Math Lesson Plan 1 – 2.

1 Grouping by 10’s
Amanda Wenzel
September 30, 2015
Objective

Materials

Opening

Presentation

Students will be able to understand
place value as well as use place
value understanding and properties
of operations to add and subtract
money while grouping by 10’s and
working with $1, $10, and $100
bills.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.NBT.A.1.A
Math Notebook
Math Journal
Game board and play money
Mental math warm up
 Have students count by 10’s
together
-(stand up/sit down squat with each
group of ten)
 Review hundreds, tens, and
ones place by putting
example number on the
board and asking students to
identify what number is in
which spot
 Show students a pile of
money (a larger pile of one’s
included)
 Ask students to make a
prediction about how much
money they think I have and
write it down

Count money as a class and
write amount on board
- Review how ten ones
equals one ten while
counting
Discuss with students how
many tens/ones are in
number by reviewing place
value
Explain to students that they
will also be getting an
envelope of money and their
job is to count it up with a
partner

Accommodations

Remind students they can
refer to number chart on the
board to assist with counting

Have students write the 3digit number down in their
math notebooks along with
teacher

Students will think quietly to
themselves during
prediction making. They can
also write their prediction in
their math notebook.

Refer to ones and tens place
value chart if available/Refer
to opening discussion about
place value

If students choose not to
follow directions and
complete assigned work
they will punch their great
day slip

Instruct students to complete
page 17 in their math journal
independently and when
finished, students will use
the silent partner strategy to
find their partner.
- For sake of time, this
can be left out of the
lesson and page 17
can be completed as
independent morning
seatwork the following
day
- Remind students how we
use the silent strategy
(close journal, stand up,
push in chair, and look up
—whoever you make eye
contact with first that is
also finished with page 17
will be your partner)
Review good partner
expectations

Students will be reminded
what noise level is
appropriate when
completing partner work
Students will be paired
based on ability,
competence, and
personality
Appropriate partner pairing
is the goal when using the
silent strategy
If not using silent strategy
for sake of time, pair
partners with appropriate
“good fit” partners

Guided Practice


Students partner up, one
gets the dice and one gets
the game board, and count
their envelope of money
Write the amount of money
in math notebook
Discuss as a class the
different strategies each
partner group used to count
their money
(10 $1 bills = 1 $10 bill)
-worth the same but look
different (shortcut/
“highway” to counting like
on our number grid anchor
chart)
Explain rules of exchange
game
-explain that there is no
winner in this game, but you
are working as a team to
exchange money to get to
$100
Review “exchange” vocab

Ring the chime to bring
whole class back together
for discussion
Walk around and assess
students as they complete
this. Students having trouble
counting larger amounts can
exchange for a reduced
amount
Students choosing not to
follow directions or work
appropriately will have to
hole punch their great day
slip

Math Lesson Plan 1 – 2.1 Grouping by 10’s
Amanda Wenzel
September 30, 2015
Independent Practice

Closing



Model with Mrs. Avolio
Students will play “Making
Exchanges” using their paper
game board and money

Ask students how the game
went
-patterns they noticed?
Once finished, ask students
to give an example of a time
we may need to use what we
learned in class today in the
real world (bank, grocery
store)
Thumbs up/middle/down on
how confident student feels
in exchanging money

Informally assess students’
knowledge and
understanding of
exchanging and grouping
tens by walking around and
observing students playing
the game
Students who complete the
game with ease and reach
$100 quickly can keep going
past for extra practice
Students may also be
encouraged to write their
real world examples down in
their math notebooks