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Specific Program Plan

Get Your
Leisure On!

Specific Program Plan:

Get Your Leisure On!


Mitzy Perez
Florida International University

Table of Contents
Implementation Description..4-12
Introduction...4-5
Population..5-7
Program Purpose7-8
Frequency..8

Specific Program Plan


Facilities and Equipment ..9
Staff10
Evaluation..10-12
Program Evaluation10-11
Client Evaluation11-12
Program Plan..12-16
Program Title.12
Statement of Purpose.12-13
Program Objectives.13-16
Terminal Program Objective 113-14
Terminal Program Objective 214-15
Terminal Program Objective 315-16
Content and Process17-37
Session 1.17-19
Session 2.20-21
Session 3.22-23
Session 4.24-25
Session 5.26-27
Session 6.28-30
Session 7.31-33
Session 8.34-35
Session 9.36-37
Sequence Sheet.37-40
References ...41-43
Appendices .44-69
Appendix A44-46
Appendix B47
Appendix C48
Appendix D49-50
Appendix E51
Appendix F52
Appendix G53
Appendix H.54
Appendix I.55-56
Appendix J..57
Appendix K58-59
Appendix L60-61
Appendix M....62
Appendix N63-64
Appendix O65-66
Appendix P67
Appendix Q...68-69

Specific Program Plan

Implementation Description
Introduction

Specific Program Plan

Leisure education has been one of the most used facilitation techniques used by
recreational therapists. It involves teaching and implementing recreation and leisure related
skills, attitudes and values (Dattilo & McKenney, 2011). In order for leisure education to become
a therapeutic medium it must meet clients needs and goals as well as, bring about a desired
change in the client. Not only does leisure education teach leisure skills, it also allows clients to
see personal barriers/leisure barriers and find ways to overcome those barriers. The overall goal
of leisure education is to assist individuals to gain an awareness about and learn to use leisure in
ways that improve the quality of their lives (Dattilo & Murphy, 1991).
There are four skill types that a recreational therapist should implement while facilitating
leisure education activities. These skill types include: leisure awareness, social skills, leisure
resources and leisure skills (Stumbo and Peterson, 2004). This program will focus more on
leisure awareness, social skills and leisure resources. It is important to touch base with the clients
on self-awareness, social skills, and community resources before teaching leisure related skills.
Before any kind of leisure can take place, the clients must know what leisure is. The recreational
therapists job is to bring knowledge about leisure to the client in order for the client to
successfully participate in leisure. The clients must be able to distinguish what their leisure
preferences and dislikes are in order to be more motivated in participating in leisure activities
and most importantly, be able to make their own decisions about what leisure activities they want
to participate in. Hand in hand with self-awareness, the recreational therapist must be able to
teach social and community skills to the client. Most leisure activities require social interaction
or going out into the community and finding leisure resources. The clients must have these
necessary skills before participating in activities. If these needs are not fulfilled, the clients could
most likely feel a sense of incompetency and have negative thoughts towards certain leisure

Specific Program Plan

activities, leading to feeling less motivated to go out and participate in leisure activities (Dattilo
& McKenney, 2011). With the newly gained leisure awareness and social skills, the client will be
more inclined to go out into the community and participate in activities offered. Practicing
finding leisure resources would be beneficial for the client, especially by teaching the client how
to overcome certain barriers presented and how to use their own personal resources for leisure
opportunities.
Population
Shoreview VA Hospital serves the veteran community of Miami-Dade country, more
specifically the Homestead, Florida community. The recreational therapy department of
Shoreview VA Hospital is recognized for their work with veterans diagnosed with spinal cord
injuries, substance abuse, PTSD and those veterans with varying amputations.
Spinal cord injuries affect the communication between sensory and motor signals from
the spinal cord to the brain due to a lesion, most commonly caused by trauma (Jr,Frederick M
Maynard F.M., 1997). There are different classifications of spinal cord injuries depending on the
site of the injury. Tetraplegia affects the movement of arms, legs, trunk and pelvic regions.
Paraplegia does not affect the movement of the arms, but depending on the site of the injury, it
affects the movement of the legs and the trunk (Jr,Frederick M Maynard F.M., 1997). These
clients have a variety of physical limitations, as well as emotional impairments. In a study
performed by Kennedy, a population of people with spinal cord injuries were evaluated over a
longitudinal analysis and were found to have high rates of anxiety and depression due to their
accident (Kennedy, 2000). Physical impairments can include limited range of motion and
spasticity.

Specific Program Plan

Amputations are classified as the surgical removal of a limb or body part due to trauma,
infectious disease, or congenital defect (Ajibade, Akinniyi & Okoye, 2013). Amputations can
also be classified due to the location of the amputation, such as under the knee, above the knee
and all other amputations. (Robertson & Long, 2008). Along with the physical impairments such
as limited range of motion, just like clients with spinal cord injuries, people with amputations
also can have depression and low self-esteem. In a study performed by Rybarczyk it was found
that the way the participants who had amputations felt about their body in a social context, were
found to have indicators of depression (Rybarczyk, 1992).
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, or PTSD, is a common diagnoses found in Shoreview VA
Hospital. It is defined as a person who has gone through a traumatic event causing significant
distress in a persons daily life (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). The DSM-5 has made
a clearer line as to what constitutes as a traumatic event, as well as the patient not having to show
signs of helplessness or intense fear due to the fact that it has been found that these two
stipulations have no effect on properly diagnosing PTSD (American Psychiatric Association,
2013). The DSM V has also subdivided the symptoms into the following categories: reexperiencing, avoidance, negative cognitions and mood, and arousal (American Psychiatric
Association, 2013).
Another psychological disorder commonly treated at Shoreview VA Hospital is substance
abuse disorder. Substance abuse disorder is defined as the recurrent use of alcohol and/or drugs
causing functional and clinical impairments in a persons day to day life (Substance Abuse and
Mental Health Services Administration, 2015). The DSM V recognizes 6 common substance use
disorders including alcohol use, tobacco use, cannabis use, hallucinogen use, opioid use and
stimulant use disorders. People who have PTSD and/or substance abuse disorders have been

Specific Program Plan

found to have emotional and social impairments. In recent studies there has been proof that
veterans with PTSD have maladaptive patterns in social functioning including social anxiety and
violence (Frueh, B.C., 2001). People diagnosed with substance use disorders are diagnosed based
on social and emotional symptoms such impaired control, social impairment and risky use
(Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2015).
For all the treated disabilities, it has been found that there are physical, social and
emotional impairments that prevent veterans from fully being re-integrated into the community
as well as living a healthy leisure lifestyle. This program is dedicated to those veterans that are
diagnosed with psychiatric disorders such as PTSD and substance abuse disorder in order to
reintegrate the returning veterans into their community.
Program Purpose
The purpose of this program is to use leisure education on clients in order for them to
gain an appreciation for leisure in their life. This program will allow clients to see that by using
leisure, many aspects of their lives will be improved especially reintegration into society and
regaining emotional control. Clients will be taught how to find and use leisure resources that are
available to them, as well as, identify and overcome barriers that are presented. Clients will also
be taught how to express their feelings and thoughts in an appropriate manner, in addition to
appropriate social skills, in order to initiate and maintain social networks. The recreational
therapist will identify and target these social and emotional deficits through proper evaluation.
It has been found that people diagnosed with PTSD or Substance Abuse Disorder have
varying levels of social and emotional problems that lead to flashbacks or usage of substances. In
veterans diagnosed with PTSD it can be found they have a hard time feeling emotions and may

Specific Program Plan

feel detached from others, causing problems with personal relationships. Those with PTSD also
tend to avoid situations that may remind them of their traumas leading to avoiding social
activities. Veterans with PTSD often struggle with intense anger and impulses and in order to
avoid such feelings, they avoid closeness or suppress those feelings (PTSD: National Center for
PTSD). PTSD is usually comorbid with substance abuse disorder or a way for veterans to cope
after coming back from war. Substance abuse has been linked to failing to maintain relationships,
initiating relationships that encourage use of substances, becoming violent, depression, etc.
(Social Effects of an Addiction - Drug Addiction).
Using leisure education on veterans with PTSD or Substance Abuse Disorder will allow
the client to focus on finding their preferred leisure lifestyle, changing the habits that they once
had into better and more productive habits. Leisure education will allow the veterans to gain
those social skills that they lost and use them to reintegrate into society in a much healthier way.
Frequency
Veterans in the Shoreview VA Hospital will participate in this leisure education program
for a total of 9 sessions. The sessions will be performed twice a week for 4 weeks, and the final
week will contain 3 sessions. Studies have shown that prolonged exposure to therapy has a
substantial effect on the person undergoing therapy, therefore, the sessions will occur for 60
minutes. The sessions will be determined to be one on one sessions or group sessions by the
recreational therapist, as well as what the activity designates.
Facilities and Equipment
Shoreview VA Hospital has two rooms dedicated to recreational use. The facilities are
equipped with the most up-to-date equipment available and are open enough to accommodate a

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group of 15 people comfortably. If the activity requires a more open space, the facility has large,
grassy areas that the therapist can use if needed. The following items are provided and required
for the activities implemented in this program (any additional items will be mentioned in the
specific activity):

Paper
Pens/pencils
Desks/tables (enough to seat at least 10 people)
Chairs (enough for each table or desk)
Markers
Crayons
Colored Pencils
Velcro
Tape
Scissors
Glue
Erasers
Name tags

Staff
Shoreview VA Hospital has 2 CTRS certified Recreational Therapists employed, as well
as 2 recreational therapist assistants. The program will be implemented by the two therapists who
hold a CTRS certification, as well as a 4 year Bachelors degree. The therapists will have leisure
education experience and training. The recreational therapist assistants will also have to have a 4
year Bachelors degree, as well as some experience in leisure education programs. The RT
assistants will provide assistance to the CTRS when needed, or will be guiding the activities
under the supervision of the CTRS.
The recreational therapists will also have volunteers assisting with gathering materials
and setting up/taking down activities. Every 4 months there will be a new intern that will be

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under the supervision of the CTRS. The intern will be required to observe and take action during
the program.
Evaluation
Program Evaluation
Evaluations are important to conduct in order to make sure that programs are constantly
being modified and improved, as well as for our clients to get the best service possible in order
for them to reach and improve their needs. Evaluations are also conducted to evaluate
accountability, what goals have been met, and the cost effectiveness of the program. Shoreview
VA Hospital goes under a numerous amount of evaluations, especially the recreational therapy
department.
The Shoreview VA Hospital Recreational Therapy Department will be undergoing
formative and summative evaluations. Formative evaluations are performed while the activity or
program are in progress. This allows the therapist to make improvements during the duration of
the program for the client to meet specific needs. This also allows the therapist to add or remove
certain aspects of the activity that will make the program more effective. Furthermore, the
formative evaluation allows the therapists to address any problems that may have gone unnoticed
while planning the program. The therapist performing the formative evaluation will be using the
Post Session Report form (Appendix A) after each activity session. Summative evaluations, as
the term coins, is performed at the end of each program. In the case for this program, it will be
conducted after every 9-session cycle. Summative evaluations are used to compare other
programs against one another as well as to provide information for the next cycle of the program.
The agency will be able to look upon client satisfaction and client behavior and be able to see

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what activities worked and what did not work. Even though those clients will not be in the
program anymore, the information is valuable for the next round of clients. This also allows the
agency to perform cost-benefit analyses, to see which programs are most effective and should be
offered again. The therapist performing the summative evaluation will be using the Post Session
Analysis Form (Appendix B).
Client Evaluation
Client evaluations are an integral part of patient care monitoring (Stumbo & Peterson,
2004). Client evaluations are conducted for the therapist and the client to see if the client
outcomes formed during the initial treatment plan were accomplished. They allow the therapist
to see what behavioral changes were made due to the program. Client evaluations are performed
on an individual basis, due to the varying client outcomes in each treatment plan. The agency
later has the ability to synthesize individual evaluations to test the efficacy of the program as
well as note any major problems with the program. The recreational therapy department will
perform client evaluation through pre and post assessments, as well as through journals that the
clients will be documenting their progress in. Before the participants are accepted into the
program, the therapist will sit down with the client and discover what goals the client wishes to
achieve, what needs have to be addressed and improved, and what will be the best way to
achieve those goals/needs safely and successfully. The therapist will also review other reports
from prior treatment team members in order to see if the client can work in small groups and
shows social/emotional deficits.
Once the therapist deems that this program will be beneficial to the client, the therapist
will have the client undergo a pre-assessment to determine benchmarks. The therapist will use
two assessment tools: the Leisure Boredom Scale (Appendix D) which allows the therapist to see

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the clients current leisure lifestyle and satisfaction and another tool that measures the clients
knowledge of leisure, their leisure needs/preferences and dislikes, known barriers/resources
available and what they plan to do with leisure once they are discharged (Appendix E). The same
tools will be used as a post-assessment tool to evaluate the changes made in the clients leisure
knowledge and behavior. During the sessions, the therapist will take note if the client has
achieved the performance measures for each activity and any behavioral changes made within
the client. The information will later be used to fill out a Performance Sheet (Appendix C) after
the program has ended.
Program Plan
Program Title: Get Your Leisure On!
Statement of Purpose:
To provide leisure education to reintegrate the client into society and gain control of emotional
states by improving leisure awareness and social skills.
Program Objectives
TPO 1: To demonstrate an improved knowledge of leisure awareness.
Enabling Objective (EO)

Performance Measure (PM)

1.1- To demonstrate a clear understanding of

1.1.1- By the end of the first session, the client

what leisure encompasses.

will be able to write a solid definition of what


leisure means to them, once a day, as judged by
the recreational therapist.

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1.2- To demonstrate self-awareness of their

1.2.1- By the end of the program, the client will

own leisure preferences.

be able to demonstrate their leisure preferences


by listing examples of preferred leisure
activities and reasons why they are preferred,
once a week, as judged by the recreational
therapist.

1.3- To demonstrate the importance of making

1.3.1- By the end of the program, the client will

decisions.

demonstrate decision making skills by:

Providing a list of 5 leisure activities that


the client will partake in after the

program has ended


Narrowing down that list to 2 activities
by looking at the influences behind that
decision that drove the participant to
make that decision and how the activities
will help them reach their goals.

As judged by the recreational therapist

TPO 2: To provide knowledge on how to use and navigate leisure resources


Enabling Objective (EO)

Performance Measure (PM)

2.1- To demonstrate the ability to identify what 2.1.1- By the end of the third week, the client
is personally needed in order to participate in a

will be able to provide an example of how they

leisure activity.

would prepare for an activity beforehand, at


least twice, as judged by the recreational

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therapist.

2.2- To demonstrate an ability to identify

2.2.1- By the end of the session, the client will

community resources involving leisure.

be able to provide a list of facilities in the


community that offer preferred leisure activities,
at least once, as judged by the recreational
therapist.

2.3- To demonstrate an ability to identify and

2.3.1- Upon request, the client will be able to

overcome leisure barriers.

identify 2 barriers and explanations on how to


overcome them, 75% of the time, as judged by
the recreational therapist.

TPO 3: To develop and improve social skills.


Enabling Objective (EO)

Performance Measure (PM)

3.1- To demonstrate the ability to express

3.1.1- By the end of the program, the client will

feelings and emotions in an appropriate

demonstrate an ability to express themselves

manner.

appropriately by identifying emotions and


proper coping mechanisms, 50% of the time, as
judged by the recreational therapist.

3.2- To develop the ability to initiate and

3.2.1- By the end of the last week, the client will

maintain appropriate social interaction.

be able to approach another group member,


initiate and maintain a conversation for 5
minutes, as judged by the recreational therapist.

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3.3- To improve the ability of developing and

3.3.1- By the end of the program, the client will

maintaining social networks.

be able to come up with a list of people they


have maintained contact with and what plans
they have made with those contacts in the
future, once a week, as judged by the
recreational therapist.

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Content and Process


Session 1: Knowledge of Leisure
TPO 1: To demonstrate an improved knowledge of leisure awareness.
EO 1.1: To demonstrate a clear understanding of what leisure encompasses.
Materials Needed: Blankets
CONTENT
1. Orientation Activity: Blanket Names

PROCESS

1. Orientation Activity:
The purpose of this activity is to serve as an
a. introduce the participants to one another
icebreaker. This is the first session of the
b. practice social skills and teamwork
program and many of the participants do not
c. See Appendix F
know each other. The participants will be
seeing each other frequently, so it is
important for them to be introduced to each
other. Learning each others name will serve
to help the participants familiarize
themselves with one another and begin to
become comfortable with other people. The
RT should remain close to the group, but let
the participants develop in the game
independently. The RT should take note of
any behaviors such as frustration, anger,
anxiety, etc.
2. Introduction:
2. Introduction:
a. RT should introduce the concept of
The purpose of this program is for the
leisure.
participant to use leisure as an appropriate
b. Provide definitions of play, recreation
way to reintegrate back into society after
and leisure
serving in the military. Veterans with PTSD
-Play: Behavior that is engaging,
and Substance Abuse Disorder usually do
intrinsically motivated and chosen that not practice appropriate leisure activities or
results in a transformation of reality.
avoid them.
-Recreation: Leisure activity that is
Have the participants sit at the tables and

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organized for the attainment of


personal and/or social benefits
-Leisure: Subjective state of mind when
individuals experience a sense of
freedom and are motivated to
participate in an activity primarily for
the enjoyment associated with the
activity. It is not coerced (meaning it is
not forced) and it is a positive
experience that requires people to use
their abilities and resources to engage
in personally satisfying and fulfilling
experiences.
Source: (Dattilo & McKenney, 2011)
3. Presentations and Discussions:

listen to the RT give definitions of play,


recreation and leisure (found in content) in
order for the participants to be able to
distinguish each one.

a. Briefly discuss with participants the


upcoming activity
b. Take questions

Have the participants move any tables and


chairs away to make an open space in the
room. The participants should all sit in a
circle.
The RT should go around and briefly
explain what the activity is about. The RT
should also give some examples of leisure
activities.
Allow the participants to ask any questions
at this time regarding the previous
information given. If the clients need
clarification of the defined terms, the RT
should be able to clarify these terms. It is
important for the participants to fully grasp
what leisure is in order for them to apply it
to their life.
4. Learning Activity

4. Learning Activity: Leisure Name Game


a. See Appendix G for the activity. The
purpose of this activity is for the
participants to get to know each other a
little more while getting them to think
of different leisure activities that they
know about.
Leisure is subjective

3. Presentations and Discussions:

The participants are already sitting in a


circle. The RT should sit in the circle as well
and start the activity by stating their first
name and a leisure activity that begins with
the same letter as their first name. The next
person repeats the previous response and
adds their own name with another activity.
The activity should continue until the last
participant in the circle takes a turn. No

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leisure activity can be repeated.

5. Debriefing/Conclusion
1. Why did you pick the leisure activity
you stated?
2. What did you learn about leisure?
3. Where do you see leisure taking a part
in your life right now?
4. Can you give me your own definition of
leisure?
a. Leisure is a subjective state of mind
b. Start thinking of what leisure activities
you prefer

5. Debriefing/Conclusion
The RT should use the questions in the
content section to debrief the group.
The RT should conclude the session by
going over the concept of leisure and how it
can be found all around. The RT should ask
the participants to start thinking about their
leisure preferences for the next session.

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Session 2: Leisure Preferences


TPO 1: To demonstrate an improved knowledge of leisure awareness.
EO 1.2: To demonstrate self-awareness of their own leisure preferences.
Materials Needed: pens, post-it notes, coat of arms worksheet, colored pencils, and markers.
CONTENT

PROCESS

1. Orientation Activity: Connecting Stories 1. Orientation Activity:


a. Connecting with other participants
b. Building trust
c. See Appendix H

The group should split up into even groups of 4 or


5. Each group should sit at a table with pens and
post its. One participant should start by sharing a
favorite memory. Another person should continue
the story with a common element or theme. This
should keep going until the RT decides to finish.
For each element, the participants should write
down a note in order to remember the common
element or theme. The group with the longest
chain wins. The RT can ask the group to share
their story with the whole group.
This activity allows the participants to open up a
little more with other participants in the program.
It gives the participants a chance to find common
interests with one another and build a sense of
trust.

2. Introduction:
a. Talk about leisure preferences and
self-awareness
b. Discuss what the participants will be
doing for this session and the intended
goals

2. Introduction:
In order to live a healthy leisure lifestyle, a person
needs to know what they enjoy doing in their free
time. Everyone has different leisure preferences
and should be made aware of these preferences.
The RT should be able to make the participants
wonder what kind of leisure activities they would

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like to participate in and describe how beneficial
the activities they participate in now are to their
life.

3. Presentation and Discussion:


a. Pass out materials
b. Brief discussion of leisure activities
and disability
c. Take any possible questions

4. Learning Activity: Leisure Coat of Arms


a. See Appendix I for this activity
b. The purpose of this activity is for the
participant to be more aware of their
preferred leisure activities and why
they choose to partake in those
activities.

5. Debriefing/Conclusion:
1. Why did you choose your response?
2. What does the entire coat of arms say
about you personally? (Mostly positive
or negative attributes, etc.?)
3. What values were revealed to you?
4. Now that you can see what preferences
you usually lean towards, what can
you say about your leisure
preferences?

3. Presentation and Discussion:


While the intern or RTAs are passing out the
materials, have the participants discuss how
having PTSD or a substance abuse disorder has
affected the leisure activities they partake in, if
they partake in any at all. This should open up a
brief discussion with the RT on how those barriers
can be overcome. Answer any questions that the
participant has. It is imperative that the clients
understand what they are doing and how it will
help them in future situations. The RT should
make the goals of this activity clear and provide
clarification when needed.
4. Learning Activity:
The participants should be sitting at the tables with
the materials already set out. The Coat of Arms
worksheet is separated into 6 sections that
coordinate with the questions found in the
Appendix. The RT should read each question 1 by
1 and give 3-5 minutes in between each question
so that the participant can draw or write in their
response into the corresponding section. The RT is
free to come up with different questions than those
provided in the appendix if seen fit. At the end, the
participants should share their Coat of Arms to the
whole group.
5. Debriefing/Conclusion:
The RT should refer to the questions in the content
section for the debriefing of the group.
To conclude the session, the RT should recap the
main focus of this activity. It should be brought to
light that leisure activities can greatly benefit
aspects of your life if you partake in appropriate
leisure activities that cater to your needs and that
suit your leisure preferences. Encourage the

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5. What can be changed in you
personally, that can help you change
your leisure preferences so that they
can be more beneficial for your life?

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participants to see what leisure activities can help
them overcome feelings of anxiety, depression or
anger.

Session 3: Decision Making


TPO 1: To demonstrate an improved knowledge of leisure awareness.
EO 1.3: To demonstrate the importance of making decisions
Materials Needed: participant shoes, For My Leisure worksheet, and pens
CONTENT
1. Orientation Activity: Shoe Pile Mingle
a.
b.
c.
d.

Introduce clients
Familiarize each other
Find common interests
See Appendix J

PROCESS
1. Orientation Activity:
The purpose of this activity is to have the
participants go around the room and introduce
themselves to people they have yet to meet and
to incorporate aspects of the previous session.
All the participants should take off one of their
shoes and throw them into a big pile in the
front of the room. Once all the shoes are in a
pile, have everyone grab a random shoe that
isnt their own and go around the room
introducing themselves and their preferred
leisure activity; all while trying to find the
person holding their shoe.

2. Introduction:
a. Talk about the importance of making
your own decisions
b. Talk about the influences behind
decisions that are made

2. Introduction:
One of the most important aspects of leisure
education is to have the clients make their own
decisions. Many people going through these
programs do not make decisions for
themselves, depending on others to make the
decisions for them. Others might make

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decisions that negatively impact their life.
The RT should make it clear that the decisions
you make in your life impact you greatly. The
participant should realize how big of a
responsibility it is to make a decision. The RT
should also go over different influences that
drive participants to make certain decisions
such as family, friends, peer pressure, etc.

3. Presentation and Discussion:


a. Pass out the materials
b. Brief discussion with the participants
c. Take questions

4. Learning Activity: For My Leisure


a. See Appendix K for this activity
b. The purpose of this activity is to have
the participants increase their problem
solving and decision making abilities as
well as, improve their awareness of the
influences of others on decision
making.

3. Presentation and Discussion:


While the intern or the RTAs are setting up the
materials and the tables, the RT should have a
brief discussion with the participants talking
about who makes their decisions and if they are
happy/proud of the decisions they have made
in their life. The RT should take note of any
emotional triggers or driving forces. Make sure
to clarify any doubts that the participants may
have.
4. Learning Activity:
Have the participants sit at the tables where the
materials should be already set up. Each
participant should have a For My Leisure
Worksheet in front of them. Give the
participants 10-20 minutes to fill out their
worksheet. After the participants have filled out
their worksheet, go over their responses.
The RT should play a supervisor role and not
interfere with the participants responses. This
activity forces the participants to think about
the influences behind decisions that were made
for them and what they would like to do.

5. Debriefing/Conclusion:
1. How much do outside influences affect
your decision making?
2. What are the differences between the
decisions made by others for you and
the decisions made by you?
3. What does society expect you to do?
4. Do you depend on anything/anyone to
make your decisions?
5. What are some barriers to your decision
making.

5. Debriefing/Conclusion:
The RT should lead a debriefing with the
questions found in the Content section.
The debriefing questions are to allow the
participant to take a deeper look at the
decisions that have been made in their lives.
For clients with PTSD and Substance Abuse
Disorder, many of the decisions made are from
family or from peers. Some of those decisions
are either for the own good of the participant

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6. Are you satisfied with the decisions you
have made?

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and others cause the participant to act out.
The RT should drive home the importance of
making decisions. Make a point of how
decisions, either big or small, can influence the
goals the participant has set out to reach. Also,
make sure to discuss how decision making
affects the leisure lifestyle they lead.

Session 4: Personal Resources


TPO 2: To provide knowledge on how to use and navigate leisure resources
EO 2.1: To demonstrate the ability to identify what is personally needed in order to participate in
a leisure activity.
Materials Needed: Pens and Get Ready worksheet
CONTENT
1. Orientation Activity:
a. Allow the participants to socialize with
each other
b. Participants should be more familiar
with each other

PROCESS
1. Orientation Activity:
The participants have attended three sessions of
this program and should be familiar with the
other participants. There should be no need for a
formal icebreaker. Allow this time for the
participants to interact with each other.
The RT should take note of any behaviors that
can be observed during this time. Take note of
any symptoms of PTSD or Substance Abuse
Disorder. It is common for people with PTSD to
withdraw from social interactions, act on impulse
or have bursts of anger. People with Substance
Abuse Disorder often are depressed or show
signs of anxiety/high stress.

Specific Program Plan


2. Introduction:
a. Talk about what personal resources are
such as finances, transportation,
clothing, etc.
b. Talk about how those personal resources
affect participation in leisure activities.

3. Presentation and Discussion:


a. Hand out materials
b. Examples of personal resources
c. Answer questions posed

24
2. Introduction:
Before the participants can be sent out into the
community to find leisure activities, they must be
able to identify the personal resources they
already have or might need to gain. Since leisure
was something that was not well understood in
the beginning of this program, many individuals
had a limited awareness of possible leisure
opportunities already at their reach. Some
resources that the individual may already have
are functional abilities such as running or
walking. Other resources that they may have are
creativity, finances, or even educational level.
3. Presentation and Discussion:
While the intern or the RTAs pass out the
worksheet and the pens, the RT should go into a
brief discussion with the participants about some
examples of personal resources. Ask the
participants what functional abilities they have,
what educational level are they at, do they
possess any special skills, etc.
It is important for the participants to understand
the purpose of this activity and the goals they are
trying to meet. Answer any questions posed with
as much clarity as possible.

4. Learning Activity: Get Ready


a. Use worksheet from Appendix L
b. The purpose of this program is to allow
the participant to see what personal
resources they already have and what
resources they would need in order to
participate in interested activities.

4. Learning Activity:
The participants should all be seated at a table
with the Get Ready worksheet in front of them.
The participants should list activities they would
like to participate in. Once they list those
activities they must list all the personal resources
they have to perform that activity, as well as all
the resources that they do not have. Give the
participants 10-15 minutes to fill out the
worksheet. Go over their responses

Specific Program Plan


5. Debriefing/Conclusion:
1. What recurring personal resources did
you notice?
2. What personal resources were
commonly lacking?
3. Do lacking those resources become a
barrier to participating in the activity?

25
5. Debriefing/Conclusion:
The RT should lead a debriefing with the
questions in the Content section
The RT should conclude the session by going
over the different ways of getting those personal
resources that the participants were lacking.
Recommendations to other programs can be
helpful for the participant. The RT should also
go over how those skills that were not developed
could become a barrier to participating in the
activity. Discuss with the group how they would
overcome those personal barriers.
Remind participants to bring family members or
friends to the next session.

Session 5: Community Resources


TPO 2: To provide knowledge on how to use and navigate leisure resources
EO 2.2: To demonstrate an ability to identify community resources involving leisure.
Materials Needed: Brochures, displays, business cards, maps, and flyers
CONTENT
1. Orientation Activity:
a. Allow the participants to socialize
with each other
b. Participants should be more familiar
with each other

PROCESS
1. Orientation Activity:
The participants have attended four sessions of
this program and should be familiar with the
other participants. There should be no need for a
formal icebreaker. Allow this time for the
participants to interact with each other.
The RT should take note of any behaviors that
can be observed during this time. Take note of
any symptoms of PTSD or Substance Abuse
Disorder. It is common for people with PTSD to
withdraw from social interactions, act on impulse
or have bursts of anger. People with Substance

Specific Program Plan

26
Abuse Disorder often are depressed or show
signs of anxiety/high stress.

2. Introduction:
a. Talk about the importance of
community resources
b. Talk about different activities offered
around the area
c. Involvement of family/friends

2. Introduction:
The RT should stress the importance of finding
community resources. Shoreview VA Hospital
offers a variety of leisure programs, programs
that are available for all veterans. The veterans
who are going through treatment take advantage
of these programs, but once they are released,
those programs are not visited. The veterans
being treated should be made aware of the
programs and activities that are offered in the
community.
The RT should also mention activities and
programs that are offered outside of the facility.
The activities/programs do not need to be in the
same area, but closer to the area that the
participants lives in.
Mention how involving family/friends can be
motivation to go out and participate in programs
and activities offered in the community because
many of them are family oriented.

3. Presentation and Discussion:


a. Set up room for families to come in
b. Greet the families

3. Presentation and Discussion:


For this activity, the RT, RTAs and intern would
have to set up the room in order to accommodate
family and friends. Before allowing the
participants and the guests into the room, the RT
should greet everyone and give a brief discussion
of what the department is responsible for and the
purpose of this session.

Specific Program Plan


4. Learning Activity: Community Resources
Awareness Night
a. Adapted from Appendix M
b. The purpose of this activity is to get
family and friends more involved in
the participants leisure lifestyle and
for the participant to be aware of the
variety of programs offered around the
community, not just at Shoreview VA
Hospital.

27
4. Learning Activity:
There should be different displays on each table.
One table should be brochures about programs in
the facility. Another table should have business
cards, phone numbers, maps and flyers from
other facilities that offer a variety of leisure
programs and activities for families with a
veteran who has PTSD/Substance Abuse
Disorder. One table should have sign-up sheets
for programs offered at the facility.
Have the families go to each station. The RT
should answer any questions that may arise.
The RT should also take note of any behaviors
shown by the participants around family
members/friends.

5. Debriefing/Conclusion:
1. What places stood out the most to
you? Were most interested in? Least
interested in?
2. Are your family members/friends
interested in partaking in programs?
3. What other places do you know that
offer leisure activities/programs?

5. Debriefing/Conclusion:
The RT should lead a debriefing with the
participants with the question found in the
Content section. The RT should gather the
participants in another room for the debriefing.
The guests can stay in the other room and keep
browsing. Leave an RTA supervising that room.
Conclude this session by discussing with the
participants what they learned during this
session.

Session 6: Leisure Barriers


TPO 2: To provide knowledge on how to use and navigate leisure resources.
EO 2.3: To demonstrate an ability to identify and overcome leisure barriers.
Materials Needed: Pens and Leisure Barrier worksheet
CONTENT

PROCESS

Specific Program Plan


1. Orientation Activity:
a. Allow the participants to socialize
with each other
b. Participants should be more familiar
with each other

28
1. Orientation Activity:
The participants have attended five sessions of
this program and should be familiar with the
other participants. There should be no need for a
formal icebreaker. Allow this time for the
participants to interact with each other.
The RT should take note of any behaviors that
can be observed during this time. Take note of
any symptoms of PTSD or Substance Abuse
Disorder. It is common for people with PTSD to
withdraw from social interactions, act on impulse
or have bursts of anger. People with Substance
Abuse Disorder often are depressed or show
signs of anxiety/high stress.

2. Introduction:
a. Discuss what leisure barriers are
b. Give examples of leisure barriers
c. Give possible solutions the leisure
barriers

3. Presentation and Discussion:


a. Hand out materials
b. Brief discussion
c. Take questions

2. Introduction:
The RT should discuss the topics that will be
covered in this session. Many returning veterans
have returned home and have yet to readjust to
non-war environments. Participants with PTSD
and Substance Abuse Disorder have an even
more difficult time readjusting to their
environment. Leisure barriers are found
everywhere and can make participating in leisure
activities complicated. The RT should make sure
to discuss personal barriers as well as other
common leisure barriers that can arise. Go over
stigmas that are made towards people diagnosed
with PTSD or Substance Abuse Disorder. Make
sure to also go over possible solutions for the
barriers if encountered.
3. Presentation and Discussion:
While the intern or the RTAs pass out the
worksheet and the pens, the RT should go into a
brief discussion with the participants about
leisure barriers. Ask the participants if they have
experienced any leisure barriers and how they
responded to the barrier.
It is important to clarify any questions that the
participants have about leisure barriers. Leisure
barriers are a common occurrence when
participants have a disability, whether it be
physical or psychological.

Specific Program Plan


4. Learning Activity: Leisure Barriers
a. See Appendix N for activity
b. The purpose of this activity is to
increase awareness of leisure barriers
and to improve decision making skills
related to leisure involvement.

29
4. Learning Activity:
Have the participants sit at the tables. Make sure
that each participant has the according worksheet
and pen to write responses. Give a description of
what the worksheet is and give the participants
10-15 minutes to complete the worksheet as the
questions apply to him/her.
This worksheet allows the participant to see the
leisure activities they participant already is
involved in and those activities they would like
to participate in. It forces the participants to
come up with good reasons as to why they are
not participating in the activity and to come up
with ways that would enable them to participate.
The RT should go around the room and make
sure that the participants are writing honest
responses to why they are not participating in
ideal activities.

5. Debriefing/Conclusion:
1. What common barrier did you find
while completing the worksheet?
2. Are the possible solutions achievable?
3. How many of the barriers listed, were
personal barriers?
4. What can you do to improve those
personal barriers?

5. Debriefing/Conclusion:
The RT should lead a debriefing using the
questions that are found in the Content section.
The RT should conclude the session by
discussing with the participants that many of the
leisure barriers can be overcome with the help of
other people or by gaining the skills needed to
complete the activity. Many veterans diagnosed
with PTSD or Substance Abuse Disorder believe
that seeking treatment for personal barriers is not
for them or that it may hurt their career. There
are many stigmas that surround the person with
the diagnoses. The RT should make sure that the
participants understand that these stigmas can be
overcome.

Specific Program Plan

30

Session 7: Feelings and Emotions


TPO 3: To develop and improve social skills.
EO 3.1: To demonstrate the ability to express feelings and emotions in an appropriate manner.
Materials Needed: Emotions bingo worksheet, bingo marker or chips for each participant, note
cards, hat/cup/bag, and pens
CONTENT

PROCESS

Specific Program Plan


1. Orientation Activity:
a. Allow the participants to socialize with
each other
b. Participants should be more familiar
with each other

31
1. Orientation Activity:
The participants have attended five sessions of
this program and should be familiar with the
other participants. There should be no need for a
formal icebreaker. Allow this time for the
participants to interact with each other.
The RT should take note of any behaviors that
can be observed during this time. Take note of
any symptoms of PTSD or Substance Abuse
Disorder. It is common for people with PTSD to
withdraw from social interactions, act on impulse
or have bursts of anger. People with Substance
Abuse Disorder often are depressed or show
signs of anxiety/high stress.

2. Introduction:
a. Talk about the importance of
expressing emotions/feelings
b. Discuss how repressing
feelings/emotions can be detrimental
c. Talk about how participating in leisure
activities can help participant express
emotions.

3. Presentation and Discussion:


a.
b.
c.
d.

Hand out materials


Brief discussion of emotions
Go over the goals for this session
Take questions from participants

2. Introduction:
The RT should present to the veterans the
importance of expressing emotions/feelings.
PTSD and Substance Abuse Disorders are
psychological disorders that affect the way the
veterans control their emotions. One of the ways
that patients with PTSD cope with emotions is
by repressing them or withdrawing from social
situations. Not being to express or control
agitation, anxiety or stress can lead to rash
behaviors or to the use of substances. The RT
should stress the importance of being able to talk
about feelings or expressing emotions in order
for others to be able to help during a situation as
well as for the individual to reach their goals.
The RT should also discuss how participating in
leisure programs can help the participant get a
better grip on their emotions all while finding a
way to cope with their symptoms in a healthy
manner.
3. Presentation and Discussion:
While the intern or the RTAs pass out the
worksheet and the pens, the RT should go into a
brief discussion with the participants about
different kinds of emotions and how they affect
everyones life. Explain that this session should
allow the participant to not be afraid of
expressing themselves.

Specific Program Plan

32
Clarify any questions that the participant has
about the goals and purpose of the following
activity.

4. Learning Activity: Emotions Bingo


a. See Appendix O for activity
b. The purpose of this activity is to allow
the participants to see what emotions
are most prevalent in their life and to
help them express those feelings using
words.

4. Learning Activity:
Have the participants sit at the tables with the
already set up materials. Explain to the
participants that they must fill out their bingo
card with the emotions that are found at the
bottom of the page. The emotions that they are
using must be emotions that they are currently
feeling or are feeling when they are experiencing
symptoms of their disability. None of the
emotions can be used more than once. If a
particular emotion is not found on the list, the
participant can write it down on their card and let
the RT know so that he/she can add it to the bag
and let the other participants know that another
emotion has been added that they can use.
Once everyone has filled out their bingo card, the
RT should pick emotions, one by one, out of a
bag and read it out loud. Require the participants
to mark their bingo chip if they have written that
emotion on their card. The first person to have
five emotions in a row wins the round. The
person who has won should be given the
opportunity to pick out one of those emotions
and retell a story of when they felt that way.

5. Debriefing/Conclusion:
1.
2.
3.
4.

What did you learn about emotions?


What did you learn about yourself?
What did you learn about others?
Why is it important to express your
feelings?

Conclude the session with closing discussion

5. Debriefing/Conclusion:
The RT should lead a debriefing with the
questions found in the Content section. The RT
should also go around the room and have
participants share stories of times they felt a
strong emotion and how they reacted.
The RT should conclude the session by again
stressing the importance of expressing how one
feels. Explain how learning how one reacts when
feeling a certain way is one of the first steps in
learning how to control emotions or cope with
that emotion.

Specific Program Plan

33

Session 8: Initiate and Maintain Conversation


TPO 3: To develop and improve social skills.
EO 3.2: To develop the ability to initiate and maintain appropriate social interaction.
Materials Needed: Prepared topics for Are You Listening activity
CONTENT

PROCESS

Specific Program Plan


1. Orientation Activity:
a. Provide time for the participants to
socialize with each other
b. Participants should familiarize with
one another

34
1. Orientation Activity:
The participants have been attending this
program for several sessions, there is no need for
the use of a formal icebreaker. Allow this time
for the participants to talk amongst each other.
The RT should take note of any behaviors that
can be observed during this time. Take note of
any symptoms of PTSD or Substance Abuse
Disorder. It is common for people with PTSD to
withdraw from social interactions, act on impulse
or have bursts of anger. People with Substance
Abuse Disorder often are depressed or show
signs of anxiety/high stress.

2. Introduction:
a. Talk to the participants about the
importance of appropriate initiation
and maintaining of a conversation
b. Explain the goals for this session

3. Presentation and Discussion:


a. Hand out the materials
b. Take any questions the participants
may have

2. Introduction:
Veterans who has PTSD or Substance Abuse
Disorder lack the appropriate social skills to
initiate or maintain a conversation. Although
they can communicate, most tend to avoid social
situations on order to avoid triggering flashbacks
or cannot maintain a conversation resulting in
bursts of anger or violence. There is also the lack
of opening oneself up to another person. The RT
should explain to the participants the goal for this
session.
3. Presentation and Discussion:
The intern or the RTAs should move the tables
and clear an open space in the room to allow the
participants to move around freely.
The RT should clarify any questions the
participants may have.

4. Learning Activity: Are You Listening


a. See Appendix P for activity
b. The purpose of this activity is to have
the participants increase their social
skills, build their listening skills, and
increase the participants ability to selfdisclose to one another.

4. Learning Activity:
The RT should start off the activity by opening a
discussion about appropriate communication and
social skills such as building trust and selfdisclosure. The RT may ask the participants to
share appropriate skills needed in order to initiate
and maintain a conversation.
Have the participants pair up with someone
he/she does not know very well and hand them a
topics for them to discuss for five minutes.

Specific Program Plan

35
After the five minutes are up, each participant
should find another person they do not know
very well and should be given another topic to
discuss for five minutes.
After the two five minute conversations are over,
have the participants come together and hold a
group discussion.

5. Debriefing/Conclusion:
1. Were you really listened to? Did your
partner show interest in what you said?
2. Did you listen to what your partner
was saying?
3. Did you really share your feelings or
did you screen what you said?
4. Would you have continued the
conversation if you had more time?
5. Did you find it difficult to maintain a
conversation?
6. What did you feel while talking to
your partner?

5. Debriefing/Conclusion:
The RT should follow up the activity with a
debriefing, using the question found in the
Content section.
It is important for the RT to conclude this session
by going over appropriate social and
communication skills and how to react in
situations where emotions tend to run high. The
RT should give coping mechanisms for
participants who are feeling highly anxious or
experiencing stress such as excusing yourself
from the conversation or expressing yourself to
the person so that they understand. This
participants should be able to use skills learned
from the previous session.

Session 9: Developing and Maintaining Social Networks


TPO 3: To develop and improve social skills.
EO 3.3: To improve the ability of developing and maintaining social networks.
Materials Needed: Discovering Your Leisure Partners worksheet and pens
CONTENT

PROCESS

Specific Program Plan


1. Orientation Activity:
a. Provide time for the participants to
socialize with each other
b. Participants should familiarize with
one another

36
1. Orientation Activity:
The participants have been attending this
program for several sessions, there is no need for
the use of a formal icebreaker. Allow this time
for the participants to talk amongst each other.
The RT should take note of any behaviors that
can be observed during this time. Take note of
any symptoms of PTSD or Substance Abuse
Disorder. It is common for people with PTSD to
withdraw from social interactions, act on impulse
or have bursts of anger. People with Substance
Abuse Disorder often are depressed or show
signs of anxiety/high stress.

2. Introduction:
a. Talk about leisure partners and the
importance of maintaining appropriate
partners.

3. Presentation and Discussion:


a. Hand out materials
b. Brief discussion about appropriate
leisure partners
c. Take questions from participants

2. Introduction:
Veterans with a Substance Abuse Disorder
usually partake in illegal leisure activities due to
the people they consider their leisure partners.
Veterans with PTSD often do not have leisure
partners due to withdrawing from social
situations. The RT should stress the importance
of developing and maintaining appropriate social
networks in order to improve their life.
3. Presentation and Discussion:
The intern or the RTAs should move the tables
and clear an open space in the room to allow the
participants to sit in a semicircle. Hand out
worksheets and pens. The RT should explain the
purpose of this activity and start introducing the
importance of appropriate leisure partners.
The RT should clarify any questions the
participants may have.

4. Learning Activity: Discovering Your


Leisure Partners
a. See Appendix Q for activity
b. The purpose of this activity is for the
participants to learn who they prefer to
participate in leisure activities. This
also serves the purpose of seeing if the
participants are finding appropriate
leisure partners that help the
participant practice appropriate leisure

4. Learning Activity:
Have the participants form a semicircle with
worksheet in hand. The RT should introduce the
activity by explaining that many leisure activities
take place in social situations with other people.
Have the participants complete the worksheet for
10-15 minutes.
Once the participants have finished the
worksheet, start a group discussion about the

Specific Program Plan

37

activities.

worksheet.
Have the participants gather with each other and
plan to participate in a leisure activity with one
another. The participants should be able to use all
the skills they have learned throughout the
program and put them in practice.

5. Debriefing/Conclusion:

5. Debriefing/Conclusion:

1. What are some trends in your choices


of leisure partners?
2. Are you participating in enough
activities that involve other people?
3. What categories were checked were
more frequently?
4. What do your responses say about your
values?

The RT should lead a debriefing using the


question found in the Content section.
The RT should conclude the session by thanking
the participants for attending the program and
reviewing all the skills that have been learned.
The RT should ask the participants for general
feedback about the program. Allow for a couple
of minutes of socialization and end the session.

Sequence Sheet
A sequence sheet is provided as part of a specific program plan to delineate how the total
program is to be implemented (Stumbo & Peterson, 2004). The sequence sheet shows what
enabling object will be addressed, what contents and processes are going to be performed, and a
time estimation of each activity. Recreational therapists can use the recommended sequence sheet
but can make quick alterations depending on the participants (Stumbo & Peterson, 2004).
TP
O

EO

DESCRIPTION

SESSION
NUMBER

TIME (min.)

Specific Program Plan


1

TP
O

1.1

1.2

1.3

EO

38

Orientation Activity: Blanket Names


Introduction
Concept of leisure
Defining terms
Presentation/Discussion
Hand out materials
Brief discussion
Learning Activity: Leisure Name Game
Perform activity
Debriefing/Conclusion
Questions
Discussion/end session

Orientation Activity: Connecting Stones


Introduction
Explain what leisure preferences/awareness is
Review goals and purpose
Presentation/Discussion
Handing out materials
Brief discussion
Learning Activity: Leisure Coat of Arms
Perform activity
Debriefing/Conclusion
Questions
Discussion/end session

Orientation Activity: Shoe Pile Mingle


Introduction
Importance of making decisions
Influences behind decisions
Presentation/Discussion
Handing out materials
Brief discussion
Learning Activity: Leisure Coat of Arms
Perform activity
Debriefing/Conclusion
Questions
Discussion/end session

DESCRIPTION

10
5
5
5
5
20
5
5
10
5
5
5
5
20
5
5
10
5
5
5
5
20
5
5

SESSION
NUMBE
R

TIME (min.)

Specific Program Plan


2

TP
O

2.1

2.2

2.3

EO

39

Orientation
Introduction
What are personal resources
Effect of personal resources on leisure activities
Presentation/Discussion
Hand out materials
Brief discussion
Learning Activity: Get Ready
Perform activity
Debriefing/Conclusion
Questions
Discussion/end session

Orientation
Introduction
Community Resources and examples
Involvement of family/friends
Presentation/Discussion
Set up room
Greet guests
Learning Activity: Leisure Coat of Arms
Perform activity
Debriefing/Conclusion
Questions
End session

Orientation
Introduction
What are leisure barriers
Possible solutions
Presentation/Discussion
Handing out materials
Brief discussion
Learning Activity: Leisure Barriers
Perform activity
Debriefing/Conclusion
Questions
Discussion/end session

DESCRIPTION

5
5
5
5
5
20
10
5
5
5
5
5
5
30
2.5
2.5
5
5
5
5
5
20
10
5

SESSION
NUMBE
R

TIME (min.)

Specific Program Plan


3

3.1

3.2

3.3

40

Orientation
Introduction
Importance of emotions/feelings
Repression of emotions
Presentation/Discussion
Hand out materials
Brief discussion
Learning Activity: Emotions Bingo
Perform activity
Debriefing/Conclusion
Questions
Discussion/end session

Orientation
Introduction
Importance of initiating and maintaining conversation
Presentation/Discussion
Handing out materials
Brief discussion
Learning Activity: Are You Listening
Perform activity
Debriefing/Conclusion
Questions
Discussion/end session

Orientation
Introduction
Leisure partners
Appropriate social networks
Presentation/Discussion
Handing out materials
Brief discussion
Learning Activity: Discovering your Leisure Partners
Perform activity
Debriefing/Conclusion
Questions
Feedback
End session

5
5
5
5
5
20
10
5
10
10
5
5
20
5
5
5
5
2.5
5
5
20
2.5
2.5
2.5

Specific Program Plan

41
References

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42

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Stumbo, N., & Thompson, S. (1986). Get Ready. In LEISURE EDUCATION: A Manual of
Activities and Resources (pp. 256-258). Venture Publishing.

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Stumbo, N., & Peterson, C. (2004). Therapeutic recreation program design: Principles and
procedures (4th ed.). San Francisco, CA: Benjamin/Cummings.
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2015). Substance use disorders.
Retrieved from http://www.samhsa.gov/disorders/substance-use

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Appendix A
Post Session Report Form

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Source: Stumbo, N., & Peterson, C. (2004). Therapeutic recreation program design: Principles
and procedures (4th ed.). San Francisco, CA: Benjamin/Cummings.

Appendix B

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Post Session Analysis

Source: Stumbo, N., & Peterson, C. (2004). Therapeutic recreation program design: Principles
and procedures (4th ed.). San Francisco, CA: Benjamin/Cummings.

Appendix C

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Performance Sheet

Source: Stumbo, N., & Peterson, C. (2004). Therapeutic recreation program design: Principles
and procedures (4th ed.). San Francisco, CA: Benjamin/Cummings.

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Appendix D
Leisure Boredom Scale

LBS (Leisure Boredom Scale)

Rate the following items from 1 to 5 according to the extent to which you agree. A rating of "1"
indicates that you strongly disagree and a rating of "5" indicates that you strongly agree.

1 = STRONGLY DISAGREE
2 = DISAGREE
3 = NEUTRAL
4 = AGREE
5 = STRONGLY AGREE

1. _____ For me, leisure time just drags on and on.

2. _____ During my leisure time, I become highly involved in what I do.

3. _____ Leisure time is boring.

4. _____ If I could retire now with a comfortable income, I would have plenty of
exciting things to do for the rest of my life.

5. _____ During my leisure time, I feel like Im just spinning my wheels.

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6. _____ In my leisure, I usually dont like what Im doing, but I dont know what else
to do.

7. _____ Leisure time gets me aroused and going.

8. _____ Leisure experiences are an important part of my quality of life.

9. _____ I am excited about leisure time.

10. _____ In my leisure time, I want to do something, but I dont know what I want to do.

11. _____ I waste too much of my leisure time sleeping.

12. _____ I like to try new leisure activities that I have never tried before.

13. _____ I am very active during my leisure time.

14. _____ Leisure time activities do not excite me.

15. _____ I do not have many leisure skills.

16. _____ During my leisure time, I almost always have something to do.
Source: http://uwf.edu/svodanov/boredom/lbs.htm

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Appendix E

Pre and Post Assessment: Leisure Education Knowledge


Client Name:______________________________________________
Facilitator/CTRS:__________________________________________

1. What is leisure?
______________________________________________________________________________
2. What does leisure mean to you?
______________________________________________________________________________
3. What leisure activities do you participate in?
______________________________________________________________________________
4. What leisure activities would you like to participate in?
______________________________________________________________________________
5. What are you leisure needs?
______________________________________________________________________________
6. What are some leisure barriers?
______________________________________________________________________________
7. Provide possible solutions to leisure barriers?
______________________________________________________________________________
8. What are your plans after the program is over?
______________________________________________________________________________
Adapted from: Stumbo, N., & Peterson, C. (2004). Therapeutic recreation program design:
Principles and procedures (4th ed.). San Francisco, CA: Benjamin/Cummings.

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Appendix F
Blanket Names

Activity: Blanket Names


Source: Blanket Name Game. (2014, June 28). Retrieved November 20, 2015, from
http://www.icebreakers.ws/medium-group/blanket-game.html
Materials: Large blanket
Participants: 10 or more

Activity Description:
Have the participants introduce each other by stating their name. After the group has introduced
themselves, have the group form 2 teams with the same amount of participants. Have each team
go to the front of the room. If the leader has assistants, have the assistants hold the blanket up
between the two teams so that the two teams cannot see each other (if no assistants, have two
volunteers hold up the blanket). For each turn, each team chooses a volunteer to stand or sit
behind the blanket. The facilitator will count to three and then have the assistants drop the
blanket. The first player to identify the name of the other player, wins the round. Keep repeating
the rounds until one team reaches the desired number of points.

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Appendix G
Leisure Name Games

Source: Stumbo, N., & Thompson, S. (1986). Get Ready. In LEISURE EDUCATION: A Manual
of Activities and Resources (pp. 256-258). Venture Publishing.

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Appendix H
Connecting Stories

Activity: Connecting Stories


Source: Connecting Stories Icebreaker. (2014, June 28). Retrieved November 21, 2015, from
http://www.icebreakers.ws/small-group/connecting-stories.html
Materials: Pens and Post-It notes
Participants: 10 or more

Activity Description:
Have the participants split up into groups of 4-5 and sit at a table. Make sure that each table has
enough pens and post it notes. The goal of the activity is to connect mini stories in an interesting
way. Each person must share at least one item that connects to the other mini stories. The longer
the chain of items that can be created, the better.
The first person begins by sharing an interesting memory or experience that they have. For
example, one time I locked myself out of my apartment, so then I spent the entire day in a
coffee shop. The next person can tell a related story that has any similar themes or elements the
previous story such as, I am a total coffee addict, I drink at least 3 cups and sometimes it
prevents me from going to sleep. The story continues the same way with the other participants.
Any person can add something to the story to keep it going. To remember the chains of the story,
have the participants write down notes on the post its.
At the end of the activity, whichever group has the longest chain of stories is the winner. The
facilitator can ask the group to share the long story with the whole group. The point of this
activity is to have a fun way of getting people to share stories with each other while finding
common interests.

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Appendix I
Leisure Coat of Arms

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Source: Stumbo, N., &


Thompson, S. (1986). Get Ready. In LEISURE EDUCATION: A Manual of Activities and
Resources (pp. 256-258). Venture Publishing.

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Appendix J
Shoe Pile Mingle

Activity: Shoe Pile Mingle


Adapted from: Shoe Pile Mingle - Icebreakers, Ice Breakers, Ice Breaker Games. (2014, August
8). Retrieved November 21, 2015, from http://www.icebreakers.ws/medium-group/shoe-pilemingle.html
Materials: Participants shoe
Participants: 10 or more

Activity Description:
Ask everyone to take off one of their shoes and throw them into a big pile in the front of the
room. Once everyone has taken off one shoe and placed it into the pile, the facilitator should
have everybody grab a random shoe that is not their own. The goal is to go around the room and
introduce yourself to as many people, state your favorite leisure activity, all while trying to find
your shoe.

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Appendix K
For My Leisure

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Source: Stumbo, N., &


Thompson, S. (1986).

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Get Ready. In LEISURE EDUCATION: A Manual of Activities and Resources (pp. 256258). Venture Publishing.

Appendix L
Get Ready

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Source: Stumbo, N., & Thompson, S. (1986). Get Ready. In LEISURE EDUCATION: A Manual
of Activities and Resources (pp. 256-258). Venture Publishing.

Appendix M
Community Resources Awareness Night

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Source: Stumbo, N., & Thompson, S. (1986). Get Ready. In LEISURE EDUCATION: A Manual
of Activities and Resources (pp. 256-258). Venture Publishing.
Appendix N
Leisure Barriers

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Source: Stumbo, N., & Thompson, S. (1986). Get Ready. In LEISURE EDUCATION: A Manual
of Activities and Resources (pp. 256-258). Venture Publishing.
Appendix O
Emotions Bingo

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Source: Pettry, D. (2006). Exploring Emotions through Activities. Retrieved November 21, 2015,
from http://www.dannypettry.com/ebook_emotions.pdf

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Appendix P
Are You Listening

Source: Stumbo, N., &


Thompson, S.

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(1986). Get Ready. In LEISURE EDUCATION: A Manual of Activities and Resources (pp.
256-258). Venture Publishing.
Appendix Q
Discovering Your Leisure Partner

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Source: Stumbo, N., & Thompson, S. (1986). Get Ready. In LEISURE EDUCATION: A Manual
of Activities
and
Resources
(pp. 256258).
Venture
Publishing.