Power Supply Project

Yash Patel
(100574630)

Course Code: CAD 1133
Course Name: CAD for Electronics

Date: 14th April 2015

Submitted to: Professor Louis Bertrand

1

Letter of transmittal
To: Louis Bertrand
From: Yash Patel
Date: 14th April 2015
Re: Power Supply Report
I am pleased to submit this report in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the CAD
1133 – CAD for Electronics course in the Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology
program at Durham College. The report details the design, construction and testing of an
electronics workbench power supply.
The attached report is of my own creation. It includes the work of others used by
permission and properly attributed, and I have reviewed its entire contents before
submitting it for grading. I understand what is meant by the terms "academic integrity" and
"plagiarism" and guarantee that I am abiding by Durham College's Academic Integrity
Policy #ACAD-101.
Sincerely,
Yash Patel

2

Abstract
This project is made mainly to reduce 120 VAC to usable DC voltage. This project is to make a
power supply that can plug direct into the wall, produce a fixed 5V output, and two variable voltage
output which can be adjust from 0 to +15V or from 0 to -15V. Also there should be a switch to turn
the power supply on and off; a LED to indicate whether the power supply is on or off; and a fuse
that can protect the power supply.
In this project Multisim is used to test and learn how the circuit functions. Eagle CAD is used to
create a PCB for the power supply. Base on the Eagle drawing, a PCB was developed. All the
components were putted on the PCB by soldering. A metal box was specially made for the power
supply base on the given templates. After assembly the power supply, a neat, organizes power
supply with all the functions that expected was made.

3

Acknowledgements
Thanks for Mehul Chaudhri. He helped me to print the transfer sheet and answer me a lot of
questions about how to use Eagle. Without him remained me the due day of all the different things,
now I may still stuck at somewhere else. Also thanks for the people that from some other courses. I
not even know their names. When I drilling the holes on the box, they teach me how to change the
drill so that I can fit the box under the drill. They are nice and friendly. Thanks for every teachers,
classmates, and friends that have helped me. Without all the helps, my board will not even exist. So
thanks for everyone’s help, I really appreciate all the helps.

4

Contents
ABSTRACT..................................................................................................................................................III
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS.........................................................................................................................IV
CONTENTS...................................................................................................................................................V
LIST OF FIGURES....................................................................................................................................VII
1

2

3

4

5

INTRODUCTION...............................................................................................................................1

1.1

THE POWER SUPPLY PROJECT................................................................................1

1.2

PURPOSE OF A POWER SUPPLY...............................................................................1

1.3

OBJECTIVES OF THE PROJECT.................................................................................1

1.4

LAYOUT OF REPORT...............................................................................................1

DESIGN AND THEORY OF OPERATION.....................................................................................2

2.1

DRAFT SCHEMATIC.................................................................................................2

2.2

CIRCUIT SIMULATION SOFTWARE...........................................................................4

2.3

PRIMARY CIRCUIT AND TRANSFORMER.................................................................4

2.4

RECTIFIERS AND FILTERS.......................................................................................4

2.5

FIXED 5V REGULATOR...........................................................................................6

2.6

VARIABLE POSITIVE REGULATOR...........................................................................7

2.7

TRACKING NEGATIVE REGULATOR..........................................................................8

PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD.........................................................................................................10

3.1

PCB DESIGN SOFTWARE (EAGLE).......................................................................10

3.2

COMPONENTS AND LIBRARIES.............................................................................11

3.3

PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD DESIGN.......................................................................11

3.4

PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD PRODUCTION..............................................................14

POWER SUPPLY ENCLOSURE....................................................................................................15

4.1

ENCLOSURE DESIGN.............................................................................................15

4.2

ENCLOSURE FABRICATION...................................................................................17

FINAL ASSEMBLY AND TESTING..............................................................................................18

5

6

5.1

CIRCUIT BOARD ASSEMBLY AND TESTING..........................................................18

5.2

ENCLOSURE ASSEMBLY........................................................................................18

5.3

COMPLETE ASSEMBLY TESTING...........................................................................21

RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS...................................................................................................22

6.1

SUMMARY OF RESULTS........................................................................................22

6.2

RECOMMENDATIONS.............................................................................................22

REFERENCES/BIBLIOGRAPHY.............................................................................................................23
APPENDICES...............................................................................................................................................24

APPENDIX A: COMPLETE SCHEMATIC...........................................................................24
APPENDIX B: PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD DRAWING.......................................................25
APPENDIX C: POWER SUPPLY ENCLOSURE DRAWING...................................................26

6

List of Figures

Figure 1 : Hand Drawn Schematic of Power supply...........................................................2
Figure 2 : Hand Drawn Schematic of Power Supply Divide into different section.............3
Figure 3 : Step down transformer in Multisim....................................................................4
Figure 4 : Full Wave Rectifier Circuit.................................................................................5
Figure 5 : Rectifier And Filter Circuit in multisim..............................................................6
Figure 6 : Wave Form image of figure 5 in multism...........................................................6
Figure 7 : Fixed 5V circuit in multism................................................................................7
Figure 8 : 0-15 Positive Voltage Regulator..........................................................................8
Figure 9 : 0-15 Negative regulator.......................................................................................9
Figure 10 : Full Schematic in Eagle..................................................................................10
Figure 11 : Eagle With All Layer visible...........................................................................12
Figure 12 : Bottom View of the PCB board.......................................................................13
Figure 13 : Top Layer Of the PCB....................................................................................13
Figure 14 : Front Face Template of the Enclosure.............................................................15
Figure 15 :Rear Face of the Enclosure..............................................................................16
Figure 16 : Bottom of the Enclosure..................................................................................16
Figure 17 : Power Chord....................................................................................................19
Figure 18 : Connection of the transformer.........................................................................19
Figure 19 : Soldering on the Panel Meter..........................................................................20
Figure 20 : Connection of switch

Figure 21 : Connection of Fuse........20

7

1

Introduction

1.1 The Power Supply Project
This project is to make a power supply is to reduce 120 VAC to usable DC voltage that we
can plug into the wall to 120V 60Hz AC, and produce positive and negative 15VAC with a
center tap, fixed 5 volts DC, positive variable DC voltage from 0 to +15 volts, and negative
variable DC voltage from 0 to -15 volts.

1.2 Purpose of a Power Supply
First of all its main purpose is to reduce the AC voltage to some usable voltage. The main
purpose of the power supply is to obtain the fix 15 V at the output of the positive rectifier
circuit, and negative -15 V at negative part. Also the 5V at the output of the 7805 IC voltage
regulator.

1.3 Objectives of the Project
a. To learn who to make the circuit board practically by making the schematic in the
eagle
b. Use Multisim to understand how the circuit work.
c. Use Eagle to draw PCB
d. Make the PCB.
e. Assemble the power supply

1.4 Layout of Report
The report is divided into six sections. Chapter 1 contains introductory material pertaining
to the study. Second chapter covers the creation of the schematic diagram and the operation
of the circuits. Third covers Eagle CAD schematic and the layout of the PCB. Fourth covers
the production of box. Fifth covers final assembly and testing of the power supply. Finally,
sixth concludes the work and suggests areas for future investigations

8

2

Design and Theory of Operation

This section shows the schematic of the power supply, and how the different parts of circuit
operated.

2.1 Draft Schematic
Figure 1 is the hand drawn over view schematic of the power supply, whereas figure 2
shows how power supply is divide into many different section.

Figure 1 : Hand Drawn Schematic of Power supply

The transformer on the left of figure 3 is used to step down the 120VAC voltage that comes from
the wall. The four diodes on the left of the schematic in figure 3 are two full wave rectifiers to
rectify the AC voltage from the transformer to positive or negative DC voltages. The 7805, LM317,

9

and LM337 are voltage regulators used to produce fixed +5 volts, positive variable voltage from 0
to +15 volts, and negative variable voltage from 0 to -15 volts.

Figure 2 : Hand Drawn Schematic of Power Supply Divide into different section

2.2 Circuit Simulation Software
The power supply contains a voltage step down circuit, two full-wave rectifiers and filter
capacitors, a fixed 5V power supply, a 0 to+15V variable power supply, and a 0 to -15V
variable power supply. As a whole, these circuits will step down the AC voltage from the
wall, convert it to DC voltage, and adjust the voltage to fixed 5V, between 0 to +15V and
between 0 to -15V by using three voltage regulators.

10

2.3 Primary Circuit and Transformer
The power from the wall is 120V AC, the transformer can step the voltage down to 28V AC.
The demonstration of the step down transformer is shown in figure 3 in Multisim.

Figure 3 : Step down transformer in Multisim

2.4 Rectifiers and Filters
The figure 4 is the circuit to rectify and filter the AC voltage to change it to DC voltage.
This circuit has two functions. First is to rectify the AC voltage so that the voltage only goes
positive or only goes negative. It also filters the waveform so it is smoother and more like a

DC voltage.
Rectify
Rectifier is used to rectify the AC voltage so that only the positive or the negative voltage
was appeared at the output. A full wave rectifier can be built by using two diodes and a
center tape transformer which is demonstrated in figure 4 and figure 5. At the same time,
only one of the two diodes is forward bias, the other diode is always reverse bias. So there
will always be only the positive voltage at the cathode of the diodes, since diodes only allow
the current flow from the anodes to the cathodes.

11

U1

D1

XSC1

V1

0.5 A
120 Vrms
60 Hz

T1

4.1

1N4001GP

Ext T rig
+

R1
1MΩ

D2

_
B

A
+

_

+

_

1N4001GP

Figure 4 : Full Wave Rectifier Circuit

Filter
As shown in figure 5, a 2200uF capacitor is used to filter the waveform. The input voltage
will keep charging and discharging the capacitor, so the output waveform will be smoothed.
The larger the value of the capacitor, the smoother the output waveform will be. The
demonstration circuit is shown in figure 6 in multisim. From figure 6 we can see that the
output waveform is almost a straight line, which is a 20VDC voltage with a small AC ripple.
The same as for the rectifying, two of these capacitors are needed for positive and negative
voltages.
U1

D1

XSC1

V1

0.5 A
120 Vrms
60 Hz

T1

4.1

1N4001GP
D2

R1
100Ω
C1
2200µF

Ext T rig
+
_
B

A
+

_

+

_

1N4001GP

Figure 5 : Rectifier And Filter Circuit in multisim

12

Output waveform
after rectify and
filter
Input waveform

Figure 6 : Wave Form image of figure 5 in multism

2.5 Fixed 5V Regulator
The circuit that is shown in figure 7 provides a fixed +5V DC output for the power supply. It also
provides power to turn on the LED which shows that the power supply is on.

The positive supply voltage is applied to 7805 voltage regulator. The common pin of the
voltage regulator will be simply tied to the ground. Therefore the output voltage will be
fixed at positive 5 volts. The diode D10 that connected to the output of the voltage regulator
is to protect the circuit. In the normal operation of the circuit the diode will be reverse bias,
so there will be no current flow through it. When the voltage on the output of the voltage
regulator goes below the ground, the diode will be forward bias to short the short the output
and protect the circuit. The capacitor that parallel connected with the diode is for smooth the
output waveform.

The resistor R8 which series connected with the LED is to limit the current that flow
through the LED to protect the LED. The current that flow through the LED is 21.5 mA
(I=V/R=(5V-0.7V)/200Ω=21.5mA).
D1
1N4004GP

V1
120Vrms
60Hz

D3
1N4004GP

C1
2200µF

U1
LM7805CT
LINE
VREG
VOLTAGE
COMMON

T1

C3
10µF

D5
1N4004GP

R1
200Ω
+

4:1

D2
1N4004GP

D4
1N4004GP

C2
2200µF

-

LED1
5.003

U2
DC 10MOhm
V

Figure 7 : Fixed 5V circuit in multism
13

2.6 Variable positive regulator
The circuit that is shown in figure 8 provides an adjustable voltage output for the power supply. The
output voltage of the circuit can be adjusted from 0 to +15V by adjusting the resistance of the
potentiometer (R3).

For the voltage regulator LM317, the output pin should be always 1.25V higher than the
adjust pin. So there will always be about 10mA flow through R2 from top to the bottom
(I=V/R=1.25V/120Ω=10.4mA). Since there is almost no current flowing into the adjust pin,
the current flow through R1 is almost the same as the current flow through R2 which is
10mA. So the voltage drop across R3 will increase with the value of R1. When R1 is set to
15kΩ, the voltage drop across R1 will be about 15V (V=I*R=10.4mA*15kΩ=15.6V) as
shown in figure 10. When R1 is set to 0Ω, the voltage drop across R1 will be about 0V
(V=I*R=10.4mA*0Ω=0V).

R3 limits the current flow through D3 and D5, so that the two diodes can work properly.
Without R3, the voltage drop across D3 and D5 will be forced to -20V.Every diode will has
about 0.7V voltage drop across when it is forward bias. So D3 and D5 will have totally
about -1.4V voltage drop across them which means the voltage of the cathode of D5 is about
-1.4V. This voltage put down the voltage at the output of 1.4V, which is almost the same as
the voltage drop between the adjust pin and the output pin of LM317. So the output is
almost the same as the voltage drop across the R1. Therefore, the output can be adjusted to
0V (1.25V-1.4V=-0.15V).

14

U3
LM7805CT

Key = Space
+
-

-

0.089

A

0

5.005

V

-

18.767

C5
D10
U4
RL
10µF
1N4004GP
DC 10MOhm
100Ω

+

V
U55.005
DC 10MOhm

+

U6
T1
DC 10MOhm

+

-

COMMON

D1
D2
C1
1N4004GP
1N4004GP
2200µF

AM1

0.5A
V1
120Vrms
60Hz

+

LINE
VREG
VOLTAGE

SW1

F1

U2
DC 10MOhm

V

V

U1
LM117HVH

4.3

Vin

R1
120Ω

Vout
ADJ

C2
10µF

D3
D6
D7
1N4004GP
1N4004GP 1N4004GP

+

+

D5
U71N4004GP
DC 10MOhm

+
-

-0.863

D4
1N4004GP
VM1

-

15.814

V

U8
R3
DC 10MOhm
1.5kΩ 100 %
Key=A

-

16.669

V

V

R2
1kΩ
CAD 1133 Winter 2015
Week 2: Primary, Rectifier, Filter and 5V Regulator
STARTER FILE

Figure 8 : 0-15 Positive Voltage Regulator

2.7 Tracking negative regulator
For the negative Voltage regulator the 741 op-amp is used and also the potentiometer to adjust the
resistance so that we can change the output voltage. Also the input voltage we are using is 0-15
voltage regulator. Figure 9 shown below is the 0-15 negative regulator.

15

XSC1
V1
Ext Trig
+
_

V3
5.6V

5

1

R1
10kΩ

7

B

A

Vpos

+

_

+

_

R4
1.5kΩ 50 %
Key=A

U1
3

6

V2
20V

Vneg

2
4

S1

R2
10kΩ

UA741CD

C1
1000µF

R3
120Ω
REF

VIN VOUT
Key = Space

Filtered_Negative

VREF

REG1
LM337

Figure 9 : 0-15 Negative regulator

16

3

Printed Circuit Board

This section shows the schematic in Eagle, different layers of the PCB, and how the PCB
was made.

3.1 PCB Design Software (Eagle)
The Eagle CAD schematic is shown below in figure 10. It is important to make sure that the
right library and component was selected and all the components are connected. The wrong
library or wrong part number of the component will end up with a wrong component size
show up on the PCB, for example like a too small pad, or wrong physical shape of the
components.
The wires that cross each other look like they are connected may not actually connected.
This will end up with some missing trace on the PCB. The show command can be used to
check the connections of the components. All the leads that were connected together will
light up when the wire was selected under the show command.

Figure 10 : Full Schematic in Eagle

17

3.2 Components and Libraries
For the eagle there is a special libraries from which we can take the components and make the
circuit for the PCB of the power supply. In eagle the components have their specific
name/production number so that we can use that in making the PCB in the lab.

3.3 Printed Circuit Board Design
In eagle, the PCB has two layers, the top and the bottom which present the top and the
bottom of the PCB in real life. The components are placed on the top layer and the traces are
on the bottom layer. Figure 11 shows the board view in Eagle which is looking from the top
of the board and seeing through the board which means both the top layer and the bottom
layer can be seen at the same time. So at the board view all the components on top and the
traces and the pads on the bottom layer are shown. But since we are looking from top, so or
the traces are mirrored. This can be seeing by looking on the initials that is on the bottom
layer.
The dotted line rectangle shows the edge of the PCB. The smaller rectangle that surrounds
the three voltage regulators shows where the heat sink located. The heat sink is on the top
layer. It is a piece of metal that help the voltage regulators to cold down faster. So the
voltage regulators should be right on top of it. Also, no other components on the top layer
should be in the rectangular.
As shown in figure 11, some of the components have one lead that do not connected to
another component. This is because when the board is filled with copper, the whole copper
is used as the ground. All those leads that did not connect to any other component are
connected to ground. After the copper was filled, the coppers may be separated into some
isolated islands because of the traces and the pads. Since that all the copper that acts like
ground need to be checked to make sure none of them were isolated from others. Otherwise
some jumper wires may be needed to connect the ground together.

18

Figure 11 : Eagle With All Layer visible
To make the PCB, the board needs to be filled with copper. And non-inverted bottom of the board is
needed which is shown below in figure 12. When making the CAM, select the mirror to get the noninverted bottom view. Select where to save the file and type ‘.ps’ at the end of the name of the file
so it can be read by ghost. Select the bottom, vias, pads, dimension, and bottom document. So the
traces, pads, initial and all the labels will appear on the ghost. And print the ghost as pdf file so it
can be read in other computers.

19

Figure 12 : Bottom View of the PCB board
A component template is needed to place the components. Use CAM to make a component template
that like the one shown below in figure 13 can be got. To get this template in CAM, select the top
layer, pads, top component, top name, and top document. So the only the components, heat sink,
pads, and the names of the components are shown.

Figure 13 : Top Layer Of the PCB

20

3.4 Printed Circuit Board Production
Print the non-inverted bottom view into a transparence form. Peel off the clear cover from
the board. Place the transparence sheet on the side where the cover just get peel off, it is the
side that contains the photo sensor cells. Place the side that has the sensor cells on the
bottom of the UV machine so it can get UV light. The transparence sheet will block some
part of the UV. Where the UV gets blocked, the photo sensor cells remain soft. Set the time
for 60 seconds. When it done there should be some mark that shows the traces on the board.
Clamp the PCB into the rack. Place the rack into tank that is at the right side of the
developer machine. Cover the lid and make sure no chemical can spray out. Press the
ON/OFF button on the right. The machine should spray the chemical for 90 second. The part
that did not explode to the UV should be washed off. Check if all of the soft photo cells are
washed away. If not turn it on for another 30 second. If it is done, then move the rack to the
rinse tank which is the tank that is at the left. Push the second green rocker button from the
left to turn on the water to rinse the PCB.
Place the board on the other rack and put the rack into the etchant tank. The temperature
display should be 50°C. Press the ON button at the right, the etchant tank should spray chemical
for 90 second. During this process the copper that did not cover by the photo sensor cells will be
removed. Check if all the copper are washed away. If not turn it on for another 30 second. If
it is done, then move the rack to the rinse tank which is the tank that is at the left. Push the
green rocker button to turn on the water to rinse the PCB.
Put the PCB in a tray. Pour a little bit of stripper chemical (Sodium Hydroxide) into the tray, so
the chemical can cover the PCB. Slosh the PCB in the tray until all of the photo-resist is
removed. Use water to rinse the PCB, then use paper towel to dry it.
Drill eight holes on the board with a 1/32” drill for the op-amp; a 5/32” drill for the three holes
for the heat sink; and a 3/64” drill for the rest of the holes that are for the pads.
Use the shear to trim the four edge of the board. Be careful about the shear, when adding the
force to push the handle, the handle will suddenly move and trim everything that is under it.

21

4

Power Supply Enclosure

This section shows the drawing for box production and the process to produce the box.

4.1 Enclosure Design
There are three drawing was needed for box production, the front face template (figure14.),
rear face template (figure 15), and the bottom face template (figure 16). All of them were
made in CAD. The size of the drills and punches are all labeled in the templates.

Figure 14 : Front Face Template of the Enclosure

22

Figure 15 :Rear Face of the Enclosure

Figure 16 : Bottom of the Enclosure

4.2 Enclosure Fabrication
Glue the front face and rear face templates at outside of the box. Make sure they are right
side up. Glue the bottom face template at inside of the box. Make sure the side labeled as
23

front close to the front face. Use the right size drills or punches as labeled on the templates
to drill or punch the holes. Center punches the holes before drilling.
Some big holes need to punch more than once to get the desire size or shape. The 7 holes on
the front face for the voltage output need to punch twice to get the shape as drawing on the
template. Make sure the left and right sides of those holes are flat so the output connecters
will not shift when the connecters are rotating. The rectangular hole that on the front face
need to punch all the way around the rectangle to get the right shape.
After punching and drilling. Use water to take off the three templates and the glue. Use file
flatten the holes or make the size of the holes slightly bigger to fit in the components. File
slowly and use the components to test the size of the holes, so the holes will not be too big.
Either use a larger size drill to deburred or use a file to flatten the edge.

24

5

Final Assembly and Testing

5.1 Circuit Board Assembly and Testing
Glue the component template on the top of the PCB. Place the all components and solder
them on the PCB as labeled on the component template. Make sure the polarities of the
capacitors and diodes are correct. An insulation tape should be tape on the heat sink at the
side that will touch the voltage regulators, so the heat sink will not short the voltage
regulators. Put the heat sink on the PCB and screw the voltage regulators on it before solder
the voltage regulators, so the legs of the regulators and banded at the right length to fit in the
heat sink. Make sure the proper pins of the potentiometer are connected to the PCB so that
the magnitudes of the output voltage increase when the potentiometer is turning clockwise.
Cut the power cord so the three wires in it can be connected to other components. Pass the
power cord through the power cord gourmet, make sure the yellow ring is pushed all the
way to the power cord as shown in figure 17, and then tighten the gourmet to secure the
power cord. Screw all the output connecters, the switch, LED, potentiometer, the fuse, heat
sink, and the transformer on the box.

5.2 Enclosure Assembly
The green wire (the ground) should be connected to the metal part of the transformer by
screw. The white wire (neutral) is connected to one of the input wire of the transformer. The
wires should go through a heat shrink before they are soldered together to isolate any
exposed wire. The black wire (live) is connected to the bottom of the fuse like shown in
figure 18. So it is hard for people to touch the live wire when someone is changing the fuse.
The other side of the fuse is connected to the switch on the front face. The other side of the
switch is connected to the other input wire of the transformer. Therefore, the fuse and the
switch can really cut down the power supply to the PCB.

25

Figure 17 : Power Chord.

Figure 18 : Connection of the transformer.
Solder the secondary coil wires including the center tape to the output connecters that are on the
front face to give positive and negative 14VAC and the center tape outputs. Solder wires from the
positive and negative 14VAC and the center tape outputs to the PCB to give power to the PCB.
Solder wires from the output of the PCB to the output connecters that are on the front face. Solder
wires from the PCB to the LED. All the wires should be in a proper length. The plastic ties can be
used to make the box more organize. Make sure any exposed wire is covered by either the heat
shrink or the electrical tape.

Solder the DC, 20V, J1, J2, and P2 of the panel meter to set it for 20VDC range. Connect +5V to
+V, positive adjustable voltage to IN, and ground to –V and GND as shown in the figure 19.
Use multimeter to measure the adjustable voltage. Adjust the potentiometer at the back of the panel
meter till the readings of the multimeter and panel meter are the same. Put the cover of the box on.

26

Screw the four screws on the both sides to secure it. Stick the four rubber feet at the four corner of
the bottom of the box.

Figure 19 : Soldering on the Panel Meter.

Figure 20 : Connection of switch

Figure 21 : Connection of Fuse

5.3 Complete Assembly Testing
Plug the power cord into the wall. Turn the switch on. The LED lights up. The voltage different
between the two AC outputs is 28Vrms.The voltage different between the center tape and either of
the AC outputs is 28Vrms. The fixed +5V output has 5.04V output which is within the 4.75V-5.25V
27

range. Turn the potentiometer fully clockwise, +14.93V is on the positive adjustable output. Turn
the potentiometer fully anticlockwise, -0.02V is on the positive adjustable output. Turn the
potentiometer to some random position, the different between the magnitudes of the positive
adjustable voltage and the negative adjustable voltage is less than 0.03V. All expected functions of
the power supply are achieved

28

6

Results and Conclusions

6.1 Summary of Results
In this project, a power supply that produce positive and negative 14VAC with a center tap,
fixed 5 volts DC, positive variable DC voltage from 0 to +15 volts, and negative variable
DC voltage from 0 to -15 volts was made. It was built from an incomplete schematic. Eagle
CAD was used to create a PCB base on the completed schematic. A PCB was developed
from blank board. A metal box was specially made for the power supply base on the given
templates. After solder the components on the PCB the power supply was assembling. The
power supply has all the design functions. The goal of the project was not achieved by me.

6.2 Recommendations
From my point of view I would like to say that my power supply is not working after trouble
shooting it many times. I realized that I should have to do my work step by step and then I
can be able to find my problem. My mistake was that I placed all the component and solder
it and then tried to trouble that complicated circuit. One of the best way to get the power
supply work is that I should remake it right from the beginning.

29

References/Bibliography
CIRE Principle of Electronic (by V K MEHTA & ROHIT METHA)
CAD for electronic textbook having the eagle software information in it.
DC connect slide picture.
https://www.fairchildsemi.com/datasheets/LM/LM7805.pdf
https://www.sparkfun.com/products/107
http://www.chegg.com/homework-help/definitions/operational-amplifier-4

30

Appendices
Appendix A: Complete Schematic

Complete eagle schematic of the power supply

31

Drawing of the eagle to make the circuit board.

Appendix B: Printed Circuit Board Drawing

Drawing of the PCB. Black part is where the copper is placed in the circuit board.

32

Top layer of the PCB to get the idea where the actual components is to be placed.

33

Appendix C: Power Supply Enclosure Drawing

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