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USD/DLT edTPA Lesson Plan Template

Name: Nicole Howard


Subject: ELA
Grade Level: 4/5
1. STANDARDS (CA Common Core Standards)
Fourth'Grade:'
Word'Analysis'1.6:'Distinguish'and'interpret'words'with'multiple'meanings.''
Reading'Comprehension'2.2:'Use'appropriate'strategies'when'reading'for'different'
purposes'(e.g.,'full'comprehension,'location'of'information,'personal'enjoyment).'!
Literary Response 3.5: Define'figurative'language'(e.g.,'simile,'metaphor,'hyperbole,'
personification)'and'identify'its'use'in'literary'works.'!
Fifth'Grade:'
Word'Analysis'1.5:'Understand'and'explain'the'figurative'and'metaphorical'use'of'words'in'
context.'!
Reading'Comprehension'2.3:'Discern'main'ideas'and'concepts'presented'in'texts,'
identifying'and'assessing'evidence'that'supports'those'ideas.'!
Reading'Comprehension'2.4:'Draw'inferences,'conclusions,'or'generalizations'about'text'
and'support'them'with'textual'evidence'and'prior'knowledge.'!
Literary'Response'3.1:'Identify'and'analyze'the'characteristics'of'poetry,'drama,'fiction,'
and'nonfiction'and'explain'the'appropriateness'of'the'literary'forms'chosen'by'an'author'
for'a'specific'purpose.'
2. OBJECTIVES
Content:'Students'will'analyze'poetry'in'their'book'clubs'based'on'a'figurative'language'
worksheet.''This'is'the'first'in'a'series'of'two'weeks'of'lessons'focused'on'poetry.'
Key Vocabulary: alliteration, onomatopoeia, personification, rhyme, metaphor, simile
3. ASSESSMENT
Informal'or'Formative:'I'will'circulate'during'student'discussion'periods'to'evaluate'
discussions.''I'will'also'evaluate'responses'to'questions'I'ask'during'the'lesson.'
Formal'or'Summative:'The'formal'assessment'for'this'lesson'will'be'an'independent'
analysis'of'a'poem'that'they'will'complete'at'the'end'of'the'unit.'
4. INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES AND LEARNING TASKS
I. ANTICIPATORY SET
Motivation: We just finished The Hundred Dresses with our book clubs last week. This
week, we are going to start something new and challenging with our book clubs.
Activate Prior Knowledge: Ask students about working in book clubs what are some
things we wrote in our journals that working collaboratively in a book club helps us do?
II. INSTRUCTION AND MODELING (Best Practice Strategies)
Minilesson: Page 98

After we have reviewed what we did in book clubs in our last unit, I will discuss our
teaching point for the day: Today I want to teach you that readers link ideas
together to build larger theories or interpretations. As they think about how ideas
might connect, Could there be a larger truth or lesson here?
We will review the anchor chart, Drawing on All You Know to Read Well and
Interpret Texts.
Next, I will distribute the figurative language sheets. We will go over the six types of
figurative language listed: alliteration, onomatopoeia, personification, rhyme,
metaphor, simile
I will let the students know that we will work together to find examples of these six
types of figurative language in the poetry that we read this week to fill in the blanks
in the chart
I will read Alone by Maya Angelou aloud. I will ask the students to listen and
think: What is this poem about are there any lessons it is trying to teach us?
[isolation, needing others to survive, money cant buy happiness] What is its
theme? [community] What are some examples of figurative language? [hearts of
stone/metaphor, water is not thirsty/personification]
III. GUIDED PRACTICE
Students will read, A word is dead by Emily Dickinson in their groups.
o CAVEAT: Based on time, if we are running short, I may have students
analyze the last two stanzas of Alone in their groups, and save the
Dickinson poem for the next lesson. The same guided practice activity can
be done with the last two stanzas.
Any adult volunteers, other teachers, or aides may assist in facilitating the group
reading and discussions.
They will identify the figurative language in groups. They will discuss what they
think the poem is about, and if her message is important to us.
I will lead a class discussion with a spokesperson from each group: what is she
saying? Is her message important to us?
The students will share what examples of figurative language they came up with and
we will add them to our chart.
IV. CLOSURE (Student summary of learning)
I will ask students what we learned today and how it relates to what we did last week.
How can we use these skills in our independent reading?
V. INDEPENDENT PRACTICE (Summative assessment) The'formal'assessment'for'
this'lesson'will'be'an'independent'analysis'of'a'poem'that'they'will'complete'at'the'
end'of'the'unit.
5. DIFFERENTIATION STRATEGIES
To support learning differences, English Learners, IEPs, 504, GATE, etc.
ELLs: Analyzing poetry and figurative language is usually difficult for ELLs. We will work as a
class and in groups for their support. Visual cues are on the worksheet to assist with
understanding each type of figurative language. Examples put on their sheets will come directly

from the texts we are reading.


Struggling students: We will work as a class and in groups for their support. Notes they take
during group discussions will support students who are anxious about speaking in front of the
class.
IEPs: A student aide may be available to assist as needed. Students will be working in groups.
GATE/Fast finishers: Students who are fast finishers may support their groups by leading
discussion.
6. INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES AND MATERIALS

'

Poetry Books
Literacy Notebooks
Authors Journals
Figurative Language Worksheets for journals/folders
Lucy Calkins Reading Unit 1, Analyzing Themes

Poetry Terms
Alliteration
Repeating the same beginning sound
in more than two words.
Seven snakes slithered silently.
Crazy kangaroos kissed quietly.
Your Own Example:

Personification
Giving non-human objects
human qualities.
The sun smiled on the angry
clouds.
Your Own Example:

Metaphor
A comparison between two
unlike things without using
like, as, or than.
My friend is a treasure.
Your Own Example:

2012Addie Williams

Onomatopoeia
Words that sound like the
object or actions they refer to.
The mosquitoes buzzed.

Thunder boomed overhead.


Your Own Example:

Rhyme
Words that have the same ending sounds.
The tiny birds in the tree,
Were singing softly just for me.
Your Own Example

Simile
A comparison of two unlike things
using like, as or than.
She was as quiet as a mouse.
The water was like glass.
Your Own Example:

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