You are on page 1of 6

Friday, K. (2012, September 26). The Cost of Electronic Medical Records.

 The New York
Times. Retrieved March 14, 2016, from 
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/27/opinion/the­cost­of­electronic­medical­
records.html?_r=0 
In todays world everything is moving toward electronics.  In our health care 
settings, everything is moving to electronic medical records.  All patient information is 
computerized and intended to improve patient safety.  The question is though is it really 
safer and is the change worth the cost? Another question with these improvements would 
be, is the Affordable Care Act able to recover these cost by changing financial incentives 
for the physicians?   Another issue that was brought up in this article was that fact that 
with this new system, there is no proof that there is actually direct contact with the 
physician and the patient.  With the new charting system, physicians click on different 
boxes to describe the chief complaint a patient has.  On the old paper system, the 
physician had to write out on paper how the patient felt and use the words the patient 
used to describe how they were feeling. With this type of interaction the physician was 
able to get to know the patient directly and the patient was able to connect with the 
physician.

Graham, J. (2015, September 30). Cancel, Don't Delay, Meaningful Use Stage 3 For 
Electronic Health Records. Retrieved March 15, 2016, from 
http://www.forbes.com/sites/theapothecary/2015/09/30/cancel­dont­delay­
meaningful­use­stage­3­for­electronic­health­records/#5dc293fb472e

“Meaningful Use Stage 3 (MU3) was imposed by the federal government via the 
HITECH Act of 2009” (Graham, 2015). This stimulus act used almost $30 billion to 
make health care facilities and physicians convert to Electronic Health Records (HER). 
This provided a very large influx to the companies selling the Electronic Health Records 
programs. Two very large companies selling public HER are Cerner and athenahealth, 
which have increased their prices over the NASDAQ Index.
 
Hackers can profit greatly by stealing your health data. Are you protected? (n.d.). 
Retrieved March 15, 2016, from 
https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health­science/hackers­can­profit­
greatly­by­stealing­your­health­data­are­you­protected/2015/11/09/e1f126f6­
5181­11e5­933e­7d06c647a395_story.html 

In the last three years, the health care industry has been the most common area for
information breaches according to the Identity Theft Resource Center.  Many people 
don’t realize the amount of information hackers can get from patients medical records.  
Information such as Social Security numbers, contact information and insurance ID 
numbers, also security questions revealing mother maiden name, fathers last name, your 
birthday, where you went to school, and many, many other personal questions such as 
those.  When health information is stolen, it can take several thousands of dollars to 
resolve the problem, whereas with stolen credit cards, a maximum legal liability is only 

50 dollars.  There are several steps to take to insure personal health information is 
protected and you are kept safe from hackers.

Horwitz, L. (2012, November 22). A Shortcut to Wasted Time. The New York Times. 
Retrieved March 15, 2016, from 
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/23/opinion/shortcuts­in­medical­
documentation.html  

Back when patient’s charts existed as a folder and paper, much time was spent 
looking for misplaced charts and distinguishing the handwriting of each physician.  It was
easy then to believe whatever the physician wrote down was true, because they spent the 
time to actually sit there and physically write it down.  In today’s society with electronic 
records, it’s as easy as a click here and a click there to fill in an entire “normal” physical 
exam on a patient.  There is also the copy and paste trick that temps physicians to use, 
and it works by coping patient information from a previous day and pasting it onto that 
day’s exam.  Insurance companies pay the physician by the amount of information on the 
patient’s chart, not by the amount of time spent in the room with the patient.  The sad part
about this is we have physicians out there who are more concerned about the amount of 
money they make and not necessarily how well the patient is feeling.  

Husten, L. (2015, April 12). Two Dirty Little Secrets About Electronic Health Records. 
Retrieved March 15, 2016, from 
http://www.forbes.com/sites/larryhusten/2015/04/12/two­dirty­little­secrets­
about­electronic­health­records/#7012b7cf35e2 

One of the largest EHR systems out there is the Epic system, which many of the 
largest hospitals use.  There are a few secrets with these systems that many don’t know.  
Epic as well as several other systems requires their buyers to sign a non­disparagement 
agreement, which makes it legally forbidden for the companies that buy them to criticize 
the EHR system in any way.  They are not even allowed to publish screen shots of the 
software on how to use it.  Another secret many do not realize with EHR systems is that 
EHR’s primary goal was not to keep patients safe, but to be sure that healthcare systems 
were receiving the maximum reimbursement.  It was also made to help healthcare 
executives manage their systems and employees.

Pradhan, M., Berkowitz, L., Bacon, D., Cohen, M. P., Novick, D. M., & Lombardi, G. 
(2012, December 2). Uneasy About Online Medical Records. The New York 
Times, A28. Letters to the Editor Retrieved March 15, 2016 from: 
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/03/opinion/uneasy­about­online­medical­
records.html 

Several physicians gave their input of what they feel would make for a better 
system for electronic health records.   One physician highlighted the dangers of the 
shortcuts that have been created to make for more efficient work for the physicians.  
Simply copy and pasting information from one area of a patients chart to another can 
save a great deal of time for a physicians.  But often times he is finding conflicting data 
entered into a patient’s chart.  This is leading to dangerous treatments to our patients.  
This can compromise a patient’s treatment and possibly lengthen their stay at a hospital 
or put their life in jeopardy.  One other author in this article talks about how adding the 
patient’s signature to the end of their chart will ensure the physician is documenting the 
correct information and has gone over the information with the patient.  This will add 
more steps to a physician’s workflow but will help ensure patient safety and false 
documentation.

Rodriguez, L. (2011, Dec. 12). Privacy, Security, and Electronic Health Records.
Retrieved from: https://www.healthit.gov/buzz­blog/privacy­and­security­of­
ehrs/privacy­security­electronic­health­records/ 

As many people have noticed when going to the doctor’s office, physicians are 
working on computers entering patient information into electronic health records.   This 
has been an opportunity for better care for patients and easier access to patient charts.  
Although the electronic record system seems to be a great opportunity for better patient 
care, many patients question whether or not their information is safe from hackers, or 

even documented correctly.  HIPAA or Health Insurance Portability and Accountability 
Act were set in place to ensure patient privacy as well as security. The federal law 
mandates all hospitals, doctors, and any other health care provider to notify any breach of
health information.