males and other
students of color in urban contexts.
Utilizing both qualitative and quantitative
methodologies, he examines the sensemaking processes involved in constructing
identities that lead to high academic
performance in urban schools. He also
studies issues of educational access and
equity for communities of color in addition
to single-sex educational spaces for urban
youth.

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MAKING RELATIONSHIPS WORK: A SUMMIT ON BLACK MALE ACADEMIC SUCCESS AND INCLUSION

MESSAGE FROM SUMMIT CONVENERS


Greetings! It is our pleasure to welcome you to the College of Education at Michigan State University
(MSU). Thank you for joining us for what should be an exciting and engaging conference on Making
Relationships Work to support and improve the academic success and inclusion of Black men and boys across
the P-20 pipeline. There are few issues as critical in todays P-12 schools, colleges and universities than
the fight for racial equity, justice, and inclusion. In the last year we have witnessed many acts of resistance
broadcast around the country as young people actively oppose long-standing institutional racism and
oppression. This struggle is not theirs alone. Efforts to establish learning environments that affirm youth
of color, and Black males in particular, require the collective participation of multiple stakeholders. We are
ecstatic you have chosen to invest in this cause.
Those of you who are parents, education practitioners, faculty members, mentors, administrators, clergy,
and/or concerned community members who may work at MSU, in government agencies, local P-12
school districts, or higher education are likely here because of an active interest in disrupting the forces
that marginalize young Black men and boys in school. Relationship building does not end in elementary,
middle, or high school. Relationships matter regardless of the education level; they just take different forms
as Black boys develop into young Black men. Additionally, if you are a Black male student, you are likely
here to acquire and share strategies for cultivating strong interpersonal relationships with the adults who
interact with you every day. This convening is intended to help each attendee understand the utility for, and
approaches to, building and sustaining high-quality interpersonal relationships that lead to greater incidences
of Black male academic success and inclusion.
We have brought in experts from around the country to help facilitate a dialogue that builds on cutting
edge research, the best practices of educators, and the strengths of Black male students and collegians.
Your participation in that dialogue stands to make the greatest contribution as we collaborate to transform
discussion into action. We hope you leave reinvigorated, well-informed, and equipped with strategies to be
more effective in creating an environment in your local education institutions conducive for relationship
building with and amongst young Black men and boys. High-quality interpersonal relationships help chart a
course for their continuous success in school and beyond. If not us, who? If not now, when? Each of us has
a role in making our schools more humane places for every young person who enters the doors. Thank you
for your ongoing commitment and active engagement in this work.
Make new friends and dont forget to tweet your learning today using the hashtag #MSUMRW16
Warm Regards,
Chezare A. Warren, PhD, Assistant Professor
Dorinda Carter Andrews, EdD, Associate Professor
Terry Flennaugh, PhD, Assistant Professor & Coordinator of Urban Education Initiatives
Department of Teacher Education
College of Education
Michigan State University

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SUMMIT SCHEDULE
8:00 a.m.
Registration & Continental Breakfast

Erickson Hall
Lobby & Kiva Foyer
8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.
Welcome and Summit Overview
Erickson Kiva
9:15 a.m. 10:20 a.m.
Focus Group Viewings
Erickson Kiva
10:30 a.m. 11:20 a.m.
Breakout Session 1
Erickson Classrooms
11:30 a.m. 12:20 p.m.
Breakout Session 2
Erickson Classrooms

Lunch and Keynote Student Panel


Erickson Kiva
Box lunches provided outside of Spartys
12:30 - 2:00 p.m.
2:10 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Breakout Session 3
Erickson Classrooms
3:15 p.m. 4:30 p.m.
Debriefing and Action Planning
Erickson Kiva
4:30 p.m. 5:00 p.m.
Summit Closing Session
Erickson Kiva
4:45 p.m. 6:00 p.m.
Summit Resource Fair
Erickson Lobby
5:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m.

Reception for Black Men and Boys


Erickson Room 252

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MAKING RELATIONSHIPS WORK: A SUMMIT ON BLACK MALE ACADEMIC SUCCESS AND INCLUSION

K-1 2 ST U D E N T T R AC K S C H E D U L E
8 a.m. 9:00 a.m.
Registration & Continental Breakfast

Erickson Hall
Lobby & Kiva Foyer
8:30 a.m. 9:00 a.m.
Welcome and Summit Overview
Erickson Kiva
9:10 a.m. 9:50 a.m.

Session 1

10:00 a.m. 10:40 a.m.

Session 2

10:50 a.m. 11:30 a.m.

Session 3

11:40 a.m. 12:20 p.m.

Session 4

Lunch and Keynote Student Panel


Erickson Kiva
Box lunches provided outside of Spartys
2:10 p.m. 3:00 p.m.

Real Talk: Candid Conversations with Men of MSU

3:15 p.m. 4:30 p.m.


Debriefing and Action Planning
Erickson Kiva
4:30 p.m. 5:00 p.m.
Summit Closing
Erickson Kiva
4:45 p.m. 6:00 p.m.
Summit Resource Fair
Erickson Lobby
5:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m.

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Reception for Black Men and Boys


Erickson Room 252

MAKING RELATIONSHIPS WORK: A SUMMIT ON BLACK MALE ACADEMIC SUCCESS AND INCLUSION

SESSION DESCRIPTIONS
Session Title:

So whats your secret? Exploring the impact of a living-learning community


centered on Black college men
Session Description
Developed in the 1920s, living-learning (L/L) communities quickly emerged as a popular approach for
fostering a sense of connectedness on college and university campuses, facilitating structured interactions
among faculty and peers, integrating academic and non-academic spheres of college life, and creating a
more seamless higher education experience overall. Today it is estimated that more than 600 living-learning
programs exist in American higher education. This interactive session will explore the Huntley House
for African American Men, an emerging L/L program model focused on the racialized and gendered
experiences of males at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities.
Session Title:

Men in Black: Learning from African American Undergraduate Narratives about


Manhood
Session Description
The presenter will share findings from several interrelated studies investigating how Black undergraduate
men define manhood and the collegiate role in this process. At the forefront of this research is a multiinstitutional qualitative study of 24 African American males enrolled in 12 colleges, both historically Black
and historically White institutions. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the presentation draws upon
perspectives in history, Black studies, gender studies, sociology, cultural studies, psychology, and anthropology.
The sessions aim is to stimulate ideas about equitable collegiate policy and practice that derive from Black
undergraduate mens narratives about what it means to be a man. Further, the presenter will discuss the role
of intersecting systems of oppression on practitioner work with Black male college students. In support of
these efforts, the presenter will use reflective questions to promote engagement and dialogue.
Session Title

Can You Help Me? Exploring the development of authentic relationships with
Black males that promote and facilitate their academic and socio-emotional
success.
Session Description
The K-12 schooling experiences of Black males are often characterized as a pipeline to prison. Black males
are suspended and expelled from school at higher rates than any other racial group. The failures that Black
males face in K-12 schools limit their opportunities as adults to become active participants in the workforce;
instead many become participants in crime, unemployment, and the criminal justice system. This session will
explore how a middle and high school in Detroit uses authentic relationship building, restorative practices,
and academic mentoring to cultivate a positive and academically enriching schooling experience for Black
males; and how these strategies are working to decrease the discipline referral, suspension, and expulsion
rates of Black males at this school.

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SESSION DESCRIPTIONS CONTINUED

Session Title

Relational Teaching with Black Boys: Key Strategies for Learning


Session Description
To challenge deficit-oriented perspectives of Black boys as largely independent and nonrelational, this
workshop entails: (1) a brief presentation of evidence-based relational teaching strategies, designed to
facilitate positive learning relationships among early-adolescent Black boys and their schoolteachers; and
(2) small group and whole group discussion of the application of these strategies with specific boys at the
respective schools of workshop attendees. The goal is to assist teachers and other school professionals with
the effective use of these relational strategies, with implications for boys academic performance and overall
school engagement.
Session Title

Learning and Literacy for All: Lessons from Hip-Hop Culture


Session Description
This interactive session provides an overview of how hip-hop culture can be used as a basis for learning and
healthy classroom environments, particularly for young Black adolescents and men in schools. The session
will probe deeper than rap music by touching on affect, sampling, and other aesthetic practices that run
through hip-hop expressions. Attendees can expect to leave the session with practical ideas about how to start
leveraging hip-hop culture for a more healthy and inclusive learning environment.
Session Title

Developing Relationships is the Key to Success: How the Todd A. Bell National
Resource Center on the African American Male Fosters Students Personal and
Academic Success
Session Description
The Todd A. Bell National Resource Center on the African American Male (BNRC) hosts annual programs
for African American male students at the Ohio State University to establish relationships with faculty,
staff, and current students and to enhance the students connectedness to the university. The interactive
presentation will focus on several programs (Early Arrival Program, Success Coaching, Leadership Institute)
implemented by the BNRC that impacts the retention, graduation rates, and increased sense of community
amongst undergraduate African American male students. Strategies to increase engagement between
universities and African American male students will be discussed.
Session Title

Examining contemporary youth literacies across listening-party interviews:


Enacting participatory research with Black male youth
Session Description
This interactive workshop session focuses on enacting participatory research roles with Black male youth
to examine contemporary youth literacies, and consider possibilities for co-designing culturally affirming
classroom and school environments. Enacting participatory research roles will involve calling forth,
analyzing, interpreting, and sharing literacy practices in listening-party interviews as research practices, to
demonstrate participatory approaches to establishing and maintaining stakeholder relationships with Black
male youth that assert young mens participatory roles as contributors in schools and communities.

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1 0 : 3 0 A . M . 1 1 : 2 0 A . M . B R E A K O U T S E S S I O N : O N E

A) Session Title:

So whats your secret? Exploring the impact of a living-learning community


centered on Black college men
Presenter: Mr. Mauriell Amechi
Room - Erickson Room 107

Session Objective(s):
Understand the history of and contemporary models for living-learning programs in American
higher education
Work in diverse teams to discuss and develop concepts for infusing relationship-building into
existing/new programs
Learn general strategies for developing positive relationships with and creating inclusive
educational spaces for Black college men
Primary Audience: Postsecondary
B) Session Title:

Examining contemporary youth literacies across listening-party interviews:


Enacting participatory research with Black male youth
Presenter: Dr. Vaughn Watson
Room - Erickson Room 109

Session Objective(s):
Discuss the contributions of participatory research roles and contemporary youth literacies in
creating culturally affirming classroom and school environments
Describe how to enact strategies, approaches, and perspectives to establish and maintain
stakeholder relationships with Black male youth that assert young mens roles as participants
and contributors across academic communities
Primary Audience: K 12th grade
C) Session Title:

Learning and Literacy for All: Lessons from Hip-Hop Culture


Presenter: Dr. Emery Petchauer
Room - Erickson Room 111

Session Objective(s):
Describe an overview of hip-hop culture as a basis for learning and healthy classroom
environments
Primary Audience: K 12th grade
D) Session Title:

Relational Teaching with Black Boys: Key Strategies for Learning


Presenter: Dr. Joseph Nelson
Room - Erickson Room 113

Session Objective(s):
Describe how negative stereotypes of Black males obscures teachers ability to see them as
relational beings, and thus compel practitioners to deemphasize fostering a positive learning
relationship with their Black male students
Broaden participant toolkit of relational teaching strategies with early-adolescent and
adolescent Black male students
Primary Audience: 3rd 8th grade
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1 1 : 3 0 A . M . 1 2 : 2 0 P. M . B R E A K O U T S E S S I O N : T W O
A) Session Title:

Examining contemporary youth literacies across listening-party interviews:


Enacting participatory research with Black male youth
Presenter: Dr. Vaughn Watson
Room - Erickson Room 109

Session Objective(s):
Discuss the contributions of participatory research roles and contemporary youth literacies in
creating culturally affirming classroom and school environments
Describe how to enact strategies, approaches, and perspectives to establish and maintain
stakeholder relationships with Black male youth that assert young mens roles as participants
and contributors across academic communities
Primary Audience: K 12th grade
B) Session Title:

Relational Teaching with Black Boys: Key Strategies for Learning


Presenter: Dr. Joseph Nelson
Room - Erickson Room 113

Session Objective(s):
Describe how negative stereotypes of Black males obscures teachers ability to see them as
relational beings, and thus compel practitioners to deemphasize fostering a positive learning
relationship with their Black male students
Broaden participant toolkit of relational teaching strategies with early-adolescent and
adolescent Black male students
Primary Audience: 3rd 8th grade
C) Session Title:

Developing Relationships is the Key to Success: How the Todd A. Bell


National Resource Center on the African American Male Fosters Students
Personal and Academic Success
Presenter: Mr. Daniel Thomas
Room - Erickson Room 111

Session Objective(s):
Identify strategies for becoming more actively involved with undergraduate African American
males at their college/institution
Identify strategies for integrating programs which provide African American male students the
confidence and skillset to be successful at a predominately white institution
Primary Audience: Postsecondary

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D) Session Title:

Can You Help Me? Exploring the development of authentic relationships


with Black males that promote and facilitate their academic and socioemotional success.
Presenter: Dr. Curtis Lewis
Room - Erickson Room 133D

Session Objective(s):
Participants will learn how to use restorative practices to cultivate positive relationships with
middle and high school Black males
Participants will leave with strategies that can be used to create, cultivate, and sustain authentic
relationships with Black males
Primary Audience: K 12th grade
E) Session Title:

Men in Black: Learning from African American Undergraduate Narratives


about Manhood
Presenter: Dr. T. Elon Dancy
Room - Erickson Room 133E

Session Objective(s):
The sessions aim is to stimulate ideas about equitable collegiate policy and practice that derive
from Black undergraduate mens narratives about what it means to be a man
Primary Audience: Postsecondary

2 : 1 0 P. M . 3 : 0 0 P . M .
A) Session Title:

B R E A KO U T S E S S I O N : T H R E E

So whats your secret? Exploring the impact of a living-learning community


centered on Black college men
Presenter: Mr. Mauriell Amechi
Room - Erickson Room 107

Session Objective(s):
Understand the history of and contemporary models for living-learning programs in American
higher education
Work in diverse teams to discuss and develop concepts for infusing relationship-building into
existing/new programs
Learn general strategies for developing positive relationships with and creating inclusive
educational spaces for Black college men
Primary Audience: Postsecondary
B) Session Title:

Learning and Literacy for All: Lessons from Hip-Hop Culture


Presenter: Dr. Emery Petchauer
Room - Erickson Room 111

Session Objective(s):
Describe an overview of hip-hop culture as a basis for learning and healthy classroom
environments
Primary Audience: K 12th grade
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B R E A KO U T S E S S I O N : T H R E E CO N T I N U E D

C) Session Title:

Developing Relationships is the Key to Success: How the Todd A. Bell


National Resource Center on the African American Male Fosters Students
Personal and Academic Success
Presenter: Mr. Daniel Thomas
Room - Erickson Room 113

Session Objective(s):
Identify strategies for becoming more actively involved with undergraduate African American
males at their college/institution
Identify strategies for integrating programs which provide African American male students the
confidence and skillset to be successful at a predominately white institution
Primary Audience: Postsecondary
D) Session Title:

Can You Help Me? Exploring the development of authentic relationships


with Black males that promote and facilitate their academic and socioemotional success.
Presenter: Dr. Curtis Lewis
Room - Erickson Room 133D

Session Objective(s):
Participants will learn how to use restorative practices to cultivate positive relationships with
middle and high school Black males
Participants will leave with strategies that can be used to create, cultivate, and sustain authentic
relationships with Black males
Primary Audience: K 12th grade
E) Session Title:

Men in Black: Learning from African American Undergraduate Narratives


about Manhood
Presenter: Dr. T. Elon Dancy
Room - Erickson Room 133E

Session Objective(s):
The sessions aim is to stimulate ideas about equitable collegiate policy and practice that derive
from Black undergraduate mens narratives about what it means to be a man
Primary Audience: Postsecondary

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B R E A KO U T S E S S I O N S P E A K E R B I O G R A P H I E S
MR. MAURIELL AMECHI

Mauriell H. Amechi is the inaugural director of the Community Outreach, Retention, and
Engagement (CORE) Program at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities. In this role, he
coordinates the Huntley House for African American Men, a living-learning community
that supports 15 first-year students each academic year with the objective of creating a sense
of belonging and facilitating opportunities for personal and academic growth. An emerging
scholar-practitioner in higher education, his research agenda spans three areas: (1) the
stratification of college opportunity for foster youth and other underrepresented populations,
(2) the role of school counseling and student support programs in postsecondary access,
retention and completion, and (3) campus climate issues. Amechis most recent publication
appears in the edited volume, Advancing Black male student success from preschool through
Ph.D. A native of Chicago and Ph.D. candidate at UW-Madison, Amechi received his B.A.
from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and M.A. in higher education and
student affairs from the Ohio State University.

DR. T. ELON DANCY


T. Elon Dancy II is an associate professor of Adult and Higher Education and a faculty
fellow in the Office of Senior Vice President and Provost at the University of Oklahoma in
Norman. He holds affiliate faculty appointments in African & African American Studies,
Womens & Gender Studies, and the OU Center for Social Justice. An education sociologist,
Dr. Dancy studies the relationship between college experience and identity development.
With nearly 70 publications to his credit, he is author or editor of five books, including The
Brother Code: Manhood and Masculinity among African American Males in College and
Black Male Collegians: Increasing Access, Retention and Persistence in Higher Education.
Dr. Dancy is past editor of the College Student Affairs Journal. In 2014, Diverse Issues
in Higher Education Magazine named him Top Emerging Scholar for his study of
underrepresented students and campus diversity. Dr. Dancys research on males of color
and academic outcomes has been supported by a number of funding agencies including the
National Science Foundation.

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DR. CURTIS LEWIS

Dr. Lewis is principal of Henry Ford Academy: School for Creative Studies, a college prep
middle/high school located in the heart of Detroit. He was also the founding principal
of Henry Ford Academy: Elementary School located in the Boston Edison community in
Detroit. An accomplished urban educator, Dr. Lewis taught as a fifth grade teacher, middle
school math teacher, and an alternative education teacher at the secondary level. Dr. Lewis
has presented his research findings in urban education at a host of conferences, most notably
the American Education Research Association and Piaget Society Conference. Prior to
his principalship at the Henry Ford Academies, he was manager of teacher leadership
development for Teach For America for which he received the Core Value Team award for
his unwavering commitment to effectively developing young educators. In 2013 Dr. Lewis
was recognized by the Michigan Chronicles 40 Under 40 and was recently selected to the
third cohort of the nationally recognized America Achieves Fellowship for Teachers and
Principals. He is also the author of a chapter in the book Mentoring African American
Males: A Research Design Comparison Perspective, which was published in 2014.

DR. JOSEPH NELSON

Joseph Derrick Nelson is a visiting assistant professor of educational studies at Swarthmore


College, and a senior research fellow with the Center for the Study of Boys and Girls Lives
at the University of Pennsylvania. A sociologist of education, school ethnographer, and
teacher educator, his scholarship to date has examined how school culture influences boys
identities; fostered their resistance to rigid gender norms; and employed interdisciplinary
frameworks to address how schools limit boys engagement in elementary school settings.
These projects led to publications with Teachers College Record, Harvard Educational
Review, the Psychology of Men and Masculinity, and co-editing a special issue on boys
education with the Journal of Boyhood Studies. His research has been supported by the
Ford Foundation, the National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation, and the
International Boys School Coalition. In his hometown of Milwaukee, Wis., Dr. Nelson
taught first-grade in a single-sex classroom for Black and Latino boys.

DR. EMERY PETCHAUER


Emery Petchauer is an associate professor of urban education at Oakland University
where his research focuses on the cultural dimensions of teaching and learning
in urban schools and universities. A former high school English teacher, he is the
author of Hip-Hop Culture in College Students Lives (Routledge, 2012) and the
co-editor of Schooling Hip-Hop: Expanding Hip-Hop Based Education Across the
Curriculum (Teachers College Press, 2013). In addition to these academic pursuits,
Dr. Petchauer has over fifteen years of experience organizing urban arts spaces
across the United States

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MR. DANIEL THOMAS


Daniel (Dan) Thomas is a native a Cleveland, Ohio. He received a Bachelors of
Science in Human Ecology focusing on Family Studies while also receiving a minor
in African and African American Studies at the Ohio State University (OSU).
Currently, Dan is a program manager in The Todd A. Bell National Resource
Center on the African American Male at OSU. In this role; he develops and assesses
programming to increase retention, graduation rates, and sense of community for
African American males at OSU. Dan previously worked with the nations largest
diversity scholarship, The Morrill Scholars Program (MSP), where he managed the
application process and developed opportunities for MSP recipients to engage in
diversity and leadership initiatives in Ohio and across the nation. Dan has a strong
interest in working collaboratively with college students, promoting higher education
to underprivileged school-aged children, and providing educational enrichment
programs for students outside the classroom.

DR. VAUGHN WATSON


Vaughn W. M. Watson is a former public high-school English teacher of 12 years
in Brooklyn, N.Y. His areas of research focus are the interplay of literacy learning,
and reimagining identities for Black youth and youth of color across socio-cultural
contexts of English education, hip-hop and education, civic learning and action,
and qualitative participatory research methodologies. His research examines how
youth, making meaning of diverse literacies and identities across creative and artistic
artifacts and practices affiliated with hip-hop, reframe understandings of changing
mandates for student work, and teacher accountability.

CO L L E G E O F E D UCAT IO N | 15 |

MAKING RELATIONSHIPS WORK: A SUMMIT ON BLACK MALE ACADEMIC SUCCESS AND INCLUSION

NAMES OF SPONSORS
MSU College of Education, Department of Teacher Education, Office of the Provost,
Office of the Vice President of Student Affairs, MSU Neighborhoods, Office of Inclusion and
Intercultural Initiatives, and Residence Education and Housing Services.

STEERING COMMITTEE
Chezare A. Warren, Ph.D.
Dorinda Carter Andrews, Ed.D.
Terry Flennaugh, Ph.D.
Genyne Royal Ph.D.
Theodore Ransaw, Ph.D.
Thaddeus Stegall
Darrius Gregory
Lorri Jenkins

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS






















Steering Committee and Volunteers


Our Sponsors
Dr. Margaret Crocco, Professor/Chairperson, Department of Teacher Education
Jeff Seguin, Graphic Artist
Smita Sawai, Graphic Artist
Troy Hill, Photographer
Antonio Pee, Assistant Director, Residence Education
Dr. Kris Renn, Professor, Department of Educational Administration
Jon Good and the COE Observation Research Lab
Paulette Granberry Russell, Director, Office for Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives
Dr. Denise Maybank, Vice President for Student Affairs and Services
June Youatt, Provost
Sue Blanshan, Senior Advisor to the Provost, Office of the Provost
Dr. Robyne Thompson, Superintendent, East Lansing Public Schools
Robert Floden, Dean, MSU College of Education
Dr. Lee June, Professor, Honors College
Dr. Joanne Marciano, Coordinator for College Access and Transitions, Career Services and Placement
Tracy Abbott, MSU COE Copy Center
Vennie Gore, Vice President for MSU Auxiliary Enterprises
Kathy Collins, Director for MSU Residence Education and Housing Services
MSU Chapter of National Panhellenic Council
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., Kappa Delta Lambda Chapter
All of the young Black men and boys who participated in the keynote panel and focus groups

| 16 | COLLEGE OF ED UC AT ION