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Grade

Standard

Lesson Concept

Assessment

Students will make a family timeline. They will
The assessment is based on the student’s
choose two events that happened before they were
timeline. If they include every part of the
born, 8 events during their lives, and two future
timeline, they pass.
events.
Students will be making a school timeline in class.
We will put the timeline up on the wall from 1990
1-H2.0.1 Demonstrate chronological
to 2026. We will include important school days
thinking by distinguishing among past,
The assessment is based on the student's
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such as breaks, half days, holidays, and their
present, and future using family or school
research for the school’s timeline.
graduation date. Each student will be assigned two
events
or three school events and will place them in the
correct spot on the timeline.
The calendar that will be taught each morning will
1-H2.0.1 Demonstrate chronological
This will be an informal assessment. Instead of
include important school events and birthdays.
thinking by distinguishing among past,
testing the kids on paper, test them at the
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When we go over calendar, ask about dates from a
present, and future using family or school
carpet during calendar time. See who actively
few weeks ago. What they did in class, if they had
events
participates and who doesn’t.
school, assemblies.
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1-H2.0.1 Demonstrate chronological
thinking by distinguishing among past,
present, and future using family or school
events

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1-H2.0.2 Use a calendar to distinguish
among days, weeks, and months.

Each day, there will be calendar time. Each month
should have a different pattern, color scheme, and
“mascot” to help associate the month with
something. For example, September will be fall
This will be an informal assessment. Instead of
colors and have a leaf pattern. October will be
testing the kids on paper, test them at the
black and orange with pumpkins. November should
carpet during calendar time. See who actively
be turkeys. December will be Christmas trees, red,
participates and who doesn’t.
and green. January will be snowflakes. February will
be hearts, pink, and white. March will be clovers,
green, and yellow. April will be . May will be . June
will be .

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1-H2.0.2 Use a calendar to distinguish
among days, weeks, and months.

This will also be an informal assessment. Ask
them questions at the carpet then pull sticks
Each day, there will be calendar time. When discussing what day it is, use the “Yesterday was…. Today is… Tomorrow will be… We have been in school ___ days” format. Ask students what yesterday was, today is, what tomorrow will be. Use the days of the week song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yIvQOab00OQ to help kids remem
to answer your questions. If they need help,
they may ask a friend.

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1-H2.0.2 Use a calendar to distinguish
among days, weeks, and months.

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1-H2.0.2 Use a calendar to distinguish
among days, weeks, and months.

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1-H2.0.2 Use a calendar to distinguish
among days, weeks, and months.

Also, with the calendar, include how many days
we’ve been in school. Using tools like a sticker
chart with groups of ten, tally marks, and a chart.
Have the students count with you for how many
days they’ve been in school.
Have a counter for each month. Place tally marks
on the counter for the number of days we’ve been
in school. Talk about how last month we were in
school for ____ days, and so far this month we’ve
been in school for ___ days.

This will also be an informal assessment. Ask
them questions at the carpet then pull sticks
to answer your questions. If they need help,
they may ask a friend.
This will also be an informal assessment. Ask
them questions at the carpet then pull sticks
to answer your questions. If they need help,
they may ask a friend.
This will also be an informal assessment. Ask
them questions at the carpet then pull sticks
to answer your questions. If they need help,
they may ask a friend.

1-H2.0.3 Investigate a family history for
at least two generations, identifying
1 various members and their connections
in order to tell a narrative about family
life.

Have the students talk with their parents and make
a family tree. They should include themselves,
siblings, parents, aunts, uncles, grandparents and
great-grandparents.

1-H2.0.3 Investigate a family history for
at least two generations, identifying
1 various members and their connections
in order to tell a narrative about family
life.

Using the family tree, talk to the students about
generations and how they parents are from a
different generation than they are. Talk about how Student is able to describe how they are in a
they are two generations from their grandparents. separate generation from their parents.
Discuss how each generation is different from the
next.

1-H2.0.3 Investigate a family history for
at least two generations, identifying
1 various members and their connections
in order to tell a narrative about family
life.

Using the family tree, have the students pick one
family member. They will get a family story from
that family member and come back to class with it
and share it in class. After, they will draw a picture The student shares their story and draws a
of what they think it looked like when that event
detailed, colorful picture of what they imagine
happened. (For example, my great uncle was a
it being like in that time.
bootlegger with Al Capone. I would share the story
about prohibition, what bootlegging meant, and
then share a picture of what I pictured him doing.)

1-H2.0.3 Investigate a family history for
at least two generations, identifying
Students will make a family book. It will start with
1 various members and their connections them, then move on to siblings, parents,
in order to tell a narrative about family
grandparents, aunts, uncles, and cousins.
life.
1-H2.0.4 Retell in sequence important
1 ideas and details from stories about
family or schools

1-H2.0.4 Retell in sequence important
1 ideas and details from stories about
family or schools

1-H2.0.4 Retell in sequence important
1 ideas and details from stories about
family or schools

1-H2.0.4 Retell in sequence important
1 ideas and details from stories about
family or schools

1-H2.0.5 Use historical records and
1 artifacts to draw possible conclusions
about family or school life in the past.
1-H2.0.5 Use historical records and
1 artifacts to draw possible conclusions
about family or school life in the past.

1-H2.0.5 Use historical records and
1 artifacts to draw possible conclusions
about family or school life in the past.

1-H2.0.6 Compare life today with life in
1 the past using criteria of family, school,
jobs, or communication

Depending on the amount of generations the
student shows on their family tree. They must
show and explain how they are related to each
person on the tree.

The student’s family book includes family
members listed, how they are related, and
pictures.

This will be an informal assessment. Instead of
testing the kids on paper, test them at the
carpet after the story is told. Make a venn
diagram and discuss similarities and
differences they notice.
This will be an informal assessment. Instead of
Read Families, Families, Families! by Suzanne Lang. testing the kids on paper, test them at the
Have students retell the story in order of events.
carpet after the story is told. Make a venn
Have them explain what the book was about.
diagram and discuss similarities and
differences they notice.
Read Henry’s Freedom Box by Ellen Levine. Have
This will be an informal assessment. Instead of
students retell the story in order of events. Have
testing the kids on paper, test them at the
them explain what the book was about, what they carpet after the story is told. Make a venn
notice is different from that time and today. Have diagram and discuss similarities and
them talk about similarities.
differences they notice.
This will be an informal assessment. Instead of
Read Dad, Jackie, and Me by Myron Uhlberg. Have
testing the kids on paper, test them at the
students retell the story in their own words, discuss
carpet after the story is told. Make a venn
similarities and differences, and explain what the
diagram and discuss similarities and
story was about.
differences they notice.
This will be an informal assessment. Instead of
chalkboards vs whiteboards vs smart boards. paper
testing the kids on paper, test them at the
vs tablet vs computer. chalk vs pencil vs computer.
carpet after the story is told. Make a venn
Lantern vs fluorescent light vs clap lights.
diagram and discuss similarities and
transportation to school.
differences they notice.
Read Put Me In The Zoo by Robert Lopshire. Have
students retell the story in order.

clothing. Greenfield village scavenger hunt trip.
one room school house vs two room school house
vs school today. Visit a one room schoolhouse. Talk
about how there was only one teacher for multiple
grades. Kindergarteners were in the same class as
fifth graders and third graders and middle
schoolers.
Students will talk to their parents about what
school was like when they went to school. They will
then draw a picture of what they think it looked like
then.

Student completes the scavenger hunt in their
group.

Students can describe differences in ways
schooling has changed, and they can talk
about how one room schoolhouses are
different from schools today.

Students draw a detailed picture of ways
school has changed over years.

1-H2.0.6 Compare life today with life in
1 the past using criteria of family, school,
jobs, or communication

Read The Family Book by Todd Parr. Have the
students compare their families to the family
described in the book.

Students can describe how their family is
different, and will make their own version of
the Family Book.

1-H2.0.6 Compare life today with life in
1 the past using criteria of family, school,
jobs, or communication

Have students ask their parents what their first
jobs were. (Mine was a cider maker) compared to
where they are now (teaching). Students will
compare jobs from the past with jobs now. (for
example, women didn’t work a long time ago, but
now they do.)

Students can talk about how the workforce has
changed over multiple years. (Women working
now vs 1900s.)

1-H2.0.6 Compare life today with life in
1 the past using criteria of family, school,
jobs, or communication

Talk about how their parents talk to friends or
family compared to ways they talk to friends or
family. Examples could include e-mail, facebook,
twitter, texting, calls, etc. Have students make
their own “Facebook”. They will be given a piece of
paper with a Facebook Template. They will draw a
self-portrait for their profile picture. They will then
write “statuses” throughout the day about things
they are learning.

Student’s “Facebook Profile” is the
assessment. If they are able to “write a status”
when given time throughout the day, and they
can talk about how it is different from the way
they communicate with friends, then they
pass.

1-H2.0.6 Compare life today with life in
1 the past using criteria of family, school,
jobs, or communication

1-H2.0.7 Identify the events or people
1 celebrated during US national holidays
and why we celebrate them

1-H2.0.7 Identify the events or people
1 celebrated during US national holidays
and why we celebrate them

1-H2.0.7 Identify the events or people
1 celebrated during US national holidays
and why we celebrate them

1-H2.0.7 Identify the events or people
1 celebrated during US national holidays
and why we celebrate them

1-H2.0.7 Identify the events or people
1 celebrated during US national holidays
and why we celebrate them

Talk about how technology has changed since their
grandparents were in school. Talk about ice chests,
Students participate actively and give good
fires, vehicles, etc. Make a venn diagram about
ideas for the venn diagram.
things that have changed and things that have
remained the same.
On the calendar that is taught every day in class,
mark the holidays with fun shapes. (i.e. a turkey for
Thanksgiving.) When the day arrives, or a few days
before depending on breaks, explain why we
celebrate that holiday. Sticking with the
Thanksgiving theme, have the students act out the
pilgrims coming over on the Mayflower and
Students will be able to explain holidays, why
meeting the Indians. Explain to the kids how the
they are celebrated, and who we celebrate for
pilgrims were sick and didn’t know how to farm or
each holiday.
have a life in the new land, so the Indians
graciously taught them how to do so. Read them
the book The First Thanksgiving by Linda Hayward.
Talk about family traditions during the holiday. For
Thanksgiving, have each student make a pie that
can easily be put in an oven to finish baking for the
dinner.
Each month, discuss the holidays that are coming
up. For example, in February, discuss how it is
called Black History Month and talk about Martin
Luther King Jr. Day, Rosa Parks Day, President’s
Day, Valentine’s Day, Groundhog Day, Leap Year (if
it is a leap year, if not explain how it is every four
Students will be able to explain holidays, why
years and an extra day is added to February). As
each holiday arrives, read books about the person they are celebrated, and who we celebrate for
celebrated on that day. For MLK Jr Day, read the
each holiday.
book A Picture Book of Martin Luther King, Jr. by
David A. Adler. On Groundhog Day and Leap Day,
read a book about the traditions held on those
days. (Punxsutawney Phyllis by Susanna Leonard
Hill for Groundhog Day and Leap Year Book by
Barbara Sutton-Smith for Leap Day.)
For holidays celebrating veterans (Veteran’s Day,
Memorial Day, Labor Day) have the students write
letters and draw pictures to the men and women
serving overseas. Also, have a few veterans come
Students will be able to explain holidays, why
in to the classroom and tell a few stories and have
they are celebrated, and who we celebrate for
the students ask them questions about what they
each holiday.
were doing overseas or on base. At the end of the
day, have an assembly honoring the veterans
where the children sing patriotic songs and thank
the veterans for their service.
For holidays such as Earth Day and Arbor Day, read
a book about each, and then go out of the
classroom and explore in nature. For Arbor Day,
plant a tree as a class and collect leaves from
already planted trees. Go back into the classroom
and make a leaf book. Stamp the leaves into the
Students will be able to explain holidays, why
book and write from which tree they came from.
they are celebrated, and who we celebrate for
Explain how Arbor Day focuses on the preservation
each holiday.
of the world’s forests and how a lot of things are
made from trees. (paper, pencils). For Earth Day,
talk about pollution being a problem and ways we
can fix it. Have the students make a recycled craft,
a bird feeder, and go outside and pick up some
trash around the playground.
Spend time to talk about important dates that we
celebrate, even though they are sad days. (i.e.
Students will be able to explain holidays, why
9/11) talk about what happened on those days,
they are celebrated, and who we celebrate for
how the US reacted, and why we remember these each holiday.
days.

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