Basic background on China

› Total population: 1,357,000,000 (2013)
‑ world’s largest; 
‑ roughly 4x the US population

› Land area: 3,705,000 square miles
‑ roughly equivalent to US
‑ population density is 4x that of US

› Key topographical features: 
Eastern seaboard borders Pacific Ocean;
NE provinces border Siberia; 
NW of China is predominantly desert;
Himalayan Mountains in SW; 
Major rivers: Yellow River and Yangtze River
1

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Yulin plant to be 
built here

Densely populated: 94% of people live in 43% of the land area (Hu Huanyong line)

› Compare this with the US, where 58% of people live in roughly 33% of the land area 
‑ (approx. US population and land area east of the Mississippi River, America’s densest area)

2

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Cities of China

› The majority of our trainees come from a single province in China called Shaanxi 
Province (where the Yulin JV plant will be built). 

‑ Xi’an is the capital city of Shaanxi.
‑ Many of our JV trainees are from Xi’an, Yulin, and the surrounding areas

› Because China’s cities are so densely populated, the ten largest US cities would barely 
crack the top 150 largest cities in China.

› Chinese people refer to a city of 1 million as a “small city.”
› See the tables on the next slide for an overview.

3

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Where would the top 10 most populous US cities rank in China?
Rel Chn.
Rank Rank
City
1
1 Shanghai
2
2 Beijing
3
3 Tianjin
4
4 Guangzhou
5
5 Shenzhen
6
6 Wuhan
7
7 Dongguan
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
4

8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

NYC
Chengdu
Chongqing
Nanjing
Hong Kong
Foshan
Harbin
Xi'an
Shenyang
Hangzhou
Suzhou
Qingdao
Zhengzhou
Dalian

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

Province
 
 
 
Guangdong
Guangdong
Hubei
Guangdong

2014 pop.
22,265,426
19,295,000
11,090,314
11,070,654
10,357,938
9,780,644
8,220,937

NY
Sichuan
 
Jiangsu
 
Guangdong
Heilongjiang
Shaanxi
Liaoning
Zhejiang
Jiangsu
Shandong
Henan
Liaoning

8,175,133
7,677,122
7,457,589
7,165,828
7,055,071
6,771,900
6,704,573
6,501,189
6,255,921
6,242,000
5,349,090
4,587,200
4,253,627
4,087,733

3/18/16

Rank
if in
US
China Rank
City
8
1 New York
21
2 Los Angeles
39
3 Chicago
48
4 Houston
71
5 Philadelphia
80
6 Phoenix
94
7 San Antonio
96
8 San Diego
112
9 Dallas
153
10 San Jose
184
20 Seattle

State
New York
California
Illinois
Texas
Pennsylvania
Arizona
Texas
California
Texas
California
Washington

2014 pop.
8,175,133
3,792,621
2,695,598
2,100,263
1,526,006
1,445,632
1,327,407
1,307,402
1,197,816
945,942
670,000

› Highlighted in yellow are the two closest 
cities to both Moses Lake and Yulin.

Government and economy of China

› Government: Chinese Communist Party is in 
control, though other smaller parties exist 
› Chinese may directly elect representatives at 
certain levels (local/county) but executive roles 
such as President/Chairman (currently Xi 
Jinping, pictured) are not directly elected.

› Economy: “Socialist with Chinese characteristics” 
(still many industries which consist largely of 
state-owned enterprises, but China’s market is in 
many ways as “capitalist” as America’s) 
› Currency unit is the “yuan” (Renminbi, RMB) with 
$1USD worth approx. 6.5 RMB.

5

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

One Child Policy

› Social policy of “one-child” per couple was in effect from 1978 until 2015, after which 
couples are now allowed to have two children if they choose.

‑ For this reason, the vast majority of our trainees are only children in their respective families. 
Thus, the common American ice-breaker of “How many siblings do you have?” is not as 
effective to use among groups of Chinese!

› In years past, if a couple opted to have a second child, the parents were forced to pay 
“social maintenance fees”, which vary in amount by province. In Xi’an, this would be 
around 3-6 times a household’s annual income, which is at least $13,846.

› Due to factors such as gender-selective abortions and giving daughters up for 
international adoption, in China today, 118 boys are born for every 100 girls

‑ Global average is between 103 to 108 boys per 100 girls
‑ Gender imbalance will be a socio-economic problem for China throughout this century
6

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

The concepts of “face” and “harmony”

› Chinese people care greatly about “saving face” in public or group situations.
› Chinese people want to “give face” to people who are important and respected (leaders, 
managers, elders, etc.) by showing special recognition and favor to those people

› If you find the need to criticize a Chinese person, remember to do so privately so the 
person does not feel their “face” is being challenged in front of the group.

› Chinese prefer “harmony” over “discord” in social situations, so they often go along with 
group consensus even if they personally disagree

7

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Harmony in the barnyard? (The Little Red Hen)

› In this well-known Western folk tale, the hen 
finds no one willing to help and decides to take 
all of the work (and tasty rewards!) for herself.

› At the end, the red hen sitting smugly in front 
of the other animals and denying them bread 
damages the “harmony” of the barnyard

› Chinese people would prefer to revise the 
story so that the hen forgives everyone and 
shares the bread…

8

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

When “Yes” means “No”

› In businesses, a Chinese person may tell his or her boss “Yes” 
when asked if an objective can be met, even though the truth 
may be NO!

› This is because the person does not want to make his/her boss 
lose face by saying “No” directly to his/her superior’s face.

› Saying “no” in this instance might cause the boss to “lose face.” 
Also, this might threaten the “harmony” of the work 
environment.

› If making a request which may be difficult for a Chinese person 
to grant/complete, asking via email or some other private 
means may help avoid this problem.
9

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

What’re you laughing at?!?

› When Chinese people find themselves in an awkward or 
uncomfortable situation (such as when someone is angry with 
them, or when being criticized or reprimanded), they may 
unconsciously let out a nervous laugh or chuckle. 

› In China, this is a culturally-acceptable way of diffusing a tense 
situation, but it often has the opposite effect on an American.

› The American, already upset about the situation, may interpret 
the Chinese “nervous laugh” as someone being happy about 
an anger-inducing situation. 

› In these moments, it is important to remain calm and to try to 
politely resolve the issue without tempers flaring.
10

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Collectivism and Individualism (East meets West, graphics by Ms. Yang LIU)

› **For more informative images from this series, visit: http://bsix12.com/east-meets-west/
11

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Chinese collectivism

› China is a collectivist society (i.e. the needs/interests of the group outweigh those of the 
individual)

› Chinese people do not like to “stand out” in group situations, whether by appearance, 
behavior, or other means. Standing out from one’s peer group is frowned upon.

› Chinese tend to “go with the flow” and do what their peers are doing. Asking one Chinese 
person to do something significantly different from what his/her peers are doing may 
result in his/her declining to do so.

12

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

American individualism

› The U.S. is more individualist, where people who are unique or different from the group 
are respected, even celebrated

› Whereas Americans will proudly promote and discuss their personal views on an issue 
openly, Chinese are more likely to determine the overall group attitude and adjust their 
own attitude accordingly.

13

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Chinese education

› China’s system emphasizes high test scores above all else. Those who score the highest 
gain entry into the best universities and tend to have the best future prospects in life.

› For this reason, Chinese parents expect their children and teens to focus on studying and 
almost nothing else (no chores, no household responsibilities, etc.)

› At school, students who have the highest grades are the most popular, and are highly 
respected. 

‑ In this case, the “nerds” are more popular than the “jocks;” there is not a strong culture of 
“student athletes” like here in the U.S.

14

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Practical implications of the Chinese education system

› This results in Chinese graduates who are not as 
“well-rounded” upon finishing school as Americans, 
since Chinese parents de-emphasize and allow almost 
no time for:





Sports
Clubs/extracurricular activities
Dating/romance
Finding a job
Learning to drive a car

› Chinese graduates are therefore extremely bright and 
knowledgeable about what they have studied before, 
but they lack hands-on, real-world experience (“street 
smarts,” etc.)
15

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Differences in Chinese and Western education

› When studying/training, Chinese people consider asking the teacher/trainer a question to 
be either:

‑ An indication that the student was too stupid to understand the content
‑ An insult to the ability of the teacher/trainer to explain the content

› For this reason, it is important to create a training atmosphere in which JV trainees are 
comfortable asking REC employees questions when some aspect of the training is not 
understood.

› As a result of this, Chinese learners may seem too passive or uninterested in their 
learning, even though they may be very eager to actively take part or may have deep 
interest in what is being taught.

16

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

“Do you understand?”

› Asking this question in a Chinese classroom is usually met by blank stares which don’t 
necessarily indicate understanding.

› Chinese people may nod or otherwise indicate their understanding even on occasions 
when they did not understand what was said.

› As indicated on the previous slide, Chinese may be uncomfortable indicating to their 
trainer/teacher that something was not understood. For this reason, you’ll likely need to 
take a different approach…

17

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

More effective ways to gauge understanding

› Try asking more detailed, targeted questions which allow the trainee to demonstrate to 
you his/her understanding of what has been taught:

‑ “Can you repeat the steps of this process back to me?”
‑ “Can you show me on this diagram where the hydrogen recycle compressor is located?”
‑ “Based on what we’ve discussed just now, where would you find ______ in the unit?”
‑ Consider a practical field exercise in which the trainee could directly demonstrate 
understanding of what was just taught

‑ If possible, a written examination (even in the form of a short “quiz”) on what was taught would 
allow the trainee to demonstrate understanding (or lack thereof) in a less confrontational way.

18

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

English as a Second Language in China

› Chinese students are required to study English throughout middle school, high school, 
and college. This means our trainees average between 10-15 years of prior English.

› However, the Chinese education system emphasizes rote memorization of vocabulary 
and grammar over actual, functional communication

› For this reason, Chinese struggle with productive English skills (writing and speaking)

19

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

English as a Second Language in China (cont.)

› Of the four skills, Chinese are relatively weak in speaking and listening. This is mainly 
because they lack opportunities to practice interacting with native English speakers.

› Weaker listening skills will mean that your accent (however minor), pronunciation (no 
matter how “standard”), and speech rate will cause difficulty for our trainees.

20

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

How can we improve our JV trainees ability to understand spoken English?

› Speak more slowly than usual
‑ You can gradually increase your speed of speaking over the days/weeks as the trainee gets 
used to interacting with you

› Make a conscious effort to avoid confusing slang or idioms whenever you can
› For emphasis, repeat certain important concepts/terminology, even if not asked to repeat

21

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

How can we improve our JV trainees ability to understand spoken English? (cont.)

› Try paraphrasing (explaining complex terms/ideas in simpler words) when possible
› Use gestures, graphics/diagrams, visual aids (such as “show-and-tell” hands-on 
materials), and other means which rely more on sight than hearing

› Ask a trainee to repeat an important idea/concept back to you to verify understanding

22

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Spoken English mistakes

› Because making an English mistake (especially in front of a person of authority or in front 
of a group, regardless of authority figures present) would be a significant “loss of face,” 
Chinese are very hesitant to express themselves in spoken English.

› Remember to be patient and understanding when listening to trainees.
› Try to make a special effort to adjust your ear to the accent and pronunciation of a 
Chinese person speaking English.

› Work to establish an environment in which trainees feel free to express themselves and 
allow them to make mistakes in their speaking from time to time.

23

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

What to do when a spoken English mistake is made

› Encourage the trainee to keep speaking, especially if the mistake is minor and does not 
impede communication of the message

› Allow the trainee an opportunity to self-correct, in case he/she recognizes his/her mistake
› If you decide to correct the mistake, try to do so in a polite and non-threatening way
‑ Stay mindful of not making the trainee “lose face” in front of others
‑ You might ask “Do you mean _____?”
‑ Otherwise, try repeating the idea back using correct English:

24

Trainee: “This valve is on the under of the tank.”
You: “Yes, the valve is on the bottom of the tank, that’s right.”

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Common English mistakes/challenges

› In Mandarin Chinese (the dialect spoken by our 
trainees), the words for he and she are pronounced 
EXACTLY the same (“ta”), though they are written 
differently. For this reason, you may hear a Chinese 
person say:

‑ “My father is so kind. She always took me to the park 
after he finished her work.”

› In this case, try to clarify the situation as needed, but 
try not to make a big deal out of it.

‑ See notes above on correcting English mistakes and 
on “saving face”

25

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

17 or 70?

› Chinese often struggle to hear the difference between English number pairs such as 
“seventeen” and “seventy.” Since our trainees (especially in operating units) will need to 
learn/discuss/remember many figures, please bear this in mind.

› You can assist by:
‑ Clearly enunciating the different sounds
‑ Repeating when needed
‑ Sometimes writing out the digits visually in case the comprehension is critical

26

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Numbers (1-10)

› Chinese people can use a 
single hand to represent any 
number between 1 to 10. 
They may often use these 
hand gestures to verify 
numbers which they have 
heard.

› Note how many of the 
gestures visually match or 
approximate the written 
Chinese characters for each 
number.

27

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Units of measurement

› China, like most foreign countries, has adopted the metric 
system. 

› Some measures in our REC plant are done in metric units 
(cm, kg, etc.) but Chinese will definitely struggle to adapt to 
measures like ounces/pounds, cups/quarts/gallons, 
inches/feet/miles, and degrees Fahrenheit. 

› If you tell a Chinese person it is 20 degrees outside, he/she 
will be excited to wear a t-shirt (20 degrees Celsius is 
around 68 degrees Fahrenheit) and won’t know that a parka 
is more appropriate!

28

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Numerology and (un)lucky numbers

› Chinese people have beliefs about lucky and unlucky 
numbers. Beliefs in numerology (the study of the 
divine/mystical relationship between numbers and coinciding 
events) are strong in China.

› Here in America, many people regard 7 as a lucky number 
and 13 as an unlucky number. 

› For Chinese people, 6/8/9 are each considered lucky, but for 
different reasons. The number 4 is avoided, since it sounds 
similar to the Chinese word for “death.”

› Chinese people will go to great lengths to have more 8s or 
9s in their license plate or phone number!
29

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Giving

› When given a gift, Chinese people will politely accept it but not usually open it until later 
after guests and the gift giver have left. 

‑ This is to avoid possibly upsetting the giver with a negative reaction. 
‑ The recipient also does not want to appear too impatient, which would mean they value 
material objects more than the people present.

› When offering a Chinese person something (such as dessert after a meal), they will 
politely decline the offer twice. It would only be after a third offer (“Please, have some 
cake!”) that they will finally accept. 

‑ When Americans make such offers only one time, Chinese are disappointed that they don’t get 
two more chances!

30

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Two hands

› When handing or receiving an object (including business cards), Chinese are taught as 
children that it is rude to hand/receive an object with only a single hand. Because of this, 
they will usually present business cards, forms, documents and other paper objects with 
two hands, expecting the recipient to also extend two hands to receive the object.

31

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Sensitive topics of discussion

› Even among some Westerners, there are three discussion topics which tend to be 
avoided among people who do not know each other well, namely:

‑ Money/finances
‑ Religion
‑ Politics

› We will advise our trainees to approach these topics sensitively, but realize that it is 
common in China for a Chinese person to walk up to an American stranger and ask: 

‑ “What’s your monthly salary?” or 
‑ “Do you believe in God?” or
‑ “Did you vote for President Obama?”

› You may be curious about these three topics and how our trainees feel about them…
32

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Salaries/incomes in China

› With an exchange rate of $1USD per 6.5RMB, it is not unusual to find Chinese workers 
whose salary is less than a sixth of what a typical American earns. The cost of living in 
China is generally cheaper, so this offsets that difference to some extent.

› There are major discrepancies between what a worker in urban China (especially big 
cities such as Beijing and Shanghai) earns in comparison to what rural workers earn.

‑ Some data indicates that China’s rural workers on average earn only 60% of what Chinese 
urban workers earn.

› Our trainees are being paid a salary by the Yulin JV while they are working here in the 
US, but they will likely not feel comfortable discussing that with you.

33

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Religion in China

› The Communist Party officially recognizes China as an “atheist” country, though people 
do in fact practice various religions.

› Though reliable statistics are hard to find (and/or conflicting), there are varying numbers 
of supporters of the following religions or spiritual beliefs:

‑ Buddhism
‑ Ancestor worship
‑ Daoism (Taoism)

› Christianity is on the rise in China, but it, along with all other religions, faces restrictions 
on how citizens may practice their religion publically. 
› Though China grants its citizens the freedom to believe in religions, the ways in which it 
can be practiced in society are structured and controlled by the government.
34

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Politics in China

› The Chinese Communist Party controls all major government offices.
› The average Chinese student is expected to join the precursors to the Party (such as the 
Communist Young Pioneers and Communist Youth League) from middle school or high 
school, respectively.

› Pragmatic, young Chinese today realize that certain opportunities for advancement in 
China (including professional opportunities in certain fields/industries) may be closed to 
them without Party membership.

› If you choose to discuss the Party or politics in general with our trainees, realize that 
Chinese youth in the 21st century are not as interested in politics as their parents were, so 
you might not get much of a response.
35

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Politically-sensitive issues which are best avoided = The Three T’s

› Americans should sensitively handle the “Three T’s” as follows:
‑ Tibet (whether or not it is a sovereign nation or part of Chinese territory)
‑ Taiwan (whether or not it is a sovereign nation or part of Chinese territory)
‑ Tian’anmen Square (the crackdown on pro-democracy protesters on June 4, 1989)

› It would be safest to avoid discussing any of these three issues with a trainee until after 
you have developed a closer relationship with that trainee. 

› In practice, it may be best to “agree to disagree” regarding these three topics rather than 
trying to make a trainee take your point of view about any of these issues.

› In case you choose to discuss any of these topics, do so with sensitivity and respect.
36

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Other politically-sensitive issues

› Chinese people have strong feelings about the Japanese occupation of China during 
WWII, as well as Japan’s later whitewashing of those historical events.

› In recent years, the Chinese government has made territorial claims to various islands 
and expanses of water in the South China Sea and East China Sea (including island 
groups such as the Spratlys and the Senkaku Islands)

37

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Other politically-sensitive issues (cont.)

› Chairman Mao Zedong is still revered as a great leader in China (particularly by older 
generations of Chinese), despite the modern Communist Party stating officially that he 
was “70 percent right and 30 percent wrong”

› Other major political leaders since Mao (including, pictured in L-R order below, Deng 
Xiaoping, Jiang Zemin, Hu Jintao; current president Xi Jinping) are also highly respected.

‑ In contrast with America, where politicians are mocked and joked about daily in cartoons and 
stand-up comedy, Chinese do not have the same attitude about their politicians.

38

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Environment

› Chinese people care about balancing the 
traditional Chinese “elements” in life:





Metal
Wood
Water
Fire
Earth

› Feng shui:
‑ orienting communities, buildings, rooms, 

39

personal workspaces, and objects within the 
environment based on auspicious energy 
is based upon these elements

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

› Hong Kong building with a hole intentionally 
left in it so that the flow of energy (feng shui) 
would not be impeded.

3/18/16

Health

› Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) uses herbs and 
holistic remedies and is sometimes chosen over 
“Western medicine” (pills, surgery, etc.) for treating 
certain conditions.

‑ Western medicine is the dominant form of medicine found 

in modern Chinese hospitals
Popular remedies include acupuncture, acupressure, and 
other traditional methods

› Chinese prefer to have fresh air circulating indoors and 
will often choose to open a door/ window when 
Americans would feel the weather is too cold/hot to do so

40

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Sports and fitness

› Chinese people tend to prefer different sports than Americans do. 
› Contact sports, especially collision sports like ice hockey and American football, are not 
popular in China. 

› The most popular sports in China are soccer, ping pong (the national sport of China), 
badminton, and, more recently, basketball.

‑ If you follow the NBA, try reaching out to our trainees about your favorite teams and players!

41

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Martial arts

› Chinese also enjoy various martial arts, though you shouldn’t expect the trainees you 
meet to be kung fu masters! 

‑ That would be like a Chinese person expecting every American to be Michael Jordan! 
‑ Actually, the most commonly-practiced martial art in China is not violent at all—tai chi (aka 
taijiquan)

› Many Chinese enjoy doing daily tai chi to stay mentally and physically fit
‑ Driving early to work, I’ve seen trainees doing this outside their Moses Lake apartments!

42

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Food

› The elements (mentioned above) influence eating and drinking habits, since cold drinks 
are thought to disrupt a person’s qi (bodily energy) if drank while consuming hot foods.

‑ Chinese will request “no ice” in their drinks.
‑ Chinese drink beer and other alcohol at room temperature.

› Chinese prefer cooked vegetables (typically steamed or fried) to raw vegetables (like 
salads)

43

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Food (cont.)

› Chinese people usually find Western deserts too sweet and/or too rich, so they might not 
be excited about donuts or birthday cake brought in to work…

‑ In China, most people prefer fresh fruit as a dessert to conclude a meal

› If invited to someone’s home (or even a restaurant), it is considered rude to eat ALL of 
the food served and leave only a bare plate. 

‑ This would be seen as a message that the host is not competent enough to cook (or order) 
enough food for everyone

44

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Restaurants

› In general, it takes a great deal of time and effort for 
Chinese to develop a taste for American food and other 
Western food.

› In case you invite a trainee to lunch/dinner at a Western 
(American, Italian, Mexican, etc.) restaurant, they may 
decline your offer. This could be due to a distaste for the 
food and/or the fact that American restaurants are 
relatively expensive when compared to Chinese ones.

› Sadly, most Asian restaurants in the US don’t closely 
approximate what our trainees ate at home, so they might 
not like those options, either.

45

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Personal space

› Due to the high population density of Chinese cities, most Chinese are willing to accept 
MUCH tighter quarters than the average American would be comfortable with.

› In less crowded rooms or elevators, Chinese prefer to maintain a larger “bubble” between 
themselves and strangers than Americans would

46

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Personal space (cont.)

› Also, Chinese young people are used to living in close quarters with many roommates in 
a single dorm room (as many as 4-8, with very limited space for each individual). 

› These dorms also usually have shared bathrooms and communal showers, further 
limiting the sense of individual privacy yet increasing the sense of group belonging.

47

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Privacy

› In these kinds of crowded environments, people don’t 
have the same expectation of personal privacy that 
Americans would.

› Many details which Americans consider private or too 
personal to be discussed openly are not so in China. 

‑ For instance, Chinese teachers publish a list of every 

student’s score in an entire class, so there is no secret as 
to who was the best/worst or in the middle. 

48

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Physical contact

› Chinese people are not as comfortable with physical contact (handshakes, hugs, etc.) 
with strangers as Americans tend to be. 
› Handshaking as a custom is relatively new in China, and you’ll likely find Chinese (even 
men) give a somewhat limp handshake compared to Americans. 
› Conversely, Chinese wonder why the American they just met has tried to crush their 
hand! 

49

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Same-gender physical contact

› Another cultural difference is in same-gender physical contact. 
› In China, it is very common to see two women (typically friends, classmates, co-workers, 
etc.) walking down the street holding hands, but it is a strictly platonic gesture. 
› Similarly, two Chinese men are more likely to walk alongside one another with a brotherly 
arm over the shoulder than two American men would be.

50

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

What’s in a name?

› When a Chinese person tells you his/her name, it can be confusing as to which is his/her 
“first name” or “last name.” 

› In Western conventions, the family name (surname) usually comes second, with the 
given name (sometimes referred to as Christian name) coming first.

‑ In China, this order is reversed. 

› Chinese culture places great emphasis on filial piety (dutiful respect to your 
parents/elders) and people emphasize the group (family, in this case) over the individual.

‑ Placing the family name before the given name is a way to emphasize this. 
Examples:
given name = Michael
surname = Jones
› Mr. Michael Jones
given name = Weibin
surname = Li
› Mr. Li Weibin
51

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

How should I address you?

› Some Chinese adjust their own names when talking with Americans, which means the 
person might be giving you their name in Western order (Weibin Li instead of Li Weibin).

› If in doubt, ask the person which name they’d prefer to be called. 
› Chinese people are usually more formal in terms of address than Americans. 
› Among co-workers, Li Weibin is likely to be called “Mr. Li” and would normally only be 
called “Weibin” by very close friends. 

‑ Of course, some people are more or less formal, so it pays to ask!

52

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

English names

› Each of our trainees has chosen an English name for themselves, so you are welcome to 
use that name when interacting with a trainee.

› A good conversation starter or ice-breaker can be:
‑ Why did you pick this English name?

› Another good question:
‑ What is the meaning behind your Chinese name?
‑ Many Chinese names have very poetic, profound, or interesting meanings.

53

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Lunar Calendar

› Most important Chinese holidays follow the Lunar 
Calendar, with its cycles of the moon

› The Western calendar (referred to as Gregorian 
calendar) follows solar cycles (the sun)

› The first day of the first lunar month is considered 
New Year’s Day, but this occurs irregularly between 
mid-January to mid-February due to discrepancies 
between the lunar/solar calendars.

‑ Fell on Monday, February 8th, 2016; 
‑ our trainees got the day off of work! 

54

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Important Chinese holidays/festivals of 2016

› Lantern Festival (fifteenth day of first lunar month; Feb-Mar) 
› Tomb-Sweeping Day (solar calendar; April 4th or 5th)
› May Day (Labor Day, solar calendar-- May 1st)

Feb 22, 2016

April 2, 2016 (obs)
May  1, 2016 

› Dragon Boat Festival (fifth day of fifth lunar month; May-June)

Jun 9, 2016

› Chinese “Valentine’s Day” (seventh day of seventh lunar month; Aug) Aug 9, 2016
› Mid-Autumn Festival (15th day of 8th lunar month; Sep-Oct)

Sep 15, 2016

› National Day (celebrates founding of the PRC; follows solar calendar) Oct 1, 2016
55

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Chinese Zodiac

› Chinese people follow the Chinese zodiac instead of the Western one
‑ Organized by year of birth and animal sign 
‑ 12 Animals: rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, goat, monkey, rooster, dog, pig

56

‑ 2016 will be the Year of the Monkey
‑ For Chinese people, asking someone’s zodiac sign is a clandestine way of asking his/her age!

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Birthdays

› Chinese people believe that the Chinese New Year (Lunar New Year) is the day when 
everyone gets one year older, so some people celebrate this to a greater extent than 
their actual birthdate.

› Some Chinese will celebrate both their lunar AND solar calendar birthdays
‑ Two parties instead of one!

57

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Celebrating birthdays

› For Chinese birthdays, some young people have 
adopted the Western habit of having a sweet, 
frosted birthday cake. 

› Traditional ways to celebrate in China include:
‑ Eating noodles (with long strands symbolizing a 
long life ahead)

‑ Older people eat steamed buns shaped like 
peaches (as peaches symbolize longevity)

‑ Inviting friends/family to lunch/dinner, but the 
birthday boy/girl pays the bill!!!

58

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16

Any questions?

› Please contact Andy if you have further questions or concerns about how to best support 
our JV trainees.

‑ Email: Andrew.Ramdular@RECSilicon.com
‑ Phone: 509-431-3781
‑ Office: JV Training Trailers (Moses Lake), office in the North office trailer

› We hope everyone will do their best to make our trainees feel both welcome and 
supported during their training programs here in the US!

59

©  REC Silicon ASA. All rights reserved. Confidential

3/18/16