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Program Plan 2015

REDUCING TYPE 2 DIABETES IN
RURAL FIRST AUSTRALIAN
COMMUNITIES IN FAR NORTH
QUEENSLAND

REDUCING TYPE 2 DIABETES IN RURAL FIRST AUSTRALIAN COMMUNITIES IN FAR NORTH
QUEENSLAND

Program Plan
Student Name
David Mueller
s2942319
Bachelor of Environmental Health
&
Angus Glover
S2941502
Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics

Course Name & Convenor
2218MED Needs Assessment, Program Planning and Evaluation
Bernadette Sebar

Needs Assessment
Program Plan Public Health
Due: 01/11/20145
Weight: 30%

Word limit
none

Word Count
4175

Submitted
Draft: 30/10/2015

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REDUCING TYPE 2 DIABETES IN RURAL FIRST AUSTRALIAN COMMUNITIES IN FAR NORTH
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Content
1.0

Formative Research
1.1
Cultural Determinants
1.2
Health Services
1.3
Social Determinants
1.4
Environmental Determinants
1.5
Individual Determinants

Page 3

2.0

Program Goals

Page 5

3.0

Program Objectives
3.1
Cultural Objectives
3.2
Health Services Objectives
3.3
Social Objectives
3.4
Environmental Objectives
3.5
Individual Objectives

Page 5

4.0

Program Focus

Page 7

5.0

Program Strategies

Page 7

6.0

Strategies

Page 8

7.0

Task Development Timeline

Page 10

8.0

Budget

Page 14

9.0

Evaluation Plan

Page 19

10.0

References

Page 22

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1.0 – Formative Research
Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition affecting the lives of approximately 917 000 Australians (AIHW,
2015). Of those affected, studies show that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience a
rate three times higher than those of Non-Indigenous Australians (AIHW, 2015). As a population group
the Indigenous people suffer a diabetes prevalence of approximately 6% with those living in remote
areas experiencing a heightened rate of 9% compared to 5% in those living in non-remote areas (ABS,
2009).
A study was undertaken in remote indigenous communities in far north Queensland which showed
distinct increases in new type 2 diabetes prevalence from 1999 through to 2007. The incidence of
diabetes in these populations was almost 4 times that compared to the Non-indigenous population as
well as a higher incidence rate than those experienced by Indigenous people throughout Australia
(McDermott, R. et al, 2010).

1.1 Cultural Determinants
The indigenous population’s culture is extremely important to their health needs. The implementation
of a westernised lifestyle within these indigenous communities profoundly interrupts their cultural
identity and has adverse effects on their health. Issues such as racism, historical hardships in terms of
mistreatment and lack of cultural understanding are mentioned throughout the literature whereby
poor mental health is highlighted as a major issue contributing to detrimental behaviours and lifestyles
among Indigenous Australians (Dick, D. 2007).
The other disparity noted in the literature is the differing view of what health is between the
westernised culture and Indigenous culture. The Indigenous culture identifies health as holistic with
emphasis on community, social, cultural and emotional well-being being paramount in the health of
an individual (AHMRC, n.d.). This outlook on health is constantly being challenged and degraded as
western lifestyle health ideals predominate the indigenous culture and lifestyle.

1.2 Health Services

1. Among rural Indigenous populations health care services generally aren’t; physically
accessible, affordable or culturally competent. As a result of this approximately 26% of
Indigenous people over the age of 15 have trouble accessing health care (AHRC, 2008). The
cost of healthcare is of concern whereby 32% of indigenous Australians were unable to access
health care as a result of costs. One of the major factors affecting access to health services is
the culturally incompetent aspect of health care whereby Indigenous people may feel
uncomfortable in a health service setting. In some cases there are language barriers as well as
mistrust between Indigenous patients and Non-indigenous health care providers due to
historical mistreatment of Indigenous people (AHRC, 2008).
2. Accessible health care services are a vital component of health, particularly in the early
detection, prevention and treatment of health issues such as diabetes. They are also a focal
point for education and promotion of health making them of critical importance in the fight
against type 2 diabetes incidences in rural Indigenous communities.

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REDUCING TYPE 2 DIABETES IN RURAL FIRST AUSTRALIAN COMMUNITIES IN FAR NORTH
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1.3 Social determinants

1. The social status in the Australian society plays an important role in the overall health of its
people. Within it, First Australians are placed in one of the lowest social classes and
socioeconomic patterns and health outcomes are influenced from it. It is proven that people
living in higher social classes have better health than people on the lower end of the hierarchy
(Shepherd, Li & Zubrick, 2012).

2. The understanding of how to treat an illness, especially of chronic illness is based on two
different models. Whereas the Western concept is based on an individual's responsibility, in
Aboriginals believe it is also the responsibility of the family and even the whole community,
which can be described as “collective” management. Once the community support breaks
away, there is a major impact on the health outcome of the individual, because primary
support for health and curing illness comes from the community and not from the health
system (Barnett & Kendall, 2015).

1.4 Environmental determinants

1. A study undertaken at communities at the Murray River looked into Aboriginals interaction
with the environment and how the lifestyle changed since the arrival of the Europeans. The
results show a major shift in the Aboriginal life on several levels such as family activities, their
diet and a rise in costs for food. This is because the life of the Indigenous population was
tightly linked to the river, but changes to its flow and natural fauna, shifted the traditional
lifestyle and food sources over only a few generations. With the result that more money needs
to get spend on food and the health is decreasing among this communities (Willis, Pearce &
Jenkin, 2004).
2. Fresh food scarcity plays another major role in the development of bad health outcomes in
rural communities. Here is the excess to fresh vegetables and meat the limiting factor and not
the lack of money. Food stores in rural areas do not stock all the time fresh articles and the
stock gets mostly replenished every two weeks, in accordance with Government payments.
This results in a scarcity of fresh healthy food after a few days and people are forced to by
processed food which last a long time on the shelfs and are influencing the health negatively
(Scelza, 2012).

1.5 Individual determinants

1. The behaviour of an individual in terms of diet, physical activity, alcohol consumption, illicit
drug use and smoking heavily influences one’s health. Indigenous people in Australia generally
display poorer health behaviours in comparison to the non-indigenous population. Indigenous
people over the age of 15 were shown to be 10% less likely to consume the recommended
fruit intake compared to non-indigenous Australians, while 66% of Indigenous people in 201213 were considered overweight/obese. These figures are similar to Non-indigenous figures
although obesity rates among this were shown to be 1.5 times higher in comparison with Nonindigenous Australians (AIHW, 2014).

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REDUCING TYPE 2 DIABETES IN RURAL FIRST AUSTRALIAN COMMUNITIES IN FAR NORTH
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2. The individual's experience with racism is not only based on a personal scale, but also from
experience from family members, friends and community members. Another problem is that
these experience are given to the next generation and they are reinforced by an individual's
experience which at the end will lead to sceptical and negative view on the western health
system (Barnett & Kendall, 2015).

2.0 – Program Goal
To decrease the prevalence of new cases of Type 2 Diabetes amongst First Australians living in Rural
Far-North Queensland communities.

3.0 – Program Objectives
3.1 Cultural Objectives
1. To improve indigenous cultural health as a means of reducing type 2 diabetes by establishing
one Indigenous Cultural centre within each rural Indigenous community in FNQ by 2030.

If we can successfully establish the target of Indigenous cultural centres, then we expect to
see improvements in cultural health within rural Indigenous communities in FNQ and as a
result see a decrease in type 2 diabetes prevalence.

2. To implement more culturally appropriate and effective type 2 diabetes prevention healthcare
in rural Indigenous communities in FNQ, in doing so decreasing current incidence rates by 25%,
by 2020

If we can implement culturally based and culturally appropriate diabetes health services, then
we should see an increased success rate in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes
in rural indigenous communities in far north Queensland.

3.2 Health Service objectives
1. To improve the accessibility to healthcare as a means of reducing the prevalence of type 2
diabetes within rural indigenous communities in FNQ by subsidising costs of Indigenous
healthcare by 50% before 2017.

If we decrease the cost of healthcare, then we would increase accessibility and opportunity
for treatment and information, resulting in an expected decrease of prevalence of type 2
diabetes within rural Indigenous communities in far north Queensland.

2.
To improve promotion of health services by 30-50% as a means of preventing and treating
type 2 diabetes within rural Indigenous communities in FNQ by 2020.

If we improve promotion of available health services, then we expect to see more individuals
seeking health care and as a result a reduction in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes within
rural indigenous communities within FNQ.

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REDUCING TYPE 2 DIABETES IN RURAL FIRST AUSTRALIAN COMMUNITIES IN FAR NORTH
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3.3 Social Objectives
1. Reducing unemployment rate for First Australians in rural FNQ to 20% by 2020.
If we increasing employment opportunities and chances for employment for rural indigenous
people in FNQ through training and educational programs, then their social status and with it
their overall health will increase.
2. Involving First Australians in FNQ in 100% of community health care programs by 2020.
If we present culturally aware health care concept to the communities in FNQ with their
involvement in planning and organising these events, than the community support for the
individual will be better and health will increase.

3.4 Environmental Objectives
1. Recovery of natural habitats in FNQ so that 80% of First Australians communities have excess
to them for traditional hunting and lifestyle by 2020.
If we recovery natural habitats and allow indigenous people in FNQ to use them for hunting
and collecting traditional food sources, than we improving their diet, increase community
bonds and recognising traditional lifestyle.

2. Improving the delivery of fresh food to 80% of rural FNQ First Australian communities
minimum once a week and store them in sufficient cool rooms by 2020.
If we can manage to deliver fresh healthy food at least one time a week to remote areas in
FNQ with sufficient storage facilities, than people are empowered to buy and use them.

3.5 Individual Objectives
1.) Free sporting activities and equipment for 60% of First Australian communities in FNQ by 2020.
If we provide sporting equipment and free activities, then we should influence individual’s lifestyle
choices and therefor increase physically activity levels.

2.) Building of community discussion groups between First Australians and New Australians to
understand each other’s culture in 80% of FNQ communities.
If we building discussion groups in FNQ about historical events that led to misunderstanding in each
other culture, than awareness and feeling of being equal will develop.

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REDUCING TYPE 2 DIABETES IN RURAL FIRST AUSTRALIAN COMMUNITIES IN FAR NORTH
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4.0 Program Focus
To provide 80% of healthcare providers in rural indigenous communities in FNQ with the knowledge
and resources to implement culturally appropriate Type 2 diabetes healthcare by 2020.
Because cultural sensitivity, respect and understanding are key issues to overcome perceived racism
for First Australians, which in turn leads to mistrust in western medicine as mentioned throughout
literature (Dick, D. 2007). Another key point is to understand that health is a community issue among
Indigenous people and not only an individual’s responsibility. Understanding this concept and apply it
to new health care policies will increase the success rate of new policies (Barnett & Kendall, 2015).
In training health care providers in cultural awareness, we will reduce the feeling of racism towards
First Australians and this will improve their trust in Western medicine. Through this, we will be able to
work together with the community, involve them I health care plans and influence the overall health
and health awareness positively.

5 – Program strategies
“To implement more culturally appropriate and effective type 2 diabetes prevention healthcare in
rural Indigenous communities in FNQ, in doing so decreasing current incidence rates by 25%, by 2020”
Strategy 1 – Building Healthy Public Policy
Introduction of mandatory Indigenous cultural courses for healthcare providers in 60-70% rural
Indigenous communities in FNQ.
If healthcare providers have the knowledge of the Indigenous cultures perception of health, then
those healthcare providers will have the resources and ability to implement culturally appropriate
diabetes healthcare to Indigenous people within rural FNQ.
Strategy 2 – Reorienting Health Services
- Introduction of free type 2 diabetes screenings in healthcare services throughout 80% of rural
Indigenous communities in FNQ.
If diabetes screening is provided free for indigenous Australians in rural FNQ, then we should see an
increased number of people seeking diabetic health services and as a result enable healthcare
providers to impart preventative knowledge and information to those who receive diabetes screening.

Strategy 3 – Developing Personal Skills
Implementation of compulsory culturally appropriate type 2 diabetes education programs within
schools in rural Indigenous communities in FNQ.
If we provide education on preventative measures of type 2 diabetes in a school setting, then we
establish a strong platform where information and knowledge of prevention of type 2 diabetes can be
conveyed to students.
Strategy 4 – Strengthening Community Action

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REDUCING TYPE 2 DIABETES IN RURAL FIRST AUSTRALIAN COMMUNITIES IN FAR NORTH
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Establishment of a health committee in 80% of rural indigenous communities in FNQ, involving various
community members and health professionals with regular meetings to discuss and outline strategies
on improving the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in their community.
If we enable community members the opportunity to provide input into type 2 diabetes prevention,
then the programs implemented should be more specific to the communities cultural and health
needs and as a result an improved success rate in diabetes prevention should be attained.

Strategy 5 – Creating Supportive Environments
Establishment of at least one major sporting/leisure ground within 50-60% of rural indigenous
communities in FNQ
If we provide the community with an environment that promotes physical activity, then healthcare
providers have a vital community resource available to recommend when in consultation with a
patient.

6 – Activities
Strategy 1 - Introduction of mandatory Indigenous cultural courses for healthcare providers in 60-70%
of rural Indigenous communities in FNQ.



Seek government funding for the resources needed to implement the program
Create a curriculum for the mandatory Indigenous cultural course to be based on
Hire a program co-ordinator to oversee the teachings and implementation of the program
Seek approval for official accreditation of the program as a recognised qualification

Strategy 2 - Introduction of free type 2 diabetes screenings in healthcare services throughout 80% of
rural Indigenous communities in FNQ.



Seek government funding so diabetes screening can be implemented as a free service
equip health services with the needed resources and training
Implement increased media promotion (radio, TV, newspapers) about the free type 2 diabetes
screening
Develop a prevention information package on type 2 diabetes to be distributed upon
consultation

Strategy 3 - Implementation of compulsory culturally appropriate type 2 diabetes education programs
within 80% of schools in rural Indigenous communities in FNQ.




Seek any necessary government funding
Develop curriculum for diabetes program
Equip participating schools with necessary resources
Provide excess training to education providers

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REDUCING TYPE 2 DIABETES IN RURAL FIRST AUSTRALIAN COMMUNITIES IN FAR NORTH
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Strategy 4 - Establishment of a health committee in 80% of rural indigenous communities in FNQ,
involving various community members and health professionals with regular meetings to discuss and
outline strategies on improving the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in their community.




Seek approval and possible funding from local council
Appoint diverse variety of community members with local health professionals to a
committee
Establish goal and objectives for group meetings
Establish regular meeting places and times for the foreseeable future

Strategy 5 - Establishment of at least one major sporting/leisure ground within 50-60% of rural
indigenous communities in FNQ




Secure land of which can be utilised
Seek council approval for development of a sporting/leisure ground
Seek funding for development of a sporting/leisure ground
Appoint a construction/development company in charge of the project (aim for construction
time of approximately 1 year)

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REDUCING TYPE 2 DIABETES IN RURAL FIRST AUSTRALIAN COMMUNITIES IN FAR NORTH
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7 – Task Development Timeline
Strategy 1 - Introduction of mandatory Indigenous cultural courses for healthcare providers in 60-70%
of rural Indigenous communities in FNQ.

Seek
Government
Funding For
necessary
resources
Create
Curriculum
For
Indigenous
cultural
course
Seek
approval for
official
accreditatio
n of the
program
Hire
program coordinator &
staff
to
implement
the program

Jan
201
6

Feb
201
6

Mar
201
6

X

X

X

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Apr
201
6

May
201
6

X

X

Jun
201
6

Jul
201
6

Aug
201
6

X

X

X

Sep
201
6

Oct
201
6

Nov
201
6

X

X

X

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REDUCING TYPE 2 DIABETES IN RURAL FIRST AUSTRALIAN COMMUNITIES IN FAR NORTH
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Strategy 2 - - Introduction of free type 2 diabetes screenings in healthcare services throughout 80%
of rural Indigenous communities in FNQ.
Dec
2016

Jan
2017

X

X

Feb
2017

Mar
2017

X

X

Apr
2017

May
2017

Jun
2017

Jul
2017

X

X

X

Seek government funding
Equip
health
services
with
necessary resources and training
Develop information Brochure for
post-consultation
Implement marketing/promotion
campaign

X

Strategy 3 - - Implementation of compulsory culturally appropriate type 2 diabetes education
programs within 80% of schools in rural Indigenous communities in FNQ.
Aug
2017

Sep
2017

X

X

Oct
2017

Nov
2017

X

X

Dec
2017

Jan
2018

Seek necessary funding
Develop curriculum
Equip schools with necessary resources
X
Employ qualified personnel to deliver program to
students
X

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REDUCING TYPE 2 DIABETES IN RURAL FIRST AUSTRALIAN COMMUNITIES IN FAR NORTH
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Strategy 4 - Establishment of a health committee in 80% of rural indigenous communities in FNQ,
involving various community members and health professionals with regular meetings to discuss and
outline strategies on improving the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in their community.

Seek approval
and
any
funding from
local council
Appoint
community
based
committee
Establish
goals
and
objectives
Establish
regular
meeting place
and times
Unforeseeabl
e
timing
issues
allowance

Feb
201
8

Mar
201
8

X

X

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Apr
201
8

May
201
8

X

X

Jun
201
8

Jul
201
8

Aug
201
8

Sep
201
8

Oct
201
8

Nov
201
8

Dec
201
8

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

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Strategy 5 - Establishment of at least one major sporting/leisure ground within 50-60% of rural
indigenous communities in FNQ
Jan
201
9
Secure land
of which can
be utilised
Seek council
approval for
development
of
a
sporting/leis
ure ground
Seek funding
for
development
of
sporting/leis
ure ground
Appoint
construction
company
(aim
for
finished
development
in 6 months)
Construction
of
sporting/leis
ure ground

Feb
201
9

Mar
201
9

X

X

Apr
201
9

Ma
y
201
9

X

X

Jun
201
9

Jul
201
9

Aug
201
9

Sep
201
9

Oct
201
9

Nov
201
9

Dec
201
9

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

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X

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8.0 Budget
8.1 Strategy 1 - Introduction of mandatory Indigenous cultural courses for
healthcare providers in rural Indigenous communities in FNQ.
Total budget = $500 000
Labour requirement

Costs
Recurrent?
annual $

non Labour
requirements

costs
Recurrent?
annually $

1x Curriculum Developer

50 000

Yes

work clothing

1000

yes

1x Program coordinator

40 000

Yes

transport with
government car,
petrol

3000

yes

Total annual

90 000

4000

total annually plus:
leave loading 17.5%,
Tax 5%, Superannuation
9.5%
= +32%

118 800

5280

total per Month

9 900

440

Total over 4 years
program (2016 - 2020)

$475
200

21 120

Total Strategy costs:
$496 320

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8.2 Strategy - Introduction of free type 2 diabetes screenings in 60-80% of
healthcare services throughout rural Indigenous communities in FNQ.
Total budget = $2 000 000
Labour requirement

1x Program coordinator
20 x Health care
provider payments
(doctor)

Costs
annual $

Recurrent?

non Labour
requirements

costs
annually
$

Recurrent?

work cloth

1000

yes

40 000

Yes

transport with
government car,
petrol

3000

yes

20 x 15
000 = 300
000

yes

Materials for
training

5000

yes

Media promotion

20 000

yes

10

no

Medical resources
000

Total annual

340 000

39 000

total annually plus:
leave loading 17.5%,
Tax 5%,
Superannuation 9.5%
= +32%

448 800

51 480

total per Month

37 400

4 290

Total over 4 years
program (2016 - 2020)

1 795
200

205 920

Total Strategy costs:
$2 001 120

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8.3 Strategy - Implementation of compulsory culturally appropriate type 2 diabetes
education programs within 60 -80 % schools in rural Indigenous communities in FNQ
Total budget = $1 400 000

Labour requirement

Costs
annual $

Recurrent?

non Labour
requirements

costs
annually
$

Recurrent?

1x Curriculum
Developer

50 000

Yes

work clothing

1000

yes

1x Program coordinator

40 000

Yes

transport with
government car,
petrol

3000

yes

30 x Education provider

30 x 5000
= 150 000

yes

Materials for
training

5 000

yes

Educational
resources

10 000

yes

Total annual

240 000

19 000

total annualy plus:
leave loading 17.5%,
Tax 5%,
Superannuation 9.5%
= +32%

316 800

25 080

total per Month

50,710

2 090

Total over 4 years
program (2016 - 2020)

1 267 200

100 320

Total Strategy costs:
$ 1 367 520

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8.4 Strategy 4 - Establishment of a health committee involving various community
members and health professionals with regular meetings to discuss and outline strategies
on improving the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in their community
Total budget = $2 000 000

Labour requirement

Costs
annual $

Recurrent?

non Labour
requirements

costs
annually
$

30 x Health committee
payments (30 different
communities)

30 x 10
000 = 300
000

Yes

Materials for
meetings

5000

1x Program co-ordinator

40 000

Yes

resources

5000

yes

yes

reservation
costs

1000

yes

Total annual

340 000

11 000

total annualy plus:
leave loading 17.5%, Tax
5%, Superannuation 9.5%
= +32%

448 800

14 520

total per Month

37 400

1 210

Total over 4 years
program (2016 - 2020)

1 795 200

58 080

Recurrent?

Total Strategy costs:
$1 853 280

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8.5 Strategy 5 - Establishment of at least one major sporting/leisure ground within
30 -50% of rural indigenous communities in far north Queensland
Total budget = 10 000 000

Labour requirement

Costs
annual $

Recurrent?

non Labour
requirements
10 x purchase of
council land

costs
Recurrent?
annually $
10 x 80
000 =
800 000

ground planner

30 000

no

10 x construction costs
(including materials)

10 x 500
000
= 5 000
000

no

10 x Maintenance costs

10 x 30
000 =
300 000

yes

Total annual

5 330
000

800 000

total annually plus:
leave loading 17.5%, Tax
5%, Superannuation
9.5%
= +32%

7 035
600

1 056 000

total per Month

586 300

88 000

Total over 4 years
program (2016 - 2020)

7 035
600

1 056 000

no

Total Strategy costs:
$8 091 600
Overall Program budget = $15 900 000
Overall Program expected expenditure = $13 809 840

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9.0 Evaluation plan
This projects evaluation plan will comprise of 5 components, evaluating each strategy of which are
based on the 5 action areas of the Ottawa charter. The overall aim of this evaluation is to determine
whether the strategies put in place are successful in decreasing new type 2 diabetes incidence rates
in rural indigenous communities in far north Queensland. The evaluation plan used was based on the
outcome evaluation model which we believe is most appropriate in determining the outcome of the
processes.

Strategy 1 Evaluation Plan
Introduction of mandatory Indigenous cultural courses for healthcare providers practising in rural
Indigenous communities in FNQ.
What will be evaluated?

Whether healthcare providers are implementing culturally appropriate healthcare/utilising
information from the Indigenous cultural course within their practises and whether they have
seen improvement in Indigenous community care as a result

How will we evaluate this?

request a report from the healthcare provider on what changes they have made to their
practice to make it more culturally appropriate and how they feel the changes have impacted
their practice (negatively or positively) with focus on the effect it has had on the Indigenous
community’s health behaviours.

When will we evaluate this?

12 months after implementation of the prog

Strategy 2 Evaluation Plan
Introduction of free type 2 diabetes screenings in healthcare services throughout rural Indigenous
communities in FNQ.
What will be evaluated?

What the impact free diabetes health screening has had on the amount of people seeking type
2 diabetes related health treatment

How will we evaluate this?

Keep a medical record of number of people seeking the free screening and compare with data
from the number of people who sought diabetes screening before implementation of the free
service
Provide patients with a brief survey asking how the free service has impacted their knowledge
and behaviour in relation to type 2 diabetes.

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REDUCING TYPE 2 DIABETES IN RURAL FIRST AUSTRALIAN COMMUNITIES IN FAR NORTH
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When will we evaluate this?

12 months after implementation

Strategy 3 Evaluation Plan
Implementation of compulsory culturally appropriate type 2 diabetes education programs within
schools in rural Indigenous communities in FNQ.
What will be evaluated?

Whether the program has been successful in educating the youth about preventing type 2
diabetes from affecting them in the future and the dangers associated with having diabetes.

How will we evaluate this?

Provide a test at the beginning and completion of the program to gauge how successful the
program has been in improving the knowledge of type 2 diabetes.

When will we evaluate this?

At the start of the program implementation and at the completion of the program

Strategy 4 Evaluation Plan
Establishment of a health committee involving various community members and health professionals
with regular meetings to discuss and outline strategies on improving the prevalence of type 2 diabetes
in their community.
What will be evaluated?

Whether the goals and objectives set out are being reached

How will we evaluate this?

Request a monthly report from each meeting outlining the main points of discussion and the
subsequent community programs that are being implemented as a result of these meetings.

When will we evaluate this?

On a regular monthly basis

Strategy 5 Evaluation Plan
Establishment of at least one major sporting/leisure ground within the community centre
What will be evaluated?

Whether the development of the sporting ground has improved physical activity levels of the
community and in turn improved health in relation to type 2 diabetes

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REDUCING TYPE 2 DIABETES IN RURAL FIRST AUSTRALIAN COMMUNITIES IN FAR NORTH
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How will we evaluate this?

Healthcare providers ask patients how often they use the facility upon consultation and report
findings
Culturally appropriate analysis of all patients health by healthcare providers including heart
rate, blood pressure and BMI levels (provides an indication of the overall health of the
community)

When will we evaluate this?

12 months after construction of sporting ground has been completed

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10.0 References
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