Blake Anderson 

Mr. Girba 
English 9H 
February 3, 2016 
 

Quarter 2 Summative Essay 
 
Xun Zi once stated, “Human nature is evil, and goodness is caused by intentional 
activity.” This intuitive quote displays that humans are inherently evil,​
 and when a person seems 
to be good, they are still evil; they are just putting in a conscious effort to show that they are 
good.  One of the most common debates in the world is the clash between good and evil. Also 
known in many people’s childhood, the “good guys” or the “bad guys”. However it is not that 
simple. People are evil because they are born evil. People who are “good” still have evil inside of 
them. As said in the quote, they are putting in an effort to express the artificial goodness. 
Humans tend to stray from good nature through the lack of civilization shown in the ​
Lord of the 
Flies​
, inner savagery in ​
The Most Dangerous Game​
, and the desire for power from the ​
Stanford 
Prison Experiment​

Humans stray from good nature because of the lack of civilization. ​
In Lord of the Flies​

the boys were isolated on an island far away from society. They struggled to survive, which 
eventually led the group to a situation where the evil emerged from them, and murdered a friend 
on the island. “At once the crowd surged after it, poured down the rock, leapt on to the beast, 
screamed, struck, bit, tore. There were no words, and no movements but the tearing of teeth and 

claws” (Golding, 153). The quote shows the possessed boys killing Simon like a beast or animal, 
which shows that they had given in to savagery, meaning that there was not a single sign of 
civilization within them. ​
Other people may argue that Piggy was civilized, and that he did not 
show signs of savagery. However, the only reason why Piggy is classified as good is because it’s 
the civilization that still has a hold of him. The civilization left Piggy when he helped the boys 
murder Simon.​
 Another example that can be compared to this is when Roger killed Piggy. 
“Roger, with a sense of delirious abandonment, leaned all his weight on the lever….the rock 
struck Piggy a glancing blow from chin to knee; the conch exploded into a thousand white 
fragments and ceased to exist” (Golding, 181). This shows that Roger released his inner savage 
and evil as well. A few chapters back, Roger had the urge to throw a rock at a littlun. With the 
artificial goodness on the outside, Roger purposely missed the shot. When Roger had the chance 
to kill Piggy, he made sure he capitalized on it, therefore showing the evil that is inside of him. 
The boys and Roger both had the urge to release their inner savage and inner evil. 
 Humans are evil because of their inner savagery. General Zaroff, in ​
The Most Dangerous 
Game​
, revealed his inner savagery to Rainsford during their deep conversation. “Why should I 
not be serious? I am speaking of hunting. ‘Hunting? Great guns, General Zaroff, what you are 
speaking of is murder” (Connell, 7). In the quote, Rainsford finds out that Zaroff is an evil 
murderer. It is important, because Zaroff finally takes off his mask of society and reveals his true 
self; an evil person. Rainsford initially thought that the general was a decent, moral, and civil 
person. “Come. We shouldn’t be chatting here. We can talk later. Now you want clothes, food, 
rest. You shall have them. This is a most­restful spot” (Connell, 5). Zaroff is treating Rainsford 
like a guest, and Rainsford had no idea about Zaroff’s true identity. These examples show that 

that artificial goodness can cover one’s evilness, and that humans are evil because of the inner 
savage they have within them. 
Humans stray from good nature because of desire for power. In the ​
Stanford Prison 
Experiment,​
 the guards became more aggressive towards the prisoners. “Encounters quickly 
became cruel, hostile, and dehumanizing” (CC Psychology) The encounters between the guards 
and prisoners became aggressive, because the guards were allowed to do whatever they wanted 
to do to the prisoners. Since the guards had the power over the prisoners, they decided to abuse it 
by yelling and calling the prisoners names. Another example of desire for power is in ​
Lord of the 
Flies​
, as well. Jack wanted to have a separate tribe, in which he would be the leader.”Before the 
party had started a great log had been dragged into the center of the lawn and Jack, painted and 
garlanded, sat there like an idol” (Golding, 149). In the quote, Jack sounds like he wanted to be 
treated like a deity. The term “garlanded” means that someone put a crown on him. Thus, the 
only reason why Jack wanted to leave Ralph’s tribe was to have the power of being a leader. 
These examples show that humans stray from good nature because of desire for power. Humans 
want the power to rule over others, which usually gets out of hand. 
Humans tend to stray away from good nature in many ways. As seen in Lord of the Flies, 
the boys release their inner savage and kill Simon. In The Most Dangerous Game, Zaroff finally 
lets go of his artificial goodness. Lastly, In the Stanford Prison, the guards have a hunger for 
power, as well as Jack from Lord of the Flies. Nonetheless, the point remains that humans are 
naturally evil because of the lack of society, the savage that is inside of them, and the lust for 
power. 
 

Citations 
 
Langston Hughes. ​
"Thank You, M'am"​
 1958.  
 
Richard Connell. ​
The Most Dangerous Game​
. Collier's Book, 1924.  
 
Social Thinking: Crash Course Psychology #37​
. Perf. Hank Green. 2014.  
 
William Golding. ​
Lord of the Flies.​
 New York: Penguin Group, 1954.