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Lets Go on a Safari!

3rd Grade
Fall 2015
Travis Carpenter
Cooperating Teacher: Mrs. McClung
Fairplains Elementary

Rational Statement
Unit Goal
Through the teaching of this unit, students will learn various information about Africa. They will
be able to recognize the different animal habitats and what animals live in each. Also, the
students will know how animals have adapted to live in their particular environment. Students
will learn about rural African culture and customs. Also, through this unit, students will learn the
value of conservation and the toll human actions can take on the environment. The students will
make real-world connections by comparing/contrasting life in the United States to that of rural
Africa. The students will be taught where our energy comes from such as: fossil fuels, nuclear,
and renewable resources. Students will also learn some conservation practices they can use in
their own homes.
Levels of Blooms Taxonomy
Remember: The students will use this level of Blooms by remembering or recalling events from
our previous lessons. For example, when we discuss rural African life, I will ask students to
recall information they learned from the previous week when we discussed rural life by reading
My Great-Grandmothers Gourd by Christina Kessler.
Understand: Students will demonstrate this level of Blooms by comparing and contrasting life
in the United States to life in rural Africa. The students will also summarize the key points or
events from our selected readings. Students will also classify different African animals into the
habitats each animal lives in.
Apply: The students will apply what they have learned throughout this unit by creating a
postcard in which they describe imagined events that occurred during their African safari.
Analyze: The students will organize information in a logical order when they write their
postcards. They will also organize African animals by their various characteristics.
Evaluate: The students will evaluate their work by checking their answers to the crossword
puzzle. They will also check to see if they are correct when labeling the bulletin board to show
the various animal habitats in Africa and the animals that live in each habitat.
Create: The students will use their knowledge acquired through this unit and create a postcard in
which they describe their adventures through Africa. The students will also be creating and
decorating an African drum, a Djembe.
Unit Breakdown
Lesson One:

The students will be given a pretest in the form of a KWL chart. The students will be instructed
to write what they know about Africa and things they want to know. I will lead a discussion
about what a safari is and things someone who is going on a safari would take with them. Next, I
will have the students participate in a listening activity. The students will be placed into pairs
and each pair will think of an object they would take on a safari. I will pick one pair to start the
activity and they will say We are going a safari and we are going to take ______________.
The next pair will say We are going on a safari and we are going to take _______________
and then repeat what the first group said. The last pair of students will have to repeat what each
of the previous groups said. Next, I will display a map of Africa and we will investigate it as a
class. I will lead a discussion in which we talk about the various animal habitats (desert,
grasslands, rainforest) in Africa and the kinds of animals that live in each habitat. As we are
talking about certain animals, such as a camel, we will discuss how the animal has adapted to
survive in its particular habitat. The students will learn that the Sahara Desert is the largest
desert in the world.
Lesson Two:
In this lesson, we will discuss the various landforms/landmarks which are important to Africa.
We will also discuss the characteristics of each one. We will talk about Mt. Kilimanjaro, Victoria
Falls, the Nile River, and The Pyramids of Egypt. As a class we will discuss what it means for
an animal to be endangered. I will identify some African animals which are currently
endangered and discuss some reasons for why these animals are endangered. We will discuss
poaching and its effect on animals and the environment. I will lead an interactive read aloud
using Jubela by Christina Kessler. In groups, the students will talk about ways to stop poaching.
Lesson Three:
Before I start this lesson, I will give the students a short quiz to assess what they have learned the
previous two lessons. For this lesson we will discuss conservation. We will talk about the
conservation of animal habitats and conservation of energy. I will read excerpts from All the
Kings Animals by Christina Kessler. I will explain what happened to the animals in Swaziland,
Africa. I will discuss Ted Reilly, a man who transformed his familys farm in Swaziland into an
animal sanctuary. Next, we will discuss energy conservation. We will discuss what life would
be like without energy. I will explain where our energy comes from and how it is made. We will
discuss fossil fuels, nuclear energy, and renewable energy sources. I will give the students an
energy consumption worksheet they will fill out so they can see how much energy their family
uses. In groups, students will brainstorm ways in which they can conserve energy. Then, the
groups will share their answers with the rest of the class.
Lesson Four:
I will discuss the results of the previous weeks quiz. This lesson will begin a two-week
discussion about rural African life. I will read and discuss My Great-Grandmothers Gourd by
Christina Kessler. I will display images of African baobab trees and discuss the trees many uses.
Throughout the read aloud, I will focus on vocabulary enrichment and various details of rural
African life. I will ask individual students questions in order to see how well they are

comprehending the text. The students will be given a summarizing graphic organizer and will
also be instructed to summarize the main idea and key events from the story. I will model how to
summarize key events by relating what happened on my birthday. The students will be allowed
to work together with a partner to determine the main idea and key events from the selected
reading.
Lesson Five:
During this lesson I will be reading excerpts from Africa by Carole Marsh. We will be
discussing various aspects of rural African life including: dress, music, language, school,
shopping, and homes. I will show a powerpoint in which I display pictures of each of the
aforementioned aspects of African life. We will discuss each aspect as a class. Each group of
students will be assigned a particular aspect to compare/contrast with its American counterpart.
Each group will present their findings to the class. I will provide a graphic organizer for the
students to use. Students will also be creating their own djembe (African drum).
Lesson Six:
This will be the final lesson in this unit. The students will given a post-test to assess what they
have learned throughout this unit. The students will be creating their own postcard to describe
their African safari. The students will write a 4-5 sentence summary of something they learned
during this unit. On the other side, the students will draw and color a picture depicting a scene
from Africa. I will display a rubric of what I am looking for with the summary and the picture.
Detailed lesson plans for each day will follow.

Creator: Travis Carpenter


Grade Level: 3rd
Subjects: Social Studies, English/Language Arts, Art, Science, Math
Unit Calendar:
Oct 16:
Pre-test
Listening exercise
Explore a map of Africa
Exploring African climates
The animals that live in each climate.
Oct 23:
Landmarks
o Nile River
o Mt Kilimanjaro
o Victoria Falls
o Pyramids of Giza
Endangered African animals and habitats
o Grasslands
o Rhinos
o Poaching
Read Jubela by Christina Kessler
Oct 30:
Quiz over content covered during the previous lessons
Read All the Kings Animals by Christina Kessler
Explore conservation
Students will think of ways they can practice conservation
Map skills
Nov 6
Rural African Culture
Read My Great-Grandmothers Gourd by Christina Kessler
Discuss baobab trees and their many uses
Nov 13
Rural African Culture
o Dress
o Customs

o Music
o Language
Students will create their own Djembe (African ceremonial drum)

Nov 20
Students will create a post card detailing their African Safari
Show an example of a post card
Post test
Big Ideas:
Through this unit the students will discover important facts about African culture. They
will be able to explain how African culture differs from American culture.
Students will learn about conservation.
Students will learn about African landmarks
CSOs Taught and Learning Objectives:
Language Arts:
ELA.3.R.C1.4: Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of an
informational text.
o Students will demonstrate comprehension of the selected texts by being able to
compare and contrast life in America with that of rural Africa. The students will
be given a Venn Diagram and will be expected to list at least 2 similarities and
differences.
ELA.3.R.C1.2: Recount stories, fables, folk tales, and myths from diverse cultures.
o Students will be able to summarize the main idea and key details of My GreatGrandmothers Gourd. The students will be given a graphic organizer listing the
main idea and five four supporting details. I would expect the students to
correctly answer 4 out of 5.
ELA.3.R.C1.1: Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a literary text,
referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
o Students will be able to show comprehension by answering questions during the
interactive read aloud using Jubela.
ELA.3.W.C9.5: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences.
o The students will write a 5-sentence paragraph in which they describe their
imagined experiences during their African safari. The paragraphs will be graded
using a rubric. The students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge about
various aspects of African culture and animals.
Social Studies:
SS.3.G.2: Distinguish between a continent, country, state, and capital.
o The students will be taught the difference between continents, countries, states,
and capitals.
SS.3.G.3: Label maps to demonstrate knowledge of map skills.

o The students will use map skills to label animal habitats on the interactive bulletin
board. They will also label various African landmarks/landforms. The students
will self-assess using a answer key I provide.
Science:
SC.O.3.2.03: Compare physical characteristics and behaviors of living organisms and
explain how they have adapted to a specific environment.
o Students will identify characteristics and adaptations that help certain animals
survive in their particular habitats.
SC.O.3.3.10: Develop respect and responsibility for the environment by engaging in
conservation practices.
o Students will brainstorm collaboratively with their group to think of ways they
can conserve energy.
Art:

VA.O.3.4.04: Create artworks with subjects that reflect present-day culture.


o The students will create and decorate their own African drum, called a djembe.
o The students will also draw a picture for their post cards. The students will be
expected to demonstrate knowledge of African culture, landmarks, and animals.
This drawing will be graded using a rubric.

21st Century LS & TT CSOs:


21C.O.3-4.1.LS3: Student, cognizant of audience and purpose, articulates thoughts and
ideas accurately and effectively through oral, written or multimedia communications.
21C.O.3-4.2.LS3: Student engages in a problem solving process that promotes
questioning, planning investigations and finding answers and solutions.
21C.O.3-4.2.LS1: Student engages, with teacher assistance, in a critical thinking process
that synthesizes knowledge and ideas.

Essential Questions:
What different types of climates/habitats are found in Africa?
What animals live in each habitat?
How have some animals adapted so they can live in a certain habitat?
How is life in rural Africa different from life in America?
How do human actions affect the environment?
Students Will Know and Understand:
The various animal habitats within African and the many animals that live in each habitat.
Students will be able to label the various habitats on a map of Africa.
How certain animals have adapted to survive in the habitats in which they live.
Students will learn to recognize various African landmarks and landforms and the details
about each one
o Mt Kilimanjaro

o Victoria Falls
o Nile River
o Pyramids of Giza
Students will learn the effects of poaching and the need for conservation.
Students will learn where our energy comes from and how much energy we use on a
daily basis.
Students will learn some conservation practices they can do at home.
Students will learn about rural African culture and customs
o Music
o Dance
o Clothing
o Homes
o Language

Students Will Do:


Recognize and label the various animal habitats in Africa
o Students will label a map of Africa to show their knowledge of where the habitats
are and what kinds of animals live there.
Students will be able to label various landforms/landmarks on a map of Africa
Students will complete a crossword puzzle to show their understanding of African
landmarks and animals.
Create a Djembe
Compare/contrast life in Africa with life in America
Create a postcard detailing their African safari.

References
Albert, T. (1994). Endangered: African Grasslands. Greensboro, NC: Carson-Dellosa
Publishing Company, Inc.
Hankey, A. (2004). Retrieved from Adansonia digitata :
http://www.plantzafrica.com/plantab/adansondigit.htm
Indians.org. (1995-2015). Retrieved from http://indians.org/articles/native-americanculture.html
Kessler, C. (1995). All the King's Animals. Honesdale, PA: Caroline House Boyds Mills
Press, Inc.
Kessler, C. (2000). My Great-Grandmother's Gourd. New York, NY: Orchard Books.
Kessler, C. (2001). Jubela. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.

Kids Past. (1998-2015). Retrieved from The Great Pyramid of Giza:


http://www.kidspast.com/world-history/0075I-pyramid-of-giza.php
Marsh, C. (2009). It's Your World: Africa. Gallopade International.
Science For Kids. (2015). Retrieved from Nile River:
http://www.sciencekids.co.nz/sciencefacts/earth/nileriver.html
Sussman, E. (2002). Deserts. Dana Point, CA: Edupress, Inc.
Tanzania National Parks. (2002). Retrieved from Mt. Kilimanjaro Park:
http://www.tanzaniaparks.com/kili.html
UNESCO World Heritage Convention. (1992-2015). Retrieved from Mosi-oa-Tunya /
Victoria Falls: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/509/

Photo Resources for Power Points


http://fc09.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2013/041/8/0/african_women_traditional_dresses_by_takato1000
-d5ui135.png womens clothing
http://www.thehindu.com/multimedia/dynamic/01348/01frkenya1_JPG_1348019g.jpg women
clothing
http://dupsies.com/Dstore/images/Red%20Gold%20Blue%20African%20Print%20Top
%20DP2264TP.jpg head wear
https://jeevan99.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/stock-photo-4681156-traditional-africandress1.jpg men clothing
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/fd/15/06/fd15063fb561788af16017fb513a3da9.jpg
men clothing
http://www.newfarm.org/columns/research_paul/2005/may05/images/FARMSERVEPICTURES-015b.jpg houses
http://holbeton.devon.sch.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Zambia-cropped-vs-2.jpg villages
http://cdn.c.photoshelter.com/img-get2/I0000klab.rmMVto/fit=1000x750/tl08ghana-ho06.jpg
fetching water
https://c1.staticflickr.com/7/6172/6197040497_739ae23e78_b.jpg water well
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-XErDgEmazwM/UXZaU_h9dcI/AAAAAAAARHg/vQ6Lyml_2M/s1600/baobab+tree.jpg baobab tree
Post cards
http://rlv.zcache.com/elephant_at_sunset_in_africa_k_turnbull_art_postcardr014c3eeb313b40d3bd10917708cc1dce_vgbaq_8byvr_324.jpg
http://rlv.zcache.com.au/african_landscape_postcardra7b8b1cbe6984db1a04c7be537b0489c_vgbaq_8byvr_324.jpg
http://rlv.zcache.com/african_sunset_postcardr446226825b2940118b83c3a240bc38e0_vgbaq_8byvr_1024.jpg
http://images.delcampe.com/img_large/auction/000/190/204/533_001.jpg
Materials

Pencils
Paper
Colored pencils
Graphic organizers
Card stock paper
Paper or plastic cups
Contact paper

Twine
Glue
Assorted art supplies
Computer
Projector
Smart board
Document camera

Accommodations
Accommodations will be made for any student who may require such assistance. For example,
for a student with a disability in reading, I would read the directions of the quiz aloud. Also, if
needed, I would have a peer buddy read the quiz to the student.
Also, for a gifted student, I would supply him or her links to Native American culture so that the
student could do an extended research assignment and compare/contrast Native American culture
to that of rural Africa. The student would then be allowed to present his findings to the class.
Accommodations will be labeled with * on the lesson plans.
Assessments and Rubrics
Pre-test: The pre-test will be in the form of an Africa KWL chart. The students will be
instructed to fill out the columns labeled K and W for what they know about Africa and
things they want to know about Africa.
Post-test: For the post test, the students will be given another Africa KWL and will be instructed
to fill out the column labeled L for what they have learned throughout this unit.
Quiz: During lesson three, I will give the students a short quiz in which they will demonstrate
knowledge acquired during the previous two weeks. I will use this assessment to determine what
the students have learned and what content the students may have struggled with. The data I
acquire from this quiz will determine what content I may need to reteach and where I should
proceed to from this point.
Graphic Organizer: During the lesson featuring My Great-Grandmothers Gourd, the students
will be given a graphic organizer in which they will identify the main idea and four supporting
details.
Crossword Puzzle: Another form of formative assessment I will be using is a crossword puzzle.
The puzzle will be part of my interactive bulletin board.
Venn Diagram: The students will complete a Venn Diagram comparing/contrasting life in the
United States to life in rural Africa. This would also be an example of formative assessment.
Summative assessment: Summative assessment for this unit will be in the form of a postcard
created by the students. I will grade the students postcards with a rubric which is attached.
Copies of all assessments are attached.

Reflection
My pretest will measure how much knowledge the students possess about Africa. The pretest
will be in the form of a KWL chart, so the students will write what they know in the K column
and what they want to know, or wonder about, in the W column. This pretest will affect my
teaching because I am not going to teach content that most of the students already know. That
would only waste my time and theirs. At the end of the unit the students will be another KWL
chart and will be instructed to fill in the L column describing what they have learned through
this unit. If I have done my job, each student will have multiple entries in the L column.
However, if the students do not write very many items in this column, I will want to revise the
unit before I teach it again.
In creating this lesson, I realized how much work actually goes into preparing a unit plan. I had
to think of various activities that covered a wide range of content areas. I also had to take into
account the different learning modalities, and the different levels of Blooms taxonomy. I
actually enjoyed putting this unit together and I am looking forward to implementing it in the
classroom.
Pillars Addressed
Teaching Skills: I will show teaching skills by teaching this unit to the 3rd Grade students in Mrs.
McClungs class at Fairplains Elementary. I will teach them various aspects of African culture,
animals, animal habitats, and important landmarks/landforms. I will assess my teaching skills by
determining how much I have taught the students by using a pre/post test. If I have done my job
correctly, the students will be able to learn new information about Africa.
Planning Skills: I have shown planning skills by creating this six-week unit plan. I had to plan
what I wanted to teach each week and what I wanted the students to know. I also had to plan
how to assess the students to make sure I have affected their learning.
Interpersonal Skills: I will display interpersonal skills by effectively communicating with my
cooperating teacher, Mrs. McClung. I will have to communicate my ideas for the unit plan and
make sure everything aligns well with what she will be teaching. I will also have to effectively
communicate with the students to make sure that they are aware of what is expected of them.
Decision Making Skills: I used decision making skills when I decided what content to include in
my unit plan. There was no way I could include everything about Africa and teach this plan in
six weeks. I had to decide what I wanted to cover and how to assess the content. I also had to
decide on an overall topic of my unit. I wanted to do something I thought the students would be
interested in. At the beginning of the year, each grade level at Fairplains picked a continent they
wanted to learn about and then share that information with the rest of the school. The 3rd graders
picked Africa, so I will be able to help them with their goal of learning more about Africa so they
can share the information they learn with the rest of the school.

Diversity: I will show diversity in the teaching of this unit because I planned on making
accommodations for any student who may have a learning disability or exceptionality. I will
employ various methods to ensure that all students have the opportunity to learn.
Professional Commitment: I will display professional commitment throughout the teaching of
this unit by dressing professionally each day. I will also act in a professional manner at all times.
I will also show professionalism by arriving to the school on time each day and professionally
interacting with the teachers and other staff members.
Worksheets and Assessments will follow.

Circle the best answer for each question.


1. What is the name of the largest desert in the World?
A. Gobi
B. Kalahari
C. Painted
D. Sahara
2. What is the name of the longest river in the World?
A. Little Kanawha
B. Mississippi
C. Nile
D. Ohio
3. What is the name of the tallest mountain in Africa?
A. Mount Everest
B. Mount Kilimanjaro
C. Mount McKinley
D. Mount Rushmore
4. How tall is Victoria Falls?
A. 3 Feet
B. 30 Feet
C. 300 Feet
D. 3000 Feet

5. Why did the Egyptians build pyramids?


A. Churches
B. Libraries
C. Playgrounds for children
D. Tombs for the pharaohs

List two animals that live in each of the African habitats.


Desert:

Savannah/Grasslands:

Rainforest:

Rubric for Postcard


Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of Africa by completing a 5-sentence
paragraph describing an imagined African safari. Students will also draw a picture depicting
African scenery, animals, or a combination of the two.
Criteria
Paragraph

Picture

Total points
available: 10

Meets Expectations,
5pts.
Student shows
exceptional
knowledge of
African landmarks,
animals, and animal
habitats. Paragraph
is easily readable.
Has legible
handwriting.
Student shows
exceptional
knowledge of
African landmarks,
animals, and animal
habitats. Objects in
picture are easily
recognizable.
Picture is neat and
organized.
Total points
earned:_________

Meets Some
Expectations, 3pts.
Student demonstrates
some knowledge of
African landmarks,
animals, and animal
habitats. Paragraph is
readable. Has legible
handwriting.

Meets No Expectations,
0pts.
Student demonstrates
little or no knowledge of
African landmarks,
animals, and animal
habitats. Paragraph is
unorganized. Does not
have legible handwriting.

Student demonstrates
some knowledge of
African landmarks,
animals, and animal
habitats. Some objects
are not recognizable.
Picture is somewhat
neat and organized.

Student demonstrates
little or no knowledge of
African landmarks,
animals, and animal
habitats.