You are on page 1of 38

Strategy Notebook

Brittany Wright
Reading 3351
Agriculture, Food and Natural
Resources

Table of Contents:

Vocabulary
1. Vocabulary Overview Guide
2. Magnet Summaries
3. Story Impressions

ELL
1. Inquiry Charts
2. Possible Sentences
3. Knowledge Rating Scale

Writing
1. Double-Entry Diaries
2. K-W-L Plus
3. KIM

Study Skills/Test Taking


1. Verbal Visual Word Association
2. TOAST
3. Mind Mapping

Vocabulary

APA Citation:
Buehl, D. (2013). Vocabulary Overview Guide. In Classroom strategies for interactive
learning (4th ed., pp. 217-220). Newark, Del.: International Reading Association.
Vocabulary Overview Guide. (n.d.). Retrieved April 22, 2015, from
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Vocabulary-Overview-Guide-69544

Name: Vocabulary Overview Guide


Steps:
1. The teacher chooses a variety of vocabulary words from an article that the students have
been learning from class.
2. A discussion needs to take place on each of the words chosen to see how much students
already know.
3. Have students reread the article that was given to them at the beginning of class.
4. The students will describe each word by using the knowledge they have obtainedthis
can just be a short definition nothing elaborate.
5. Use key words throughout the lesson to reiterate what they are learning.
6. Later on get students to work by themselves on figuring out vocabulary words using
context clues.
Strengths:
Vocabulary Overview Guide is a great tool to get students to understand vocabulary other than
looking up definitions in a dictionary. It allows students to use their prior knowledge to try and
figure out the words as well as using target words. This is a great organizational method and
students learn how to actually use vocabulary and learn it independently.

Example:

Vocabulary

APA Citation:

Buehl, D. (2013). Magnet Summaries. In Classroom strategies for interactive learning


(4th ed., pp. 140-143). Newark, Del.: International Reading Association.
Comprehension Strategies. (n.d.). Retrieved April 22, 2015, from
https://manleyliteracy.wikispaces.com/Comprehension Strategies

Name: Magnet Summaries


Steps:
1. The teacher will guide students to pick out the most important parts of the reading
material that way they can paraphrase and condense the information.
2. The students will read and try to connect words and the teacher will take note of the
students discussion by writing on the board.
3. Have them work in partners to see if they can come up with a few more words to use.
4. The students will then use the words chosen to write sentences and they could even
combine two sentences and take out any unneeded information.
5. Have the class use the sentences written to make a summaryit needs to make sense so
make sure they put it in order. They need to make sure they have the correct information.
Strengths:
Magnet Summaries are a great vocabulary tool and it is great to learn a great deal of information
in a short amount of time. Using this the students will be able to figure out what they need to
remember and they will be able to simplify the texts they read to pick out the necessary
information.

Example:

MAGNET WORD AND 4


CONNECTING DETAILS

COMBINE INFORMATION
INTO ONE OR TWO
SENTENCES

ARRANGE ALL
SENTENCES INTO A

Vocabulary

APA Citation:

Buehl, D. (2013). Story Impressions. In Classroom strategies for interactive learning (4th
ed., pp. 192-195). Newark, Del.: International Reading Association.
Name: Story Impressions
Steps:
1. The teacher will pre-read the material and choose about ten words that can be considered
vocabulary wordsyou want to choose words they will know and some they wont.
2. Students will work in groups to try and figure out what each word means by using their
prior knowledge.
3. Get students to write an example of the material using the words they are giventhis can
be about a paragraph.
4. Now they will read the actual material to see if they were correct on their assumptions.
They can then correct any misinformed information to better reflect what the passage
says.
Strengths:
Story Impressions are good vocabulary tools by having students use their prior knowledge to see
what they already know and then going from there. Because they do this they get practice on
how to write a summary of what they are learning and effectively brainstorm.
Example:
Chain of Events

Your Version of What the Textbook Might Say

ELL

APA Citation:
Buehl, D. (2013). Inquiry Charts. In Classroom strategies for interactive learning (4th ed.,
pp. 123-125). Newark, Del.: International Reading Association.
Inquiry Chart. (2013, March 19). Retrieved April 22, 2015, from
http://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/inquiry_chart

Name: Inquiry Charts


Steps:
1. The teacher will choose a content area topic and interact with students by asking questions to
see what they already know or want to know.
2. Explain the Inquiry Chart by doing an example on the board while also giving them a blank
copy of the chart. The teacher will write the questions that they think are the most useful and
write them into the chart on the board.
3. The students will use any prior knowledge to tell any information they may already know
about the topic; interact with them to see what they know.
4. Give the students extra materials to use such as internet access or any magazines that have to
do with the discussion. They can also work in groups to see what each other knows.
5. Students need to make a summary of everything they have learned.
6. They will continue to discuss and add to the questions as well as answer them.

Strengths:
Inquiry Charts are a great tool to use to make students think on their own and they get to use
short direct facts to get the information across. Students will learn how to use other resources
other than a textbook. This is a great technology based lesson to get students to interact with each
other and learn information.

Example:

ELL

APA Citation:
All About Adolescent Literacy. (n.d.). Retrieved April 22, 2015, from
http://www.adlit.org/strategies/19782/
Possible Sentences. (2013, March 19). Retrieved April 22, 2015, from
http://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/possible_sentences

Name: Possible Sentences


Steps:
1. The teacher needs to pick approximately ten words out of a text for students to use
some need to be known.
2. Students will then write a sentence using two of the words and the need to write at least
three of them.
3. They will then read the sentences aloud to the class and the teacher will write them on the
board for evaluation.
4. The students will read the text to themselves to see if they used the words correctly in
their sentences.
5. Have a discussion over the sentences on the board and see if they need to be corrected or
not.
6. They will then create new sentences or correct the ones that were wrong.
Strengths:
Possible Sentences allow students to interact with each other and become interested in the
content being discussed. Since they use their prior knowledge they have to then check their
knowledge by reading the text.

Example:

Look at the vocabulary words your teacher provided. As a group, define the words, and then
select pairs of related words from the list. Write your word pairs on the lines below.

Write a sentence that might appear in the text youre about to read for each of the word pairs
given what you know about the subject area and the title.
1

After you read, come back and review your possible sentences. Sentences that are not accurate
should be revised.

ELL

APA Citation:
(n.d.). Retrieved April 22, 2015, from
https://wvde.state.wv.us/strategybank/KnowledgeRatingScale.html

Name: Knowledge Rating Scale


Steps:
1
2
3
4

The teacher will pick out vocabulary words to use from the text.
The students will use the chart given to them to decide if they know what the
words mean before they read the text.
They will then read the text to see if they were correct in their assumptions and
they can discuss this as a class if needed.
The students will then compare what they knew before hand to what they learned
once the worksheet is complete.

Strengths:
Knowledge Rating Scale is great for English language learners as it allows them to learn
vocabulary words by using any prior knowledge they have on the subject. This sets a purpose to
organizing information into what students do know and do not know and allows the teacher to
evaluate and test them.

Example:

Knowledge Rating Scale


Word

Know It Well

Have Seen or
Heard It

Hav

Writing

APA Citation:

Buehl, D. (2013). Double-Entry Diaries. In Classroom strategies for interactive learning


(4th ed., pp. 98-100). Newark, Del.: International Reading Association.
Name: Double Entry Diaries
Steps:
1. The students will need to make a T-chart and will be divided into two sections.
2. Keep the right hand side of the paper simple such as What I Was Thinking to
write down any thoughts while reading the text.
3. They also need a What I Learned Column to allow them to examine the text
more.
4. This allows them to find any key words and to use their context clues to figure out
the most important parts of the text.
Strengths:
Double-Entry Diaries is a great method to allow students to keep track of their thoughts while
reading. The students must be able to think on their feet and use their prior knowledge to access
important information. Writing down information while they are reading allows them to
categorize their thoughts better.
Example:
What I Learned

What I Was Thinking

Writing

APA Citation:
Buehl, D. (2013). K-W-L Plus. In Classroom strategies for interactive learning (4th ed.,
pp. 135-139). Newark, Del.: International Reading Association.
(n.d.). Retrieved April 22, 2015, from http://learn.bcbe.org/mod/resource/view.php?
id=169187.

Name: K-W-L Plus


Steps:
1. The teacher will write the topic on top of the grid/table on the board and will get students
to use their prior knowledge to figure out what they know on the topic.
2. Have students ask questions that they might have on the topic and even have them
discuss in partners or groups.
3. The students will read the text and they need to be able to use the chart to mark what they
know and want to know.
4. Once students finish the text they will then fill in the blank for the learned section.
5. Then students can discuss in groups what they have learned from the text and compare.
6. Once students are done with the table there is the option of having them make some sort
of web to organize the information differently.
Strengths:
K-W-L Plus is great for teachers as it allows them to know what their students know about the
information before they start the lesson. It also lets the class interact with each other and
compare and contrast what each student knows. Students can learn how to organize their
thoughts into categories.

Example:

Directions
1) List what you know (K) about a topic; 2) what you want (W) to learn about a topic; and 3)
with you learned (L) about a topic after reading about it.

K
What I KNOW

W
What I WANT to Know

L
What I LEARNED

Writing

APA Citation:

(n.d.). Retrieved April 22, 2015, from


http://www1.ccs.k12.in.us/teachers/downloads/cms_block_file/89322/file/117321
(n.d.). Retrieved April 22, 2015, from
http://esu4vocabularystrategies.wikispaces.com/file/view/Vocabulary Strategies Templates.doc.

Name: KIM
Steps:
1. The teacher will pick out vocabulary words from the text to give to the students.
2. The three different sections in this method are used at throughout the lesson by
having students write down any key words that come to mind first.
3. The students will then read the text to write down any definitions or information
that has to do with the word.
4. The last thing the students have to do is draw a memory clue to help them
remember the vocabulary words.
5. Everyone can share their ideas with the class if wanted, this could be done in
groups, partners or individually.
Strengths:
KIM is a good vocabulary tool though students must write what they think it is and it could even
be turned into a summary of the text that was chosen. This method could be used to just
determine prior knowledge or used to wait till after the text is read and evaluated.

Example:

K.I.M. -- for vocabulary words and new ideas

K
Key idea

1.

2.

3.

I
Information

M
Memory Clue

Study
Skills/Test
Taking

APA Citation:
(n.d.). Retrieved April 23, 2015, from
http://www.uic.edu/orgs/ctn/D1/doc/Vocabulary24.pdf
n.d.). Retrieved April 22, 2015, from
http://esu4vocabularystrategies.wikispaces.com/file/view/Vocabulary Strategies Templates.doc

Name: Verbal Visual Word Association


Steps:
1. The teacher must choose a variety of vocabulary wordsonly one is used at a time.
2. The students will write down one of the vocabulary words first in the upper left hand
corner.
3. They will then draw a picture in the upper right hand corner that they feel will represent
the word that is chosensomething that will help them remember.
4. The students will discuss what they think the word means in groups once they do that
than they will look up the definition on a computer and write it down in the bottom left
hand corner.
5. They can then discuss in groups something that is a non-example that they can either
draw or use a word which will be written in the bottom right hand corner.
6. After the chart is complete students should discuss everything that is written down in
groups and they should keep the chart for future references.
Strengths:
Verbal Visual Word Association is a tool teachers can use as a vocabulary study guide. It allows
students to organize their thoughts and use visual tools to understand words in a simpler way.
They must use prior knowledge before actually looking up the exact definition of the word.

Example:

Verbal and Visual Word Association


Vocabulary Term

Definition

Visual Representation

Personal Association or Charac

Study
Skills/Test
Taking

APA Citation:

Adolescent Literacy Instruction. (n.d.). Retrieved April 22, 2015, from


http://www.learningpt.org/literacy/adolescent/strategies/toast.php

Name: TOAST
Steps:
1. The teacher picks out a list of vocabulary words from a text and then they have the
students take a quick quiz to see what words they may know from prior knowledge.
2. The students will then need to categorize them into sectionswhatever makes them the
easiest to follow.
3. They will then get into groups and discuss the words to see how they can memorize what
they mean. They could do this through visual aids or even another word.
4. The students will need to repeat the words; they might even use it in a sentence to better
understand it.
5. The teacher will then give a test to see how well the students were able to grasp the
information.
Strengths:
TOAST is a great testing method for teachers as they can see if students really understand the
material. The students get to use their prior knowledge to figure out what words mean. Also
using visual aids can help a great deal with memorization and hopefully will be useful when
trying to recall words in the future.
Example:
Visual Aid/Key Word

Knew When First Tested

Did Not Know When Tested

Repeat the words approximately five times in a proper sentence either aloud or on paper.

Study
Skills/Test
Taking

APA Citation:
Buehl, D. (2013). Mind Mapping. In Classroom strategies for interactive learning (4th
ed., pp. 148-150). Newark, Del.: International Reading Association.

Learn To Create A Mind Map In Word? Heres How! (n.d.). Retrieved April 22, 2015,
from http://mindmapsunleashed.com/learn-to-create-a-mind-map-in-word-heres-how

Name: Mind Mapping


Steps:
1. The teacher will choose vocabulary and any important words from a text that have to do
with the main idea.
2. Then the students will draw a mind map to go with each of the words and how they are
all connected.
3. Doing this the students will use their prior knowledge to evaluate where the words will
go.
4. The teacher will be doing this activity alongside the students by drawing the map on the
board and will discuss it as well.
5. Give the students the text to read and have them decide if they organized the map
correctly.
6. They should work in groups to add any extra information they have gathered while
reading.
Strengths:
Mind Mapping is a visual aid that allows students to organize their thoughts into categories while
also letting them use their prior knowledge. The students will be able to learn new vocabulary as
well as having an outline to work with.

Example: