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Reflective Statement

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
REFLECTIVE STATEMENT

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1. Introduction.................................................................................................... 1
2. Self Awareness............................................................................................... 2
3. Opportunity Awareness.................................................................................. 3
4. Decision Making............................................................................................. 4
5. Opportunity Search........................................................................................ 5
6. Application and CV......................................................................................... 5
7. Selection......................................................................................................... 6
8. Conclusion...................................................................................................... 6
REFERENCES

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APPENDICES

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Appendix A: Solent Career Box.........................................................................10
Appendix B – John Holland Career Choice Test..................................................11
Appendix C: VAK Learning Style Self-assessment Questionnaire......................12
Appendix D: Jung MBTI Test.............................................................................. 18
Appendix E: Tables............................................................................................ 19
Appendix F: Pathfinder...................................................................................... 21
Appendix G: Job Advertisements......................................................................22
Appendix H: New Curriculum Vitae...................................................................24
Appendix I: Mock Job Interview Feedback.........................................................25

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REFLECTIVE STATEMENT
1. Introduction
Reflection is an important part of the study and reflective statement in this regard gives an
opportunity to students to evaluate themselves and also to think about what they have learned
from their experiences in the past.
Boud et al. (1985) defined reflection in relation to learning as “a generic term for those
intellectual and affective activities in which individuals engage to explore their experiences in
order to lead to new understandings and appreciations” (p. 19). Based on the definition, it can
be said that reflection helps to review the past experiences for the purpose of describing,
analysing, and evaluating best learning practices.
The Southampton Solent University always in search for providing excellent opportunities to
graduate students for starting their careers by developing new skills and abilities and
recognising, enhancing, and critically assessing their existing talent and competencies. In
order to do so, the university has introduced ‘career and CV building unit’ where students
learn how to develop portfolios consisting of various significant elements such as reflective
statement, curriculum vitae, skills profile, job application, and feedback for the mock
interview. For this purpose, the university provides ‘Career Box’ where students can get many
options for self-awareness, opportunities, course focus, and self-promotion to develop new
knowledge and skills. A snapshot of Solent’s Career Box can be seen in appendix A. By going
through this innovative and critical process, students become capable of deciding about their
right career paths successfully. My experience is also excellent with the university. During the
studies and especially during this unit, I learned many things which are mentioned throughout
the statement and concluded in the conclusion section.
This reflective statement aims to uncover the fact that how I developed self awareness, new
skills, capabilities whilst studying ‘career and CV building unit’. Also, how these newly
developed skills and abilities will reflect my career-related decisions? A number of theorists
developed several models which support reflective learning and writing. Three foremost
reflective models include: Kolb’s model of reflection (Kolb, 1984), Gibbs reflective cycle
(Gibbs, 1988), and Driscoll model of reflection (Driscoll, 2000). I have selected Driscoll
(2000) model to describe incidents, problems, choices, and action plans about my future
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options. In this regard, the whole discussion surrounds three constituents of the model such as
what, so what, and now what. In following the order, I first explained key incidents and
problems at ‘what’ stage and analysed and evaluated the significance of those events and
issues at the next stage namely ‘so what’. Lastly, I elucidated the proposed necessary actions
that I need to take to secure my career.

2. Self Awareness
Self-awareness is an important and versatile phenomenon which is comprehensively defined
by Reis (2010) as “recognising self abilities, personality type, and preferences and knowing
the strengths and weaknesses, likes and dislikes, and hot buttons” (p. 207). Over the years,
many self awareness tools and techniques have been developed to explore and analyse skills,
preferences, personality traits, beliefs, values, and preferred learning styles. However, these
tools and techniques are reluctant to provide exact results and are just designed to narrow
down the existing possibilities (Ferrari and Sternberg, 1998). During this course, I attempted
many self-awareness tests through ‘Career Box of Solent University’ to develop self
awareness but found three tools useful in terms of providing excellent results in the context of
personality, learning style, and decision making.
Firstly, John Holland’s personality types theory was used to determine my type of personality
as well as my behaviour at work. Holland’s test is based on six personality types such as
artistic, conventional, enterprising, investigative, realistic, and social (Holland et al. 1993).
Holland’s test results are available in appendix B where I am assigned a RICASE personality
code which predicts my personality type as more ‘realistic’, followed by ‘investigative’, and
‘conventional’. These results are the outcomes of 15 personality questions based on my
likings and disliking regarding work activities. I believe that these results match my
personality type as I am more realistic in doing machinery and tool-oriented works in
electrical, mechanical, and technical aspects (Lock, 2004). In addition, I like to be
investigative by engaging myself in clerical works and then analysing the situation to devise
the solution of the problem in a conventional way. However, unfortunately I am less
appealing towards artistic (e.g. drawing, creative arts, graphics) and social works (coaching
and assisting others). The Holland test also suggests me a list of appropriate occupations
according to my personality type which also comply with my aspirations where I am more
attracted towards professions related to engineering works.
The second test was performed to know about my learning style and for this purpose I chose
VAK learning style questionnaire to identify and evaluate my learning abilities. The VAK
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learning style theory consists of three kinds of learning abilities such as auditory learners,
kinaesthetic learners, and visual learners (Evans, 2006). The results of VAK assessment are
available in appendix C which uncover the fact that I am a kinaesthetic learner and likes to
experience things myself rather than learning from and listening to others. It is also true about
me that I like to learn by performing actions or physically experiencing things. In my
opinion, this skill is very important for me which will support me in my future aspirations as I
belong to electrical engineering field where physical experiences are more important rather
than listening or visualising things.
In order to identify skills to dealing with information processes, people, and decision making,
I conducted Jung personality test using the MBTI tool (Myers et al., 1995). The MBTI tool
helps me to identify my psychological preferences that fit my career in engineering domain.
On the basis of options I have chosen during the Jung test, the MBTI tool gives me ISTP code
which suggests my personality type as extrovert, sensor, thinker, and judger (see appendix D).
The results of the Jung test match with my personality as I am reluctant to be extrovert or
social and rely more on my abilities of completing assigned tasks. In addition, I like to
resolve problems on own my own by thinking first and then taking actions.
These three self-awareness tests allow me to conduct a SWOT analysis based on my career
which is available in appendix E. The outcome of SWOT analysis reveals my major strengths
(exploratory, analytical thinker, flexible, compatible, and focused minded), weaknesses
(reluctant to support others, aggregative, and over conscious), threats (job competition and
lack of resources), opportunities (foreign qualification, foreign job experience, research work,
or self-employment).

3. Opportunity Awareness
After gathering the knowledge about myself in the context of my personality, learning style,
and decision making, it was crucial to decide among various available opportunities after
graduation. A number of options were obtainable; for instance, research work, admission in
postgraduate study, graduate jobs, self-employment, or charity jobs to gain some practical
experience. To evaluate these options, I looked at the positive and negative aspects of each
alternative. For example, the research work option was not considered because it requires lots
knowledge about the topic and also needs plenty of time and resources to conduct
experiments. More importantly, it was not a suitable choice after graduation because research
results in the electrical engineering domain must be accurately recorded and published
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(Basden and Klein, 2008). In case of any mistake in the findings, it may not rectifiable or
requires additional time and resources to reconcile the outcomes.
The MSc Electrical Engineering course offered by Southampton Solent University attracted
me a lot as it is fully relevant to my study background, but I dropped this option for the time
being because of extremely high fee i.e. £15,000+ for international students. Another
foremost reason for not taking admission in postgraduate study was to consider the opinions
of various experts who focused on obtaining one or two year’s practical experience before
doing an MSc particularly in the science and engineering fields (Boschi, 1999). The UK
government specifically HMRC encourages graduates to start a new business but in fact it
requires ample capital and widespread knowledge and information about the UK market.
Therefore, self-employment option was also dropped.
Finally, two options i.e. graduate employment and voluntary work were adequate for me but I
was confused which one to prefer to secure my future. In this regard, I critically evaluated
both options by comparing them with each other on the basis of their similarities and
differences. These similarities and differences are illustrated in table 2 in appendix E. By
comparing these two ultimate options, I felt that graduate job is an adequate for me after
graduation especially in terms of learning practical things as well as enhancing my skills,
knowledge, and abilities. In addition, by doing graduation job I will be able to save money to
support myself during postgraduate studies as well. I will try to focus on doing electronic
technician or trainee engineering job because I guess I will get more opportunities to learn
whilst working at operational level along with senior engineers and technicians.

4. Decision Making
Prior to evaluating different available alternatives after graduation, I was unsure which one to
choose to secure my future and also to best use of my skills learned during graduation. But
comparing different alternatives with each other gave me a clear direction and therefore I
preferred graduate employment because during the job I will be able to utilise my knowledge
and skills that I developed during graduate studies. In addition, the practical experience in the
electrical engineering domain will also help me during my postgraduate studies in the future.
Now the question was which particular jobs I can apply for. In order to resolve this matter
and also to clarify my career path for applying graduate jobs, I used ‘career pathfinder’ tool
provided by workbc.ca. The pathfinder provided me 10 adequate job suggestions that match
with my background study (see appendix F). Using this tool it was clear about the jobs I can
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apply for because ultimately all are relevant and I can achieve my personal long-term goals
and short-term objectives by working with senior electrical or electronic engineers during my
jobs.

5. Opportunity Search
After the decision, I started to find and apply for graduate work schemes in the engineering
sector. By some means I was mystified about which source is best for me for applying
graduate jobs. For example, I was supposed to select one or two sources such as newspapers,
internet, or recruitment agencies. In these days, online job search is popular due to its
underlying benefits (e.g. quick, cost effective, effortless, and convenient) over conventional
methods (Brown, 2008). In addition, various websites are particularly designed for jobs in
specific domains. For example, Hays.co.uk and Reed.co.uk provide an opportunity to
engineering students to find particular jobs in specified areas as convenient to them.
Although, ‘Career Box’ allows students to find employers adequately but priority was given
to Reed and Hays due to their popularity for the availability of variety of jobs especially for
fresh graduates. Through these recruitment websites, I applied for 10 jobs in engineering
companies and received interview calls from two companies. The both copies of job
advertisements are placed in appendix G where job title, description, salary, and other
requirements are mentioned in detail. My first preference is to work in the UK for at least 2
years and then take admission in MSc in Electrical Engineering. In the meanwhile, I have
also developed my profile on LinkedIn to develop relationships with professionals in my
field. This strategy is the part of my long-term planning because ultimately after finishing my
MSc. I will go back to KSA for obtain greater opportunities.

6. Application and CV
According to Corfield (2006), the Curriculum Vitae (CV) has a critical role for a candidate to
bring him on the interview seat. Similarly, a well-ordered and regimented CV also impresses
employers and let them understand the education and experience levels of the candidate.
Before studying ‘Career and CV building unit’ my CV was not impressive and standardised.
But the unit helps me to develop an attractive CV with meaningful updated information
regarding my career objective, education, experience, new knowledge and skills, and
capabilities. Overall, I am satisfied with the unit in assisting me to develop a new CV
replacing my old tedious resume. The major changes I made in my CV are: adding career
objective, adding skills and abilities section, and updating my educational and qualification
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details more professionally. I am confident that these changes will allow me to confidently
apply for graduate employment schemes.

7. Selection
The mock interview was the last element of the career search process. The mock interview
before real interview gives confidence to interviewee especially when the interviewer
pinpoints strong and weak points of the interviewee by providing timely and detailed
feedback. The mock interview was arranged for me to lessen interview nervousness during
the real interviews with two companies from where I received interview calls. These two
interviews will be held for ‘electronic technician’ and ‘trainee engineer’ posts respectively.
But I was supposed to select one post for the mock interview and thus I gave a mock
interview for ‘Electronics Technician’.
The feedback for mock interview is available in appendix I. The overall feedback was
positive as the interviewer, Judith Hanley, indicates some positive points about my interview
such as regularity, stable eye contact, excellence of cover letter, professionalism of CV, and
polite and friendly communication throughout the interview. Apart from these positive
aspects, the following key areas for improvement are also highlighted:
 Wear tie and suit in the real interview;
 Add more detail to my CV particularly about topics studied at the university that are
relevant to the job applied for;
 The information in cover letter should be reflected in my CV;
 Give proper and detailed answers of the questions asked by the interviewer
Above stated areas for improvement provide me the opportunity to prepare myself for the real
interview.

8. Conclusion
I must say that overall I acquired excess new knowledge and developed valuable skills over
the duration of ‘career and CV building unit’. Furthermore, I learned about:
o the paramount significance of developing a comprehensive portfolio and
understanding how it can assist me in my career growth
o the significance of building self-awareness using various tools and techniques in order
to recognise my abilities, personality type, and preferences and also knowing the
strengths and weaknesses
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o the consequence of opportunity awareness and decision making in my professional
career to foresee opportunities
o developing eye catching CV to apply online jobs through recruitment websites
o the significance of preparation before the real interview to achieve considerable
success
o how to develop various transferable skills and abilities that can help me at work
o last but not least, writing an effective reflective statement
On the basis of the above, I can be said that it is vital for a student to obtain quality education
from a reputable institution as it will have deep impact on its entire career.

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REFERENCES
Basden, A. and Klein, H.K. (2008). New research directions for data and knowledge
engineering: A philosophy of language approach. Data & Knowledge Engineering, 67(2), pp.
260-285.
Boschi, N. (1999). Education and training in indoor air science. Springer
Boud, D., Keogh, R. and Walker, R. (1985). Reflection: Turning Experience into Learning.
London: Kogan Page.
Brown, L.E. (2008). Job seekers on the internet: An empirical analysis. ProQuest
Corfield, R. (2006). Preparing the perfect CV: How to make a great impression and get the
job you want. 4th edition, Kogan Page Publishers
Driscoll, M. P. (1994). Psychology of learning for instruction. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn
and Bacon
Driscoll, J. (2000). Practising Clinical Supervision. Edinburgh: Balliere-Tindall
Evans, C. (2006). Learning styles in education and training. Emerald Group Publishing
Ferrari, M.D. and Sternberg, R.J. (1998). Self-awareness: its nature and development.
Guilford Press
Gibbs G. (1988). Learning by Doing: A Guide to Teaching and Learning Methods. Oxford:
Further Education Unit
Greener, S., Bourner, T. and Rospigliosi, A. (2011). Graduate employment. Bookboon
Holland, J. L., Johnston, J. A., & Asama, N. F. (1993). The Identity Scale: A diagnostic and
treatment tool. Journal of Career Assessment, 1, pp. 1–12
Kolb, D. A. (1984). Experiential learning: experience as the source of learning and
development. New Jersey: Prentice Hall
Lock, R.D. (2004). Taking charge of your career direction: career planning guide. 5th edition,
Cengage Learning
Myers, Isabel Briggs with Peter B. Myers (1980, 1995). Gifts Differing: Understanding
Personality Type. Mountain View, CA: Davies-Black Publishing.
Reis, M. (2010). A manager’s guide to human behaviour. 5th edition, AMACOM Div
American Mgmt Assn
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Online Links
BC Student Outcomes (2013). Career Pathfinder. [online]. Available from:
http://www.workbc.ca/Jobs/JobSeekers/CareerExplorer.aspx [Accessed: 11 February 2013]
John Holland Career Choice Test http://www.123test.com/career-test/
Jung MBTI Test http://www.123test.com/jung-personality-test/
Solent CareerBox http://solent.ac.uk/careerbox
VAK Learning Style Self-assessment Questionnaire
http://www.businessballs.com/vaklearningstylestest.htm

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APPENDICES
Appendix A: Solent Career Box

Source: http://solent.ac.uk/careerbox

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Appendix B – John Holland Career Choice Test

Test source: http://www.123test.com/career-test/

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Appendix C: VAK Learning Style Self-assessment
Questionnaire
Bold and Italicized options are my selection
1. When I operate new equipment I generally:
a)
b)
c)

read the instructions first
listen to an explanation from someone who has used it before
go ahead and have a go, I can figure it out as I use it

2. When I need directions for travelling I usually:
a)

look at a map

b)

ask for spoken directions

c)

follow my nose and maybe use a compass

3. When I cook a new dish, I like to:
a)

follow a written recipe

b)

call a friend for an explanation

c)

follow my instincts, testing as I cook

4. If I am teaching someone something new, I tend to:
a)

write instructions down for them

b)

give them a verbal explanation

c)

demonstrate first and then let them have a go

5. I tend to say:
a)

watch how I do it

b)

listen to me explain

c)

you have a go

6. During my free time I most enjoy:
a)

going to museums and galleries
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b)

listening to music and talking to my friends

c)

playing sport or doing DIY

7. When I go shopping for clothes, I tend to:
a)

imagine what they would look like on

b)

discuss them with the shop staff

c)

try them on and test them out

8. When I am choosing a holiday I usually:
a)

read lots of brochures

b)

listen to recommendations from friends

c)

imagine what it would be like to be there

9. If I was buying a new car, I would:
a)

read reviews in newspapers and magazines

b)

discuss what I need with my friends

c)

test-drive lots of different types

10. When I am learning a new skill, I am most comfortable:
a)

watching what the teacher is doing

b)

talking through with the teacher exactly what I’m supposed to do

c)

giving it a try myself and work it out as I go

11. If I am choosing food off a menu, I tend to:
a)

imagine what the food will look like

b)

talk through the options in my head or with my partner

c)

imagine what the food will taste like

12. When I listen to a band, I can’t help:
a)

watching the band members and other people in the audience
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b)

listening to the lyrics and the beats

c)

moving in time with the music

13. When I concentrate, I most often:
a)

focus on the words or the pictures in front of me

b)

discuss the problem and the possible solutions in my head

c)

move around a lot, fiddle with pens and pencils and touch things

14. I choose household furnishings because I like:
a)

their colours and how they look

b)

the descriptions the sales-people give me

c)

their textures and what it feels like to touch them

15. My first memory is of:
a)

looking at something

b)

being spoken to

c)

doing something

16. When I am anxious, I:
a)

visualise the worst-case scenarios

b)

talk over in my head what worries me most

c)

can’t sit still, fiddle and move around constantly

17. I feel especially connected to other people because of:
a)

how they look

b)

what they say to me

c)

how they make me feel

18. When I have to revise for an exam, I generally:
a)

write lots of revision notes and diagrams
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b)

talk over my notes, alone or with other people

c)

imagine making the movement or creating the formula

19. If I am explaining to someone I tend to:
a)

show them what I mean

b)

explain to them in different ways until they understand

c)

encourage them to try and talk them through my idea as they do it

20. I really love:
a)

watching films, photography, looking at art or people watching

b)

listening to music, the radio or talking to friends

c)

taking part in sporting activities, eating fine foods and wines or dancing

21. Most of my free time is spent:
a)

watching television

b)

talking to friends

c)

doing physical activity or making things

22. When I first contact a new person, I usually:
a)

arrange a face to face meeting

b)

talk to them on the telephone

c)

try to get together whilst doing something else, such as an activity or a meal

23. I first notice how people:
a)

look and dress

b)

sound and speak

c)

stand and move

24. If I am angry, I tend to:
a)

keep replaying in my mind what it is that has upset me
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b)

raise my voice and tell people how I feel

c)

stamp about, slam doors and physically demonstrate my anger

25. I find it easiest to remember:
a)

faces

b)

names

c)

things I have done

26. I think that you can tell if someone is lying if:
a)

they avoid looking at you

b)

their voices changes

c)

they give me funny vibes

27. When I meet an old friend:
a)

I say “it’s great to see you!”

b)

I say “it’s great to hear from you!”

c)

I give them a hug or a handshake

28. I remember things best by:
a)

writing notes or keeping printed details

b)

saying them aloud or repeating words and key points in my head

c)

doing and practising the activity or imagining it being done

29. If I have to complain about faulty goods, I am most comfortable:
a)

writing a letter

b)

complaining over the phone

c)

taking the item back to the store or posting it to head office

30. I tend to say:
a)

I see what you mean
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b)

I hear what you are saying

c)

I know how you feel

Explanation:
If somebody chosen most A’s, it means he/she is having VISUAL learning style;
If somebody chosen most B’s, it means he/she is having AUDITORY learning style; and
If somebody chosen most C’s, it means he/she is having KINAESTHETIC learning style
Results:
A = 5,

B = 5,

C = 20

Source: http://www.businessballs.com/vaklearningstylestest.htm

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Appendix D: Jung MBTI Test

Test source: http://www.123test.com/jung-personality-test/

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Appendix E: Tables
Table 1: Career SWOT Analysis

Internal

Strengths
o Practical approach of getting things done
o Deep thinking, exploratory and analytical
nature
o Energetic and communicative
o Enterprising and conventional
o Flexible in personality, easily adjustable
o Well-organised
o Quality believer
o Compatible in team working environment
o Focused mind
o International study exposure
o Rapid problem handling skills
o Fluent in English and Arabic

ernExt
al

Opportunities
o Plenty of opportunities in my country due to
foreign qualification
o Graduate jobs to enrich practical working
skills
o Self employment
o Admission in postgraduate course
o Research work

Weaknesses
o Does not like administrative works
o Reluctant to support or guide others
o More conventional rather than
social or enterprising
o Can be aggregative to other
o Require sufficient information to
complete the project
o Over conscious in completing tasks
o Lack of intuitive skills
o Bored from routine and repeated
tasks

Threats
o Increasing fees for postgraduate
courses
o Job competition in KSA and UK
markets
o Lack of capital, information, and
skills of running own business

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Table 2: Graduate employment vs. Voluntary work
Graduate job

Voluntary work

Knowledge and experience

Yes

Yes

Skill development and improvement

Yes

Yes

Succession planning

Yes

Yes

Overcoming self limiting beliefs

Yes

Yes

Goal attainment

Yes

Yes

Contribution to the business

Yes

Yes

Personal satisfaction

Yes

Yes

Yes

Pocket money

Potential opportunities

More

Less

Level of responsibility (legal or ethical)

High

Low

No

Could be

Working hours

Fixed

Flexible

Reliability

Strong

Weak

Employer-employee relationship

Strong

Weak

Routine

Yes

No

Sense of social responsibility

No

Yes

High

Low

Similarities

Differences
Remuneration (or financial assistance)

Time consuming

Trust and loyalty

Sources: Greener et al. (2011)

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Appendix F: Pathfinder

Source: BC Student Outcomes (2013)

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Appendix G: Job Advertisements

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Appendix H: New Curriculum Vitae

RASHED MOHAMMED ALDAWSARI
Personal Detail
Address: 51 Endeavour court, 50 Channel way,
Southampton, So14 GD
Mob #: 07808501665
Email: rmd.111@hotmail.com

Nationality: Saudi
DOB: 14/03/1985
Status: Married

Career Objective
Looking for a demanding and reliable position in a progressive firm for professional
development and personal growth in order to attain organisational and personal long term
goals and short term objectives

Professional Experience
SAAB BANK (Jan06 – July-06)
Call Center Support Representative
Job Description:


Inbound support
Outbound calling

Educational Qualification
BSE (HONS) ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING
Southampton Solent University – UK

THE GENERAL ALSULAYYL SECONDARY SCHOOL 2003
HUTAIN PRIMARY SCHOOL 1997

Skills and Abilities






Problem solving
Customer Relationship
Presentation Skills
Communication Skills
Quick learner, Self-directed
Team player
Computer literate
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Good written, spoken, and listening skills

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Appendix I: Mock Job Interview Feedback
Overall summary of performance
Name: Rashed Mohammed Aldawsari

Date: 22nd February 2013

Position interviewed for: Electronics Technician
Interviewer: Judith Hanley
A brief summary of positive aspects and any key areas for improvement/development:
Positive Aspects
You arrived early for your interview and were polite and friendly. During the interview you
maintained good eye contact and were leaning forward in your seat.
You were not dressed for an interview but were able to say that for a real interview you would wear
a suit and tie.
Your cover letter was well laid out and contained all the relevant information required, but some of
it had been copied and pasted directly from the job advert. Ideally you should use the job advert as
a prompt but then put this into your own words.
Your CV looked professional, well laid out and included all of the key topics expected from a CV.
When answering the interview questions, if you did not fully understand the questions, you had the
confidence to ask for it to be clarified before answering.
Key areas for improvement
Your CV is the perfect length of 1 side of A4, but it could be improved by adding more detail
especially around topics studied at university that are relevant to your job application and duties
you undertook in your last job.
Detail mentioned in your cover letter was not reflected in your CV. If you presented your CV
without a cover letter an employer would not see sufficient detail to offer you an interview. Make
sure your CV promotes you in the best way possible by adding more detail and examples.
When answering the interview questions, your answers were very short and did not always fully
answer the question asked. You did not go into any detail or use many examples from your work or
studies. You did not really say enough for a judgement to be made on your ability to do the job
applied for.

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