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Global Strategy Group
March 22, 2016
POLL RESULTS Nevadans want tax revenues to go to convention center, not NFL stadium

A commanding majority of Nevadans support a proposal to use Clark County room tax revenues to
modernize and expand the Las Vegas Convention Center. When confronted with the possibility that only
one economic development project can be funded through the room tax, voters prefer that the
convention center expansion move forward over the publicly-subsidized construction of an NFL-quality
stadium in Las Vegas by a clear, double-digit margin. Voters across the state see the convention center as
a more worthwhile use of public funding, and support for using room tax revenues to fund the convention
center is particularly strong among voters closest to the issue in Clark County. Key findings from Global
Strategy Groups recent poll of 800 likely 2016 General Election voters in Nevada are as follows:

KEY SURVEY FINDINGS:

Voters overwhelmingly support a plan to expand the Las Vegas Convention Center: After hearing
about a $1.4 billion dollar plan to modernize and expand the convention center, including the fact
that it would be funded through Clark County room tax revenues, roughly two-thirds of Nevadans
support moving forward with the proposal (67% support/25% oppose). Support is even higher among
the Clark County voters who stand to be affected most by the proposal (71% support/24% oppose).

Nevadans prefer the convention center expansion by a double-digit margin over a competing plan
to use public dollars on an NFL stadium: When voters also hear about the $1.2 billion dollar proposal
to build a new NFL-quality stadium in Las Vegas, with $720 million coming from public funds,
Nevadans would rather see room tax revenues devoted to the convention center plan by a 13-point
margin (51% convention center/38% stadium). This margin extends to 18 points among Clark County
voters (55% convention center/37% stadium).

Voters are skeptical about using public funds on a private stadium: Nevadans are 32 points more
likely to identify the convention center plan as having clear public benefits (57% convention
center/25% stadium) than the stadium proposal, and twice as likely to believe the convention center
expansion would be a good use of taxpayer dollars (52% convention center/26% stadium). By a 46point margin, Nevadans are also more likely to describe the convention center plan as a safe
investment (63% convention center/17% stadium) of public funds.

ABOUT THIS POLL


Global Strategy Group conducted a survey between March 9-13, 2016 with 800 likely 2016 General Election
voters in Nevada. The results have a margin of error of +/- 3.5%, and care has been taken to ensure the
geographic and demographic divisions of the expected electorate are properly represented based on past voter
turnout statistics.

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