You are on page 1of 3

Topic: How Do I Estimate The

Torque For An Impeller Agitator?


25 February 2013posed by

I need to estimate the torque for an impeller agitator. Characteristics of the impeller: d:
17'' x h: 13.5''. For the tank: 23'' diameter x 24'' height. The impeller is an anchor type
with four blades.
.

Dave DickeyForum Moderator319 Posts

Re: How Do I Estimate The Torque For An Impeller Agitator?


25 February 2013 at 11:27am

Your anchor impeller does not fit your tank. An anchor impeller for a 23" diameter tank
should be 20" to 22" in diameter. The 17" diameter impeller will do little more than rotate
the contents of the tank, which will not provide much mixing. However, I can give you a
method for estimating the amount of torque required.
The viscous power number for your impeller is 176. The viscous power number is a
characteristic of the impeller geometry. I assumed that each of the four blades is 1"
wide. An anchor impeller will have a constant viscous power number for impeller
Reynolds numbers less than 1.0. Impeller Reynolds number (dimensionless) can be
calculated by the following formula:
Re = 10.7 * D^2 * N * sp.gr. / visc
The Reynolds number is dimensionless, the constant 10.7 is a conversion factor and D is
your impeller diameter in inches, which is squared, N is the rotational speed of the
impeller in revolutions per minute, sp.gr. is the density of the fluid as specific gravity with
respect to water (grams/cubic centimeter), and that quantity is divided by the visc the
viscosity in centipoise.
The torque for the impeller is as follows:
Torque [inch-pounds] = 6.8x10^-8 * visc * N * D^3
The torque is in inch-pounds, the coefficient is 6.8 times 10 to the -8 power
(0.000000068) includes your viscous power number, times the viscosity in centipoise,
times the rotational speed in rpm, times the impeller diameter in inches cubed.
Remember the formula for torque is only valid for Reynolds numbers less than
1.0. As the Reynolds number increases, so does the calculated torque. The impeller
torque gradually increases as the flow becomes more turbulent as defined by a larger
Reynolds number. The torque in the turbulent range could be more than 1000 times the
torque calculated by this formula, depending on the amount of rotation of the fluid. Your
small impeller may not increase the torque that much since you will not be mixing, only
spinning the fluid.
The answers by this expert are based on the best available interpretation of the

information provided. The consequences of the application of this information are the
responsibility of the user. If clarification is needed, please submit a further question.

Milla HerculeCommunity Member1 Post

Re: How Do I Estimate The Torque For An Impeller Agitator?


25 February 2013 at 3:04pm

The product mixed is so sensitive, that is why that design has been used. The rotational
speed is 100RPM, the viscosity 20 cp and the sp. gr is 1.045. I attach a file with further
information on the impeller design. By using the formula you gave on a precedent topic
(May 31, 2011), I estimated the Reynolds = 1.8 x 10^4. As the Reynolds was for a
turbulent flow, I then estimated the correction factor, then after I've been able to estimate
the power of the impeller (0.134 HP). Finally, knowing that : Torque [lbf.in] = 396 000 P
[HP] / 2*pi* N [RPM], I've been able to found out the required torque of 85 lbf.in Do you
think, I've got the right path? Thank you for your help.
Attached Files

Agitator-design.pdf
163 KB

Dave DickeyForum Moderator319 Posts

Re: How Do I Estimate The Torque For An Impeller Agitator?


26 February 2013 at 11:15am

The attached impeller drawing looks nothing like what is typically known an an anchor
impeller. The impeller drawing shows more of a wide-blade paddle (or turbine) impeller.
Unfortunately, using typical correlations and corrections for modified anchor impellers
and wide-blade paddle impellers give different results for the same dimensional
extremes. Because the impeller looks more like a four-blade, wide-blade paddle impeller,
working from similar turbine impellers seems reasonable. The impeller-to-tank diameter
ratio and fluid properties are closer to those commonly mixed with turbine impellers. The
best data for anchor impellers is at much higher viscosities and larger impeller-to-tank
diameter ratios.
Using a modified correlation for a wide-blade impeller, the Reynolds number is about
16,000, the power estimate is for 0.66 hp and the resulting torque at 100 rpm is 418 lbfin. The power and torque estimates could be high compared with actual measurements
if the fluid rotates freely and does not experience much vertical and radial flow. The
Reynolds number does indicate turbulent conditions, but the flow pattern may be more
like Couette flow, which could mean a lower torque.
This situation has a sufficient number of unique characteristics that estimates based on
more conventional mixing equipment may not be accurate. The reason for the question
about torque may influence how conservative the estimate should be. If the mixer drive
is sized based on required torque, a higher estimate is recommended.

The answers by this expert are based on the best available interpretation of the
information provided. The consequences of the application of this information are the
responsibility of the user. If clarification is needed, please submit a further question.