2016-2017 Strategic Plan

Prepared by:

Emily Wilson
Paige Meyers
Raquel Ugalde

March 23, 2016
Table of Contents

Page
Executive Summary ....................................................................................................................................3
Introductory Summary.................................................................................................................................3
1.0 Organization Background .....................................................................................................................4
1.1 Business definition ...................................................................................................................4
1.2 Vision........................................................................................................................................4
1.3 Mission.....................................................................................................................................4
1.4 Value Proposition......................................................................................................................4
1.5 Organization Structure...........................................................................................................4-5
1.6 History & Culture ....................................................................................................................6
2.0 Situation Analysis..................................................................................................................................6
2.1 Definition & Scope of Situation............................................................................................6-7
2.2 Stakeholders Effected ..............................................................................................................7
2.3 Competition ..........................................................................................................................7-8
2.4 SWOT Analysis...................................................................................................................8-10
2.5 Market Position.......................................................................................................................10
3.0 Plan .....................................................................................................................................................10
3.1 Objectives, Strategies & Tactics........................................................................................10-12
3.2 Critical Success Factors ....................................................................................................12-13
3.3 Key Performance Indicators .............................................................................................14-15
3.4 Budget & Resource Allocations..............................................................................................15
3.5 Timeline.............................................................................................................................15-16
3.6 Evaluation Method & Anticipated Results.........................................................................16-17
Appendices ...............................................................................................................................................18
A. Committee Chair Job Descriptions...........................................................................................18
B. Student Chapter Guide.............................................................................................................19
C. Research Survey & Results.................................................................................................20-23
D. Recruitment Plan................................................................................................................24-25
E. Budget......................................................................................................................................26
F. Timeline....................................................................................................................................27
References.................................................................................................................................................28

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Executive Summary
Illinois State University’s Association for Women in Communication is a recently reestablished student
chapter at Illinois State University. The organization is seeking to improve awareness and participation in
the chapter to forward professional development opportunities for students to grow in the field of
communications. ISU AWC is facing challenges of being a new reestablished chapter, not having proper
awareness of chapter qualities, and being similar to other communication-based chapters at Illinois State
University. This organization has potential to grow in members by allowing any student in the university
to join regardless of major or gender, having a lower membership fee then competing RSO’s on campus,
and providing a connection to local professionals in the Bloomington-Normal professional chapter. ISU
AWC is in the process of raising awareness about its organization through the entire student body of
Illinois State University, faculty of the university, and professionals who can help in communication
development opportunities.
This document is intended to help ISU AWC in planning for recruitment, fundraising, budgeting,
and increasing their professional development for the 2016-2017 academic school year. This plan will
start with defining and analyzing the organization to review their history, mission, and values in order to
establish their opportunity for growth. Next, these possible opportunities will be developed through
planned strategies and tactics. Objectives were created for the organization as well as a suggested budget
and timeline to aid in the execution of this plan. The suggested multiple objectives for ISU AWC include:




A process to double funds available through multiple channels by March 31, 2017.
A plan to double the number of new members by November 30, 2016.
A process to create awareness among ISU students by February 1, 2017.
A plan to increase faculty members’ and local professionals’ involvement as mentors for ISU
AWC members by 35% by December 31, 2016.
A plan to double professional development events by May 1, 2017.

This plan will serve as a guide to carry out for an entire year in order to attain these objectives.
All executive members should know and utilize the plan for it to reach its full capabilities. For the next
year this plan will serve as a basic guide to develop growth and opportunities needed to sustain as a
chapter. Compliance with the plan outlined below after its acceptance will bring ISU AWC the guidance
to prosper on-campus.

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1.0 Organization Background
This section creates a foundation of knowledge about the registered student organization (RSO) of Illinois
State University (ISU)’s chapter of Association for Women in Communication (AWC). It provides 
additional information essential to understand the situation analysis and the plan.
1.1 Business Definition
ISU’s Association for Women in Communication (ISU AWC) is linked to the national organization that
champions the advancement of women across all communication disciplines by recognizing excellence,
promoting leadership, and positioning its members at the forefront of the evolving communication era.
1.2 Vision
To further the professional development of all women in all industries involving communication.
1.3 Mission
AWC combines professional­development workshops, volunteer opportunities, and socials for ISU 
students.
1.4 Value Proposition
The value proposition is critical to the aspects that set the ISU AWC chapter apart from other RSOs. This
proposition includes the two essential parts of a slogan and proof points of that slogan. The slogan asserts
why AWC is unique and the proof points support the slogan by displaying the advantages ISU AWC has
over its competition.
Slogan: “Be the professional communicator you want to be.”





Proof Points:
Membership fees provide members with involvement in both their chapter as well as the local
AWC Bloomington-Normal Professional Chapter.
Members are members of the national AWC organization while in the student chapter and after
graduation.
The chapter is one of 18 student chapters in the country and one of two student chapters in
Illinois.
ISU AWC is open to any ISU student, regardless of a student's major or prior experience in the
communication field. See the following link for ISU’s Dean of Students Office RSO’s Handbook:
http://deanofstudents.illinoisstate.edu/downloads/RSOHandbook2013-2014.pdf
Chapter meetings often feature guest speakers from the local Bloomington-Normal community
who are professionals in the field of communication.
ISU AWC hosts professional-development workshops for members at least once a month.

1.5 Organization Structure
The ISU AWC chapter is a RSO at ISU. The organizational structure consists of four executive board 
members, six committee chairs, and a present total of 21 members, including executive board members 
and committee chairs (see chart below). For the job descriptions of the six committee chairs, please refer 
to Appendix A. Currently any ISU student can join the organization. The descriptions of roles are given in
the subsections below. Please refer to 
Appendix B for the AWC Student Chapter Guide from the AWC National Headquarters.

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1.5.1. President: Miranda Puskar
The president is responsible for creating and reviewing meeting agendas. This position appoints
committee chairs, delegates responsibilities among the executive board members, and directs the budget.
The president leads all members of the chapter and is in charge of planning and executing weekly
meetings. This position manages the marketing for the organization to ISU students.

1.5.2. Faculty Advisor: Julie Navickas
The advisor counsels the organization in all respects, especially by providing guidance about proper and
efficient functioning. This position must be a faculty or staff member of ISU.

1.5.3. Vice President: Toni Wells
The vice president assists the president in every aspect. This position is responsible for the committee
chairs. This position delegates responsibilities among the committee chairs and holds weekly meetings to
brainstorm with the committee chairs about different ways to involve ISU AWC and the ISU community.

1.5.4. Secretary: Nicole Weishaar
The secretary takes attendance and minutes at weekly meetings, organizes all meeting minutes, provides
meeting minutes to all members.

1.5.5. Treasurer: Steven MacDonald
The treasurer keeps record of financial transactions including member dues. The treasurer also creates
reports with receipts, disbursements, reimbursements and invoices.

1.5.11: Members
Members are not limited to only one committee. They are encouraged to join multiple to get an overall
feel of the organization and what it has to offer.
1.6 History & Culture
The Association for Women in Communications is one of the many organizations that recognizes the
complex relationships that exist across communications disciplines. The local Bloomington-Normal

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chapter of AWC was founded in 1980 and has achieved its strength through the combined efforts of
members who are interested in both professional development and excellence in communications. The
local chapter has monthly luncheons in the community touching on those two topics.
Launched on August 18, 2014, the ISU student chapter of Association for Women in
Communication began when a member of the Bloomington-Normal of the national AWC chapter decided
to establish a student chapter at a nearby university. The student chapter is on its fourth semester here at
ISU and is hoping to grow in membership and stability.
ISU AWC strives to provide professional experiences and opportunities to ISU students. Through
networking, resume building, event planning and community involvement, ISU AWC creates an outlet for
students to the real world. ISU AWC meets every Tuesday at 6 p.m. in Fell Hall, room 162.
The student chapter of AWC has created a welcoming environment for students of all majors,
although most members are a part of ISU’s School of Communication (SoC) and also happen to be
women. AWC’s organization’s color is maroon and members are encouraged to honor that by wearing
maroon on meeting days. The organization meets in Fell Hall, the home of ISU’s SoC on campus.
Members enjoy the sense of familiarity that Fell Hall offers to the organization. There have been no rules
written or enforced towards attendance or participation of the organization thus far. However, there are
norms that are practiced weekly. ISU AWC begins their weekly Tuesday meetings having the executive
board members report updates to all members followed by a brief reminder of information covered at the
previous meeting. Meeting minutes are also emailed out weekly allowing all members reference if
needed. The first meeting of each month is usually a guest speaker from the community regarding a topic
of communication. The second Tuesday of each month is focused on professional development through
various workshops and committee meetings. The third Tuesday entails a fundraising event at a local
business or through ISU. Generally, the last week of each month is a planned social event for members to
connect with one another outside of Fell Hall. This desired planned monthly calendar is tentative due to
possible scheduling conflicts.
2.0. Situation Analysis
ISU AWC has been a part of ISU’s campus for less than two years. The organization has a lot of potential
to grow as a RSO which makes this analysis essential. This section presents details and analysis about
ISU AWC’s situation by defining it and its scope, explaining stakeholders affected, explaining the
competition, and performing an analysis of ISU AWC’s strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats
for being a successful RSO.
2.1 Definition & Scope of Situation
ISU AWC floundered in the early 2000’s due to a lack of leadership and a lack of interest. Serving in a 
RSO, members must have a faculty member who is interested and invested in the students’ and the 
organization’s success. At the time, ISU AWC did not have a dedicated faculty member and therefore the 
RSO did not have access to the resources it needed to thrive. Additionally, ISU AWC did not have a solid
executive board to both encourage new membership and retain old members. Without the motivation and 
enthusiasm of the board, it is likely that the RSO will not preserve members. 
The organization restarted and became a reinstated university chapter in August 2014. ISU AWC 
has made strides into a positive light from their past, but are still working to improve. With 21 current 
members in the organization, one main challenge of the chapter is recruitment of new members. ISU 
AWC is also challenged by a lack of funds. The chapter gains six dollars per registered member and all 
other money comes from fundraisers. This minimal income limits experiences and opportunities of the 
chapter to only those the organization can afford. 

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Due to being a newly reinstated chapter who previously collapsed, ISU AWC has not received the
same awareness and recognition from faculty and the university on the level other RSOs on campus have.
ISU AWC is also not a prominently recognized chapter by the AWC national committee.
ISU AWC inefficiently uses the resources provided for them from ISU’s Dean of Students Office
regarding RSO’s on campus as well as the national chapter of AWC. The details these type of documents
entail can further establish ISU AWC on campus. The documents can be found at
http://deanofstudents.illinoisstate.edu/involvement/organizations/ and will aid in the progression of the
RSO for years to come.
ISU AWC works closely with the Bloomington-Normal AWC Professional Chapter, allowing
many job shadowing opportunities, mentorships and internships becoming available for ISU AWC
members. We want to increase membership within the student chapter but avoid losing close connections
with mentors or availability of mentors. The following issues are critical to the chapter’s continued
operation:

Increase funds through multiple channels of income to offer more programs for members.

Establish a solid recruitment plan to attract new members.

Promote the organization’s valuable experiences and opportunities to build awareness among
students and faculty.

Invite more faculty members to work with the RSO to build awareness among them.

Obtain more professionals as mentors for ISU AWC members.

Successfully addressing these issues will help transform the ISU Student Chapter of AWC into a
recognized and valuable RSO on campus as well as a student organization acknowledged by the national
committee.
A survey was given out to current ISU AWC members regarding their views on the organization
and how it can be improved. These details are essential to the development of our plan and provided us
with a guide for our objectives. A copy of the survey and the results can be seen in Appendix C.
2.2 Stakeholders Affected
ISU AWC has multiple stakeholders who play specific roles in determining the outcomes of the
organization. The internal stakeholders are the chapter members and the chapter faculty advisor. The first
stakeholders are the current members of the chapter who have ranging roles, but overall all members
reflect the professionalism and image of the organization and even affect the attitudes of other chapter
members. The next stakeholder is faculty advisor, Julie Navickas. Illinois State University requires every
RSO to have a faculty advisor in order to be an affiliated organization of the university. ISU AWC simply
cannot run if Julie stepped down and no replacement was in order.
The external stakeholders of ISU AWC include ISU faculty, Bloomington-Normal AWC
Professional Chapter members and the AWC National Committee. ISU faculty has an outreach to many
students as well as other faculty members. The description a professor can give about an organization to
hundreds of students in one or more classes is tremendous. If ISU AWC can create a positive relationship

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and image with faculty members, the probability of greater awareness and recruitment throughout the
student body is likely to increase.
ISU AWC relies on the connection it has created with the Bloomington-Normal AWC, where job
shadowing opportunities, mentorships, and internships have been made available due to the members of
the professional chapter. Many experiences and opportunities would be lost if the connection between
Bloomington-Normal AWC and ISU AWC dissolved. The AWC National Committee is a stakeholder
because it is the founding association and the building block for all other chapters throughout the country.
2.3 Competition
Currently, there are several registered student organizations on ISU’s campus that ISU AWC competes
with. The competition is categorized as “very strong,” “strong,” and weak.” Competition labeled as very
strong represents a serious threat to ISU AWC because these organizations offer a very similar
professional service to ISU students. Competition labeled as strong offers similar services but ISU AWC
has superior networking opportunities within the communication field. Weak competition poses a minor
threat to ISU AWC due to minor similarities but they do not hold the same advantages of ISU AWC.
Although, weak competition could potentially become stronger if an executive board becomes
implemented and they create networking opportunities for students. The list below presents the three
levels of competition:

Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) is a RSO focused on students interested in
public relations and communication. PRSSA is a very strong competitor due to the similarities to
ISU AWC. It also has been around for more than 30 years, has gained national recognition of
various kinds, and has a solid national reputation. Similarities include being a student chapter of a
national organization, networking opportunities, executive board and leadership opportunities,
and others. PRSSA has the potential to draw students’ attention with its national recognition and
direct connection with the world’s largest professional association focused on public relations, the
Public Relations Society of America (PRSA).

Strong competitors include RSOs such as Women in Business and Lambda Pi Eta. They are both
different organizations but both possess many similarities to ISU AWC. Women in Business
started in fall of 2015 at ISU. As a brand new RSO on campus, they wanted to focus on
professional and personal development. Lambda Pi Eta is a National Honor Society founded over
31 years with over 400 active chapters at various colleges and universities around the world. ISU
AWC, Women in Business and Lambda Pi Eta all focus on professional and personal
development with networking opportunities for students. However, ISU AWC possesses a local
branch of the national chapter in the Bloomington-Normal area for an opportunity to meet with a
mentor from the national branch.

Weak competitors include RSOs, similar to The Vidette. The Vidette is ISU’s newspaper
publication dedicated to covering international, national, state, and campus news for students. It
was founded in 1888. The Vidette engages the interests of the students on campus, rather than the
networking opportunities like the stronger competitors. ISU AWC wants to focus on the
networking opportunities and resume building for students.

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2.4 SWOT Analysis
Aspects

Strengths

Weaknesses

Implications

Possible Actions

Close connection with
local board in
Bloomington-Normal

Allows for close bonds
between members and
professionals which led to
the creation of the menteementor program

Continue the mentee-mentor
program, as well as hosting the
local chapter as guest speakers

Reasonable membership
requirements

Allows for ISU students of
all majors and gender to
join

Promote the membership
requirements to ISU students

Location

Offering an on-campus
location in Fell Hall for
students to meet

Continue to meet on-campus to
ensure students can maintain
membership.

Limited funds

Limits organizational
opportunities internally

Create fundraising efforts

Not promoting ISU AWC
through the use of
advertisement and social
media

Missing key publics to
make aware of the RSO

Advertise the RSO through
flyers, and social media outlets

Commitment of current
members

Current members may be
involved in other RSOs on
campus

Create incentives for
attendance and involvement of
current members

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Opportunitie
s

Threats

The term “women” in the
title of the RSO may
misguide potential new
members who happen to
be men

Men may not understand
ISU AWC is open to all
genders and all members

Promotional flyers indicating
ISU AWC is open to men and
women

Gain more members

Creates a solid foundation
of membership among ISU
students

Establish a recruitment plan

Establish awareness to
ISU students

Creates a connection
between potential
members or interested
students

Creating social media accounts
for daily or weekly updates

ISU students are
unaware of the RSO

Missing key publics to
make aware of the
organization

Continue to promote the RSO
through in-class pitches to
communication classes,
promote the RSO to all ISU
students, emphasize the RSO
is open to ALL majors (not
limited to communication
majors)

Not enough resources for
current members

There are only a certain
amount of members within
the local board. If the ISU
chapter grows, the amount
of members will not be able
to tend to the amount of
students

Emphasize that the founding
national organization was for
women but has evolved into
welcoming any gender

ISU students are
unaware that men can
also join, due to the word
“women” in the title of the
RSO

Missing out on a public that
could be involved in the
organization

Delegate amongst local board
the number of students in need
of a mentor

2.5 Market Position
ISU AWC’s current market position is a challenger. As a challenger, AWC is perceived as the next­best 
option in the market of ISU’s RSOs in the field of communications. Target consumers of ISU AWC 
include all students at Illinois State University, regardless of major or gender. With the market’s current 
leader being PRSSA, there are strengths that set ISU AWC apart from PRSSA and other RSOs that 

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intersect with communication, like the ISU chapters of Women in Business and American Marketing 
Association. The market position of these ISU RSOs could be seen as challengers. ISU AWC pairs with 
the local board of Bloomington­Normal’s professional chapter to mentor and guide the student chapter. 
Another difference is ISU AWC’s cheaper member fees ($40) in comparison to PRSSA (currently $80). 
The strengths in Section 2.4 create a widespread opportunity for ISU AWC to grow and, potentially 
reposition its competitors within their market.
3.0 Plan
This sections presents a formal and specific plan of action for ISU AWC for the 2016 to 2017 academic 
school year (August 23, 2017 to May 9, 2017). It builds upon the previous two sections and provides ISU 
AWC with guidance to make necessary improvements to best fulfill its mission and get closer to realizing
its vision. This following subsections include objectives, strategies, and tactics; critical success factors; 
key performances indicators; budget and resource allocations; an implementation timeline; and the final 
evaluation method and anticipated results.
3.1 Objectives, Strategies, and Tactics
The table below displays the objectives, strategies and tactics that form the foundation of this strategic
plan, because altogether they make up what ISU AWC must do to become stronger.

Objectives are the main results ISU AWC needs to achieve to strengthen its chapter in order to
accomplish its vision. The four parts of each objective include: the desired effect, a target goal for
the effect, a target audience, and an established deadline.

Strategies are the categories of actions ISU AWC needs to complete in order to fulfill the
objectives.

Tactics are the specific actions ISU AWC will take to accomplish each strategy, which will fulfill
each objective.
OBJECTIVES

STRATEGIES
Fundraising

1. Double funds available through
multiple channels by March 31, 2017.
(Funds are currently at a low, leaving
members missing out on possible
opportunities that the chapter could
potentially offer.)
(Benchmark: ISU AWC holds less than
$500 in its account from membership
dues and one fundraiser.)

TACTICS
Internal fundraising
 Raise membership fees from
$40 to $45. Students currently
pay $40 total ($34 to the
national chapter and $6 to the
student chapter), $45 fees
would allow an extra $5 to the
chapter per member.
External fundraising
 Concessions at school
sporting events
 Local businesses who give a
certain percentage back to
ISU organizations (Buffalo

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Recruitment-focused salient
information
2. Double the number of new
members by November 30, 2016.

(See Appendix D for
recruitment plan)

Wild Wings, Potbelly’s,
Jason’s Deli, Cherry Berry,
etc.)
Car Wash

Implement recruitment plan across
multiple channels
 Social media
 Informational meetings

(The past semester ISU AWC gained
the largest recruitment class, and, like
any organization, needs a larger
amount of committed members.)
(Benchmark: The most recent
recruitment class contained 15
members.)

Advertising
3. Create awareness among ISU
students by February 1, 2017.
(By creating awareness of ISU AWC,
campus recognition and membership
could potentially increase.)

Pass out informational flyers on
campus at the beginning of fall
semesters and at the end of spring
semesters

(Benchmark: Current awareness of
ISU AWC is low or unrecognizable
throughout campus.)

4. Increase faculty members’ and local
professionals’ involvement as mentors
for ISU AWC members by 35% by
December 31, 2016.
(The local board of the BloomingtonNormal chapter of AWC and ISU AWC
does have a connection for a mentor-

Contests and giveaways for
implementing awareness about the
RSO via social and on-campus
 Utilize social media for
contests and giveaways

Empower faculty members’
and local professionals’ to
acknowledge the chapter’s
potential growth.

Email
 Email blast sent to ISU faculty
(except School of
Communication faculty)
 Specialized email sent out to
School of Communication
faculty
Face-to-face meetings with familiar
faculty and staff

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mentee program. The only involved
ISU faculty is the faculty advisor.)
Communicate with local chapter
requesting more local professional
involvement

(Benchmark: The current involvement
with faculty and local professionals
includes 15 members.)
5. Double professional development
events by May 1, 2017.

Professional-development
opportunities research

(ISU AWC is looking to expand
professional development further than
guest speakers.)

Panel of speakers
 Alumni
 Professional writing and
editing
Include a collection of both male
and female guest speakers (male
speakers to appeal to male
students/members)

(Benchmark: ISU AWC currently
attempts to host a guest speaker once
every month.)

Organization tours
Connect with other student
chapters
3.2 Critical Success Factors
The following table describes four categories of factors called “critical success factors,” that could impact
ISU AWC positively and negatively when attempting to fulfill its objectives along with the complication
related to each category.
 Opportunities include possibilities where ISU AWC can take advantage of the situation to rebuild
its image as well as increase awareness, membership, and funding.
 Barriers include, but are not limited to, situational, attitudinal, and environmental opposition to
ISU AWC.
 Environment includes both internal and external factors that influence ISU AWC operations.
 Resources include the material required to build an accomplished organization.
OBJECTIVES
1. Increase funds
available through
multiple channels

OPPORTUNITIES

BARRIERS

More professional
speakers

Higher dues
potentially reduces
membership

Strengthen
member
involvement

Internal membership
dues

Possible travel
accommodations

Possible conflicts
of interest in areas
money is spent in
events

Greater community
relationships and
connections

Internal and external
fundraising

Greater social
events

ENVIRONMENT

RESOURCES

Donations

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Membership item
giveaways
Availability to
provide separate
committees their
own budgets
2. Increase new
members

More funds from
membership fees
More awareness
through word-ofmouth

Possible decrease
in internal
engagement

Strengthen
awareness across
campus

Social media

Potential decrease
of faculty and local
committee member
involvement

Increases
cohesion among
ISU students
interested in
aspects of
communication
and professional
development

Print materials

Potential conflict of
interest

Create relationship
between ISU
students and ISU
AWC

Advertising supplies

More leadership
opportunities
More
organizational
structure

3. Create
awareness among
ISU students

More potential
members
More leadership
opportunities

Word-of-mouth

Online

Social media
Faculty and campus
support

Clarification of ISU
AWC as a RSO
4. Increase faculty
members' and
local professionals'
involvement as
mentors for ISU
AWC members

Greater
professional
opportunities

Potential loss of
student-to-student
involvement

More incentives for
guest speakers to
be involved

Possible loss of
diversity among
chapter meeting
content

Engaging students,
faculty and
external
professionals
through a common
interest
Strengthening the
relationship with
community
involvement

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Incentives
Online and verbal
communication

5. Increase
professional
development
events

Resume building
Experience in the
field

Potential decrease
in diversity of
chapter meeting
content

Answers/advice to
profession-related
questions

Possible lack of
funds to host these
events

Strengthen
networking
relationships
between students
and professionals

Funds
Availability of
professionals
Availability of
campus venues
More delegation

3.3 Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)
Along the way, milestone measurements must be taken to ensure progress towards goals. KPIs are
specific and measurable indicators. For the objectives listed below, measurements should be taken by the
president or the vice president periodically. Measurements should also be compared to the benchmark to
ensure progression from the past.
 Objective 1: Double funds available through multiple channels by March 31, 2017.
o Benchmark: ISU AWC holds less than $500 in their account from membership dues and
one fundraising event.
o KPI: ISU AWC’s account should hold at least $300 per semester to pay for thank you
gifts for speakers and giveaway items.
o Hold a fundraising event at least once a month to ensure the progression of funds.
 Objective 2: Double the number of new members by November 30, 2016.
o Benchmark: The most recent recruitment class contained 15 members.
o KPI: Meet with the membership and recruitment chairs monthly to discuss the trends in
membership involvement and recruitment.

Objective 3: Create awareness among ISU students by February 1, 2017.
o Benchmark: Current awareness of ISU AWC is low or unrecognizable throughout
campus.
o KPI: Record the amount of followers on social media monthly to see the progression of
awareness.
Objective 4: Increase faculty members’ and local professionals’ involvement as mentors for ISU
AWC members by 35% by December 31, 2016.
o Benchmark: The current involvement with faculty and local professionals includes 15
members.
o KPI: Meet with mentors to inquire about their involvement with mentees.
o Pass out comment cards to the members after meeting with their mentors to see if they
feel like their mentor is giving them the appropriate focus and time
Objective 5: Double professional development events by May 1, 2017.
o Benchmark: ISU AWC currently attempts to host a guest speaker once every month.
o KPI: Host a guest speaker bi-weekly or invite multiple guest speakers for one night to
speak.

3.4 Budget & Resource Allocations
ISU AWC is a newly founded RSO on ISU’s campus. There has been no formal budget prepared before.
This plan presents a formal budget (see Appendix E) for enacting the plan that should be used as a model
for annual budgeting and financial tracking. This example budget is based on one semester and should be
repeated again for the following semester. It is extremely important for the organization to have to proper

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financial controls in order to implement the plan and operate successfully. The budget lists only those
expenses necessary to fulfill plan described in the section 3.1 because income was unavailable during the
development of this document. The budget offers opportunities with ISU AWC’s best interest in mind.
However, other methods may be taken to manage income and expenses.
The majority of the income comes from membership dues and fundraising. Many expenses are
dedicated to providing internal opportunities for ISU AWC. Also, expenses include material used for
fundraisers, such as the car wash. Expenses spent on internal opportunities include gift cards/thank-you
cards for guest speakers and snacks for members during meetings with guest speakers. By focusing a
majority of our budget on internal opportunities for ISU AWC, it will allow member growth. The return
on investment includes members’ professional development and extra income for the RSO.
3.5 Timeline (beginning with the proposal’s acceptance/approval)
To ensure to progress of this plan and the success of ISU AWC, a guideline of when each of the suggested
tactics should be implemented is necessary to visualize the entire scope of the plan (see Appendix F for
full timeline). This plan presents a timeline from August 23, 2016 to May 2, 2017. The dates listed at the
top of the timeline follow a bi-weekly format. This timeframe gives ISU AWC a decent amount of time to
develop and implement all tactics.
Multiple parts of this timeline are dependent on other objectives to succeed. For example, if
funds do not increase this will have a negative effect on all expenses for increasing awareness and outside
involvement. Another example would be if ISU AWC could not increase involvement among faculty
members and local professionals, the overall professional involvement throughout the chapter is likely to
be negatively affected. A few objectives cannot be implemented throughout university school closings
such as Thanksgiving, winter, and spring breaks. The following list provides reasoning for the anticipated
events throughout our timeline:

Fund increase: Since members can join at any given time, internal fundraising will be used
throughout the entire year. External fundraising includes a beginning of the year car wash,
concessions to be held during the prime sport seasons, and fundraisers at local business to be evenly
spaced throughout the calendar. This will help ISU AWC consistently maintain their income.

Membership increase: The recruitment plan will be implemented through consistent social media
posts during the year. Social media posts will be posted during academic breaks to reach out to
potential new members. Informational meetings will be held throughout the first few weeks of each
semester to start recruitment promptly.

Increase awareness: Informational flyers will aid in recruitment during the first few weeks of
each semester and the last couple weeks before students break for the next semester. This tactic may
leave students with an interest to join the following semester. Contests and giveaways will be evenly
spaced throughout the plan to hold interest and create incentives for members as well as potential
members.

Create involvement of faculty members and local professionals: Communication with the local
chapter will be used throughout the entire year as consistent networking. ISU AWC will send out
emails to potential faculty to seek involvement at the beginning of each semester. After initial email

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blasts are sent out, face-to-face meetings with interested faculty will be conducted across a few weeks
to allot for availability.

Professional involvement increase: ISU AWC will reach out to other student chapters throughout
the entirety of the year. There are 17 other student chapters, allowing a chance to network, share
chapter successes, and to minimize competition. The guest speakers and panels are evenly spaced out
to allow efficient planning. This plan allows ISU AWC to tour one of multiple organization(s) when
the school year has settled in and gives time for planning with the organization(s) and members.

All objectives included in this timeline are implemented throughout the entire year. As a new and
growing organization improvement needs constant work. The tactics either go hand-in-hand with the
objectives or are evenly spaced out due to effective planning. Multiple tactics are purposely planned since
they are achievable throughout the year. Also, note that some tactics are planned shy to the each semester
due to students preparing for end-of-the-year finals and school breaks.
3.6 Evaluation Method & Anticipated Results
In order to determine if the plan was successful, ISU AWC will need to evaluate each attempt of this plan.
See Section 3.5 for benchmarks and KPIs.
 Objective 1: Double funds available through multiple channels by March 31, 2017.
o ISU AWC must update and record expenses and income throughout the semester. If ISU
AWC doubles their funds through multiple channels by March 31, 2017, then the plan
was successful.
o If the plan was unsuccessful, ISU AWC must either reduce the number of projected
expenses or create more opportunities for fundraising.
 Objective 2: Double the number of new members by November 30, 2016.
o If ISU AWC reaches a total of 42 members by November 30, 2016, then the plan was
successful.
o If the ISU AWC cannot reach 42 members by November 30, 2016, then the plan was
unsuccessful. Therefore they need to reduce the number of projected members.
 Objective 3: Create awareness among ISU students by February 1, 2017.
o If ISU AWC’s social media accounts’ traffic and follower increased significantly from
May 1, 2016, the plan is successful.
o If ISU AWC’s social media accounts’ traffic and follower did not increase from the
previous year, the plan was unsuccessful. Therefore they will need to reduce the
expectations of traffic and followers.
 Objective 4: Increase faculty members’ and local professionals’ involvement as mentors for ISU
AWC members by 35% by December 31, 2016.
o If faculty member and professional involvement has increased by at least 8.75% per
month, then the plan is successful. Also, if evaluation of member satisfaction in regards
to faculty member and local professional involvement is positive, then the plan is
successful.
o If the member satisfaction is negative and faculty member and professional involvement
fails to improve, ISU AWC must lower projected involvement percentage.
 Objective 5: Double professional development events by May 1, 2017.
o If ISU AWC hosts professional development events at least twice a month, then the plan
is successful.

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o

If ISU AWC fails to host a professional development event at least twice a month, then
the plan deems unsuccessful and needs to re-evaluate scheduling of events.

With this plan, ISU AWC anticipates positive results. With the dedicated executive board and
members, all objectives should be executed for complete success. Adjustments may be made to the plan
to ensure overall success.

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Appendices
A. COMMITTEE CHAIR JOB DESCRIPTIONS

Professional Development Chair - The professional development chair plans guest speakers and
executes the mentee-mentor program with the local Bloomington-Normal board. The professional
development chair works closely with the special events chair. (Kelley Doessel)

Special Events Chair - The special events chair plans and executes monthly chapter social events.
This position also helps the President-Elect with the planning of the annual Crystal Awards. This
positions can also aid any of the other positions in planning events for the better of the
organization. (Paige Meyers)

Membership Chair - The membership chair creates incentives for members to stay involved in
ISU AWC. (Samantha Schultz)

Recruitment Chair - The recruitment chair generates different ideas to get ISU students involved
and interested in joining ISU AWC. The recruitment chair also works with the special events
chair for peak seasons of recruitment. (Christine Reis)

Community Involvement - The community involvement chair plans and executes different events
within the community to get the name out and also serve the community. Past community
involvement events include the Boys and Girls Club of Bloomington-Normal. (Zoe Clemmons)

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B. STUDENT CHAPTER GUIDE
Please refer to the file on the attached CD.

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C. RESEARCH SURVEY & RESULTS
Research Survey

The Association for Women in Communication: Illinois State University Student Chapter
Name:
Please circle your answers for the following questions.
1. What do you identify yourself as?
-Male
-Female
-Other
2. How old are you?
-18-20
-21-23
-24-26
-27+
3. What is your major?
_____________________________
4. Why are you a member of AWC? Circle
all that apply and rank them from most
important to least important (6 being most
important and 1 being least important)
-Professional development __
-Community involvement __
-Socials __
-Common interests in the field of
communication __
-Leadership opportunities __
-Other ___________________________ __

5. How did you hear about AWC?
________________________________
6. Was this an effective way to join? Why or
why not? If not, do you have any
suggestions on how to improve
membership?
____________________________________
_______________________________
7. Currently dues are $40 total. Would you
be willing to pay $50 total to be a part of
ISU AWC for an entire year if there could be
more opportunities for members? (34$
national dues, 16$ student chapter)
- Yes
- No
8. How do you think ISU AWC could be
more appealing to men given "women" is in
the name of the organization?
____________________________________
_________________________________

Results

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How Members Heard of AWC
8
6
4
2
0
Transfer Day

In-Class Pitch

National Conference

Recruitment Tactics

Gender of ISU AWC Members
10
8
6
4
2
0
Male

Female

Effectiveness of Recruitment Tactic

Effective
Ineffective

10

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Age of ISU AWC Members
18-20

1

21-23

3

24-26
27+

6

Willingness to Increase Dues to $50 total

Willing
No
10

Majors of ISU AWC Members

Organizational Leadership Communication

Public Relations

0 1 2 3 4 5 6

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Aspects of ISU AWC Membership in Order of Importance
(6 most- 1 least)

3

21

6

4

5

Leadership
Opportunities

Professional
Development

Community
Involvement

Networking

Common Interersts Socials
in the field of
communication

How to Appeal to Potential New Male Members

7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Explain benefits

Advertize to men

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Male guest speakers

D. RECRUITMENT PLAN

RECRUITMENT PLAN
TEMPLATE
The provided recruitment plan template creates a way to strategically think through a long-term
vision for the chapter, create specific goals, organize the recruitment committee, and create
calendar events. There are a few examples provided for each section, but goals may be changed
based on specific chapter needs.

1. MEMBERSHIP/RECRUITMENT GOAL
a. Gain more members
b. Increase attendance at weekly meetings
c. Create prospective member list for up-and-coming semesters
d. Increase funds by new membership

2. MEMBERSHIP/RECRUITMENT COMMITTEE ROSTER
Name

Phone Number

Email Address

3. RECRUITMENT COMMITTEE EXPECTATIONS

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a. Attend meetings bi-weekly. Provide a valid excuse at least 24 hours in advance if
not able to attend.
b. Provide an update on all potential new members’ information (PNMs)

4. SAMPLE MEMBERSHIP/RECRUITMENT COMMITTEE AGENDA
a.
b.
c.
d.

e.

f.
g.
h.
i.

Welcome/Introductions
Attendance
Review notes/minutes from last committee meeting
Updates to the PNMs List
i. Adding/removing names
ii. Updating personal information
iii. Discussing level of interest
iv. Last contact and next steps
v. Assigning prospects to committee/chapter members
Upcoming chapter events/functions
i. Things the chapter is already doing
ii. Discuss the recruitment events
iii. How to get PNMs to attend events
Review of the recruitment plan
i. Review and update membership/recruitment committee goals
ii. Future recruitment events
Prepare minutes for chapter meeting
Review items for all committee members
Close

5. RECRUITMENT STANDARDS
a. Must currently be an Illinois State University student
b. Must be interested in communication and/or professional development
c. Must pay dues to be considered a member

6. RECRUITMENT PLANNING CALENDAR
a. Collect all of these dates/events into a master calendar. Collaborate with the Vice
President, Special Events chair, Membership chair, and Recruitment Chair to
input the membership/recruitment events into master calendar.
b. University-wide Recruitment Events
Event
Date
Location
School of COMM Tent at 9/17/2016
TBD
ISU Family Weekend
Table at Festival ISU
TBD
TBD
Table at Winterfest ISU
TBD
TBD
In-class pitches to COM- TBD
Fell Hall
100 level courses
c. Chapter events
Event
Date
Location
Area of
Development

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Membership
Recruitment
Informational
Meeting

8/30/2016

TBD

Informational
meeting and
Personal
Development

E. BUDGET

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F. TIMELINE

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References

Illinois State University. (2015). Get Involved. School of Communication: Illinois State
University. Retrieved from http://communication.illinoisstate.edu/getinvolved/
Illinois State University. (2016). Student Organizations. Dean of Students Office: Illinois State
University. Retrieved from http://deanofstudents.illinoisstate.edu/involvement/organizations
The Association for Women in Communications. (2009) AWC student chapter guide. Alexandria,
VA: AWC National Headquarters.
Smudde, P. M. (2015). Managing public relations: Methods and tools for solid success. New
York: Oxford University Press.
Van Nort, K. E. (2016). The Association for Women in Communications. Retrieved from
http://womcom.org
Weebly. (2016). The Association for Women in Communications: Bloomington-Normal Chapter.
Retrieved from http://awcblono.weebly.com/
Weishaar, N. (2016). Illinois State University AWC. Retrieved from http://isuawc.weebly.com

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