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Early Childhood

Task 3: Assessment Commentary

TASK 3: ASSESSMENT COMMENTARY


Respond to the prompts below (no more than 10 single-spaced pages, including prompts) by typing your responses within
the brackets following each prompt. Do not delete or alter the prompts. Commentary pages exceeding the maximum will not be
scored. Attach the assessment you used to evaluate student performance (no more than 5 additional pages) to the end of this
file. If you submit feedback as a video or audio clip and your comments to focus students cannot be clearly heard, attach
transcriptions of your comments (no more than 2 additional pages) to the end of this file. These pages do not count toward
your page total.

1. Analyzing Childrens Learning


a. Identify the specific language and literacy learning objectives for the common
assessment you chose for analysis.
[I chose the assessment from learning experience two. One of the learning objectives for the
assessment is that students will be able to collaborate with each other through conversation
about cause and effect. The second objective is for students to demonstrate appropriate social
and classroom behavior. With these two learning objectives, students will be able to
collaborate, follow directions and learn about cause and effect through conversation. Student
will be collaborating to find the correct cause and effect statements that go together. The
children will have to be reading, listening and speaking during this activity. Using all three of
these skills during the activity, the children will be engaged in language and literacy. The
children will be assessed on how they use their reading, listening and speaking skills to
collaborate during the activity. This is a group activity, however they will be assessed
individually.]
b. Provide a graphic (table or chart) or narrative that summarizes the class/groups learning
for the common assessment.
[For the most part, all the children did well with this activity and were able to work together to
correctly put the cause and effect statements together. There were a couple students who still
got cause and effect statements switched but we went over the wrong answers as a class. I
would read the incorrect sentence and the class would answer if it made sense or not and if it
did not make sense, we would fix it together. As I observed the different students working
together, I was able to see appropriate classroom behavior and social skills. Children liked
putting the different statements together to answer what and why questions. They were
engaged and collaborated well together to problem solve. I overheard many conversations
where children were trying to figure out which statements worked best with each other.
Sometimes the children would put a statement together and then changed it after seeing
another statement that was more fitting. Being able to collaborate with other peers helped
children understand the concept of cause and effect. Also going over the definitions before the
activity helped recall information about cause and effect to help them understand how to put the
statements together.]
c. Use the class/group summary you provided in prompt 1b to analyze the patterns of
language and literacy learning for the class/group.
[Through conversation, children were able to build their language by discussing and working
together to put together a correct sentence. Students would put sentences together and put the
word because in the middle. Then they would re-read it and realize that it did not make sense.
With little help from the teacher, the children were able to self-correct their sentences by reading
out loud and knowing that the sentence did not make sense the way they had it. Self-correcting
is an important strategy that children need to learn. Some children were self-correcting and
might have not even notice that they were doing it and that it is an important part of learning.
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Early Childhood
Task 3: Assessment Commentary

Being about to hear and listen to each other, the children had to think and use processing skills
to see if they had any statements that would work with the one that was read. Collaborating
together helped children learn how to discuss and talk to each other by taking turns, asking
questions and responding to each other. In the small group video from task 2, one of the boys
was able to self-correct himself when he said the wrong definition for effect. I helped him realize
that the student before had just given that same definition for cause so his answer could not be
correct. Then he realized the right definition without any more help from me. The cause and
effect statements were situations that were realistic. This helped children make text to selfconnections because some of these situations could have happened to the children at home or
in school. For example, there was one statement that said Martha was cleaning the floor
because the baby spilled juice. This was one that children could relate to because more than
likely something at home was spilled and cleaned up. By reading the sentences out loud,
children were able to recognize cause and effect statements in front of them and connect the
statements together to form a sentence.]
d. Analyze the patterns of learning for the 2 focus children. Reference the 3 sources of
evidence you collected for each of the 2 focus children.
Consider childrens strengths (what children understand and do well), and areas of
learning that need attention (e.g., common errors, confusions, need for greater
challenge).
[The two focus children were in the small group video from task two. Focus child one is wearing
a bright green sweatshirt with glasses and focus child two is wearing a navy blue and grey shirt.
Both of the children did well with the common assessment. Focus child two is a struggling
reader, but he was able to read the statements fine. Focus child one is more advanced on is
placed in the highest leveled group for math and reading. During the small group video, focus
child two put the effect in the wrong spot, but then he self-corrected when he saw that there was
a period at the end of the sentence so they he knew it had to be an effect. Knowing that effect
comes at the end and cause comes before helped him fix his mistake. It took focus child two a
while to read his sentences and figure out if his went with the one that was read. He seemed
shy and was not positive if he had the right answers so he would wait a little until no one said
anything and then would say his statement. He seemed unconfident in his answers when he
was usually right. Focus child one did very well with the common assessment but he was
confused when trying to recall the definition of effect. With re-direction he was able to remember
the correct definition. One time focus child one had both the cause and effect statements and
looked at them and chose the wrong statements to go together. I guided him, in saying that
there was a better answer in front of him and then realized it and changed his original answer.
Focus child one made another error when he tried pairing a cause and effect that did not make
sense. Quickly after he said the statement, focus child two said the correct statement and focus
child one was able to see that his answer did not make sense. Focus child one did fine with the
rest of the assessment and was able to know which statement was the cause and which was
the effect. Overall, both children did well, but focus child 1 seemed more confident in knowing
his answers than focus child two. Focus child 2 seemed unsure at times when focus child one
was confident in his answers. Focus child one was still engaged in the activity but after a
couple of sentences were made, he needed a greater challenge, where the other children were
still struggling a bit with the cause and effect. Through this assessment, I was able to take
observational notes. Focus child one had a clearer understanding of the concept. You were
able to see this by him placing the statements under the correct column each time. Focus child
two seemed a little unfocused in the beginning of the activity but as the activity went on he was
more engaged. Focus child two also was able to change is original answer to the correct on
during the assessment. For the notes that were taken, both focus children were able to
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Early Childhood
Task 3: Assessment Commentary

collaborate well with each other and follow directions. Focus child one showed a little
inappropriate behavior when saying the wrong answer on purpose to be funny but that was
addressed when giving feedback.]
e. If video or audio evidence of learning or a video or audio work sample occurs in a group
context (e.g., discussion), provide the name of the clip and clearly describe how the
scorer can identify the focus children (e.g., position, physical description) whose work is
portrayed.
[When looking at the video, focus child 1 is on the right side of the girl. Focus child 1 is the boy
wearing the bright green sweatshirt and glasses. When looking at the camera, focus child 2 is
the left of the girl. Focus child 2 has bright blonde hair and is wearing a grey and navy blue
shirt.]
2. Feedback to Guide Further Learning
Refer to specific evidence of submitted feedback to support your explanations.
a. Identify the format in which you submitted your evidence of feedback for the 2 focus
children. (Delete choices that do not apply.)

Written directly on work samples or in separate documents that were provided to the
focus children

In video clip(s) from Instruction Task 2 (provide a time-stamp reference) or in


separate video clips
If a video or audio clip of feedback occurs in a group context (e.g., discussion), clearly
describe how the scorer can identify the focus child (e.g., position, physical description)
who is being given feedback.
[In the small group video from task two, the two focus children are the boys. Focus child 2 is on
the left side of the girl wearing a grey long sleeve and focus child 1 is on the right side of the girl
wearing a bright green sweatshirt and glasses. In the video I am constantly asking for their
understanding and agreement. After each statement is made, I ask for thumbs up or down if the
children agreed or not. Then after each time, I would say if I would agree or not. Toward the
end, I ask focus child 2 to recall what effect meant. He said the wrong answer so I had a peer
help him out and then he was able to correctly say the answer. During this video, I always gave
positive feedback and acknowledged their efforts and encourage them. When they would say
the wrong answer or put the statement in the wrong column, I would let them self-correct and
then say I agreed with their change. Simply saying I agreed with their work, was giving them
feedback by letting them know I support their decision and that their answers were correct.
Since I gave verbal feedback that they had all the right answers I did not return the assessment
back to them. Instead, I gave them the rubric that I graded them on. Before I gave the rubric
back to the children, I asked them to reflect on how they think they did. Then I read the
feedback to each child and asked and answered any questions that they had. I checked for
understanding of cause and effect by having them give me an example before they were
dismissed.]
b. Explain how the feedback provided to the 2 focus children addresses their individual and
developmental strengths and needs relative to language and literacy development.
[By providing both written and verbal feedback, the children were able to see what they were
able to do and what they struggled with. When I gave the written feedback, I read it to both
children instead of just handing the paper back. I did this because when students get written
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Early Childhood
Task 3: Assessment Commentary

feedback they might not always read it. This way I was able to pull aside the children separately
and explain what they were and were not able to do in the activity. Before I gave them mine
feedback, I asked the children how they think they did with the activity and asked them if they
truly understood cause and effect. After discussing with them, I then read them my feedback
and asked if they had any questions. Even though I did this with both focus children, I mainly
did it because focus child 2 who is a struggling reader. Focus child 2 might have had trouble
reading the feedback and comments on the paper I handed back. This way I was able to tell
him directly and ask him questions to check for further understanding. When talking to focus
child 1 who is a more advanced student, I was able to discuss more in-depth feedback and ask
him harder questions to check for further comprehension. I asked both children to reflect on
their performance on the activity in the beginning, which was used to challenge focus child 1 to
use refection as a tool. I used reflection as a tool for both focus children even though it was to
advance focus child 1s learning. Reflection is a great tool to involve children in their own work.
With both focus children, I made sure to mainly have positive feedback besides mentioning what
they did wrong or needed to work on. When giving the verbal feedback from the video, I helped
both children understand that they were making right decisions by saying I agreed with them by
giving me thumbs up or down. When they would put the statements in the wrong column I would
wait for them to realize that it was incorrect and then they would fix it on their own. There was
never a situation where the children did not fix their own mistakes. When giving feedback to
focus child 2, I did mention that in the video he had put the statement in the wrong column and
then fixed it, which was great. I gave him positive feedback on why fixing his mistake was OK.
Providing verbal and written feedback helped address both of the focus childrens needs. By
going deeper into why and how questions with focus child 1 helped strengthen his learning.
Reading and pointing at specific comments on the paper to focus child 2, helped him
comprehend the feedback I was giving to him.]
c. Describe how you will support each focus child to understand and use this feedback to
further their learning related to learning objectives, either within the learning segment or
at a later time.
[To further both childrens learning, I asked them to reflect on their performance when I provided
feedback. Doing this first before given them the written feedback and then reading it to them
lets them have time to reflect. This is a great tool for students to be able to analyze their own
work. It involves them in the process of feedback and then lets them really think about their
performance. Being able to share their strengths and weaknesses shows me that they
understand what they did wrong and what they were able to accomplish. Sharing the written
feedback that they did well working with others and showed appropriate behavior will let them
know that they should act the in the same way in the future when collaborating with peers. Also
when ever a cause and effect is mentioned they should be able to remember the feedback
given and what they reflected on to help them recall the information needed. When teaching
about cause and effect again, I will ask each focus child specific questions that related to their
feedback to check for understanding. Hopefully, both children will be able to learn from their
mistakes and gain from their accomplishments and use the information in the learning segment
to connect to experiences or other learning topics in class.]
3. Evidence of Vocabulary Understanding and Use
When responding to the prompt below, use concrete examples from the video clips and/or
childrens work samples as evidence. Evidence from the video clips may focus on one or
more children.

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Early Childhood
Task 3: Assessment Commentary

a. Explain how children were able to use the key vocabulary1 to support their learning of the
content.

For prompt 3a, refer to the evidence of childrens vocabulary use from ONE,
TWO, OR ALL THREE of the following sources:
1. Video clips from Instruction Task 2 and time-stamp references for evidence of
vocabulary use
2. Additional video file named Vocabulary Use of no more than 5 minutes in
length and cited vocabulary use (this can be footage of one or more children).
See Assessment Task 3 specifications in the Early Childhood Evidence Chart
for acceptable file types. Submit the video clip in Assessment Task 3, Part C.
3. Childrens work samples analyzed in Assessment Task 3 and cited
vocabulary use
[In the small group video from task two and learning experience two, the children are asked to
recall the definitions of cause and effect in the beginning of the video (00:11 - 00:24) and the
end of the video (05:45 6:14). They are also asked to do the sign language that goes along
with the words what and why related to cause and effect. Throughout the small group video,
children are asked to recognize if the statement they read is a cause or effect. They have to use
the vocabulary words to answer the question. They also have to think before they answer and
try to remember the definitions to see what column to put the statement under. In the entire
video children are asked to use the vocabulary to clearly identify which statement is the cause
and which is the effect to create an appropriate sentence that makes sense. In the whole-class
video from task two and learning experience three, children are asked recall the vocabulary
definitions and sign language. As a whole-class we say the definitions out loud and do the sign
language along with it (01:27 01:36). As the experiment is introduced to the children, they are
asked to identify what the cause and effect was of putting the egg in vinegar for twenty-four
hours. The children have to use the vocabulary to identify what the cause and effect was of the
experiment (03:10-05:08). Then, when I popped the egg, they had to identify what the cause
and effect was again. Again, children had to think what the vocabulary words meant and then
apply it to a situation (05:31-06:21).]
4. Using Assessment to Inform Instruction
a. Based on your analysis of childrens learning presented in prompts 1bc, describe next
steps for instruction:

For the class/group


For the 2 focus children and other individuals/groups with specific needs
Consider the active and multimodal nature of childrens learning and the variety of
learners in your class/group who may require different strategies/supports (e.g., children
with IEPs or 504 plans, English language learners, children at different points in the

This vocabulary was identified in Planning Task 1 and refers to developmentally appropriate sounds, words, phrases,

sentences, and paragraphs that children use or create to engage in the learning experience.

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Early Childhood
Task 3: Assessment Commentary

developmental continuum, struggling readers, and/or gifted children needing greater


support or challenge).
[The next step for the class would be to enhance this learning of cause and effect through
another activity that would engage them. Since, they have a clear understanding of cause and
effect and know how to identify which one is the cause and which is the effect, they would be
able to relate it to reading and writing. I would have students read a book of their choice so that
they can pick of something that interests them. Children are more likely to do well on their work
if they are interested in the topic. After the children pick their book, I would ask them to read for
a little until they found a cause and effect that happened in the book. Most books will have
cause and effects but incase students cannot find one; I would have a couple of books on hand
that I know had a cause and effect. After the student found the cause and effect I would ask
them to write it down and explain why and what happened. I would ask if the effect was a good
or bad thing and tell the students to write down why. This way, students are extending their
knowledge on cause and effect to comprehend if the cause and effect was a positive thing that
happened or a negative. Maybe it was neither positive nor negative to the specific situation, so
then the student would have to explain why they thought that. This would involve reading and
writing and would help children explain their thoughts. Explaining why is sometimes a harder
concept for children to understand. Children need to learn that they have to have evidence to
support their writing when they are giving their opinion. As a teacher when reading I could learn
more about the childrens understanding and could provide more feedback doing this activity. I
think this activity would help children start recognizing cause and effect all over, in their reading,
writing, in school and at home. Discussing the cause and effect in situations throughout the
year anytime it comes up in reading or writing, I would ask the students to recall what cause and
effect means and see if they are able to identify both.]
b. Explain how these next steps follow from your analysis of childrens learning. Support
your explanation with principles from research and/or developmental theory.
[Connecting and explain different cause and effect situations throughout the year, even when it
is not the main focus will help children build their learning. As children continue to develop, so
will their skills and knowledge from prior and current learning. According to the Cognitivedevelopmental theory, childrens thinking and reason change over time. That is why bringing up
cause and effect even when the children have already learned is a positive experience. Even a
couple weeks after learning about a concept, children can grow and develop in different areas
that help them with a certain concept. Being aware of all situations and constantly engaging
children in prior knowledge with support their learning. Also having students use hands-on
materials through experiences or activities will help the childs development. Lev Vygotsky
supports this. Children can collaborate with each other using hands-on materials to build their
knowledge and understanding of a concept. Learning from peers, parents, and caregivers
outside of the classroom also promotes childrens learning and helps them make connections.]
Common Assessment:
For the common assessment, children will be working in groups to accomplish the task.
Children will be in pairs and one group will be pulled to work with the teacher. Children will be
given a big piece of construction paper. They will be instructed to write cause at the top of one
side and effect on the top of the other side, leaving room in the middle to put the word because.
Then the students will split up the already cutout statements between the group. They will take
turns reading a statement and then trying to identify if it is a cause or effect. Then the other
children, including the one that just read the statement out loud will have to look at their
statement in from of them to see if they have one that goes with it. The children will keep taking
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Early Childhood
Task 3: Assessment Commentary

turns building sentences from the statement until they are done. Once they are finished, they
can re-check their statements and glue them on the construction paper. After all of these steps,
the children may turn it in. Students will be assessed using the rubric below.

Collaboration

Students
demonstrate
appropriate
behavior
when
working
together.

Students
are
struggling
working
together
and cannot
agree.

Students do
not
demonstrate
appropriate
behavior
when
working
together.

Possible
Points

/2
Directions

Students
follow all
directions.

Students
follow some
directions
but leave
out steps.

Students do
not follow
directions.

/2

Correct
Cause and
Effect
Statements

Students
have all
correct
cause and
effect
statements.

Students
have half of
the cause
and effect
statements
correct.

Students
have no
correct
cause and
effect
statements.
/2

Comments

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Early Childhood
Task 3: Assessment Commentary

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