Danielle  Vachon  
Curriculum  Portfolio  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Developmental Profile:
The New Hampshire Early Learning Guidelines (2005) present the progression of
development and learning that occurs during a child’s first five years of life. The
guidelines and questions are designed to highlight the process of learning and stimulate
thought about how adults can facilitate young children’s learning. The guidelines also
encourage users to reflect on a specific area of children’s learning and development.
The guidelines have seven domains such as physical development,
social/emotional development, approaches to learning, creative expression/aesthetic
development, communication and literacy development, healthy and safety, and cognitive
development. In physical development, children use their bodies to explore and
experience the world. Movement and play helps a young child gain an understanding of
their body and lets them experience new things. We know that infants and toddlers are
making progress in physical development when they demonstrate increasing body
strength, flexibility and control; show a range of mobility skills; use their sense to explore
things; use their bodies to explore environments; increasingly recognize bodily needs;
respond to sensory cues; and purposefully explore and use objects of equipment.
According to Copple and Bredekamp (2009) mobile infants thrive on exploration and
interaction. Mobility opens new worlds for infants. They can now move to what or whom
they want by scooting, using their hands and bouncing forward, crawling, walking and
toddling. The milestones for this domain would be an infant standing and then eventually
walking on their own, a toddler using a rake to rake the leaves, or a toddler pouring sand
into a bucket with a shovel.
In Social/Emotional Development a child’s experiences and learning is influenced
by a child’s sense of self and awareness of others such as family, friends, community and
culture. For an infant and toddler, a consistently nurturing and safe environment fosters a
healthy sense of self and the ability to trust others. For instance, Mary Ainsworth (2008)
said that securely attached infants are associated with sensitive and responsive primary
care. They develop a positive working model of themselves and have mental
representations of others as being helpful while viewing themselves as worthy of respect.
Through social interactions, children build their knowledge of self and those around
them. We know that infants and toddlers are making progress in social/emotional

development when they develop attachments to primary caregivers, demonstrate
awareness of self and their own abilities, acquire a sense of belonging, recognize
similarities and differences between people, show empathy by responding to social and
emotional cues, and explore emotions. Some small milestones for infants and toddlers
would be making a friend, overcoming a fear, or allowing a favorite person to comfort
you if you were sad.
In Approaches to Learning, children learn about their world in many ways. From
infancy, learning is a process of encountering problems and inventing solutions. Infants
and toddlers are motivated by curiosity and interest to explore their environments. A
growing ability to solve problems enables young children to take pride in their
accomplishments, said Copple and Bredekamp (2009.) We know that infants and toddlers
are making progress in approaches to learning when they exhibit curiosity, use their
senses to explore, repeat favorite behaviors and actions, learn from experiences through
trial and error, engage in play, and recognize when they have solved a problem or made a
discovery. In this domain the milestones would be if an infant is learning to walk and
they fall, if they got back up again and kept trying, or if a toddler was engaged in an
activity and was exhibiting curiosity.
In Creative Expression/Aesthetic Development beauty evokes emotion and affects
each of us in different ways. Children regularly encounter many forms of beauty in their
lives. From such experiences children become increasingly aware of the world around
them and in turn, contribute to this beauty through their personal creative expression.
Infants and toddlers are curious about their world, exploring and experiencing an array of
textures, colors, sounds, tastes, aromas, temperatures, light, and movements. We know
that infants and toddlers are making progress in creative expression and development
when they are curious, respond to an external stimulus with vocal/facial expressions,
attempt to use a variety of materials, use their imagination, move in response to music,
and begin to engage in pretend play. For this domain the milestones would be having an
infant or toddler play in a sensory table with many colors and textures, or having them
make a collage with many different materials that have different colors, textures, and
shapes.

In Communication and Literacy Development children have the ability to
communicate and understand language long before they speak their first words. Infants
use their voices, eyes, facial expressions, and bodies to express themselves and engage
others. Understanding and using language is an important foundation for the development
of literacy. We know that infants and toddlers are making progress in communication and
literacy when they engage in face to face interactions, respond to verbal and non verbal
cues, repeat sounds, communicate needs through verbal and non verbal expression, begin
to put sounds together to form words, and enjoy books and listening to stories. According
to Copple and Bredekamp (2009), infant care teachers can encourage this interest in
language by cuddling with one or two infants and reading simple books to them several
times each day. In this domain the milestones would be having an infant make many
different facial expressions, having a toddler use the word “no” in the right context, or
having a toddler ask for help or as a question.
In Health and Safety, sound health and safety practices established during the
early years can become lifelong habits. Good nutrition, hygiene, self-help, and safety
practices are all components of a healthy lifestyle. We know that infants and toddlers are
making progress when they increasingly recognize bodily needs; hunger, thirst, being too
cold or hot; begin to show interest in basic self-help skills such as eating, toileting, and
dressing; and they recognize danger and seek help when afraid. For this domain the
milestones are having an infant/toddler wash their hands before they eat, attempting to eat
on their own, or having a toddler put on their coat to go outside.
In Cognitive Development children’s development is enhanced when they have
rich opportunities to explore, notice, and inquire about different aspects. Through childdirected, adult-framed interactions, infants and toddlers begin to understand how the
world affects them, and how they affect the world. We know that infants and toddlers are
making progress in cognitive development when they recognize familiar people, places,
things; use their senses and body to investigate different things; observe and respond to
different causes and effects; and begin to collect and organize materials for play. A
strong, loving relationship with a trusted adult gives the mobile infant the secure base
from which he can explore his world, said Copple and Bredekamp (2009.) Some

milestones for this domain could be having a toddler feed a baby doll and making it take
a nap, or when an infant recognizes a staffs face at the daycare center.
By using these guidelines, they allow adults to have the power to create
environments that support children’s play, growth, and learning. People can do this by
providing experiences for children that help them acquire new knowledge and skills.

LEP 1:
Age of Children: 1.0-2.0 years old
Length of Activity: 1 hour
Purpose: The purpose of the experience was to have children be able to search through
the leaves and grass and be able to find and look at the different bugs that were hiding. I
included this activity in the curriculum because a lot of the children have been interested
in the pet cricket that we have in the classroom and I thought it would spark their
interests. An observation that I made was that the boys in the classroom have been
constantly talking about searching for bugs outdoors so I thought I would bring the
outdoors and bugs inside with this activity.
State and National Standards:
Physical Development: For this activity toddlers will be able to use their bodies to
explore environments and purposely explore and use objects and equipment.
Approaches to Learning: For this activity toddlers will be able to exhibit curiosity, use
their senses to explore, engage in play to explore people and objects in their environment
and repeat favorite behaviors and actions.
Creative Expression/Aesthetic Development: For this activity toddlers will be able to
exhibit curiosity, use their imagination, begin to engage in pretend play, and notice
shapes, textures, temperature, light, color, sounds, aromas, and movement.
Communication and Literacy Development: For this activity toddlers will be able to
engage in face-to-face interaction with others, respond to verbal and non-verbal cues, and
repeat sounds purposefully.
Cognitive Development: For this activity toddlers will be able to use their senses and
body to recognize people, places and things, begin to collect and organize materials for
play, and begin to be able to combine, separate, and name “how many” concrete objects.
Background Knowledge of Children:
The age group of the children who will be doing the activity are ages 1.0 to 2.0
years old. This age group is starting to explore on their own and solve problems on their
own. They ask a lot of questions like “What is this?” “Help!?” and “Can you do it?” They
can recognize different objects and just need help pronouncing the names of them.
I planned this activity around the boys of the classroom. For the past week they
have all been talking about bugs and catching them. This activity could also interest some
girls who are curious about insects. The children are ready for this activity because they
look for bugs outside under leaves, stumps, and rocks. I decided it would be neat to bring
the outdoors inside so they could have the opportunity to search for insects under
different colored leaves and grass. The children are also used to the big sensory table
outside which is filled with different objects on a regular basis, so I figured they would be
used to touching objects in a sensory table.

Background Knowledge of the Content Area:
The content area that is expressed in this activity is language, dramatic play and
science. The teacher and the child talking about what they see, hear, smell, and feel will
express language in this activity. Language will also be expressed from the children
talking to each other about what they see or what they feel. Dramatic play will be active
in this activity because the children will be acting out finding insects in the outdoors. The
children will most likely play with the insects and make them “talk.” Science will be
shown in this activity because of the different colors of the leaves. This will show the
children that the seasons are changing and so are the leaf colors.
The subject content that is expressed in this activity is mainly different types of
bugs. They are un-proportional in size to real life bugs but it will give the children a
chance to see what an insect looks like up close. It will also allow them to feel the
different textures of insects and look at the colors of them. The other subject content that
will be expressed in this activity is leaves. This will allow the children to hold the leaves
and see the different colors, textures and shapes of them.
Objectives:
The children will be able recognize the different names of the insects. They will
also be able to notice the different shapes, textures, and colors in the sensory table. The
children will also be able to repeat sounds purposefully.
Assessment and Documentation Plan:
Some of the strategies I will employ to determine children’s learning will be to
have one-on-one time with each child and be able to talk to them about the bugs and
different shapes, colors and textures in the table. I will also say open-ended statements so
the child has to finish the sentence. For example, “The itsy bitsy spider went up the
____?” The child should then be able to finish the statement. I will know my objectives
have been met when each child says the name of the bug back to me and can repeat the
words and sounds I make purposefully. Children will be able to pick up a bug and say
“Spider!” or “Dragon fly!” They will also be able to repeat words that I say and start
recognizing the different colors and shapes of the materials in the table. I will write brief
notes about each child’s response and experience to the activity so that I will be able to
spend as much one-on-one time with each child focusing on their speech. After the
experience I will use narratives to describe how each of the children reacted to the bugs
and how they liked the activity. My audience would be the teachers and parents because I
was not able to take photos so the children would not understand the narratives.
Materials Needed and Plan for Setting up the Environment:
For this activity I would need the following materials: different colored leaves,
plastic bugs, grass clippings, buckets, toilet paper rolls, a sensory table, the class pet
(cricket). My plan is to put a small sensory table right by the window when you first walk
in. I plan to fill it with different colored leaves and grass clippings along with some
plastic bugs that the children can search for. I then plan on putting a small sensory
container on the table and putting some more leaves, grass and bugs in that. I would also
like to put the class pet (cricket) on the table so that children can compare what a real bug

looks like to a plastic bug. My plan for student movement is that they will transfer bugs
from one sensory table to the next and be able to play with the bugs on the empty table
space if they would like. For safety precautions I am going to be by the activity at all
times so that the children don’t eat the leaves/grass, knock the sensory tables over or try
to release the cricket from his house.
Description of how you will engage children and facilitate the learning
opportunities:
I will have the sensory table and container filled with leaves, grass clippings and
toilet paper rolls. I will bury the plastic bugs underneath some of the leaves and leave
some of the bugs on top of the grass so the children know what to look for. I will put
some small buckets near the activity so that if the children want to “catch” the bugs they
can put them in a bucket. When the children walk into the classroom I will be by the
activity pretending to look for bugs. This will interest the children to come over and see
what I am doing. The first thing I will say is, “Do you want to catch some bugs?” I will
then show the children how to search for the bugs and how to use their buckets. This
should then open the door for them to explore and feel around the sensory table. While
the children are exploring you can say, “Where are the bugs?” “Do you see any?” “Oh I
see one!” “Catch one and put it in your bucket!” “Can you fit that bug in the toilet paper
roll?” As the children start to find the bugs and start putting them on the table you can
begin saying, “What kind of bug is that?” “Is it a spider, or an ant?” “Where are the bugs
eyes?” “Is that bug green?” These questions will allow the child to think about what they
are looking at and improve their language. The room that the activity is set up in is a free
flow environment. There are usually two activities going on at the tables and toys over on
the carpet. If a child finishes this activity they can go explore other activities or toys and
then come back to the bug activity if they were interested. When I see that most of the
children start drifting away from the activity I will ask the children that are near me to
help gather all of the bugs and put them back into the sensory table. I will then show the
children that are near the bug activity another activity or toy that will interest them while
I clean up the sensory tables and remove them from the area. After the activity is put
away I would have children wash their hands because they have been touching leaves,
grass and insects that have been in other children’s hands.
Child Guidance/Adaptations:
I chose a day to do this activity where there would not be a lot of children in the
morning. I did this so that every child could have a chance at exploring the sensory table.
I made two sensory tables so that one would not get crowded and it would allow children
to transfer items back and forth to different areas. I will support all children in this
experience by narrating their play for them and describing to them what they are picking
up. Some behavior challenges could be jealousy over a toy. A lot of the children like to
have all of the toys at once and then when another child comes to interact with a toy,
physical behavior can take place. A lot of behaviors could be crying or anything physical
towards another child. Having the children share the toys and having plenty of space so
that they each can explore in their own area could prevent this. You also want to be
constantly reminding the children to do “gentle touches” and telling them that they are
“friends.”

LEP Reflections:
I introduced the activity by setting up two sensory tables; one on the floor and one
on the table. I put colorful leaves in each sensory table along with grass clippings, toilet
paper rolls, and plastic bugs. I put the class cricket on the table near the activity so the
children could compare a real insect to a plastic one. My cooperating teacher brought in a
real dragonfly in a display case, which I put on the table so that the children could look at
that too. When the children arrived I showed them how to look through the leaves and
find the different bugs. I gave the children a bucket so that if they wanted to pretend to
“catch” the bugs they could put the bugs in the bucket. I then narrated the activity for the
children, which made other children come to the activity and explore because they were
curious. Once the children began the activity I was constantly asking them questions and
narrating things for them. This made the children become involved by talking to me and
to other children. Children started the experience at different times and each time a new
child came over I would show them how to dig through the leaves to find the different
bugs and talk to them one-on-one about the names, sizes, shapes, textures in the tables.
This then allowed the new children to understand the activity and engage in play with the
children that were already exploring. Children would leave the activity at different times
and go focus on another one. When they did this it gave me the opportunity to be one-onone with a child and talk to them about the activity. When I noticed that most of the
children started to circulate to different activities and toys I had the children around me
help pick up the bugs on the floor and table. They put them back into the sensory tables
for me and also helped picked up the leftover leaves/grass on the floor. I showed the
children another activity they could do and also toys that they could play with that would

interest them. While they were doing this I finished picking up the sensory tables and
moved them outside. I removed the bugs and toilet paper rolls from the sensory table and
put them back in their proper spot in the cabinets. I left the leaves and grass in the
sensory tables so that if we wanted to do that activity again all we would have to do is put
the bugs back in.
The activity went just as I expected. I knew I was going to have to show the
children how to dig through the leaves and grass to find the bugs. I also knew I would
have to narrate their play for them to make it a bit more exciting. For example, I sang the
itsy bitsy spider to one girl, had the bugs crawl on another boy, and had another child
making noises of a cricket. I was surprised that there were many girls who were
interested in the activity. They were the ones who were picking up the spiders and asking
how many legs they each had. It was interesting to see how the girls reacted to the
activity and how the boys reacted. It seemed like the girls were more focused on the
names, shapes and textures of the bugs while the boys were more focused on the play
with the bugs; having them crawl and eat the leaves. I learned that the students still need
a lot of direction in their play. They like to ask a lot of questions and need you to be there
to answer them. I learned about myself as a teacher that it’s okay to be silly and sing
songs with the children, narrate and make funny sounds with them because it makes them
be more engaged in the activity.

LEP 2:
Age of Children: 1.0-2.0 years
Length of Activity: 1 hour
Purpose: The purpose of the experience was to have children experiment with oobleck
and feel the difference between a liquid and a solid. I included this activity into the
curriculum because a lot of the children become more engaged in play when there is a
sensory activity. An observation that I made was that some of the children like the feeling
of paints and water, so I thought that this activity would spark their interests.
State and National Standards:
Physical Development: For this activity children should be able to show a range of
mobility skills; use their senses to explore people, places, and things; respond to sensory
cues; and purposefully explore and use objects and equipment.
Social/Emotional Development: For this activity children should be able to increasingly
explore people, places, and things; and imitate actions of familiar people.
Approaches to Learning: For this activity children should be able to exhibit curiosity; use
their senses to explore; repeat favorite behaviors or actions; learn from experiences
through trial and error; engage in play to explore people and objects in their environment;
and recognize when they have solved a problem or made a discovery.
Creative Expression/Aesthetic Development: For this activity children will be curious;
express themselves using a variety of facial and bodily movements; use their imagination;
and notice shapes, textures, temperature, light, colors, sounds, tastes, aromas, and
movement.
Communication and Literacy Development: For this activity children will be able to
engage in face-to-face interactions with others; respond to verbal and non verbal cues;
and repeat sounds purposefully.
Background Knowledge of Children:
The age group of the children who will be doing the activity are ages 1.0 to 2.0
years old. This age group is starting to explore on their own and solve problems on their
own. They ask a lot of questions like “What is this?” “Help!?” and “Can you do it?” They
can recognize different objects and just need help pronouncing the names of them.
I planned this activity for all of the children in the classroom. I have been noticing
lately how they have been interested in touching various materials and experimenting
with it. I knew that they would be ready for this activity because it’s fairly simple and
fun. The children are also used to the big sensory table outside which is filled with
different objects on a regular basis, so I figured they would be used to touching objects in
a sensory table. I thought that this activity would spark their senses and let the children be
creative.

Background Knowledge of Content Area:
The content area that is expressed in this activity is language and science. The
teacher and the child talking about what they see, hear, smell, and feel will express
language in this activity. Language will also be expressed from the children talking to
each other about what they see or what they feel. Science will be expressed in this
activity through the liquid and solid states of the oobleck. Oobleck first appears to be a
liquid and then when you touch it, it seems hard. As you play with the oobleck and apply
pressure to it, it becomes a liquid. The liquid and solid states of the oobleck will really
trigger the children’s curiosity. The oobleck will also have different colors, for this
activity it will be blue and pink.
Objectives:
The children will be able to feel the different textures of the oobleck. They will be
able to notice the different colors of the oobleck (pink and blue). The children will be
able to repeat sounds purposefully. The children will also be able to purposefully explore
and use objects to experiment.
Assessment and Documentation Plan:
Some of the strategies I will employ to determine children’s learning will be to
have one-on-one time with each child and be able to talk to them about the textures and
colors of the oobleck. I will also show the children how to play with the oobleck and
narrate their play for them. This will allow the children to purposefully repeat my actions
and behaviors. I will know my objectives have been met when the children are
experimenting with the oobleck and copying my actions. My objectives will have been
met when the children have also repeated sounds purposefully like, “squishy”, “wet” or
“slimy”. Children will be able to know how to change the oobleck into a liquid state from
a solid state by touching it. I will record each child’s responses and experiences during
the activity by writing notes about them. I will also take photos of the children interacting
with the oobleck. I will document the children’s experiences after the activity by
providing a narrative with each photo so that the children can look at the pictures and the
parents can read the narrative and see how their children interacted with the oobleck.
Materials Needed and Plan for Setting up the Environment:
For this activity I will need the following materials: corn starch, water, a mixing
bowl, mixing spoon, container to put the oobleck in, and food coloring. I will only put out
two containers of oobleck so that the children can explore on their own and with a
partner. I plan to put the oobleck on the small circular table with two sensory containers
on top of it. I will put the two containers of oobleck in the sensory containers and put
them at opposite ends of the table. This will allow the children to experiment with the
oobleck while watching another child experiment at the same time. My plan for student
movement is that the children will be able to come play with the oobleck at any time and
then when they are finished another teacher will help wash their hands. For safety
precautions I am going to stay at the oobleck table at all times so that the children do not
throw it, put it on another child or eat large amounts of it.

Description of how you will engage children and facilitate the learning
opportunities:
I will introduce the activity by having the two containers of oobleck set on the
table so that it looks appealing to the children. I will be sitting by the activity playing
with the oobleck and showing interest in it so that the children become curious. As the
children begin to watch me play with the oobleck I will say, “Do you want to touch it?”
“It’s gooey!” Some of the children might shy away from this or others might jump right
into it. As the children start playing with the oobleck I will ask them questions and
narrate their play. I will say, “What does it feel like?” “This is squishy!” “Drip, drip!” My
narration of their play will allow the children to realize what they are playing with, feel
the textures and see the colors of it. As the children have been experimenting with it I can
then say, “Can you let it drip on your hands?” “Can it drip on your fingers?” This will
allow them to process the dripping motion and figuring out how to make it drip on their
hands and fingers. This activity is a “come and go as you please” activity. If the children
want to play with the oobleck they are welcome to and if they do not want to play with it
that is their choice. If a child finishes playing with the oobleck and wants to move on to
something else, the teachers help that child wash their hands so that they do not create a
mess anywhere else in the classroom. As the activity is coming to an end I will make sure
all of the children’s hands are washed and make sure they are engaged in another activity
before I clean up the oobleck. I will do most of the cleaning up since the oobleck is pretty
messy. I will put a few sponges and wash clothes on the tables so that the children can
wash off the table. Other than that I will do the rest of the cleaning because I do no want
to oobleck to clog the drain.
Child Guidance/Adaptations:
I did this activity on one of the busier days of the week. I did this because I felt
like every child would enjoy this activity. I will manage the flow of the activity by
allowing only a certain amount of children at the oobleck table at a time. This will allow
children to have one on one time with me or another teacher. It will also help contain the
mess so that the teachers can clean up as the children come and go. I will put out two
sensory tables with oobleck in them with two different colors. I will support all children
in this experience by allowing them each to have a turn with the oobleck. I will narrate
their play for them and show them how to play with it in different ways. A behavior
challenge that could occur during this activity could be jealousy over the oobleck. I am
only putting out two containers of it so the children could get protective over their
container and not want to share. I will remind the children that we all need to share and
show them how they can play with it together. Another behavior challenge could be
children throwing the oobleck at each other or around the classroom. Having a teacher
present at the table at all times could prevent this. The teacher could show the children
purposeful movements with the oobleck like, dripping it, rolling it in a ball, pressing your
hand in it, etc.

LEP Reflection:
I introduced the activity by setting up two sensory containers on top of the round
table. I made blue and pink oobleck to make it look more appealing to the children. Once
the children began the activity I showed them how the oobleck turned from a solid to a
liquid just by touching it. I showed them how to pick it up, let it drip out of their hands
and place their hands in it. As the children played with the oobleck I narrated their play to
make it more interesting for them. Many of the children started the experience at different
times. I dealt with this by explaining to each new child how to play with it and how it
worked. Children of course finished the experience at different times too. The activity
was a come and go activity so the children could decide to play with it whenever they
wanted to. As the children finished one of the teachers would wash off their hands and
redirect them to another activity. When it was almost time for the activity to be finished I
went and grabbed some wet sponges and face cloths so that the children could wash the
table. This took their attention off of the oobleck so it was easy for me to remove it from
the table. As the children were washing the table off I cleaned the oobleck containers out
myself because they were pretty messy. I threw the oobleck away in the trash so that it
would not clog the drain. I then washed the remaining oobleck out of the containers by
running water over them.
I expected the children to be hesitant at first when touching the oobleck. Each
child would come over and stare at the oobleck and then they would copy my actions by
touching it. All of their faces were priceless. They each had the same reaction like, “What
is this?!” on their face. I also expected them to make a mess with it, which of course they

did. They all liked to clap it and throw it to watch it turn from a solid to a liquid. The
clean up was very easy though because once you put the sponge over it, it turned into a
liquid.
I was surprised about some of the children’s reactions. I knew that they would all
be hesitant at first when touching it but I wasn’t expecting some of them to be scared of
it. There were a few children who would touch it and then run away from it. I was also
surprised about which children were really involved in the activity. I was not expecting
some of them to be interested in it because in other projects they would complain if their
hands were dirty.
Overall, I learned that the students in the class are open to trying any activity.
They all like trying new and different things. I also realized that they still need a lot of
direction in their play and need someone to guide them. For myself as a teacher, I learned
that I need to be silly and get messy to show the children that the activity is fun. I realized
that if the children see that I am having a good time being creative then they would want
to be creative as well.

Abbreviated LEP for Extension:
State and National Standards:
1. Physical Development: For this activity children should be able to show a range
of mobility skills; use their senses to explore people, places, and things; respond
to sensory cues; and purposefully explore and use objects and equipment.
2. Social/Emotional Development: For this activity children should be able to
increasingly explore people, places, and things; and imitate actions of familiar
people.
3. Approaches to Learning: For this activity children should be able to exhibit
curiosity; use their senses to explore; repeat favorite behaviors or actions; learn

from experiences through trial and error; engage in play to explore people and
objects in their environment; and recognize when they have solved a problem or
made a discovery.
4. Creative Expression/Aesthetic Development: For this activity children will be
curious; express themselves using a variety of facial and bodily movements; use
their imagination; and notice shapes, textures, temperature, light, colors, sounds,
tastes, aromas, and movement.
5. Communication and Literacy Development: For this activity children will be able
to engage in face-to-face interactions with others; respond to verbal and non
verbal cues; and repeat sounds purposefully.
Objectives:
The children will be able to feel the different textures of the oobleck. They will be
able to notice the different colors of the oobleck (pink and blue). The children will be
able to repeat sounds purposefully. The children will also be able to purposefully explore
and use objects to experiment.
Assessment and Documentation:
Some of the strategies I will employ to determine children’s learning will be to
have one-on-one time with each child and be able to talk to them about the textures and
colors of the oobleck. I will also show the children how to play with the oobleck and
narrate their play for them. This will allow the children to purposefully repeat my actions
and behaviors. I will know my objectives have been met when the children are
experimenting with the oobleck and copying my actions. My objectives will have been
met when the children have also repeated sounds purposefully like, “squishy”, “wet” or
“slimy”. Children will be able to know how to change the oobleck into a liquid state from
a solid state by touching it. I will record my child’s responses and experiences during the
activity by writing notes about each child. I will also take photos of the children
interacting with the oobleck. I will document the children’s experiences after the activity
by providing a narrative with each photo so that the children can look at the pictures and
the parents can read the narrative and see how their children interacted with the oobleck.
Body of the Lesson:
I would start off the activity by creating the oobleck. I would make different
colored oobleck this time, maybe green and orange for example. I would then set the
oobleck up on the larger table so that the children would have more space to experiment.
As another option I could put different colored paper on the table so that if they drip the
oobleck on the table it would make a cool design on the paper. As the children became
interested in the activity I would show them how to touch the oobleck, pick it up, and
drip it out of their hands. I would narrate their play for them as they played with the
oobleck to make it more interesting for them. As the activity comes to an end I would
remove the oobleck from the table and put wet sponges on the table. This would allow
the children to clean off the table on their own and be engaged in something else as I

remove the activity. After I removed the oobleck I would clean it up and put the materials
away.
Materials Needed:
For this activity I would need the following items: corn starch, water, mixing
bowl, mixing spoon, food coloring, containers to put the oobleck in. Optional : colored
paper for the table
New Ideas:
The next experience for this activity would be to make the oobleck activity into an
art project by providing colored paper on the table. Another idea for this activity would
be to make the oobleck into a different consistency so that the children can feel how it is
different and how it changed.

LEP 3:
Age of Children: 1.0-2.0 years
Length of Activity: 1 hour
Purpose: The purpose of this activity is to have the children create their own collage with
different materials. I am including this activity in the curriculum because a lot of the
children like to use glue and different paints on paper and I thought it would be cool to
mix those things together. I have noticed that the children like to touch different materials
so I thought making a collage would bring interest to them.
State and National Standards:
Physical Development: For this activity toddlers will be able to show a range of mobility
skills, use their bodies to explore environments, respond to sensory cues, and
purposefully explore and use objects and equipment.
Social/Emotional Development: For this activity toddlers will be able to demonstrate
awareness of self and their own abilities, increasingly explore people, places, and things,
and imitate actions of familiar people.
Approaches to Learning: For this activity toddlers will be able to exhibit curiosity, use
their senses to explore, repeat favorite behaviors and actions, learn from experience
through trial and error, engage in play to explore people and objects in their environment,
and recognize when they have solved a problem or made a discovery.
Creative Expression/Aesthetic Development: For this activity toddlers will be curious,
respond to an external stimulus with vocal and facial expressions, express themselves by
using a variety of facial and bodily movements, attempt to use a variety of materials, use
their imagination, and notice shapes, textures, temperature, light, colors, sounds, tastes,
aromas, and movement.
Communication and Literacy Development: For this activity toddlers will engage in faceto-face interactions with others, respond to verbal and nonverbal cues, repeat sounds
purposefully, and communicate needs and ideas through verbal and nonverbal expression.
Cognitive Development: For this activity toddlers will use their senses and body to
investigate people, places, and things, observe and respond to different causes and
effects, and begin to collect and organize materials for play.
Background Knowledge of Children:
The age group of the children who will be doing the activity are ages 1.0 to 2.0
years old. This age group is starting to explore on their own and solve problems on their
own. They ask a lot of questions like “What is this?” “Help!?” and “Can you do it?” They
can recognize different objects and just need help pronouncing the names of them.

I am planning this activity for every child in the classroom. I think that they will
all enjoy picking out various objects off of the table and being able to glue them to a
piece of paper. I know that the children are ready for this activity because they have been
using paint and glue in other activities and have really enjoyed it.
Background Knowledge of the Content Area:
The content area that is expressed in this activity is language and creative arts.
The teacher talking, narrating the children’s play, and explaining things expresses
language in this activity. The children talking to each other and asking questions also
expresses language in this activity. Creative arts is expressed in this activity from all of
the materials that the children get to choose from. This will allow the children to pick
things out on their own and express themselves.
The subject area that is expressed in this activity is color and textures. Color is
represented from all of the materials like pom poms, feathers, fabric, and tissue paper.
Texture is expressed with glue and all of the materials.
Objectives:
The children will be able to look at an array of different materials and choose
what they want to include on their paper. They will also be able to create a piece of art
that expresses them.
Assessment and Documentation Plan:
Some of the strategies I will employ to determine children’s learning will be to
have one-on-one time with each child and be able to talk to them about the textures and
colors of the materials. I will show them how to use the glue to paste down their materials
of choice. I will know my objectives have been met when the children have managed to
glue some materials onto a piece of paper. Children will be able to create their own
collage with any materials they want. I will record each child’s experience down by
taking brief notes and by taking pictures. I will document the children’s experiences after
that activity by providing pictures and a narrative to go along with the photo so that the
audience can be the parents and the child.
Materials Needed and Plan for Setting up the Environment:
For this activity I will need the following materials: butcher paper, construction
paper, glue, paint brushes, pom poms, feathers, tissue paper, fabric, and pipe cleaners. I
am planning on putting the white butcher paper on the table so that it will help contain
the mess. I will then put the construction paper on the table so that the children can use
this as their paper to glue materials on. This activity will be on the big table so that the
children have enough space to work on their collage without a friend being too close. My
plan for student movement is that they can begin and finish the activity whenever they
want. When a child finishes the activity I will just simply put their paper to the side so
that it can dry and replace it with a new piece incase another child wants to create a
collage.
Description of how you will engage children and facilitate the learning
opportunities:

I will introduce the activity by having pieces of construction paper laid out on the
table with a container of glue and a few materials to choose from. I will engage the
students by showing them the materials and showing them what to do. Some questions or
comments that I might ask/say during the activity would be, “Oh, I see you picked out the
pink feather” “What do those feel like” “You picked the round pom pom!” This will
allow the children to see and hear what they are picking up and using for their collage. If
a child finishes early I will just put their picture somewhere to dry and replace it with a
new one so another child can participate. I will bring closure to the activity when I realize
that all of the children have done a collage and moved on to another activity. Children
will be involved in cleaning up by washing their hands and using wet sponges to help
wipe down the table for snack.
Child Guidance/Adaptations:
I will manage the flow of the activity by making sure that there is enough
materials and construction paper out for each child. Once a child leaves I will remove
their artwork from the table and replace it with a new one so that another child can make
a collage. I will support all children in this experience by making sure they have enough
materials to work with and being there for any help that they need. A behavior challenge
that could occur in this activity would be a child getting jealous of someone else’s
materials. Having many materials out so that there are plenty to go around could prevent
this. Another behavior challenge could be not having all of the children be engaged in the
activity causing them to throw materials. This could be prevented by giving every child
one on one time and making sure they have enough supplies.
LEP Reflections:
I introduced the activity by laying white butcher paper out on the table with pieces
of construction paper on top. I placed the glue in the container in the center of the table
with paintbrushes. I only put some of the materials on the table at first so it wasn’t too
overwhelming for them. Once the children began the activity I talked to them about what
materials they were using and helped them glue them on their paper. As some of the
children finished I took their papers and put them aside to dry. I would have the children
that finished go wash their hands with another teacher and go participate in another
activity. I then replaced the old papers with new ones so that other children could get the
chance to create something if they wanted to. As different children started the activity I
showed them the different materials and showed them how to glue them onto their paper.
As the activity was coming to an end I made sure all of the children had done a collage

that wanted to and I started picking up the loose materials. I put all of the finished
collages outside to dry. I put sponges on the table so that the children could help clean the
table for snack. As they were doing that I removed the remaining materials and put them
back in the cabinets for next time.
I expected the children to need a lot of direction and someone to show them how
to glue the materials to the paper. I also expected them to be more interested in the glue
than the materials. I was hoping that after a while they would realize that the materials
stuck to the paper if they used the glue. I was surprised with the involvement of the
children because I was expecting more girls to be interested in the activity but it seemed
like the boys were just as engaged in it. They liked picking out the materials and kept
asking for “more.” From this activity I learned that the students are still learning and
developing their fine motor skills so it is hard for them to glue certain objects down on
the paper. From this activity, I learned that I need to be flexible and know that my
students can only do so much and that I can only expect so much from them. I can’t
expect a 2 year old to make a masterpiece.

Abbreviated LEP for Extension:
State and National Standards:
Physical Development: For this activity toddlers will be able to show a range of mobility
skills, use their bodies to explore environments, respond to sensory cues, and
purposefully explore and use objects and equipment.
Social/Emotional Development: For this activity toddlers will be able to demonstrate
awareness of self and their own abilities, increasingly explore people, places, and things,
and imitate actions of familiar people.
Approaches to Learning: For this activity toddlers will be able to exhibit curiosity, use
their senses to explore, repeat favorite behaviors and actions, learn from experience

through trial and error, engage in play to explore people and objects in their environment,
and recognize when they have solved a problem or made a discovery.
Creative Expression/Aesthetic Development: For this activity toddlers will be curious,
respond to an external stimulus with vocal and facial expressions, express themselves by
using a variety of facial and bodily movements, attempt to use a variety of materials, use
their imagination, and notice shapes, textures, temperature, light, colors, sounds, tastes,
aromas, and movement.
Communication and Literacy Development: For this activity toddlers will engage in faceto-face interactions with others, respond to verbal and nonverbal cues, repeat sounds
purposefully, and communicate needs and ideas through verbal and nonverbal expression.
Cognitive Development: For this activity toddlers will use their senses and body to
investigate people, places, and things, observe and respond to different causes and
effects, and begin to collect and organize materials for play.
Objectives:
The children will be able to look at an array of different materials and choose
what they want to include on their paper. They will also be able to create a piece of art
that expresses them.
Assessment and documentation plan:
Some of the strategies I will employ to determine children’s learning will be to
have one-on-one time with each child and be able to talk to them about the textures and
colors of the materials. I will show them how to use the glue to paste down their materials
of choice. I will know my objectives have been met when the children have managed to
glue some materials onto a piece of paper. Children will be able to create their own
collage with any materials they want. I will record each child’s experience down by
taking brief notes and by taking pictures. I will document the children’s experiences after
that activity by providing pictures and a narrative to go along with the photo so that the
audience can be the parents and the child.
Body of the lesson:
I would start off the activity by putting white butcher paper on the table. I would
then put out a few pieces of construction paper for a few children. I would put out only
one material at a time so that it would not be overwhelming for the children. This would
also not give them the idea to have a free for all and throw all of the materials on the
ground. As the children became engaged with the activity I would show them how to glue
the materials onto the paper with the paintbrushes. As the first material was getting low I
would then put the second material on the table and so on. As the children finished with
their collages I would remove them from the table and put them in a safe spot to dry. I
would replace their paper with a new one for a different child. As the activity was
winding down I would make sure all of the collages were put to the side drying off. I then

would put sponges on the table so that the children could wash it off. As they did this I
would remove the materials worth saving and put them in the correct spots in the cabinet.
After the children washed the table I would have them wash their hands just in time for
snack.
Materials Needed:
For this activity I would need the following materials: butcher paper, construction
paper, paintbrushes, glue, pom poms, feathers, tissue paper, fabric, and pipe cleaners.
Optional: food coloring for the glue
New Ideas:
A new idea for this activity could be to add texture to the glue. I could add sand or
seeds in the glue because it seemed like the kids were more interested in the glue than the
materials at some points. Another idea could be to do a whole mural for the classroom.
Instead of the children doing their own individual collages, they could do a big one
together.

LEP 4:
Age of Children: 1-2 years old
Length of Activity: 1 hour
Purpose: The purpose of the experience was to have children explore the scarves by
pulling them out of the containers and putting them back in. I included this activity into
the curriculum because the younger toddlers like pulling objects out of different
containers and then emptying them. An observation that I made was that the younger
toddlers like playing with the clothespins and coffee containers, so I figured this would
add onto that activity.
State and National Standards: New Hampshire Early Learning Guidelines
Physical Development: For this activity children should be able to demonstrate increasing
body strength, flexibility, and control; show a range of mobility skills; use their bodies to
explore environments; respond to sensory cues; and purposefully explore and use objects
and equipment.
Social/Emotional Development: For this activity children should be able to increasingly
explore people, places, and things; and imitate actions or familiar people.
Approaches to Learning: For this activity children should be able to exhibit curiosity; use
their senses to explore; repeat favorite behaviors and actions; learn from experiences
through trial and error; engage in play to explore people and objects in their environment;
and recognize when they have made a discovery.
Creative Expression/Aesthetic Development: For this activity children should be curious;
express themselves using a variety of facial and body expressions; use their imagination;
and notice shapes, textures, temperature, light, colors, sounds, tastes, aromas, and
movement.
Communication and Literacy Development: For this activity children should be able to
engage in face-to-face interaction with others; and repeat sounds purposefully.
Background Knowledge of Children:
The age group for the children who will be doing this activity will be 1-2 years
old. This age group is starting to explore on their own and solve problems on their own.
They ask a lot of questions like “What is this?” “Help!?” and “Can you do it?” They can
recognize different objects and just need help pronouncing the names of them.
I planned this activity for all of the children, but I was focusing more on the
younger toddlers. I have been noticing in the mornings the younger toddlers like playing
with the clothespins and coffee containers. They like to put the clothespins in and then
dump them out of the containers. The children will be ready for this experience because it
is the same concept as putting something into a container and taking it out. I figured that
using a different material would interest the young toddlers.

Background Knowledge of Content Area:
The content area that is expressed in this activity is language. Language is
expressed by the teacher and child communicating about the activity. The communication
could be the teacher saying, “Pull the scarf out”, “Put the scarf back in” or the child
asking for “Help”, “Open the box”, “Shut the box.” Language will also be expressed
from the children talking to each other about what they see or what they feel.
The subject content areas that are expressed in this activity are color and texture.
Color is expressed from the different colors on the scarves and on the boxes. Texture is
expressed from the different feelings of the scarves and boxes.
Objectives:
The children will be able to notice the different textures of the scarves and boxes.
They will be able to notice the different colors and patterns on the scarves. The children
will be able to repeat sounds purposefully like, “Open”, “Shut”, “Put the scarf back
inside.” The children will be able to pull the scarves out of the boxes and be able to put
them back inside.
Assessment and Documentation Plan:
Some of the strategies I will employ to determine children’s learning will be to
have one-on-one time with each child and be able to talk to them about the textures and
colors of the scarves. I will also show the children how to pull the scarves out of the
containers and put them back in. This will allow the children to purposefully repeat my
actions and behaviors. I will know my objectives have been met when the children are
pulling the scarves in and out of the containers and copying words that I say. Some of the
words that the children will be able to repeat are, “Open”, “Shut”, “Pull”, “Push.” I will
record each child’s responses and experiences during the activity by writing notes about
them. I will also take photos of the children interacting with each other playing with the
scarf boxes. I will document the children’s experiences after the activity by providing a
narrative with each photo so that the children can look at the pictures and parents can
read the narrative and see how their children interacted with the activity.
Materials Needed and Plan for Setting up the Environment:
For this activity I will need the following materials: colorful scarves and different
size boxes/containers. I will put out around 6 different containers filled with different
color scarves. This will allow numerous children to play with the scarves and watch each
other experiment with a different container. I plan to put this activity on the small circular
table so that it is easy access for the younger toddlers. My plan for student movement is
that the children will be able to come play with the scarf boxes at any time and then leave
at any time they please. For safety precautions I am going to stay at the table so that the
children do not throw the boxes or the scarves on the floor.
Description of how you will engage children and facilitate the learning
opportunities:
I will introduce the activity by having 6 containers filled with long colorful
scarves. I will make it so there is a little piece of the scarf sticking out of each box so that

the children become curious. As the children begin to come over to the activity I will say,
“Can you pull the scarf out of the box?” “I see you chose the pink scarf!” It might take
the children a few minutes to catch onto the activity because they will need to figure out
that they need to pull the scarf out of the box. After the children do this they will be able
to explore with the scarves and do as they please with them. As they are playing with the
scarves I will say, “Open the container” “Shut the container” “Where’s the scarf?” As the
activity is coming to an end I will ask some of the children to collect the scarves and the
other children to collect the boxes. I will have the children put the scarves back in the
play area and I will take the boxes and put them away in the cabinets. The cleanup for
this activity is very quick and easy.
Child Guidance/Adaptations:
I did this activity on one of the busier days of the weeks. These days typically
have more of the younger toddlers. I will manage the flow of the activity by having 6
scarf boxes on the table for use. This will allow the children to experiment with many
different boxes and scarves while they are at the table. I will support all children in this
experience by allowing them each to have a turn playing with the scarves if they want to.
I will narrate their play and show them how to push and pull the scarves in and out of the
boxes. A behavior challenge that could occur during this activity could be jealousy over
one-on-one attention time. Making sure there are multiple teachers at the table to direct
the children and narrate their play can prevent this.
LEP Reflection:
I introduced the activity by setting up 6 containers of different size on the circular
table. I then placed a scarf into each container. I made it so a little piece of the scarf was
sticking out of each opening of the container so that it would be appealing to the children.
Once the children began the activity I showed them how to pull the scarves out of the
containers, open the containers, put the scarves but into the containers, and then shut
them and start all over again. As the children played with the scarves, I narrated their play
for them and asked questions. Many of the children began the activity at different times. I
dealt with this by showing each child how to pull the scarves out of the box and push
them back in. A lot of the children understood the activity just by watching their peers.
The activity was a come and go activity, so the children came and left as they pleased. As
the children finished the activity another teacher would redirect them to another activity.
When the activity was coming to an end I asked some of the children to gather the

scarves and the other children to gather the boxes. I then had the children with the scarves
put them back into the play area. I took the boxes and put them back into the correct
cabinets.
I expected the children to be confused with the activity at first because it was
something that they had never seen before. I expected that once I showed them how to
pull out the scarves and push them back in that they would get the hang of it, which they
did. I was surprised at how involved the older toddlers were in the activity. They liked
pulling the scarves out and seeing how many they could stuff into one box and then try to
pull them all out at the same time. The children really enjoyed the activity when I would
hold the box and they would step backwards and pull out the scarves; they thought this
was hilarious. I learned that the students in my class could be interested in something as
simple as this activity. Once the children make a game out of something they can be
engaged for a long time. What I learned about myself as a teacher is that I don’t need to
provide a million materials in order for the children to be interested. As long as I am
creative and make the activity into a learning process/game, the children will be
interested.
Abbreviated LEP for Extension:
State and National Standards:
Physical Development: For this activity children should be able to demonstrate increasing
body strength, flexibility, and control; show a range of mobility skills; use their bodies to
explore environments; respond to sensory cues; and purposefully explore and use objects
and equipment.
Social/Emotional Development: For this activity children should be able to increasingly
explore people, places, and things; and imitate actions or familiar people.
Approaches to Learning: For this activity children should be able to exhibit curiosity; use
their senses to explore; repeat favorite behaviors and actions; learn from experiences

through trial and error; engage in play to explore people and objects in their environment;
and recognize when they have made a discovery.
Creative Expression/Aesthetic Development: For this activity children should be curious;
express themselves using a variety of facial and body expressions; use their imagination;
and notice shapes, textures, temperature, light, colors, sounds, tastes, aromas, and
movement.
Communication and Literacy Development: For this activity children should be able to
engage in face-to-face interaction with others; and repeat sounds purposefully.
Objectives:
The children will be able to notice the different textures of the scarves and boxes.
They will be able to notice the different colors and patterns on the scarves. The children
will be able to repeat sounds purposefully like, “Open”, “Shut”, “Put the scarf back
inside.” The children will be able to pull the scarves out of the boxes and be able to put
them back inside.
Assessment and Documentation:
Some of the strategies I will employ to determine children’s learning will be to
have one-on-one time with each child and be able to talk to them about the textures and
colors of the scarves. I will also show the children how to pull the scarves out of the
containers and put them back in. This will allow the children to purposefully repeat my
actions and behaviors. I will know my objectives have been met when the children are
pulling the scarves in and out of the containers and copying words that I say. Some of the
words that the children will be able to repeat are, “Open”, “Shut”, “Pull”, “Push.” I will
record each child’s responses and experiences during the activity by writing notes about
them. I will also take photos of the children interacting with each other playing with the
scarf boxes. I will document the children’s experiences after the activity by providing a
narrative with each photo so that the children can look at the pictures and parents can
read the narrative and see how their children interacted with the activity.
Body of the Lesson:
I would start off the activity by placing the containers on the floor so it would be easier
for the younger toddlers to participate. I would have a little piece of the scarf sticking out
of each box so that the toddlers would be curious about the boxes. As the children
became interested in the activity I would show them how to pull the scarves out of the
box and then show them how to push them back into the box. I would narrate their play
for them as they played with the scarves to make it more interesting for them. As the
activity comes to an end I would have the children collect the scarves and boxes. I would
have them put the scarves back in the play area while I removed the boxes and put them
away in the cabinets.
Materials Needed:
For this activity I would need the following items: different size containers/boxes,
different colored/textured scarves. Optional: a mat for the floor or blanket.

New Ideas:
The next experience for this activity would be to have the boxes in a different location,
like on the floor. This will allow the children to participate in the same activity just in a
different setting. Another idea would be to use different scarves and boxes to change up
the activity.

LEP 5:
Age of Children: 1-2 years
Length of Activity: 1 hour
Purpose: The purpose of this activity is to have the children create a painted mural with
cookie cutters. I am including this activity in the curriculum because a lot of the children
are interested in painting. I thought that replacing paintbrushes with cookie cutters would
bring interest to the children.
State and National Standards: New Hampshire Early Learning Guidelines
Physical Development: For this activity toddlers will be able to show a range of mobility
skills, use their bodies to explore environments, respond to sensory cues, and
purposefully explore and use objects and equipment.
Social/Emotional Development: For this activity toddlers will be able to demonstrate
awareness of self and their own abilities, increasingly explore people, places, and things,
and imitate actions of familiar people.
Approaches to Learning: For this activity toddlers will be able to exhibit curiosity, use
their senses to explore, repeat favorite behaviors and actions, learn from experience
through trial and error, engage in play to explore people and objects in their environment,
and recognize when they have solved a problem or made a discovery.
Creative Expression/Aesthetic Development: For this activity toddlers will be curious,
respond to an external stimulus with vocal and facial expressions, express themselves by
using a variety of facial and bodily movements, attempt to use a variety of materials, use
their imagination, and notice shapes, textures, temperature, light, colors, sounds, tastes,
aromas, and movement.
Communication and Literacy Development: For this activity toddlers will engage in faceto-face interactions with others, respond to verbal and non verbal cues, repeat sounds
purposefully, and communicate needs and ideas through verbal and non verbal
expression.
Cognitive Development: For this activity toddlers will use their senses and body to
investigate people, places, and things, observe and respond to different causes and
effects, and begin to collect and organize materials for play.
Background Knowledge of Children:
The age group of the children who will be doing this activity are ages 1-2 years
old. This age group is starting to explore on their own and solve problems on their own.
They ask a lot of questions like “What is this?” “Help?!” and “Can you do it?” They can
recognize different objects and just need help pronouncing the names of them.

I am planning this activity for every child in the classroom. I know that the
children are ready for this activity because they have used paints and cookie cutters
before. They just have never used them both together at the same time.
Background Knowledge of the Content Area:
The content areas that are expressed in this activity are language and creative arts.
The teacher talking, narrating the children’s play, and explaining how to do the activity
expresses language in this experience. The children talking to each other and asking
questions also expresses language in this activity. The children’s body language is also a
key concept of language. Creative arts is expressed in this activity from the paints and
cookie cutters. This allows the children to create a mural and pick out any shape and
color of paint they would like.
The subject areas that are expressed are color, texture, and shape. The color is
represented from the paint and colors of the cookie cutters. The texture is represented
from the feeling of the paint and cookie cutters. The shape is represented from the shapes
of the cookie cutters, for example, a duck, heart, star, etc.
Objectives:
The children will be able to create a mural using cookie cutters. They will be able
to choose what cookie cutter shape they want and what color of paint they want to use.
The children will also be able to stamp shapes onto the paper using the paint.
Assessment and Documentation Plan:
Some of the strategies I will employ to determine children’s learning will be to
have one-on-one time with each child and be able to talk to them about the shapes and
colors of the materials provided. I will show them how to dab the cookie cutters into the
paint and show them how to stamp them onto the paper. I will know my objectives have
been met when the children stamp the shapes of the cookie cutters onto the paper. I will
record each child’s experience down by taking brief notes and taking pictures of their
work. I will document the children’s experiences after the activity by providing pictures
and a narrative to go along with the photo so that the audience can be the parents and
child.
Materials Needed and Plan for Setting up the Environment:
For this activity I will need the following materials: butcher paper, cookie cutters,
and paint. I am planning on putting the white butcher paper on the table so that it will
contain the mess and be the mural. This activity will be on the big table so that the
children have enough space to work with without bumping into a friend. My plan for
student movement is that they can begin and finish the activity whenever they want.
When a child finishes the activity I will ask another teacher to wash their hands before
they continue on to another activity.
Description of how you will engage children and facilitate the learning
opportunities:
I will introduce the activity by having the cookie cutters laid out on to the table
with two containers of paint that can easily be accessed by the children. I will engage the

children by showing them how to dip the cookie cutters into the paint and stamp them
onto the paper. Some questions or comments that I might ask/say during the activity
would be, “Oh, I see you picked the duck!” “Can you make a print on the paper?” This
will allow the children to see and hear what they are picking up and using for the mural.
If a child finishes early I will ask another teacher to wash their hands before they move
onto another activity. I will bring closure to the activity when I realize that all of the
children have participated in the experience that want to. Children will be involved in
cleaning up by collecting the cookie cutters and putting them into a basket for me to
wash. They will also use wet sponges to help wipe down the table.
Child Guidance/Adaptations:
I will manage the flow of the activity by making sure that there is enough space at
the table for each child. Once a child leaves I will make sure there is a teacher there to
wash their hands. I will support all children in this experience by making sure they have
enough cookie cutters and paints available. I will also be there helping them create
stamps with the cookie cutters and explaining to them what shapes they are making. A
behavior challenge that could occur in this activity would be a child getting jealous of
someone else’s materials. This could be prevented by having enough cookie cutters and
paint out on the table so each child can have their own materials. Another behavior
challenge could be the children throwing the materials onto the ground. This could be
prevented by giving the child one-on-one time and making sure they have enough
supplies and understand the activity.
LEP Reflection:
I introduced the activity by laying out white butcher paper out on the table. I put
an assortment of cookie cutter shapes on the table along with two containers of paint.
Once the children began the activity I talked to them about what shapes they were
picking up. I showed them how to dab the cookie cutters into the paint and then stamp it
onto the paper to make a print. Children started and finished the activity at different
times. As a child would begin the activity I would simply show them how to use the
cookie cutters and paint and then let them experiment on their own. As a child finished
the activity I just simply asked another teacher to help wash the child’s hands and get
them engaged in another activity. As the activity was coming to an end I made sure all of
the children had experimented with the cookie cutters that wanted to. I asked the children
who were near the table to help collect all of the cookie cutters and put them into a basket

for me to wash. I then removed the white butcher paper from the table and placed wet
sponges onto the table. This allowed the children to be engaged in cleaning up the table
while I removed the rest of the products. As the children were cleaning the table, I
washed off all of the cookie cutters and put them back in the cabinet.
I expected the children to need more direction than what I gave them for the
activity. The first child who participated in the activity took the cookie cutter and dipped
it right into the paint as if he had done it before. However, there were some children who
were confused with the activity because they had only used cookie cutters for play dough.
I was surprised with the involvement of the students for this activity. It took some of
them a minute to realize it was paint and that they have used that type of substance
before. A few of the children would get paint on their hands and immediately run to the
sink to wash it off. Normally, they wait until the end of the activity and then wash it off,
so that surprised me. From this activity I learned that the students are still learning and
developing their fine motor skills so it is hard for them to grasp a wet cookie cutter and
stamp it onto a piece of paper. From this activity I learned that students will come and go
as they please. I need to always be ready for new children starting the activity and always
be asking another teacher to help wash hands.

Abbreviated LEP for Extension:
Physical Development: For this activity toddlers will be able to show a range of mobility
skills, use their bodies to explore environments, respond to sensory cues, and
purposefully explore and use objects and equipment.
Social/Emotional Development: For this activity toddlers will be able to demonstrate
awareness of self and their own abilities, increasingly explore people, places, and things,
and imitate actions of familiar people.

Approaches to Learning: For this activity toddlers will be able to exhibit curiosity, use
their senses to explore, repeat favorite behaviors and actions, learn from experience
through trial and error, engage in play to explore people and objects in their environment,
and recognize when they have solved a problem or made a discovery.
Creative Expression/Aesthetic Development: For this activity toddlers will be curious,
respond to an external stimulus with vocal and facial expressions, express themselves by
using a variety of facial and bodily movements, attempt to use a variety of materials, use
their imagination, and notice shapes, textures, temperature, light, colors, sounds, tastes,
aromas, and movement.
Communication and Literacy Development: For this activity toddlers will engage in faceto-face interactions with others, respond to verbal and non verbal cues, repeat sounds
purposefully, and communicate needs and ideas through verbal and non verbal
expression.
Cognitive Development: For this activity toddlers will use their senses and body to
investigate people, places, and things, observe and respond to different causes and
effects, and begin to collect and organize materials for play.
Objectives:
The children will be able to create a mural using cookie cutters. They will be able
to choose what cookie cutter shape they want and what color of paint they want to use.
The children will also be able to stamp shapes onto the paper using the paint.
Assessment and documentation plan:
Some of the strategies I will employ to determine children’s learning will be to
have one-on-one time with each child and be able to talk to them about the shapes and
colors of the materials provided. I will show them how to dab the cookie cutters into the
paint and show them how to stamp them onto the paper. I will know my objectives have
been met when the children stamp the shapes of the cookie cutters onto the paper. I will
record each child’s experience down by taking brief notes and taking pictures of their
work. I will document the children’s experiences after the activity by providing pictures
and a narrative to go along with the photo so that the audience can be the parents and
child.
Body of the lesson:
I would start off the activity by putting white butcher paper on the table. I would
then put out only a few cookie cutter shapes. I then would put out the same amount of
paint but in more containers so that it is easier for the children to access. As the children
become engaged with the activity I would talk about what shapes they were picking up. I
will them how to dab the cookie cutters into the paint and then stamp it onto the paper to
make a print. The children will start and finish the activity at different times. As a child
begins the activity I will simply show them how to use the cookie cutters and paint and
then let them experiment on their own. As a child finishes the activity I will just simply

ask another teacher to help wash the child’s hands and get them engaged in another
activity. As the activity is coming to an end I will make sure all of the children had
experimented with the cookie cutters that wanted to. I will ask the children who are near
the table to help collect all of the cookie cutters and put them into a basket for me to
wash. I will remove the white butcher paper from the table and place wet sponges onto
the table. This will allow the children to be engaged in cleaning up the table while I
remove the rest of the products. As the children are cleaning the table, I will wash off all
of the cookie cutters and put them back in the cabinet.
Materials Needed:
For this activity I would need the following materials: butcher paper, cookie
cutters, and paint. Optional: paint brushes, construction paper
New Ideas:
A new idea for this activity could be to have the same amount of paint but just put
more containers on the table. This will allow the children to have easier access to the
paint and want to participate longer in the activity. Another idea could be to put
construction paper on the table to add more colors to the mural.

LEP 6:
Age of Children: 1-2 years of age
Length of Activity: 1 hour
Purpose: The purpose of this activity is to have the children explore different objects in
the water table. I am including this activity in the curriculum because I noticed how the
children love washing their hands and playing in the water. I figured this experience
would allow them to explore and play with water with a purpose.
State and National Standards: NH Early Learning Guidelines
Physical Development: For this activity toddlers will be able to show a range of mobility
skills, use their bodies to explore environments, respond to sensory cues, and
purposefully explore and use objects and equipment.
Social/Emotional Development: For this activity toddlers will be able to increasingly
explore people, places, and things; and imitate actions of familiar people.
Approaches to Learning: For this activity toddlers will be able to exhibit curiosity, use
their sense to explore, repeat favorite behaviors or actions, learn from experiences
through trial and error, engage in play to explore people and objects in their environment,
and recognize when they have solved a problem or made a discovery.
Creative Expression/Aesthetic Development: For this activity children will be curious,
express themselves using a variety of facial and bodily movements, use their
imaginations, and notice shapes, textures, temperature, light, colors, sounds, tastes,
aromas, and movement.
Communication and Literacy Development: For this activity children will be able to
engage in face-to-face interactions with others, respond to verbal and non verbal cues,
and repeat sounds purposefully.
Background Knowledge of Children:
The age group of the children who will be doing this activity are ages 1 to 2 years
old. This age group is starting to explore on their own and solve problems on their own.
They ask a lot of questions like “What is this?” “Help!?” and “Can you do it?” They can
recognize different objects and just need help pronouncing the names of them.
I planned this activity for all of the children in the classroom. I have been noticing
that the children like to wash their hands and splash in the water. I knew that they would
be ready for this activity because it is fairly simple and fun. It will allow the children to
play with water but also explore other objects in it.
Background knowledge of the Content Area:
The content areas that are expressed in this activity are language and science. The
teacher and the child talking about what they see, hear, and feel will express language in

this activity. Language will also be expressed from the children talking to each other
about what they see, what they are doing, or what they feel. Science will be expressed in
this activity through the pouring and measuring of the water with the droplets and cups.
The subject content areas that are expressed in this activity are texture, color, sea
creatures, and measuring tools. The texture that is expressed is the water, feeling of the
sea creatures, and the tin foil at the bottom of the table. The color that is expressed is the
shine from the tin foil at the bottom of the table and the color of the sea creatures.
Objectives:
The children will be able to play in the water table and explore the different
objects in it. They will be able to use the water droppers and pour water from the cups.
The children will be able to repeat sounds and actions purposefully. The children will
also be able to purposefully explore and use objects to experiment.
Assessment and Documentation Plan:
Some of the strategies I will employ to determine children’s learning will be to
have one on one time with each child and show them all of the materials provided in the
water table. I will talk to them about all of the colors and shapes that they pick up and
explore. I will know my objectives have been met when the children have exhibited
curiosity. The children will be able to use the water droppers to transfer water from the
table to the cups provided. They will also be able to squirt water from the different sea
animals in the table. I will record each child’s response and experience during this
activity through photos and brief notes. My audience will be the children and their
families. I will take pictures so the children can see themselves playing and interacting
with each other and I will write a narrative with each picture so that the parents can
understand what their child is doing.
Materials Needed and Plan for Setting up the Environment:
For this activity I will need the following materials: Sensory table, tin foil, water,
plastic sea animals, water droppers, and cups. For this activity I am going to put three
step stools around the sensory table. This will allow me to watch three children very
closely and help them use the water droppers correctly. It will also help me keep the
activity under control. For safety precautions I am going to put a towel under the sensory
table so that the floor does not get slippery from the water.
Description of how you will engage children and facilitate learning opportunities:
I will introduce the activity by putting tin foil on the bottom of the sensory table
so that it will give off a shiny look that will be appealing to the children. I will then fill up
the sensory table with water and put a few plastic sea creatures in the table. As the
children become interested in the table I will then add the water droppers. I will show
them how to squeeze the dropper under water and then hold it while it fills up with water.
I will show the children how to release the water into a cup or back into the table. During
the activity I will say, “squeeze the dropper” “hold it underwater” “squirt the water”. This
will allow the children to understand the concept of the droppers and hear what actions
they are doing. I might also ask the children, “Where is the shark?” “What color is the
dolphin?” As a child finishes the activity I will make sure that they are dry and moving

on to another activity. If a child finishes and they are soaking wet I will ask another
teacher to help change them into dry clothes. After all of the children have had a turn
with the water table and it is almost snack time, I will ask them help me collect the sea
creatures, water droppers, and cups. When all of the supplies are together I will then
remove the sensory table and dump the water out.
Child Guidance/Adaptations:
I will manage the flow of the activity by having three step stools available around
the water table. This will allow me to spend one on one time with each child while
controlling the activity. It will also make for a safe environment because there will only
be a few children at a time at the activity. I will support all children in this experience by
making sure they each get a turn and showing them how to use the water droppers and
squirt water from the sea creatures. A behavior challenge that could occur during this
activity could be children squirting, dumping, splashing water on others or all over the
floor. This can be prevented by having a select amount of stools and by having a teacher
at the activity at all times to monitor the children. Another behavior challenge that could
occur during this activity could be aggressive behavior from the children. Making sure
each child has a water dropper and that there are plenty of sea creatures to be shared can
prevent this.
LEP Reflection:
I introduced the activity by laying tinfoil at the bottom of the sensory table. I then
filled up the sensory table with water and added plastic sea creatures. I put three step
stools around the sensory table so that the children could have easier access to the table
and keep it under control. As the children became involved in the activity I added the
water droppers and cups. I showed them how to squeeze the droppers under water and
hold them there until they filled up. I then proceeded to show them how to squirt the
water from the droppers and the sea creatures. The children all started the experience at
different times. As a new child came to the activity I would show them how to work the
droppers and show them the different sea creatures in the table. As a child finished I
would make sure that they were dry and moving on to another activity. If a child had a
wet shirt or pants I would ask another teacher to help get them changed. At the end of the
activity I asked the children to help collect the sea creatures, water droppers, and cups for
me. As they were doing that I took the sensory table and dumped the water out. I then

brought over a few face cloths and had the children wipe up the water on the floor. When
they were finished wiping up the excess water they all washed their hands and
transitioned to snack.
I expected the children to all get wet and play in the water like it was a bathtub
almost. One child tried to take a cup of water and dump it over his head, he proceeded to
say, “Bath time?” I showed him that we could give the dolphins and sharks a bath with
the cup instead of him. I was surprised about how engaged the children were with the
water droppers. I figured that they would rather play with the animals inside of the table
than the droppers. Come to find out they were more interested in filling up the droppers
and then squirting water out of them. I learned that the students in my class like to fill
things up and then dump them out. They go through a lot of trial and error with new
activities until they can say, “I did it!” From this activity I learned that I need to always
have a spare change of clothes for messy activities. My jeans were soaked from the
children pouring water on the floor and missing the table. I learned to always be
prepared.
Abbreviated LEP for Extension:
State and National Standards: NH Early Learning Guidelines
Physical Development: For this activity toddlers will be able to show a range of mobility
skills, use their bodies to explore environments, respond to sensory cues, and
purposefully explore and use objects and equipment.
Social/Emotional Development: For this activity toddlers will be able to increasingly
explore people, places, and things; and imitate actions of familiar people.
Approaches to Learning: For this activity toddlers will be able to exhibit curiosity, use
their sense to explore, repeat favorite behaviors or actions, learn from experiences
through trial and error, engage in play to explore people and objects in their environment,
and recognize when they have solved a problem or made a discovery.

Creative Expression/Aesthetic Development: For this activity children will be curious,
express themselves using a variety of facial and bodily movements, use their
imaginations, and notice shapes, textures, temperature, light, colors, sounds, tastes,
aromas, and movement.
Communication and Literacy Development: For this activity children will be able to
engage in face-to-face interactions with others, respond to verbal and non verbal cues,
and repeat sounds purposefully.
Objectives:
The children will be able to play in the water table and explore the different
objects in it. They will be able to use the water droppers and pour water from the cups.
The children will be able to repeat sounds and actions purposefully. The children will
also be able to purposefully explore and use objects to experiment.
Assessment and documentation plan:
Some of the strategies I will employ to determine children’s learning will be to
have one on one time with each child and show them all of the materials provided in the
water table. I will talk to them about all of the colors and shapes that they pick up and
explore. I will know my objectives have been met when the children have exhibited
curiosity. The children will be able to use the water droppers to transfer water from the
table to the cups provided. They will also be able to squirt water from the different sea
animals in the table. I will record each child’s response and experience during this
activity through photos and brief notes. My audience will be the children and their
families. I will take pictures so the children can see themselves playing and interacting
with each other and I will write a narrative with each picture so that the parents can
understand what their child is doing.
Body of the Lesson:
I will introduce this activity by laying tinfoil at the bottom of the sensory table. I
will make sure that it is securely taped down so that it does not come loose. I will put a
towel under the sensory table incase a child spills water. I will also put three step stools
around the sensory table so that I will be able to control the activity and have one on one
time with each child. Before the children arrive I will put water in the sensory table along
with a few sea creatures, water droppers, and cups. As the children were engaged in the
activity I would show them different ways to use the water droppers and show them how
to pour water out of the cups and into the table. As the activity is coming to an end I will
have the children collect all of the sea creatures and put them into a basket and collect the
water droppers. I will then have them dispose of the plastic cups. I will provide towels so
the children can wipe up any areas of the floor that are wet. As they are doing that I will
dump out the water from the table and put away all of the materials used.
Materials Needed:
For this activity I will need the following materials: sensory table, water, sea
creatures, water droppers, cups. Optional: food coloring for the water.

New Ideas:
A new idea for this activity could be to move it outside on a nice day. It worked
well inside, however, all of the teachers had to constantly be wiping up water and making
sure the children weren’t dumping it out anywhere. If it was done outside on a nice day
then the children could splash all they wanted. Another idea for this activity would be to
add food coloring to the water to make it have a different affect. For example, you could
add blue food coloring to make it look like an ocean.

LEP 7:
Age of Children: 1-2 years of age
Length of Activity: 1 hour
Purpose:
The purpose of this experience is to have children explore the mystery bags and
use their imagination. I am including this in the curriculum because the children are
constantly touching different materials and asking, “What is this?” This experience is an
interest to the children because it will allow them to explore everyday objects that they
normally can’t explore on their own.
State and National Standards: NH Early Learning Guidelines
Physical Development: For this activity the children will be able to demonstrate
increasing body strength, flexibility, and control; show a range of mobility skills; use
their senses to explore objects; respond to sensory cues; and purposefully explore and use
objects and equipment.
Social/Emotional Development: For this activity the children will be able to demonstrate
awareness of their own abilities; increasingly explore people, places, and things; imitate
actions of familiar people; and communicate an array of needs.
Approaches to Learning: For this activity the children will be able to exhibit curiosity;
use their senses to explore; repeat favorite behaviors or actions; learn from experiences
through trial and error; and recognize when they have solved a problem or made a
discovery.
Creative Expression/Aesthetic Development: For this activity the children will be able to
be curious; express themselves by using a variety of facial and bodily movements;
attempt to use a variety of materials; use their imagination; and notice shapes, textures,
temperature, light, colors, sounds, tastes, aromas, and movement.
Communication and Literacy Development: For this activity the children will be able to
engage in face to face interaction with others; and repeat sounds purposefully.
Cognitive Development: For this activity the children will be able to recognize familiar
things; use their senses and body to recognize people, places, and things; and observe and
respond to different causes and effects.
Background Knowledge of Children:
The age group for the children who will be doing this activity will be 1-2 years
old. This age group is starting to explore on their own and solve problems on their own.
They ask a lot of questions like “What is this?” “Help!?” and “Can you do it?” They can
recognize different objects and just need help pronouncing the names of them.
I planned this activity for all of the children in the classroom. I know that the
children are ready for this experience because they are constantly curious about different

objects and always want to touch and feel everything. I thought that this activity would
give them the opportunity to feel everyday household objects that they wouldn’t be able
to feel on their own.
Background Knowledge of Content Area:
The content areas that are expressed in this activity are science and discovery,
sensory, and fine motor. Science and discovery is represented in this activity from all of
the different materials in the Ziploc bags. Some of the materials changed in the bags after
the children touched them. Sensory was represented in this activity from all of the
different feelings of the bags. The children were touching hair gel, shaving cream,
cheerios, ice, popcorn kernels, and dish soap. Fine motor was represented in this activity
from the children’s hand movements. They were pressing down on the bags with their
individual fingers working different muscles in their hands. The subject contents that are
expressed in this activity are color and texture. The children were able to see the different
colors in the bags and feel the different materials inside of them.
Objectives:
The children will be able to feel the different materials in the bags and explore
each bag with their senses. They will be able to use their hands with a purpose and copy
familiar actions of other people. The children will also be able to interact face to face
with other children and teachers during this activity.
Assessment and Documentation Plan:
Some of the strategies I will employ to determine the children’s learning will be
to have one on one time with each child. During this time I will show the child each bag
and describe to them what is in it. I will know my objectives have been met when I see
that the children are exploring the objects in the bags with a purpose. The children will be
able to make guesses about what material is in each bag and use their imagination. I will
record each child’s responses during the activity with photos and brief notes. My
audience will be the children and their families. The children will be able to look at the
photos to see themselves and the parents will be able to read the narrative with the photo
to see what their child was experiencing during the activity.
Materials Needed and Plan for Setting up the Environment:
For this activity I will need the following materials: Ziploc bags, hair gel, dish
soap, shaving cream, ice, cheerios, and popcorn kernels. I will set the bags in a circle on
the smaller table so that the children can have easy access to the bags. This will also
allow the children to spread out during the activity and discover different bags without
being on top of each other. For safety precautions I will be at the activity the whole time
making sure none of the bags are opened and making sure the children don’t eat anything
in the bags.
Description of how you will engage children and facilitate the learning
opportunities:
I will introduce the activity by setting up the bags in a circle on the smaller table. I
will make sure they are spread out so there is enough room for the children to walk up to

the table and explore a bag. I will engage the children by showing them the different
items in the bags and showing them how each of the items feels different. During the
activity I would say, “This bag is squishy” “Can you break a cheerio?” “This gel is pink!”
This activity is a come and go activity. The children will be able to walk up to the table at
any time and explore any bag. This activity has no mess with it so there is no need to
make sure a child gets their hands washed after they leave. As a child finishes I will make
sure another teacher shows them another activity that they can be engaged in. As the
activity is coming to an end I will make sure all of the children are done exploring. I will
then ask any child who is near the activity to help me collect the mystery bags and
dispose of them. I will then get wet sponges and put them on the table so that the children
can wipe off the table for snack.
Child Guidance/Adaptations:
I will manage the flow of the activity by making sure each child gets to explore
every bag that they wanted to. If there is more than one child at a big I might encourage
one of the children to come feel another bag so that there is no fighting over a bag. I will
support all children in this experience by spending one on one time with each of them.
During this time I will show them how to squish, crunch, pat, and feel the different bags.
I will talk to them and explain to them each material they are touching so that they can
begin to say the words of the materials. A behavior challenge that could occur in this
activity could be aggressive behavior. This can be prevented by making sure that there
are enough interesting bags for each child to explore. It can also be prevented by having a
teacher present at the activity at all times to prevent this behavior. Another misbehavior
that could occur during this activity could be the children opening the bags or throwing
them on the floor. This can be prevented by, once again, having a teacher present at the
activity to monitor the student’s play.
LEP Reflections:
I introduced the activity by putting hair gel, shaving cream, ice, cheerios, dish
soap, and popcorn kernels in Ziploc bags. I then put them in a circle on a small table and
spread them out enough so there was enough room for children to explore the different
bags. Once the children began the activity I showed them how to touch each bag and
explore the different textures of the materials. The children all started the experience at
different times. When a new child would come over to the activity I would show them the
different bags and explain to them which ones were squishy, hard, cold, etc. As a child
finished the activity I had another teacher show them a different activity in which they
could be engaged. At the end of the activity I had the children that were near me help

take the bags off the table and dispose of them in the trash. I then went and grabbed wet
sponges for the children to help wipe off the table for snack.
I expected the children to all show interest in the bags and be hesitant about some
of the materials in them. A lot of the children would go to touch the hair gel or shaving
cream and look at their hand to see if they got anything on them. I was surprised because
I thought the children would be interested in the squishy materials but a lot of them were
more interested in the cheerios and ice. They liked to crunch the cheerios with their
fingers and feel the temperature of the ice. From this activity I learned that my students
fine motor skills have improved so much. Many of the students were using their
individual fingers to press the cheerios and touch the different materials.
Abbreviated LEP for Extension:
State and National Standards: NH Early Learning Guidelines
Physical Development: For this activity the children will be able to demonstrate
increasing body strength, flexibility, and control; show a range of mobility skills; use
their senses to explore objects; respond to sensory cues; and purposefully explore and use
objects and equipment.
Social/Emotional Development: For this activity the children will be able to demonstrate
awareness of their own abilities; increasingly explore people, places, and things; imitate
actions of familiar people; and communicate an array of needs.
Approaches to Learning: For this activity the children will be able to exhibit curiosity;
use their senses to explore; repeat favorite behaviors or actions; learn from experiences
through trial and error; and recognize when they have solved a problem or made a
discovery.
Creative Expression/Aesthetic Development: For this activity the children will be able to
be curious; express themselves by using a variety of facial and bodily movements;
attempt to use a variety of materials; use their imagination; and notice shapes, textures,
temperature, light, colors, sounds, tastes, aromas, and movement.
Communication and Literacy Development: For this activity the children will be able to
engage in face to face interaction with others; and repeat sounds purposefully.

Cognitive Development: For this activity the children will be able to recognize familiar
things; use their senses and body to recognize people, places, and things; and observe and
respond to different causes and effects.
Objectives:
The children will be able to feel the different materials in the bags and explore
each bag with their senses. They will be able to use their hands with a purpose and copy
familiar actions of other people. The children will also be able to interact face to face
with other children and teachers during this activity.
Assessment and documentation plan:
Some of the strategies I will employ to determine the children’s learning will be
to have one on one time with each child. During this time I will show the child each bag
and describe to them what is in it. I will know my objectives have been met when I see
that the children are exploring the objects in the bags with a purpose. The children will be
able to make guesses about what material is in each bag and use their imagination. I will
record each child’s responses during the activity with photos and brief notes. My
audience will be the children and their families. The children will be able to look at the
photos to see themselves and the parents will be able to read the narrative with the photo
to see what their child was experiencing during the activity.
Body of the Lesson:
I introduced the activity by putting hair gel, shaving cream, ice, cheerios, dish
soap, and popcorn kernels in Ziploc bags. I then put them in a circle on a small table and
spread them out enough so there was enough room for children to explore the different
bags. Once the children began the activity I showed them how to touch each bag and
explore the different textures of the materials. The children all started the experience at
different times. When a new child would come over to the activity I would show them the
different bags and explain to them which ones were squishy, hard, cold, etc. As a child
finished the activity I had another teacher show them a different activity in which they
could be engaged. At the end of the activity I had the children that were near me help
take the bags off the table and dispose of them in the trash. I then went and grabbed wet
sponges for the children to help wipe off the table for snack.
Materials Needed:
For this activity I will need the following materials: Ziploc bags, hair gel, dish soap,
shaving cream, ice, cheerios, and popcorn kernels.
New Ideas:
The next experience for this activity would be to add different materials to the
bags. Another idea could be to add objects to the bags. For example, you could put blue
hair gel in a bag and put foam pieces of sea creatures in the bag to give it an ocean effect.
Another idea could be to have actual mystery boxes for the older toddlers and have them
try to guess what is in the boxes without looking.

Final Reflection:
When I was first assigned to work with infants and toddlers I was unsure of what
to expect. I have worked a lot with 4-6 year olds in the past for a summer camp but have
never worked with just infants and toddlers. When I did my first guided reflection paper
on the developmental profile of the age group I was confused as to what milestones this
age group could achieve. Throughout this semester I have gained experience in working
with this age group and now know what they can accomplish. I have grown as a teacher
in this classroom by the way I observe and interact with the children. The first few weeks
of being in the classroom I expected the children to do a lot more than what they were
capable of. I would give them many materials at once, expect beautiful pieces of artwork,
and I expected them to not be so messy/destructive. As I have grown as a teacher I
realized that children can accomplish so much with so little. What I mean by this is that
children at this age use their imagination and don’t need a million materials to be
engaged in an activity. I learned that I can incorporate different content areas in each
activity to give the children a starting point in learning that subject. I have also realized
that they are children and that they will make a mess. I learned to let the children have the
full sensory experience by getting paint all over them, tasting different materials, making
a mess, and touching everything while the activity is going on. At the end of the activity
is when I can clean the area and get all of the materials organized again. Throughout this
experience I also learned that if I participated in the activity with the children I would
gain a much better understanding of how they learn and interact with people, places, and
things. This allowed me to get thorough notes of each child, photos, and pieces of
artwork. I also discovered that this age group loves sensory exploration. They love to
touch/feel different items and explore new and different things. In my next field

experience I will continue reflect on my own practice and continue to add new
experiences to each lesson to benefit each child. In my next experience I want to begin to
inform the parents of the activities that I do in the classroom and let them know what they
can add to the activity if they want to do it at home. I will also continue to take brief
notes during activities so that I can remember what each child experienced. I also will
take many photos because a picture is worth a thousand words. A child and parent can
look at a picture and understand the activity and feel like they are experiencing it by
looking at the photo. When sharing these photos and narratives with families it allows the
teacher to involve the family and community with their child’s development and learning.
Throughout this semester I learned that when the teacher involves the family in their
child’s development then the family builds trust with the daycare center and is open to
new ideas and ways to enhance their child’s education. Throughout this experience I have
changed as a professional. I have designed many activities that have hit upon every
child’s learning style. I observed each child and watched them grow throughout this
semester. I know each of their strengths and weaknesses and now understand the
milestones of this age group. Overall, I have learned that the infant and toddler years are
critical in a child’s development. As a teacher I know that I need to continue to design
challenging curricula, understand the content knowledge and resources in academic
disciplines, observe children, spend one on one time with each child, build a relationship
with families, and have a happy and healthy environment for the children to learn in.

Bibliography
Copple, C., & Bredekamp, S. (2009). Developmentally
appropriate practice in early childhood programs (3rd ed.).
Washington DC: NAEYC.

Guidelines. (2005). New Hampshire Early Learning
Guidelines.

Mcleod, S. (2008). Simple Psychology. Retrieved from
http://www.simplepsychology.org/
mary-ainsworth.html
New Hampshire Early Learning Guidelines