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Joint Special Meeting of

The Board of Trustees


Gregory-Portland ISD
and

The City Council


City of Portland
March 22, 2016

Growth in the
City and School Communities
March 22, 2016

City of Portland Estimated Population


25,000

20,000

BRAC
15,000

10,000

5,000

New Single Family Residential Permits


140

Fiscal Year 2015-2016

100
80
60
40
20
0

PROJECTED

120

G-PISD Enrollment History


5,000
4,750
4,500
4,250
4,000
3,750
3,500
3,250
3,000

City of Portland Projected Population


Assuming 2.0% and 3.0% Growth Rate

60,000
50,000
40,000
30,000
20,000
10,000
0
2016

2020

2025

2030

2035

2040

2045

2050

G-PISD Gearing Up for Growth


Long-range facilities planning based on substantial
student and community growth projections
Conservative financial management to attain goals while
meeting expected needs
Appreciative of community support (Bonds 2012 & 2015)
to support increase in student enrollment

Facilities: Capacity & Load Comparisons


Campus

Building
Age

Building
Capacity

Enrollment

% of Capacity

Optimum
Maximum
Capacity

Andrews

36

415

344

83%

85-90%

Austin

575

472

82%

85-90%

Clark

22

671

618

92.1%

85-90%

East
Cliff

58

354

398

112.4%

85-90%

Facilities: Capacity & Load Comparisons


Enrollment

% of
Capacity

Optimum
Maximum
Capacity

729

472

65%

85%

51

1,086

729

67.1%

80-85%

13

1,800

1,357

75.3%

70-80%

Building
Age

Building
Capacity

Intermediate

51

Junior High
High School

Campus

Facilities: Expansion in Progress


Only 3 of 7 campuses have life expectancy beyond 20 yrs
High School, W.C. Andrews & S.F. Austin

There are 2 of 7 campuses exceeding optimum capacity


East Cliff & T.M. Clark

Bonds 2012 & 2015 are addressing some of these needs.


Current construction projects meet immediate needs,
while also considering future student enrollment growth.

Student Enrollment Growth


6500

6066
5949
5878 5920
5645
5469

5500
5284
5147
4989
4797

4500
4277 4253

4433

4341 4315
4197

4488 4518

4588

4606

4292

3500

ACTUAL

PROJECTED

Bond 2012: East Cliff Elementary School


$15.9 Million Project

Bond 2012: East Cliff Elementary School


New campus will be nearly twice the size (80,392 sq. ft.)
of the current campus (44,908 sq. ft.)
Feature state-of-the-art security system
Top-quality energy efficiency, 90% LED lighting
Three times the parking space of current campus
High-resolution exterior digital marquee

Bond 2015: Making Progress


Bond 2015 Projects

Cost Estimate

Completion to
Date

Land Aquisition

$1 Million

100%

New Elementary School

$25 Million

5%

New Middle School

$55 Million

0%

High School Addition &


Career Tech Center

$16.5 Million

0%

Capitalization Items

$19.5 Million

50%

$117 Million Bond Package

Bond 2015: Making Progress


5-Year Capitalization Items

Cost Estimate

Completion to Date

Band Instruments HS & Junior High

$585,000

90%

Video Technical

$300,000

10%

Health Sciences

$69,000

80%

Secondary & Elementary Music

$200,200

85%

Athletic Uniforms

$97,200

95%

Theater

$28,800

10%

Technology

$3,400,00

5%

School Buses

$1,452,000

25%

Service Vehicles

$150,000

25%

HVAC Equipment

$255,000

10%

Furniture @ New Campuses

$4,875,000

0%

$8,087,600

15%

Maintenance Projects

(Short-Term Projects,
Athletic Restrooms, Concessions Stands, Ticket Booths)

Bond 2015: Land Acquisition


& New Elementary School

Bond 2015: Land Acquisition


& New Elementary School

Bond 2015: Land Acquisition


& New Elementary School
Land acquired: 58 acres on Moore Ave.
New elementary campus planned to be larger than new
East Cliff Elementary School at approx. 92,000 sq. ft.
(new East Cliff is 80,392 sq. ft.)

Estimated Tax Values through 2035

Low Wealth to High Wealth


Big changes will affect our tax roll (revenue) very soon
As we transition to becoming a high wealth district, there
will be an even greater need for sound financial planning
More local income also means an increase in
contributions to the state thus, we will continue to rely
on community support
We will continue to exercise a conservative approach to
determine budgets, project revenue, and maintain a
healthy fund balance

City of Portland
Future Growth Corridor
March 22, 2016

2014 Annexation

2.9 Square Miles


Up to 1,200 new home sites

2015 Annexation

1.3 Square Miles


Up to 440 new home sites

voestalpine

TPCO

Oxy Ethylene

Cheniere

Sherwin

Future Growth Corridor


13,000 Ac

GP-ISD

Future Growth Corridor


13,000 Ac

Development of
Workforce Education
March 22, 2016

Del Mar College


Serving Portland, GPISD
and
San Patricio County
Lenora Keas
Interim Provost and Vice President of Instruction and Student Services
And
Vice President of Workforce Development and Strategic Initiatives

43

Corpus Christi Ship Channel

Castleton
Commodities
M&G
Plastics

T.P.C.O.
American
Tubular

La Quinta
Terminal
Voestalpine
Steel

Oxy
Propane

Martin
Operating

Cheniere
LNG

LyondellBasell

Trafigura

NSI
Occidental
Petroleum

Liquid
Gas

$40 BILLION NEW INVESTMENT


EXCALIBUR
TRAFIGURA
BUCKEYE

AIR LIQUIDE

GULF
COMPRESS

HALIBURTON
ADM GRAIN
ELEVATOR

FLINT HILLS

M&G

AEP
TEXAS

VOESTALPINE

SUPERIOR
WEIGHTING

PLAINS

OXY
ETHYLENE
CHENIERE
CONDENSATE

MARTIN
MIDSTREAM

CITGO
WEST

GULF MARINE
FABRICATORS

EMAS
ELEMENTIS

BTB
REFINING

KIEWIT

CITGO
EAST

INTERSTATE
GRAIN FLINT HILLS
PLAINS

CELANESE
BISHOP, TX

SHERWIN
ALUMINA

DUPONT

CASTLETON

PLAINS

TPCO

NUSTAR

VALERO

LYONDELLBA
SELL

CHENIERE

EAST

FLINT HILLS
INGLESIDE
OXY
ENERGY
INGLESIDE

TOPAZ
POWER
GROUP
TEXAS LEHIGH/

PLAINS

MARKWEST
JAVELINA

MAGELLAN

NORTHERN
WHITESAND

BAY

BALANCING EXPLOSIVE GROWTH WITH CLEAN AIR


AND CLEAN WATER

Del Mar College Worldwide Impact

Targeted Occupations 2015


Workforce Solutions of Coastal
Bend
by SOC Code

Bus and Truck Mechanics and Diesel Engine


Specialist
Chemical Plant and Systems Operators
Electrical and Electronics Engineering
Technicians Instrumentation Technicians
Heating, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration
Mechanics
Machinists Including CNC
Operating Engineers and other Construction
Equipment Operators
Petroleum Pump System Operators, Refinery
Operators Process Technology
Rotary Drill Operators, Oil and Gas
Welders, Cutters, Solderers and Brazers
47

Targeted Occupations 2015


Business Accountants, Paralegals and
Legal Assistants
Education School Teachers
Health Care EMS, Occupational Health
and Safety Specialists, Physical
Therapists Assistants, Registered Nurses
Public Service Firefighters, Police and
Security Guards
Miscellaneous Aircraft Mechanics and
Service Technicians
Emerging Technology Occupations

48

Industry Partners Texas


Workforce Skills Grants and Other
Support
Voestalpine
Cheniere Energy
Lyondell Basell
Chemours
Occidental Chemical Oxy Chem/Mexi
Chem
CB&I
TPCO America
Dynamic
M & G Polymers
Sherwin Alumina
Flint Hills Resources
CITGO Petroleum
Valero Energy

Programs at GPISD
Dual Credit in Associate of Liberal Arts
and Associate in Applied Science
Degrees, Certificates and Industrial
Certifications NCCER Certification
Students Earn Credits in General
Education Courses, Welding, and Process
Technology
Non-Credit Courses and Corporate
Training
Additional Options in Applied Health
Sciences and Engineering

Welding and Process and


Instrumentation Technology

Del Mar College Serving Workforce


$2.2 Million Investment

Process Technology and


Instrumentation Pilot Plant

Pilot Plant

Career & Technology Education (CTE)


Bond 2015: High School Addition & Career Tech Center
Planning to provide as many dual-credit courses as
possible (partnership with Del Mar College)
Goal to provide enough dual-credit courses so that
students can obtain certifications and/or Associates
degrees in addition to a high school diploma
Anticipating workforce needs to prepare program offerings
relevant to available job opportunities in our area

Sample of Dual-Credit Courses


PROCESS TECHNOLOGY: Purchased several
models/simulators for this year, now part of curriculum

Sample of Dual-Credit Courses


WELDING: Doubling size of welding lab this
Spring/Summer to accommodate increase in student
enrollment
Many students are now ready to test for NCCER certification in
Welding

Sample of Dual-Credit Courses


HEALTH SCIENCE: As of this year, we now have four
students who have earned a certification in phlebotomy
ENGINEERING: Now registering students for classes
beginning next year, 2016-2017
VIDEO TECHNOLOGY: Several students involved with
audio/visual production classes (GPTV) will soon test for
an Adobe certification
Full course catalog now available: www.g-pisd.org

Joint School-Library Services

March 22, 2016

Concept & Precedent

The concept of a combined public and


school library is one that has worked for
several communities in Texas and
elsewhere and is being explored for the
City of Portland and Gregory-Portland
ISD to maximize efficiencies with shared
resources.

Potential Advantages
Improved collection of
resources
Maximization of financial
resources
Facilities & Accessibility
Availability of new
technology for community
Enhanced Programs &
Services
Extended Hours of
Operation
Creation of a community
focal point for adults and
youth

Issues to be Considered
A clear sense of our
shared mission would be
vital
Public support and
involvement are essential
Staffing and funding
Blending adult usage with
student usage
Differences in technology
needs for varied library
patrons

Texas Library Statistics


887 Public Libraries
8,400 Public School Libraries
29 Combined Public/School Libraries

City of Portland
Bond 2016 Briefing
March 22, 2016

Bond Election History


1969 - GO streets and drainage
1971 - GO street improvements
1978 - GO storm drains, new PD, library expansion
1993 - Adopted Type B Sales Tax (Community
Center)
2003 - Adopted Venue Sales Tax (Aquatics
Center)

95% of our current debt is serviced by Certificates


of Obligation

Excellent Financial Health

General Obligation Bond Rating - AA


Utility Bond Insured Rating - AA
Sales Tax Bond Insured Rating - AA
Venue Sales Tax Insured Rating - AA

Total Assessed Value - Projected


2% growth assumed beyond 2018

$2,000
$1,800
Assessed Value in Millions

$1,600
$1,400
$1,200
$1,000
$800
$600
$400
$200
$0

Major Infrastructure and Facilities Projects


Project Expenditures by Class
$60

Millions

$50

$40

Recreation
Facilities

$30

$20

$10

Utilities
Streets

$0
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015

Community Center

Community Center Expansion

1993Venue Sales Tax Election


1995Constructed
2012Roof replacement
2013New HVAC and lighting controls
2014Elastomeric coating and envelope
repairs

Community Center Expansion


Element

Estimated Cost

Minor Renovations

$800,000

Major Renovations

$1,800,000

New Construction

$7,300,000

Site Work
Total Proposed Project

$900,000
$10,800,000

Sports Complex & Municipal Park


Expansion

Softball Complex and Municipal Park


Element

Estimated Cost

Softball Complex
Rehabilitation/Maintenance
Expansion
Artificial Turf (Full)
Municipal Park

$2,000,000
$4,600,000
$3,200,000

Rehabilitation/Maintenance

$2,000,000

Expansion

$4,500,000

Artificial Turf (Full)

$1,600,000

Project Total

$17,900,000

(Less Certificate of Obligation issued July, 2015)

($3,500,000)

Total Proposed Project

$14,400,000

Ad Valorem Tax Impact


I&S Tax Rate per $100 Valuation

$0.35
$0.30
$0.25
$0.20

I&S Rate with GO Bond Projects

$0.15
$0.10
$0.05
$0.00

I&S Rate without GO Bond Projects

Tax Impact to the Homeowner


Based on the average taxable home value of $150,000 @ $0.06
G.O. Bond
Projects

Community
Center
Sports
Complexes
Total

Tax Rate
Impact

Annual
Impact

Monthly
Impact

Daily
Impact

$0.0288

$43.20

$3.60

$0.12

$0.0312

$46.80

$3.90

$0.13

$0.060

$90.00

$7.50

$0.25

Bond Issuance Plan


To minimize the initial tax impact, the bonds and the
certificates will be sold in installments over a 3-year
period.
Taxpayers will not feel the year over year impact until
FYE 2019.
Illustration of estimated I&S Tax Rate Requirement if all
bonds approved:
FYE 9/30:

I&S Tax Rate

2017

20.73

2018

19.09

2019

25.09

2016 Uniform Election Calendar


Early voting begins
Early voting ends
Election day

April 25, 2016


May 3, 2016
May 7, 2016