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Unit Name: What Affects Our Identity

Lesson #1
Name of Lesson: Introduction to Unit and to the book Graceling
Goals and Objectives
Goals: Introduction to what could affect a persons identity and Graceling pre-reading activities.
Objectives: Students will be able to brainstorm about what could affect a persons identity and
analyze some factors that affect the main characters identity in the first chapter. Students will
also discuss with other students about their opinions on identity.
State Standards:
1. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development
over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by
specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. (910.RL.2)
Materials and Tools
Materials: Whiteboard with whiteboard markers, the students daily journals, and a copy of the
book Graceling.
Procedures
Motivation/ Anticipatory Set: Anticipation guide (15 minutes)
1. The teacher will write down the activities, goals, and state standards on the boards before
class starts. Also, the teacher will put individual colored stickers on the students desk
consisting of red, blue, green, yellow, orange, and purple.
2. The teacher will also write down the prompt What makes a good story? What would the
attributes be in order to make a story an entertaining one?
3. The students will write in their daily journal about what they believe is a good story and
what makes it a good story.

4. Students will share their journal entry with their closest neighbor. Students will not be
allowed to get out of their seats at the moment.
5. The teacher will read the first chapter of Graceling aloud to all the students.
Activity 1: Mini Lesson on Setting (8 minutes)
1.

Teacher will share the proper definition of a setting and ask the students what they can

gather about descriptive words and what descriptive words do for the setting.
2.

Students will also share some ideas about what the time period is in Graceling and how

they can tell based off the first chapter.


Activity 1: Authors Promise (10 minutes)
1. The teacher will explain what an authors promise is based off the first chapter of
Graceling. An authors promise is what the author promises to complete by the end of the
novel.
2. The teacher will ask students (volunteer based) what they think the author will promise to
the readers. For example, why is Katsa hiding her identity, why is Katsa so against killing
individuals, why did Katsa not kill the Lienid individual, who kidnaped the grandfather
and why? Etc.
3. Students will also discuss with the teacher (volunteer based) what they believe
foreshadowing is and what they believe is going to happen next in the story.
Activity 3: Think- Pair- Share Activity (15 minutes)
1. Students will be divided into pairs based off what color they received before class.
Students will get together with a person who has the same color sticker and start
discussing the topic on the board, which is is there any kind of reason when it is okay to
kill a person and does killing someone necessarily make the person a villain.
2. Students will share their opinion for five to six minutes with their partner while the
teacher is walking around and observing the classroom.

3. The teacher will then ask the students for volunteers to answer the question, each student
will share their partners response on one of the particular questions. Hopefully everyone
will be able to share their opinions with the class.
4. The purpose of this activity is to question Katsas reasoning about whether to kill or
injure, to interpret, and reach an understanding of Katsas character because there are
multiple times when Katsa has to kill someone and when she refuses.

Closure: Exit Ticket (5 minutes)


1. Students will then write about another students opinion and why they liked it or why
they did not like it. Students have to write one or two complete sentences.
2. The teacher will assign chapter two of Graceling as homework for the next class.
Reflective Assessment and Evaluation
Evaluation/ Assessment:
1. Students will be able to discuss with small groups and the teacher based of the reading
done in class and the mini lessons. Students will also share another students opinion with
the teacher by writing a short response.
Troubleshooting: The teacher will bring spare markers in case the classroom markers dry out.
Also, the teacher will walk around the classroom to make sure the students are actually
discussing the question. The teacher will leave behind some copies of Graceling in case, a
student or the teacher misplaced their own copy.
Reflection:

Unit Name: What Affects Our Identity


Lesson #2
Name of Lesson: Introduction to Characters and What Makes a Person Controllable
Goals and Objectives:
Goals: Discussion about characters from the previous nights reading and a discussion on
controllability.
Objectives: Students will be able to discuss and describe the characters physical attributes/
personality and analyze what makes a person controllable.
State Standards:

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explici

tly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (910.RI.1)


Analyze in detail how an authors ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular
sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter). (910.RI.5)
Materials and Tools:

Materials: A copy of Graceling, big sheets of paper, markers, crayons, handout on activity, and
post-its.
Procedures:
Motivation/ Anticipatory Set: Journaling (5 minutes)

The teacher will write on the board about what students liked or did not like in the

reading and why.


Students will write down in their journal about chapter two and chapter three. What they
need help on or what they want to focus on.

Activity 1: Character Concept Map (15- 20 minutes)

Students will get into groups of five. Each group will include five or six students. Then

they will take a piece of paper with a few markers.


Students will then be given a character out of a bucket. Characters will include Katsa,

Oll, Giddon, Randa, and Raffin.


Students will look for specific quotes in Graceling about the characters personality,

actions, and physical appearance.


Students will draw a scene they personally enjoyed with their favorite quote about their

character.
See handout.

Activity 2: Presentation of Character Maps (8-10 Minutes)

Students will discuss their character, the scene they choose, and why they decided on

that scene.
Each group will have 2 or 3 minutes to share.

Activity 3: Think- Group- Share (10 minutes)

Students will remain in their previous groups and have a discussion on controllability.
Questions to include on the white board: What makes a person in control? What requires
control? How to gain control? Is Katsa really in control of herself and actions? Or is King

Randa?
Students will write down what each other said, in order to share with the classroom
tomorrow.

Closure: Exit Ticket and Homework (5 minutes)

Students will write down a sentence or two about what they discussed in their groups or

write a sentence about what they need help with in the readings.
Students will need to read chapter four and chapter five, then write a discussion question
for the next day.
Reflective Assessment and Evaluation:

Evaluation/ Assessment

Students will share character descriptions with the rest of the class and the teacher,
showing that they have read. Then students will be able to share their discussion notes
with the class the next day.

Troubleshooting: The teacher will bring extra copies of Graceling, extra markers and paper, and
post-its with the students name on them.
Reflection:

Character Concept Map:


Students draw a map and is given a character from Graceling. Each characters
connection to the other characters will be different based off the character received. Include three
of the characters physical attributes, one quotation that explains the characters, and a visual
representation of the character. Then connect the characters to each other. See example below.

Relatives
Po

Randa
Katsa

King

Childhood friends/

Cruel

related

Benefits from
Father and

Raffin

Son

others

Unit Name: What Affects Our Identity


Lesson #3
Name of Lesson: Giftedness
Goals and Objectives:
Goals: Introduce the idea of giftedness, have students discuss and create their own character.
Objectives: Students will discuss what makes a person gifted or talented and create their own
character.
State Standards:

Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text,
including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objecti
ve summary of the text. (910.RI.2)
Materials:

Materials: Students will need a piece of paper, markers, crayons, and post-its. A copy of
Graceling would be helpful, but not necessary.
Procedures:
Motivation/ Anticipatory Set: Journaling (5 minutes)

The teacher will write the prompt What are your talents and weaknesses on the white

board.
Students will write in their journal what they are good or talented at and what their

weaknesses are.
Students will then group up with a partner next to them and share their journal.

Activity 1: Think- Group- Share Activity (10 minutes)

Students will get into the groups they were in the other day and share what they talked
about with their group.

Students will only have 2 or 3 minutes to share with the classroom.

Activity 2: Discussion on Giftedness (20- 25 minutes)

The teacher will ask the students about what abilities they found in the reading and if they
would be considered dangerous or harmless. The teacher will also ask if the meaning

gifted has to do with powers.


The teacher will ask the students about what makes a person talented? Does the person
have to be really good at something to be talented and who decides what talent is? Does

the person have to be naturally talented or does it take hard work?


Each student will have a chance to talk because the teacher will take their post-it with
their name on it as soon as the students says something substantial for the discussion

Activity 3: Create Your Own Character Activity (15 minutes)

After students deemed what is giftedness and what is not, students will create their own

character to later write a fictional and creative story about their created character.
The teacher will show a model of this in class.
Students will work individually on drawing their own character, which includes their
physical appearance, personality traits, and their giftedness. This does not mean that their

character has to be a superhero or a supervillain.


The teacher will supervise the classroom and answer any questions the students have
about the assignment.

Closure: Turning the Character Activity In (2 minutes)

Students will then turn in the assignment to the teacher before leaving.
Homework will be to read chapter six and chapter seven.
Reflective Assessment and Evaluation:

Evaluation/ Assessment: The assessment will be the multiple discussions about what they have
read in the chapters assigned.
Troubleshooting: Bring extra copies of paper, markers, handouts, and a copy of Graceling

Reflection:

Create a Character Body Worksheet:

Name of Unit: What Affects Our Identity


Lesson #4
Name of Lesson: Identifying Roles
Goals and Objectives:
Goals: Observing and identifying multiple roles that characters play.
Objectives: Students will analyze and discuss common roles while comparing those roles to the
characters role.
State Standards:

Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations)
develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or

develop the theme. (910.RL.3)


Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explici
tly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (910.RL.1)
Materials and Tools:

Materials: Students will need a copy of Graceling, role activity handout, markers and crayons,
and big sheets of paper.
Procedures:
Motivation/ Anticipatory Set: Journaling (5 minutes)

The teacher will write the prompt What are common roles that you follow every day?
Do you fulfil the role of being an older or younger sibling? Do you fulfil your teammates
expectations on your sports team on the white board before students enter the classroom.

Students will write in their journals about common roles. For instance, if they play sports
what is the role they must fulfill to make the team successful? If they have younger

siblings or older siblings, what could their role be? What would the parents role be?
After completing the journal entry, students will group with their neighbor and share their
roles or their familys role. The teacher will circulate through the classroom to make sure
everyone is on task, while passing out the role handout.

Activity 1: Role Activity Handout (15 minutes)

The teacher will should a model (regarding Prince Po) and mention how as a prince, he
should be very noble and prestigious, when he is actually casual. Then to take it a little
further, mention how Katsa expects Prince Po to shy away from her glaze (like everyone

else), but embraces it. The teacher must support with quotes.
Each student will receive a randomize handout and be paired off into groups of three
containing seven to eight students. There will be three types of stickers to pair off the

groups (a flower, a crown, and a smurf).


The flower group will focus on Katsa, the crown will focus on King Randa, and the smurf
will focus on Prince Raffin. Each group will focus on the characters role, what their role

is assumed to be compared to their reality.


The groups will need to find at least five quotes from the book Graceling, in order to

make the next activity work.


The teacher will be assisting students that have questions or be prepared with a quote in
case, the students have difficulty.

Activity 2: Drawing the Roles: (15 minutes)

One member of each group will grab two large sheet of paper with markers and crayons
in order to draw the characters reality compared to the expectations.

The group will split into halves in order to draw the characters reality while another
draws expectations for the character. For instance, if there was a group of eight students,
four would work on the reality and the other four would work on expectations.

Activity 3: Sharing with the Class (5 minutes)

Students will then share their picture while explaining the characters realistic role
compared to the expected roles. Will be very quick and brief.

Closure: Exit Ticket (10 minutes)

Students will return to their seats and write on a piece of paper about what they learned
from roles activity and how their perspective changed from doing the activity. What do
they think is expected of them? Does their role differ or similar to other peoples

expectations?
During the last few minutes, students will turn in their response to the teacher.
Homework will be to read chapters eight and nine.
Reflective Assessment and Evaluation:

Evaluation/ Assessment: The assessment will be the quotes the students picked out to support
their characters role and the scene they choose from. Also, another assessment will be from what
the students wrote down in their response.
Troubleshooting: The teacher will bring extra copies of Graceling, have a few quotes already
picked out if students are having difficulty finding quotes, and bring extra copies of the handout.
Reflection:

Role Activity Handout:


Students will need to fill out the table with their group members and find at least five quotes to
support your handout.

Description of the Character Role:

What he or she says about their role:

In your words-

In the authors wordsWhat do other people say about her roles:

Visualizing the Character:

Draw a small picture of their roles (we will be


drawing a bigger version of this, so go for the
big picture)

Name of Unit: What Affects Our Personality


Lesson #5
Name of Lesson: Introduction to Dialogue Journals
Goals and Objectives:
Goals: Introduce dialogue journals to students and do a recap of the chapters read.
Objectives: Students will be grouped into pairs to analyze more deeply with the text and review
what previously happened in the chapters.
State Standards:

Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) de
velop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or dev

elop the theme. (910.RL.3)


Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g.,
how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author dra
ws on a play by Shakespeare). (910.RL.9)
Materials and Tools:

Materials: Students will need a composition notebook, completely different from their everyday
journals, pens or pencils, and a copy of Graceling.
Procedures:
Motivational/ Anticipatory Set: Journaling (5 minutes)

The teacher will write down a prompt on the white board, like what do the students think

about the novel so far? Is the reading manageable and if not, what can be improved?
Students will then write in their journals and put the journals away for the next day.

Activity 1: Introduction to Dialogue Journals (15 minutes)

The teacher will introduce dialogue journals as a way to deepen the students
understanding of the novel. Each student will take turns to write about the chapter
assigned. For instance, what the students liked about the reading, what they did not like

or something that was confusing, and predictions.


The teacher will then show a model of a dialogue letter that the teacher wrote and explain

the expected format to write the letter in.


Students will be paired into randomized pairings based off their last names and will
decide who will write the first letter.

Activity 2: Jeopardy PowerPoint/ Prezi (25 minutes)

Students will be split into five groups of five or six groups based off numbering the

students.
The teacher will ask the question What is the relationship between Katsa and Price

Raffin? Whoever answers first will be the first to pick their category and the point value.
The rules will include what would happen if the students get it wrong (next group with
their hands up) or if they get it right (move on to the next group). The winners will
receive a free homework pass for the entire group or maybe candy.

Closure: Exit Ticket/ Bonus Round (5 minutes)

Homework will be to read chapter ten and eleven and writing the first dialogue letter.
The groups with the two highest points will go into the Bonus Round to declare the
winner and the winning group will receive their rewards.
Reflective Evaluations and Assessment:

Evaluation/ Assessment: The evaluation will be the jeopardy game to analyze who is reading and
who is not then evaluating what content level they are at.

Troubleshooting: If the Prezi does not work, then the teacher will bring pre-made notecards with
the point value and the questions on the notecards. Also, bring spare composition notebooks for
whoever needs them.
Reflection:

Dear ___________ (Your dialogue partner),


I read chapter (whatever chapter you are on) and I thought about (include your favorite
part or something you were confused on) because (why did you like or dislike something). I
think Katsa is kind of weird because she kills people and I wonder if she actually likes killing
people or if she actually hates it. I wonder why she continues to kill people her uncle doesnt
like. Try to include a quote or two.
Focus on something new. Like character relationships, arising problems, or whatever you
think is interesting. I really like the relationship between Raffin and Katsa because they are
exactly like siblings and get along really well. I wonder why Po is able to fight Katsa so well,
even though no one else can fight her.
Relate the book back to class. Only positive remarks please. Like I really enjoyed the
drawing activity we did the other day because we were able to draw whatever we wanted or I
dont understand the mini lesson on setting. What do you do to help with your understanding
of setting. Be respectful to your classmates. No cursing and try to stay positive. You can hate
this book if you so desire, but do not only talk about you hating the book. Mention reasons
why you dislike it and move on to a class activity or something that you like somewhat.

Sincerely, (Best wishes/ Thanks/ From)


Your Printed Name
Your Signature

Unit Name: What Affects Our Identity


Lesson #6
Name of Lesson: Cartoon Creation for Graceling
Goals and Objectives:
Goals: Tracking the characters progress and their beliefs.
Objectives: Students will analyze and discuss the characters improvement throughout the first
thirteen chapters.
State Standards:

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says

explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (910.RI.1).


Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the
order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the

connections that are drawn between them. (910.RI.3)


Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including
figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of
specific word choices on meaning and tone. (910.RI.4)
Materials and Tools:

Materials: A copy of Graceling, daily journals, dialogue letters, and Cartoon Creation worksheet.
Procedures:
Motivation/ Anticipatory Set: Daily Journaling and Exchanging Dialogue Letters (8 minutes)

The teacher will write the prompt What is your favorite character in Graceling? Least
favorite character? Why do you dislike or like the character? Focus on personality traits

and their way of thinking?


Students will start writing about the prompt in their daily journals as soon as the bell
rings.

When students have completed their journal, they will quietly meet with their dialogue

partner and discuss what they wrote in their letter briefly.


The teacher will be supervising the classroom while passing out the cartoon handouts.

Activity 1: Cartoon Creation Activity (20 minutes)

The teacher will discuss the handout with the students briefly and create a model for the
students to use. For example, the teacher will write about Katsa while asking the students
about her physical appearance and her personality. Then ask how the other characters
react to Katsa and focus more on Po and King Randa. Then the teacher will create a
drawing based off what the students said. For instance, Katsa being put into a cage (with
no lock) with the King poking and laughing at her, while Po says hes not the one who
makes you savage. You make yourself savage (121). Remind students to focus on the
characters reactions and behaviors regarding the character chosen (Raffin, Po, Giddon,

Randa, Helda, Bann, King and Queen of Monsea.(5 minutes for modeling)
Students will get into groups of three or four, overall there should be seven groups
because there is seven characters. When everyone is seated, the teacher will randomly tell
students what character they have and to look for at least one quote that describes the

character from anothers point of view.


The teacher will be supervising the classroom and helping students find quotes if

necessary.
After finding a quote, students will then grab large pieces of paper with crayons and
markers to draw their own created scene with their characters.

Activity 2: Mini Lesson on Point of View (10 minutes)

When everyone has completed their cartoon, the teacher will briefly talk about point of
view and how it can affect the story. For instance, what Katsa thinks of herself will be
completely different depending on what the other characters think of her. King Randa

thinks she is a prized dog and easily trainable while Po thinks shes a wonderful fighter

that cannot be controlled.


The teacher would explain that the current story would change dramatically if you looked
at Pos point of view or if it was Giddon point of view.

Closure: Sharing and Exit Ticket (12 minutes)

The students will share the different point of view they focused on and how other
characters react to their chosen character. Then they would explain why they created that

scene and why they chose a particular quote.


After sharing, students will spend the rest of the time to write down what character they
would chose to share the story and how it would be different from Katsas point of view
on a piece of paper. The student would have to name at least three things that would be

different and they can chose any character as long as it is not Katsa.
After finishing their paragraph, students will turn them in to the teacher. The homework
will to read chapter thirteen and fourteen for the next class.
Reflective Assessment and Evaluation:

Evaluation/ Assessment: The assessment will be the students character cartoon assignment and
the paragraph the students wrote for their exit ticket.
Troubleshooting: The teacher will have extra copies of the book, extra copies of the handouts and
materials. The teacher will also have multiple quotes for each character if students need a little
more assistance.
Reflection:

Cartoon Creation 101

Find a quote in the book from, to, or about your character to use in your cartoon.
Brainstorm a list or web about your characters personality traits.
Narrow down the list to external traits that other characters notice about your character.
For example, they cannot be how the character views themselves.
Consider how you might exaggerate these traits to make it funny.
Chose a familiar setting and images to include in your cartoon.
Draw, color, laugh, and have fun!
Be prepared to share!!!
o What traits you focused on
o What quote you used
o What your cartoon says about the character

Unit Name: What Affects Our Identity:


Lesson #7
Name of Lesson: Marriage
Goals and Objectives:
Goals: Introduce the history for marriage and arranged marriages.
Objectives: Students will research what a marriage and arranged marriage contains, analyze how
these two marriages differ, and research if arranged marriages are still current and where do you
mostly see arranged marriages.
State Standards:

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says

explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (910.RI.1)


Analyze seminal U.S. documents of historical and literary significance, including how
they address related themes and concepts. (910.RI.9)
Materials and Tools:

Materials: Students will need their copy of Graceling, daily journals, and laptops or computers
from the library.
Procedures:
Motivation/ Anticipatory Set: Daily Journaling and Setting up Computers (8 minutes)

The teacher will write the prompt What do you think about marriage? Does it seem
unnatural if a person does not want to marry ever, like Katsa? What do you think about
arranged marriages? Are they good, bad, or does it depend on the situation?

Students will enter the classroom and write about the prompt in their journals. After the
students are done writing, they will quietly talk with their dialogue partners to discuss

what they talked about in their letters.


The teacher and students will have a brief five minute discussion in order to share what
they thought about the marriage issues in novel, if it was right or wrong to force a

marriage, and why.


The teacher will walk around the classroom to give students a computer number between
one and fourteen. Students will be in pairs to share a single computer based of the
number they received. It has to match the same number.

Activity 1: Research on Marriage and Anti-Marriage (15 minutes)

Students will meet with their partner and the teacher will split up the classroom in exactly
half (there should be seven groups of pairs on each side). One side will be pro-marriage
and the other side will be anti-marriage. After splitting up the groups, the teacher will
explain that Katsa has difficulty with marriage, while King Randa tries to force marriage
on others. The students will research their topics to try to create a debate and an argument

which will later help with their homework.


The teacher will supervise the classroom to make sure the students are completing the

assigned task and helping with any questions the students might have.
After it seems like everyone has done a considerable amount of research, pro-marriage
members will meet each other briefly to share the information they learned. Same for the
anti-marriage members.

Activity 2: Debate (20-30 mintues)

Before starting the debate! The teacher will write down the rules on the board (no
cursing, be respectful, and raise your hands) and then show examples of what that looks

like to be respectful to your classmates. The teacher will pick a number between one and

ten, in order to decide which group goes first.


Students will then start the debate with the teacher asking questions when there seems to
be a lapse in discussion. The teachers main goal is to try to get everyone to talk, make
sure the debate stays relevant, and to prompt students to continue talking.

Closure: Exit Ticket and Homework (5 minutes)

Explain to students that homework is to read chapter fifteen and sixteen. Also, that
students will write at least a page about the debate, what side they are on, and why. Give
quotes and explanations from the debate and their research.
Reflective Assessment and Evaluation:

Evaluation/ Assessment: The assessment will be the debate and the research they completed.
Troubleshooting: The teacher will ask for computers from the library early on to make sure the
class has some, if not, make an appointment to have your students research in the library. The
debate will be point based, if someone is disrespectful a point will be reduced. If it continues, the
student will not be part of the discussion and loses participation points.
Reflection:

Unit Name: What Affects Our Identity:


Lesson #8
Name of Lesson: Reasons to Hide Parts of Your Identity
Goals and Objectives:
Goals: Analyze the factors that make a person hide parts of themselves.
Objectives: Students will discuss the factors that make the characters hide their identity and the
reasoning for this. Students will analyze what factors that make themselves hide certain parts of
themselves.
State Standards:

Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the
order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the

connections that are drawn between them. (910.RI.3)


Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including
figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of
specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion
differs from that of a newspaper). (910.RI.4)
Materials and Tools:

Materials: Students will need a copy of Graceling, their daily journals, and the Where Am I
From Handout.
Procedures:
Motivation/ Anticipatory Set: Daily Journaling and Dialogue Letters (8 minutes)

The teacher will write the prompt Katsa and Po have a lot of secrets that they like to
keep to themselves, instead of sharing these hidden aspects of their identity. Give
examples of why you think they want to hide away parts of themselves. Can you relate?

How? on the board and start putting the Where Am I From handouts on everyones

desk.
Students will write in their journals and quietly discuss their dialogue letters with their
partners as soon as they are done writing in their journals.

Activity 1: Where Am I From Activity (12 minutes)

Students are going to fill out the handout, in order to figure out the questions they would
like to focus on to make their own individual poems. Students will work individually

until, they have all the questions filled out.


The teacher will then model how to make a poem (can rhyme or not) by using their own
filled out questions to show that they could make any kind of poem. By being able to
make their own poem, students will be able to figure out how to make a poem for one of
the characters.

Activity 2: Where Am I From Character Activity (20 minutes)

Students will work in groups of three or four based off the color of the sticker on their
Where Am I From handout. Students will be given a character (Po, Raffin, Giddon,
Randa, and Helda then answer a few questions based on how the characters would

answer them.
Students will then try to create a poem based off how the character would react and how

they would think about certain activities. Try to be creative!


Students will then share with the classroom their poems and their reasoning for including
certain questions over other questions.

Closure: Exit Ticket (5 mintues)

Students will write a few sentences about which poem they enjoyed the most and why.
The homework will be to turn in the marriage assignment and to read chapter seventeen
and eighteen.

Reflective Assessment and Evaluation:


Evaluation/ Assessment: The assessment will be their finished poems that they will share and
turn in to the teacher, along with their individual poems.
Troubleshooting: If students are having a difficult time trying to think how their character would
think, the teacher would remind students of recent events in the reading that happened and
include a few quotes regarding some characters.
Reflection:

Where I Am From Handout


Select question that you are interested in answering. Students will turn this in to the teacher, so
be respectful. Chose at least five questions to answer.

Where were you born?


o Where did you grow up?
o Where have you lived?
o How do you feel about those places?
Who are your parents?
o Other family members?
o Other significant people in your life?
o Why are these people important to you?
o Where do they live?
What do you like about yourself?
o What do you dislike about yourself?
What challenges have you faced in life?
What are your goals in life?
What are you passionate about?

Unit Name: What Affects Our Identity


Lesson #9
Name of Lesson: Introduction to Sensory Words
Goals and Objectives:
Goals: Introduction to sensory words and create their own setting for their fictional character
story. It is a continuation of lesson plan three.
Objectives: Students will be able to identify sensory words and create their own landscape for
their characters using descriptive language.
State Standards:

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurati
ve, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word

choices on meaning and tone. (910.RI.4)


Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid pic
ture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters. Provide a conclusion that follo
ws from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the
narrative. (910.W.3)
Materials and Tools:

Materials: Students will need sensory words handout and create a character handout.
Procedures:
Motivation/ Anticipatory Set: Daily Journaling (8 minutes)

The teacher will be handing out the Sensory Words handout each with a twelve different
colors on the handouts. The teacher will then write the prompt Katsa and Po experiences
different landscapes and scenes while they are traveling. What makes these scenes
memorable?

Students will write in their journals about the prompt and when they are finished, they
will quietly meet with their dialogue partners in order to go over what they thought about
the reading.

Activity 1: Mini-Lesson on Sensory Words (10 minutes)

The teacher will lead a small discussion about sensory words. For instance, sensory
words make a scene more memorable by all the different words used in order to make the

reader feel like they are in the book with the characters.
The teacher will model with the students how a few words can change the sentence. An
example would be a forest.
o Students will throw out words that they think would describe a forest well. Like
mysterious, gloomy, drooping leaves. With action verbs like wandered and
skipped.
o Instead of I went into the forest the teacher will change it to I wandered
through the mysterious forest that had drooping tree branches.

Activity 2: Three-Two-One Activity (10 minutes)

Students will choose a particular landscape, it can be anything they want it to be. It can
be an ocean, a meadow, a shopping mall, it does not really matter what scene they choose

to write about.
The students will fill out the handout by using common words to describe the scene, then
drop down to using more of the sensory words from the handout, then to fill in the final
stage, by having a great sensory and descriptive sentence.

Activity 3: Create Your Scene Activity (15 minutes)

Students will work individually with their descriptive scenes and need to create three

different scenes that their character will be travelling in.


The teacher will supervise and answer any questions that the students may have.

Closure: Exit Ticket (5 minutes)

The students will write a five sentence paragraph about create the scene activity and have
to be able to place their character in each scene. The students will then turn in their

paragraph to the teacher.


The homework will be chapter nineteen and chapter twenty of Graceling.
Reflective Assessment and Evaluation:

Evaluation/ Assessment: The assessment will be the paragraph the students turn in at the end of
class.
Troubleshooting: Provide several examples for the students if they have difficulty with the
assignment. The teacher will also provide copies of the handout.
Reflection:

Sensory Words
Keep the following lists of words to help you improve your writing. Using sensory words can
help you provide more details and examples in your writing.
SOUND WORDS
Hanging
croaking
laughing
ringing
tinkling
Barking
crunching
moaning
rumbling
thudding
Bawling
crying
mooing
rustling
thumping

Blaring
dripping
mumbling
scratching
ticking
Booming
exploding
muttering
screaming
twittering
Buzzing
fizzing
noisy
screeching
warbling

Chattering
gagging
peeping
singing
wheezing
Chiming
gasping
piercing
slamming
whimpering
Chirping
giggling
pinging
shouting
whining

Clanging
grating
plopping
silent
whispering
Clicking
grunting
quacking
snoring
whooping
Clinking
gurgling
quiet
splashing
Cooing

hissing
rapping
squawking
Coughing
honking
rasping
stuttering
Crackling
jangling
riming
tearing

stubby
Clammy
gluey
mushy
slimy
tangled
Coarse
grainy
numbing
slippery
tender
greasy

oily
sloppy
tepid
Cottony
gritty
piercing
smooth
Crisp
gushy
plastic
smothering
tickling

TOUCH WORDS
Abrasive
feathery
knobbed
sandy
spongy
Biting fine
lacy
scalding
steamy
Boiling
fluffy
leathery

scorching
steely Bubby
foamy light
scratchy
sticky Bulky
freezing
lukewarm
scummy
stifled
Bumpy
furry
matted

shaggy
stinging
Burning
fuzzy
metallic
sharp
stony
Bushy
glassy
moist
silky
TOUCH WORDS

Cushioned
hairy
pocked
soapy

tough
Damp
heavy
pointed

soft
pulpy
velvety
sopping
Downy
warm
hot
Drenched
TASTE AND SMELL WORDS

humid
rocky
soupy
waxy

Acid
doughy
minty
rank
sweaty
Acidic
earthy
moist
raw

sweet
Acrid
floury
moldy
rich tangy
Alkaline
flowery
musky
rotten

tasteless
Aromatic
fresh
musty
salty
tough
Biting
fruity
scented
SIGHT WORDS

Abrasive
feathery
knobbed
sandy
spongy
Biting fine
lacy
scalding
steamy
Boiling
fluffy
leathery
scorching
steely
Bubbly
foamy
light
scratchy
sticky
Bulky
freezing
lukewarm
scummy
stifled
Bumpy
furry
matted
shaggy
stinging
Burning
fuzzy
metallic
sharp

stony
Bushy
glassy
moist
silky
stubby
Clammy
gluey
mushy
slimy
tangled
Coarse
grainy
numbing
slippery
tender
Cool
greasy
oily
sloppy
tepid
Cottony
gritty
piercing
smooth
thick
Crisp
gushy
plastic
smothering
tickling
Cushioned
hairy

pocked
soapy
tough
Damp
heavy
pointed
soft
velvety
Downy
hot
pulpy
sopping
warm
Drenched
humid
rocky
soupy
waxy

vile
Bitter
perfumed
sharp
vinegary
Bland
hearty
pickled
sour

Burnt
piney
spicy
lemony
plastic
spoiled
medicinal
pungent
stagnant