MATH 2315­3

Case Study: Hospital T
Submitted by: Shereen Richard
April 9, 2014

1

My name is Shereen Richard, and I am in my second semester at Our Lady of the Lake 
College. My major is Biology: Human Medicine, and I am enrolled in the 3+2 Physician’s 
Assistant Program. This semester, I have been enrolled in Statistics and have learned many 
things that will help me in my career in medicine. 
This Case Study Project in Statistics was assigned to me to help me to apply what I have 
learned to information related to my profession. This Project will help my classmates and I apply
what we know and have learned from a semester of Statistics to a set of data from a certain 
hospital. We all have different hospitals and data. Our job for this project is to manipulate this 
data and apply all of the formulas, definitions, and graphs to the data provided from each of our 
hospitals.
I was assigned Hospital T. The data set given from Hospital T is provided below. The 
abbreviations in each column stand for the following:
EP: number of patients seen by the Emergency Room Physician at Hospital T
AD: number of patients admitted to the hospital at Hospital T
AMB: number of patients that came to the Emergency Room by ambulance at Hospital T

2

Hospital

Month

EP

AD

AMB

TOT

T

Jan

2963

477

603

3245

Feb

2964

456

526

3281

Mar

3219

607

599

3611

Apr

3134

540

617

3462

May

3393

557

651

3749

Jun

3384

485

671

3673

Jul

3585

512

731

3879

Aug

3513

562

740

3855

Sep

3420

548

682

3670

Oct

3499

607

646

3864

Nov

3274

560

621

3558

Dec

3769

655

685

4114

Statistics1 is the study of how to collect, organize, analyze, and interpret numerical 
information from data. 
There are two divisions of Statistics: Descriptive Statistics and Inferential Statistics. Descriptive 
Statistics2 involves organizing, picturing, and summarizing information from samples and 
1 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6 th Edition).
Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 4)
2 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6 th Edition).
Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 10)
3

populations. I will use this division of Statistics when developing graphs from data from 
Hospital T. Inferential Statistics3 involves using information from a sample to draw conclusions 
regarding to the population. I will use this division of Statistics when comparing how variables 
relate to one another and will try to make predictions with the data provided from Hospital T.
Data comes in two categories: quantitative and qualitative. Quantitative data are data 
that has a numerical measurement for which operations such as addition ort averaging makes 
sense.4 Qualitative data are data that describe an individual into a category or group.5 With 
respect to Hospital T, the number of patients who were admitted to Hospital T in January is 
Quantitative data, and if we were to have the name of the patients admitted to Hospital T in 
January, this would be qualitative data. 
In data, there are two sources of where the information could come from. The data could 
either come from a population, which is every individual of interest6, or from a sample, which 
are only some of the individuals of interest7. Hospital T data is sample data because this data 
contains only information from one year in Hospital T. If this were a population, all of the data 
from the opening of Hospital T to the present moment would be included. A population 
3 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6 th Edition).
Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 10)
4 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6 th Edition).
Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 5)
5 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6 th Edition).
Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 5)
6 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6 th Edition).
Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 5)
7 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6 th Edition).
Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 5)
4

parameter is a numerical measure that describes an aspect of a population8 and a sample 
statistic is a numerical measure used to describe an aspect of a sample9. A population parameter 
would be all of the data from all of the patients who have ever visited Hospital T. The data in the 
table form Hospital T provided is an example of a sample statistic because it contains only one 
year of information from Hospital T. Notation for a population is N and notation for a sample is 
n. 
In Statistics, we must classify the data that we are measuring. There are four categories in
which data can be classified as: nominal, ordinal, interval, and ratio. Nominal data is data that 
consists of names, labels, or categories10. An example of nominal data with regard to Hospital T 
is the name of each patient that was admitted into Hospital T. Ordinal data is data that can be 
arranged in order, but differences between the data values are meaningless.11 If we ranked 
Hospital T in relation to all other Hospitals in the area based on patients admitted, the ranking 
would be an example of ordinal data. Interval data is data that can be arranged in order and 
differences between data values are meaningful.12 The number of months where over 600 
patients were admitted to Hospital T by ambulance to Hospital T is an example of interval data. 

8 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6 th Edition).
Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 5)
9 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6 th Edition).
Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 5)
10 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6 th Edition).
Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 7)
11 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6 th Edition).
Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 7)
12 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6 th Edition).
Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 7)
5

Ratio data is data that can be arranged in order, and both differences between data values and 
ratios of the data values are meaningful. 13An example of ratio data could be the age of each 
patient who was admitted to Hospital T in a calendar year.
With raw data, it is hard to tell what the data means. There is no way to tell if the data is 
related or has any meaning unless one organizes the data. There are many ways to organize data. 
Three examples of how to organize data is to arrange them into a bar graph, a circle graph, or a 
pareto.
Bar graphs can be used to display quantitative or qualitative data. The bars can be 
vertical or horizontal, must be uniform in width and spacing, use the same measurement scale, 
and must have a title, bar labels, and a horizontal and vertical scale14. The bar graph must also 
have a source telling where the data is coming from and all of the bars should be labeled for easy
access of information. A bar graph is the most common and a great way to organize data. The bar
graph presents data in an organized way that makes it easier for a spectator to pick out important 
information quickly and easily, such as which month out of the year were the most patients seen 
by and Emergency Room Physician at Hospital T. A bar graph displaying the number of patients 
seen by an emergency room physician each month of a calendar year at Hospital T is displayed 
below:

13 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6 th Edition).
Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 7)

14 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6th
Edition). Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 54-55)

6

The Number of Patients Seen by an Emergency Room Physician Each Month in a Calendar Month at Hospital T
December
November

Months of the Year

3769
3274

October

3499

September

3420

August

3513

July

3585

June

3384

May

3393

April

3134

March

3219

February

2964

January

2963

We can conclude form this bar graph that the month of December had the most number of 
patients seen by an emergency room physician and the month of January had the least number of 
patients seen by an emergency room physician.
Another way to organize raw data is by using a circle graph. This type of graph is also 
known as a pie chart. In a circle graph, wedges of a circle visually display proportional parts of 
the total population that share a common characteristic. This type of graph is useful for showing
the division of a total quantity into its component parts15. The entire circle is equal to 100%. 
Each part of the divided circle is a part of the 100% circle. A circle graph displaying the same 

15 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6th
Edition). Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 57)

7

information as the bar graph, the number of patients seen by an emergency room physician each 
month in a calendar year at Hospital T, is below:

The Percentage of Patients Seen by an Emergency Room Physician Each Month in a Calendar Year at Hospital T

January February March April May June July August September October
December; 9% January; 7%
February; 7%
November; 8%
March; 8%
October; 9%
April; 8%
September; 9%
November December

May; 8%
August; 9%
June; 8%
July; 9%

Again all graphs must have a source and must be labeled for the reader to quickly and easily 
understand the data. This circle graph displays the percentages of the total patients each month, 
which makes the data not as clear as the bar graph. Other than this, one can still see the 
comparison of percentages between each month. We can conclude that the amount of patients 
seen by an emergency room physician each month in a calendar year at Hospital T were 
relatively close to the same amount each month of the year.
Another way to organize data would be in a Pareto Chart. A Pareto Chart is a bar graph 
in which the bar height represents frequency of an event, and the bars are arranged from left to 
8

right according to decreasing height. Many times a Pareto Chart is used to manage quality 
control with companies16. A way to apply this to Hospital T would be to say that out of the total 
number of patients who were admitted to Hospital T by ambulance during the month of January 
(603 Patients) came in for different reasons. 286 came in for broken bones, 226 came in for 
migraine headaches, 56 came in for stomach pains, and 35 came in for dehydration. To organize 
this data into a Pareto chart, we must know the frequency of each event. The Pareto for this 
information is below:

Reasons Patients at Hospital T were Brought in by Ambulence in a Calendar Year

Reaons Patients at Hospital T were Brought in by Ambulance in a Calendar Year

You can determine from the Pareto that Broken Bones was the most frequent reason patients 
came in on ambulances and dehydration was the least frequent reason at Hospital T in a Calendar
Year.

16 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6th
Edition). Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 56)

9

Another method one can use to manipulate data is measures of central tendency. The 
goal of these measures is to try to find the average of your data17. There are three measures of 
central tendency: mode, median, and mean. The mode of a data set is the value that occurs most 
frequently18. With regard to Hospital T and the number of patients admitted to the Hospital in a 
calendar year, the mode would be 607 because the value 607 is the only value that repeats itself.
The median of a data set is the central value of an ordered distribution. In order to find the 
median, one must order the data from smallest to largest. If the data set has an odd number of 
data values, the median is the middle data value. If the data set has an even number of data 
values, the median is the sum of the middle two values divided by two.19 For the number of 
patients admitted to the Hospital T in a calendar year, I would find the mode this way:
1) Order the data from smallest to largest
456, 477, 485, 512, 540, 548, 557, 560, 562, 607, 607, 655
2) There is an even number of data values. The two middle numbers are 548 and 557. There 
sum is 1105. 1105 divided by 2 is equal to 552.50. The median of this data set is 552.50 
patients admitted to Hospital T in a calendar year.

17 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6th
Edition). Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp.82 )
18 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6th
Edition). Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 82)
19 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6th
Edition). Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 83)

10

The mean of a data set is the sum of all the entries divided by the total number of entries. The
mean is usually the most used measure of central tendency to find the average20. The formula for 
the mean of a population mean is μ= Σx/N, and the formula for the mean of a sample is X­bar = 
Σx/n where sigma means the sum of. This data is a sample, so I will use the X­bar formula. To 
find the mean of the number of patients admitted to the Hospital T in a calendar year, I would:
1) Find the sum of all the data values:
Sum = 6566 
2) Divide the sum total by the number of data values
6566/12 = 547.17
X­bar = 547.17 patients admitted to Hospital T in a calendar year
It is important to always include units and what you are measuring so the reader knows 
what they are reading about.
An average may not always be able to be very meaningful with respect to certain data. This is 
when we use measures of variation, which measures the spread of data21. We use range, which 
is a measure of variation, at times to obtain more meaningful data. The range is the difference 
between the largest and smallest values of data distribution22. The range of the number of 
patients admitted to the Hospital T in a calendar year would be computed by subtracting the 
smallest number, 456, from the largest number, 655, The range of this data is 199 patients 
admitted to Hospital T in a calendar year.
20 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6th
Edition). Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 85)
21 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6th
Edition). Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 93)
22 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6th
Edition). Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 93)

11

At times, the range may not tell us everything we need to know. The range does not tell us how 
much all of the values vary from one another or from the mean. This is why we have variance 
and standard deviation. These values will measure the distribution of data around the mean. 
Standard deviation is how much a value deviates from the mean, and variance is the average of 
the (x­x­bar)2 values.23
The notation for sample variance is s2 and the formula for sample variance is 
s2= Σ(x­x­bar)2/n­1. The notation for population variance is σ2 and the formula for population 
variance is σ2= Σ(x­μ)2/N. 
The notation for sample standard deviation is s and the formula for sample standard deviation is s
= √Σ (x­x­bar)2/n­1. The notation for population standard deviation is σ and the formula for 
population standard deviation is σ=√Σ(x­μ)2/N.
Standard deviation and variance are found by using the following method:
1. Make a table
2. Fill in the table
3. Substitute the values found in the table into the formula
With regard to the number of patients admitted to Hospital T in a calendar year, this is how I 
would find the sample variance and the sample standard deviation:
X Values
477.00
456.00
607.00

(X­ X­bar)
­70.17
­91.17
59.83

(X­ X bar)2
4923.83
8311.97
3579.63

23 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6th
Edition). Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 94-95)

12

540.00
557.00
485.00
512.00
562.00
548.00
607.00
560.00
655.00
Totals:

­7.17
9.83
­62.17
­35.17
14.83
0.83
59.83
12.83
107.83

        6566.00        ­0.04

51.41
96.63
3865.11
1236.93
219.93
0.6889
3579.63
164.61
11627.31
   37657.68

X­bar = 547.17 patients admitted to Hospital T in a calendar year.
n= 12
Sample Standard Deviation = s = √Σ (x­x­bar)2/n­1 = √37657.68/11 = 58.51patients admitted to 
Hospital T in a calendar year 
This means that the number of patients admitted to the Hospital deviates about 59 patients from 
the mean.
Sample Variance = s2= Σ(x­x­bar)2/n­1 = 37657.68/11 = 3423.43 patients admitted to Hospital T 
in a calendar year.
Standard deviation is a great way to see how far your data deviates from the mean of the 
data, but standard deviation is not ideal for when comparing two data sets because the data 
values may not be in the same units or size. We use Coefficient of Variance, which expresses the 
standard deviation as a percentage of the sample or population mean24, to directly compare data.
The Coefficient of Variation for a sample is defined to be CV=(s/x­bar) * 100% where s is the 
24 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6th
Edition). Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 100)

13

sample standard deviation and x­bar is the mean of the data set. The Coefficient of Variation for 
a population is defined to be CV=(σ/μ) *100%, where μ is the mean of the population and σ is 
the population standard deviation. Units for Coefficient of Variance are always percent. This is 
how to compute the Coefficient of Variance using the data above with the sample of the patients 
admitted to Hospital T in a calendar year:
CV=(s/x­bar) * 100%
X-bar= 547.17 patients admitted to Hospital T in a calendar year
S = 58.51patients admitted to Hospital T in a calendar year
CV= (58.51/547.17) * 100% = 10.69%
The Coefficient of Variance of the number of patients admitted to Hospital T in a calendar year 
is pretty small. We would use this percentage when comparing the number of patients admitted 
to Hospital T in a calendar year to another Hospital’s number of patients admitted in a calendar 
year. Whichever Coefficient of Variance is lower, is the hospital that is more consistent with 
their numbers of patients throughout that particular year.
Some data can be plotted on the Rectangular Coordinate System. Most of the time, when plotted 
on the Rectangular Coordinate System, the data does not form a straight line. Most of the time 
when the data scattered, the data suggests that there is a line but there is no way to connect the 
points. This graph is called a Scatter Diagram. A scatter diagram is a graph in which paired data
(x,y) are plotted as individual points on a grid with horizontal axis x and vertical axis y. Each x 
value has a corresponding y value. The ultimate goal when using a scatter diagram is to see if 

14

our data has a linear correlation25. Correlation and regression is the relationship between to 
variables. This linear correlation we are trying to determine can either be positive with a positive 
slope where the line appears to go up, negative with a negative slope where the line appears to be
going down, or can have no correlation at all where the points show no formation of a line. The 
points on a scatter plot are not labeled because this would make spotting a trend or correlation 
difficult.
In order to represent our data, we must find the “Best Fitting Line” or the least squares line. We 
are trying to find the linear equation for the line that best represents the points on the scatter 
diagram, so the criterion for the line is that the sum of the vertical distances from the data points
(x,y) to the line is made as small as possible. 26There is an equation for the least­ squares line that
we must compute. The equation of the line will be in this format Y­hat = a + bx, where a is the y­
intercept, and b is the slope of the line. The y­intercept is defined as where the line on the graph 
hits the y­ axis. The slope is how steep your line is and is used to find points on the line. 
The equation for the least squares line is Y­hat = a +bx. To find each part of the equation, one 
must use the following formulas:
x­bar = mean of all x­values in scatter diagram
y­bar = mean of all y­values in scatter diagram

25 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6th
Edition). Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 132-133)
26 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6th
Edition). Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 151-152)

15

b = Ssxy/SSx
Ssxy = Σxy – [(Σx)(Σy)/n]
SSx = Σx2 ­ [(Σx)2/n]
Where n is the number of points on the scatter diagram.
a = y­bar – b(x­bar)
 To find the least squares line we must compute Σx, Σy, Σx2, Σy2, Σxy, x­bar, and y­bar. Then 
we must plug these values into the formulas provided.
When using a scatter diagram and trying to find a least squares line, usually you are 
trying to find how two variables relate to one another. With regard to Hospital T, I can find the 
correlation between the number of patients who came to Hospital T by ambulance in a calendar 
year, and the number of patients who were seen by an Emergency Room Physician in a calendar 
year. First, I will make a table, then I will fill in the table, and lastly I will plug the data values 
into the formulas above to obtain my Least Squares Line equation.
X Value
603
526
599
617
651
671
731
740
682
646
621
685

Y value
2963
2964
3219
3134
3393
3384
3585
3513
3420
3499
3274
3769

XY
1786689
1559064
1928181
1933678
2208843
2270664
2620635
2599620
2332440
2260354
2033154
2581765

X2
363609
276676
358801
380689
423801
450241
534361
547600
465124
417316
385641
469225

Y2
8779369
8785296
10361961
9821956
11512449
11451456
12852225
12341169
11696400
12243001
10719076
14205361

16

Totals:             7772          40117

    26115087

   5073084      134769719

x­bar = 7772/12 = 647.67 
y­bar = 40117/12 = 3343.08
Ssxy = Σxy – [(Σx)(Σy)/n] = 26115087 – [(7772)(40117)/12] = 132643.33
SSx = Σx2 ­ [(Σx)2/n] = 5073084 – [(7772)2/12] = 39418.67
b = Ssxy/SSx = 132643.33/39418.67 = 3.36
a = y­bar – b(x­bar) = 3343.08 – 3.36(647.67) = 1166.91
Best Fit Line Equation =  y­hat = 1166.91 + 3.36x
If this were plotted on a scatter plot, one must include two points, (x­bar, y­bar) and the y­
intercept, which is (0, a). So I would plot (647.67, 3343.08) and (0, 1166.91). The graph would 
look like the following:

17

The Relationship Between the Number of Patients Who Were Admitted by Ambulance and the Number of Patients Who Were Seen by an Emergency Room Physician at Hospital T in a Calendar Year

3343.08

1166.91

0

100

200

300

400

500

600

700

800

Number of Patients Admitted to Hospital T by Ambulance in a Calendar Year
Source: Hospital T

As stated before, a correlation can be positive or negative. Another way to classify 
correlation is by its strength. The sample correlation coefficient is a numerical measurement that
accesses the strength of a linear relationship between two variables x and y. 27The notation for 
the sample correlation coefficient is r. The sample correlation coefficient can be in between ­1 
and 1. The closer r is to ­1, the stronger the negative correlation. The closer r is to 1, the stronger 
the positive correlation. If r is 0, there is no linear correlation. The formula to find r is 
r = [nΣxy – (Σx)(Σy)]/[(√nΣx2 – (Σx)2)(√nΣy2 – (Σy)2)]

27 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6th
Edition). Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 136-138)

18

Using the data from Hospital T in the Correlation Graph above, this is how to compute r:
r = 1591720/1928563.94 = 0.83
This number is close to 1, which means the relationship between the Number of Patients 
Who Were Admitted by Ambulance, and the Number of Patients Who Were Seen by an 
Emergency Room Physician at Hospital T in a Calendar Year have a strong positive correlation.
The coefficient of determination is another way to tell the strength of the least squared 
line. The coefficient of determination, or r2, is the square of the sample correlation coefficient r. 
The coefficient of determination is a measure of the proportion of variation in y that is explained
by the regression line, using x as the explanatory variable. For example, the r that I calculated 
above is 0.83. The r2 value would be 0.69. This means that 69% of the (variation) behavior of the
number of patients seen by an emergency room physician at hospital T in a calendar year can be
explained by the number of patients admitted to Hospital T by ambulance in a calendar year if 
we use the equation of the least­squares line. The other 31% of patients is due to random chance
or a lurking variable.28 A lurking variable is a variable that is neither an explanatory nor a 
response variable but may be responsible for changes in both x and y.29
Like I stated, a lurking variable can cause error in data and cause an error in the 
relationship between data. There are other affects that can affect the validity of data. 
Interpolation is predicting y­hat values for x values that are between observed x values in the 
28 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6th
Edition). Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 159)
29 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6th
Edition). Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp.143 )

19

data set and extrapolation is predicting y­hat values for x values that are beyond observed x 
values in the data set30. Interpolation is when you choose data that falls with in the domain or 
range. This is what is supposed to happen. Extrapolation is when you choose data that is outside 
the domain or range. This can skew data or cause errors in organizing data. 
All in all, the whole point of manipulating data in all of these ways is to see if there is a 
relationship between two variables, to interpret the data easily, and to predict with the data we 
have. I can make a prediction that throughout the next years at Hospital T, there will still 
probably be a strong positive correlation between the Number of Patients Who Were Admitted 
by Ambulance, and the Number of Patients Who Were Seen by an Emergency Room Physician 
at Hospital T and around the same number of patients will be seen by an emergency room 
physician to Hospital T each month of the year.
By doing this case study, I have experienced what it would be like to compute statistics in
my career. I have been able to successfully apply what I have learned in General Statistics to a 
real­world situation.

30 Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6th
Edition). Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. 155)

20

References
Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6th Edition).
Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning.
 
All formulas and notations from:
Brase, C. H. & Brase, C. P. (2013). Understanding Basic Statistics (6th Edition).
Boston, MA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. (pp. inside front cover)

21