You are on page 1of 53

 

Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

Week 1: Processes of Soil Development 
 
Lesson Aim For This Period: 
 
To examine soil formation including physical and chemical weathering, as well as organic processes; soil 
structure including horizons and soil types; soil erosion, including human and non­human impact; and 
mitigation techniques for preserving this natural resource. 
 
  
February 2, 2015 Objective: 
Students should list the 4 types of chemical weathering and the 5 types of physical weathering that is 
necessary for soil generation. 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include a) processes of soil development. 
  
February 3, 2015 Objective: 
Students should list the soil horizons in order from the surface to the bedrock. 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include a) processes of soil development. 
 
February 4, 2015 Objective: 
Students should identify the 3 soil size particles (sand, silt, and clay) that make up soil type and texture. 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include a) processes of soil development. 
 
February 5, 2015 
Students should list three human and three non­human impacts on soil (example: erosion) and identify 5 
agricultural mitigation techniques that can be utilized to preserve soil.   
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include a) processes of soil development. 
 
 
 
February 6, 2015 
Students will be tested on soil formation including physical and chemical weathering, as well as organic 
processes; soil structure including horizons and soil types; soil erosion, including human and non­human 
impact; and mitigation techniques for preserving this natural resource. 
 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include a) processes of soil development. 
 
Activities: 
 
Day 1 (Feb 2): 
Brainstorming & Think­Pair­Share 
 
Day 2 (Feb 3): 
Lecture & Graphic Organizer 
 
Day 3 (Feb 4): 
Hands­On & Quick Write 
 
Day 4 (Feb 5): 
Jigsaw Groups 
 
Day 5 (Feb 6): 
Test Day 
 
*Each day includes an exit slip quick write to check for understanding. 
 
Anticipated Materials: 
● Whiteboard 
● Markers (blue & red) 
● Soil Samples (sand, silt, clay) 
● Soil Erosion Video ​
http://study.com/academy/lesson/soil­erosion­effects­prevention.html 
● Text Set: Weathering and Erosion & Soil Impacts  
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 

 
 
 
 
 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

Aaron Napier 
 
February 2, 2015     45 minutes, 9:00 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. 
 
Lesson Aim For Today: 
To examine soil formation including physical and chemical weathering, as well as organic processes. 
 
Student Learning Objective: 
Students should list the 4 types of chemical weathering and the 5 types of physical weathering that is 
necessary for soil generation. 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include a) processes of soil development.  
 
Introduction: 
Students will anticipate the lesson’s content by examining weathering and erosion in their everyday lives.  
 
Review:  
N/A 
 
Lesson Content:  
Text Set (Levels based on Fry Readability): 
1. Weathering (level 10) 
http://www.skwirk.com/p­c_s­12_u­198_t­554_c­2063/weathering­chemical­and­physical/nsw/ 
2. Soil Composition and Formation (level 11) 
http://nerrs.noaa.gov/doc/siteprofile/acebasin/html/envicond/soil/slform.htm 
3. The Origin and Development of Soil (level 7) 
http://passel.unl.edu/pages/informationmodule.php?idinformationmodule=1130447038 
4. Erosion (level 9) 
http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/encyclopedia/erosion/?ar_a=1 
5. Makin’ the Soil (level 5) 
http://www.geography4kids.com/files/land_soil2.html 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Questions ​
(L= literal, C= critical, Cr= creative, I= implied) ​

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
(L)What are the 4 types of chemical weathering and 5 types of physical weathering? (C)What are some 
examples of each? (C)Why is weathering necessary for soil formation? (Cr) How do living things become 
part of the soil?  
 
Activities: 
1.​
 Brainstorming session will be conducted, the entire class will participate, and they will examine the 
question, “What do you know about weathering and erosion?” This will be anticipation, before reading. 
(15 minutes)  
2.​
 Students will be placed in groups of 3 or 4 based on reading levels (to differentiate) and will read 
actively by choosing 2 glossary words. This will be realization, during reading. (10 minutes)  
3.​
 Finally, the students will share their two glossary words and summary of their text to the class. 
Therefore, students will have 6­8 new words to add to their learning logs. (10 minutes)  
4. ​
To check for understanding students will write 5 sentences as to why weathering and erosion is 
important and how soil forms. This is contemplation, after reading. (10 minutes) 
Materials Needed: 
● Text Set: Soil Formation 
   
Check For Understanding: 
Students will complete an exit slip which consists of a 5 sentence quick write explaining weathering and 
erosion, as well as how soil forms. 
 
Conclusion:  
Remind students that if they get the chance to keep an eye out for weathering and erosion in their 
neighborhoods.   
 
Reinforcement: 
Students are to construct a diagram (drawing) with labels at home explaining how organic material decays 
to eventually become part of the soil. 
 
Self Evaluation: 
Be better organized for the brainstorming session. Students should take turns and only give one or two 
words per turn. It is important that everyone participates. Encourage questions! 

 
 
Aaron Napier 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

 
February 3, 2015     45 minutes, 9:00 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. 
 
Lesson Aim For Today: 
To examine soil structure including horizons and soil types 
 
Student Learning Objective: 
Students should list the soil horizons in order from the surface to the bedrock. 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include a) processes of soil development.  
 
Introduction: 
N/A 
 
Review: 
Students will share their soil formation diagram that was assigned for homework to the rest of the class. 
This will refresh their memory on the lesson the day before.  
 
Lesson Content:  
Graphic Organizer Examples: 
http://downloadtemplates.us/article/graphic­organizer­template 
https://s­media­cache­ak0.pinimg.com/736x/4b/c4/33/4bc43363d9036e1c7c111bc213708498.jpg 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
 
PowerPoint Presentation: 
1. Humus is organic material, usually black, top layer of the soil horizon. Most nutrients are present 
in the humus, also known as the “O” horizon. 
2. Zone of Leaching is simply the layer of the soil in which water carries nutrients through from the 
“O” horizon. 
3. Zone of Accumulation is the horizon where the leached nutrients collect. 
4. Unconsolidated Bedrock is the horizon made up of regolith, soil, and fragments of the parent 
material (bedrock). 
5. Bedrock is completely consolidated material, usually the parent material from which the soil was 
formed. 
*The Mcgraw­Hill Companies Inc. Earth & Space iScience, Teacher Edition Vol. 1. 2012. Pgs. 146­173   
  
Soil Erosion Video ​
http://study.com/academy/lesson/soil­erosion­effects­prevention.html 
 
Questions ​
(L= literal, C= critical, Cr= creative, I= implied)​

(L)What are the soil horizons? (C)What horizon is the most important in supporting plant life? (L)What is 
bedrock? (C)What parent rock do you think produces the best soils for agriculture, limestone, shale, or 
sandstone? 
 
Activities: 
1. Students will share their soil formation diagram that was assigned for homework to the rest of the 
class. This will refresh their memory on the lesson the day before. (5 minutes) 
2. Students will be lectured on the soil horizons, including humus, zone of leaching, zone of 
accumulation, unconsolidated bedrock, and bedrock. Included in the lecture is a short video. (10 
minutes).  
3. Students will be put into groups of three, one student in each group will be placed with two students 
possessing higher skill sets and reading levels to aid in explaining the content (differentiate). Each 
group will design their own graphic organizer explaining the soil horizons. (10 minutes) 
4. Each group will take turns drawing their graphic organizer on the whiteboard to share with the class. 
(10 minutes) 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
5. Students will complete an exit slip, which consists of two sentences answering the questions: What 
horizon is important in supporting plant life and what parent rock do you think produces the best soils 
for agriculture (limestone, sandstone, or shale) and why? (10 minutes) 
Materials Needed: 
● Graphic Organizer Examples 
● PowerPoint Presentation 
 
Check For Understanding: 
Students will complete an exit slip pertaining to the soil horizons and agriculture. This is used as 
contemplation after realization. 
 
Conclusion: 
Remind students to be on the look out for soil layers that may be exposed around construction sites, 
landslides, or farms. 
  
Reinforcement: 
N/A 
 
Self Evaluation: 
Show the students examples of graphic organizers, but allow them to design their own for self expression, 
which leads to higher retention. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

Aaron Napier 
 
February 4, 2015     45 minutes, 9:00 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. 
 
Lesson Aim For Today: 
To examine soil types. 
 
Student Learning Objective: 
Students should identify the 3 soil size particles (sand, silt, and clay) that make up soil type and texture. 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include a) processes of soil development.  
 
Introduction: 
Brainstorming session focusing on the question, “What does soil feel, look, and even taste like?” 
 
Review: 
N/A 
 
Lesson Content: 
Soil Samples:  
Consists of sand, silt, and clay which make up the three particle sizes or textures of soil. They can be 
mixed together to make loam, which is ideal for agriculture.   
 
Lab Report Quick Write Template: 
 
Soil #1 
Observation:          Prediction:          Conclusion: 
 
Soil #2 
Observation:          Prediction:          Conclusion: 
 
Soil #3  
Observation:          Prediction:          Conclusion:  
 
Questions ​
(L= literal, C= critical, Cr= creative, I= implied)​

(L)What are the three soil size particles? (I)How does each particle size change the texture and look of the 
soil? (C)How do you think particle size affects the permeability of the soil?  
 
Activities: 
1. Students will brainstorm: “What does soil feel, look, and even taste like?” 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
2. Students will be put into groups of three, one student in each group will be placed with two students 
possessing higher skill sets to aid in explaining the content (differentiate). Each group will observe 
(hands­on) three soil samples. As a group they will have to predict if the samples are predominantly 
sand. clay, or silt only by sight before handling the samples. Then they will touch the samples to feel 
the different soil textures.(10 minutes) 
3. Each group will complete a lab report quick write comparing their predictions to their conclusions. 
They need to include things like color, texture, and finally what type of soil each sample was. (10 
minutes) 
4. Students will complete a one sentence exit slip explaining how their observation of soil during the lab 
compares to how they perceived soil texture during the brainstorming session.  
Materials Needed: 
● Soil Samples: 
● Lab Report Template (Quick Write) 
 
Check For Understanding: 
Students will complete an exit slip pertaining to soil texture and how the class perceived it before 
observing soil samples. This is used as contemplation after realization. 
 
Conclusion: 
N/A 
  
Reinforcement: 
Students should write a 5 sentence paragraph answering the question, “how does soil particle size affect 
permeability, which is how easily water flows through?” 
 
Self Evaluation: 
Give the students a template for their lab report. This helps them organize their predictions/hypothesis and 
conclusions.  

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

Aaron Napier 
 
February 5, 2015     45 minutes, 9:00 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. 
 
Lesson Aim For Today: 
To examine soil erosion, including human and non­human impact; and mitigation techniques for 
preserving this natural resource. 
 
Student Learning Objective: 
Students should list three human and three non­human impacts on soil (example: erosion) and identify 5 
agricultural mitigation techniques that can be utilized to preserve soil. 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include a) processes of soil development.  
 
Introduction: 
N/A 
 
Review: 
Students will share their 5 sentence paragraph that answered the question, “how does soil particle size 
affect permeability, which is how easily water flows through?” that they had for homework the day 
before. This will be review to get their attention on science class and refresh their memory. Instructor 
should correct any false concepts included in their paragraphs.   
 
Lesson Content: ​
Text Set (Levels based on Fry Readability): 
1. Strip Cropping (level 9) 
http://www.agriinfo.in/?page=topic&superid=1&topicid=443 
2. Crop Rotation (level 11) 
http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/143973/crop­rotation 
3. No Till Farming is on the Rise (level 8) 
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/11/09/no­till­farming­is­on­the­rise­th
ats­actually­a­big­deal/ 
4. Cover Crop (level 7) 
http://www.roanoke.com/life/columns_and_blogs/blogs/fanatical_botanical/fanatical­botanical­m
ore­ways­cover­crops­help­soil/article_f2621ac2­e76e­11e4­b975­53392f1cf344.html 
5. Terracing (level 10)  http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/588178/terrace­cultivation 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
Questions ​
(L= literal, C= critical, Cr= creative, I= implied)​

(L)What is soil erosion? (C)How do humans impact soil? (L)What are some nonhuman impacts on soil? 
(L)What is no­till or minimal till farming, and how does it mitigate soil erosion? (I)Why is soil easily 
eroded? (Cr)Is soil a renewable resource, why or why not?   
 
Activities: 
1. Students will take notes to include in their learning logs on a lecture pertaining to human and 
nonhuman impacts on soil, including erosion and nutrient loss.(10 minutes)  
2. Students will be put into groups of three. Each group should consist of one student whose reading 
level is rather low, and two students whose reading levels are higher. This is done to differentiate and 
allow the student who is struggling to learn the content from the reading by students with higher 
reading levels and skill sets. Each group will receive a different reading pertaining to agricultural 
mitigation techniques used to preserve soil. (15 minutes) 
3. Each group will write a five bullet list summarizing their text to share to the class. Each group should 
select one person in their group to present their bulleted list to the class. (10 minutes)  
4. The students will complete an exit slip: Is soil a renewable resource? Why or Why not? This allows 
the students to think more deeply on the subject, which leads to better retention. I will also use it to 
check for understanding. (10 minutes)   
Materials Needed: 
● Text Set: Soil Preservation Techniques 
 
Check For Understanding: 
Students will complete an exit slip: Is soil a renewable resource? Why or Why not? 
 
Conclusion: 
Remind students to keep an eye out for agricultural mitigation techniques discussed in class. 
  
Reinforcement: 
N/A 
 
Self Evaluation: 
When using Jigsaw groups pair strong readers with students that have lower reading levels to differentiate 
instruction. This is collaborative learning.   

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

Aaron Napier 
 
February 6, 2015     45 minutes, 9:00 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. 
 
Lesson Aim For Today: 
Test Day 
 
Student Learning Objective: 
Students will be tested on soil formation including physical and chemical weathering, as well as organic 
processes; soil structure including horizons and soil types; soil erosion, including human and non­human 
impact; and mitigation techniques for preserving this natural resource. 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include a) processes of soil development.  
 
Introduction: 
N/A 
 
Review: 
Students will be allowed 5 minutes to ask any questions they have pertaining to the material examined in 
the period.  
 
Lesson Content:  
Test​
 ​
Questions: 
(L)What are the 4 types of chemical weathering and 5 types of physical weathering? 
(C)What are some examples of each?  
(C)Why is weathering necessary for soil formation?  
(Cr) How do living things become part of the soil?   
(L)What is soil erosion?  
(C)How do humans impact soil?  
(L)What are some nonhuman impacts on soil?  
(L)What is no­till or minimal till farming, and how does it mitigate soil erosion?  
(I)Why is soil easily eroded?  
(Cr)Is soil a renewable resource, why or why not?  
(L)What are the three soil size particles?  
(I)How does each particle size change the texture and look of the soil?  
(C)How do you think particle size affects the permeability of the soil?  
(L)What are the soil horizons?  
(C)What horizon is the most important in supporting plant life?  
(L)What is bedrock?  
 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
Questions  
N/A  
 
Activities: 
1. Students will be allowed 5 minutes to ask any questions they have pertaining to the material 
examined in the period. (5 minutes) 
2. Students will take a test focusing on soil formation including physical and chemical weathering, 
as well as organic processes; soil structure including horizons and soil types; soil erosion, 
including human and non­human impact; and mitigation techniques for preserving this natural 
resource. (40 minutes) 
Materials Needed: 
● Test Questions 
 
Check For Understanding: 
N/A 
 
Conclusion: 
Remind students that we will be starting karst topography and groundwater next week. (Anticipation) 
  
Reinforcement: 
N/A 
 
Self Evaluation: 
Make sure students are not talking. It would be a good idea to explain that honesty is the best policy and 
cheating is not tolerated.   

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

Week 2: Development of Karst Topography 
 
Lesson Aim For This Period: 
 
To examine the development of karst topography;  as well as relationships between groundwater zones, 
including saturated and unsaturated zones. 
 
 
February 8, 2015 Objective: 
Students will list the 7 processes of the hydrologic cycle (evaporation, transpiration, condensation, 
precipitation, runoff, infiltration, and percolation); as well as the 6 reservoirs of the hydrologic cycle 
(atmosphere, lakes/streams, oceans, glaciers, groundwater, and biota). 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include b) development of karst 
topography;  as well as c) relationships between groundwater zones, including saturated and unsaturated 
zones.  
 
February 9, 2015 Objective: 
Students should identify the three rocks associated with karst environments (limestone, gypsum, and 
dolomite); list the two speleothems examined in class (stalactites and stalagmites); and list the processes 
of cave formation (chemical weathering: dissolution). 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include b) development of karst 
topography. 
 
February 10, 2015 Objective: 
Students should be able to identify the following groundwater features: saturated and unsaturated zones; 
water table; perched water table; aquifer; aquiclude; confined aquifer; cone of depression; and springs. 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include c) relationships between 
groundwater zones, including saturated and unsaturated zones. 
 
February 11, 2015 Objective: 
Students should list 5 human impacts on groundwater (groundwater depletion, pollution, saltwater 
intrusion, surface­water change, and topographical change). 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include c) relationships between 
groundwater zones, including saturated and unsaturated zones. 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
 
February 12, 2015 Objective: 
Students will be tested on the development of karst topography;  as well as relationships between 
groundwater zones, including saturated and unsaturated zones. 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include b) development of karst 
topography;  as well as c) relationships between groundwater zones, including saturated and unsaturated 
zones.  
 
Activities: 
 
Day 1 (Feb 8): 
Brainstorm & Water Cycle Flow Chart Design  
 
Day 2 (Feb 9): 
Hands­On Rock ID, Mammoth Cave Video (Contextualization), & Quick Write 
 
Day 3 (Feb 10): 
Lecture, Word Wall, Drawing and Labeling Groundwater Features 
 
Day 4 (Feb 11): 
Lecture & Quick Write  
 
Day 5 (Feb 12): 
Test Day 
 
*Each day includes a bell­ringer to review the day’s lesson prior. 
 
  
 Anticipated Materials: 
● Whiteboard & Markers 
● Rock Samples (limestone, dolomite, gypsum) 
● Cave Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VFLDvzc5P2k 
● Colored Pencils 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

Aaron Napier 
 
February 8, 2015     45 minutes, 9:00 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. 
 
Lesson Aim For Today: 
To examine the processes and reservoirs of the hydrologic cycle.  
 
Student Learning Objective: 
Students will list the 7 processes of the hydrologic cycle (evaporation, transpiration, condensation, 
precipitation, runoff, infiltration, and percolation); as well as the 6 reservoirs of the hydrologic cycle 
(atmosphere, lakes/streams, oceans, glaciers, groundwater, and biota). 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include b) development of karst 
topography;  as well as c) relationships between groundwater zones, including saturated and unsaturated 
zones. 
 
Introduction: 
Students will brainstorm focusing on the question, “What all do you know about the water cycle?” This is 
anticipation.  
 
Review: 
Students will answer a bell ringer by writing in sentence form, The question pertains to last week’s lesson, 
“How does soil form?” 
 
Lesson Content:  
PowerPoint Presentation for Lecture: 
1. Evaporation is the process of water changing states into a water vapor; the introduction of water 
into the atmosphere. 
2. Transpiration and Evaporation are similar, but transpiration is the process by which plants release 
water vapor through stomata into the atmosphere. This is associated with biota, an important 
reservoir in the water cycle.  
3. Condensation is simply water vapor cooling to the point (dew point) it becomes water vapor. This 
occurs in the atmosphere to produce clouds. 
4. Precipitation is the process by which water droplets or ice in the atmosphere get heavy enough to 
fall to the earth’s surface. 
5. Runoff is the process by which water runs on the earth’s surface, this includes streams. Streams 
eventually runoff into oceans, the world’s largest reservoir.  
6. Infiltration is the process by which water enters the soil and eventually the groundwater reservoir, 
whereas percolation is movement in the aquifer. 
*The Mcgraw­Hill Companies Inc. Earth & Space iScience, Teacher Edition Vol. 1. 2012. Ch 12,15   

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
Questions ​
(L= literal, C= critical, Cr= creative, I= implied)​

(L)How does water travel in a cycle? (C)What would cause evaporation to increase? (C)How are 
transpiration and evaporation similar? (L)What is the world’s largest freshwater reservoir? (Cr)Why can’t 
humans utilize ocean water?   
 
Activities: 
1. Students will answer a bell ringer in no less than 4 sentences: “How does soil form?” This is used as 
review for better retention and to guide their minds to the subject. (5 minutes) 
2. Students will do a brainstorming session that focuses on the question, “what all do you know about 
the water cycle?” (15 minutes) 
3. Students will be lectured on the processes and reservoirs of the water cycle, including evaporation, 
transpiration, condensation, precipitation, runoff, infiltration, and percolation; as well as the 6 
reservoirs of the hydrologic cycle (atmosphere, lakes/streams, oceans, glaciers, groundwater, and 
biota). (10 minutes) 
4. Students will be put into groups of two based on reading levels and skill sets. Students with lower 
literacy skills will be placed with students who have higher literacy skills. (Differentiation) Each pair 
of students will design and produce a graphic organizer / flow chart explaining the water cycle and 
the reservoirs. Students should use all processes and reservoirs discussed in class. (10 minutes) 
5. Students will do an “I AM” poem, individually, describing themselves as a water droplet or water 
vapor in one of the reservoirs. (Example: I am a water droplet deep in an aquifer.) (5 minutes) 
 
Materials Needed: 
● PowerPoint 
● Colored Pencils 
 
Check For Understanding: 
Students will complete the “I AM” poem at the end of class to check for understanding. 
 
Conclusion: 
Remind students that tomorrow we will be looking at rocks. So be prepared for a fun activity. 
  
Reinforcement: 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
N/A 
 
Self Evaluation: 
Make sure all of the students are in the class before assigning the bell ringer. If the student is more than 5 
minutes late then he or she will have to make it up during free time or at the end of the class.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

Aaron Napier 
 
February 9, 2015     45 minutes, 9:00 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. 
 
Lesson Aim For Today: 
To examine caves and karst topography 
 
Student Learning Objective: 
Students should identify the three rocks associated with karst environments (limestone, gypsum, and 
dolomite); list the two speleothems examined in class (stalactites and stalagmites); and list the processes 
of cave formation (chemical weathering: dissolution). 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include b) development of karst 
topography. 
 
Introduction: 
N/A 
 
Review: 
Students will share the flowcharts they made the day before in class.   
 
Lesson Content:  
Mammoth Cave Video: 
 ​
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VFLDvzc5P2k 
 
Sedimentary Rocks: 
1. Limestone & Dolomite­ a chemical sedimentary rock that is very susceptible to solutional 
chemical weathering and is very characteristic of karst topography. 
2. Gypsum­ is a sedimentary rock and like limestone is associated with karst topography due to the 
fact that it is weathered very easily. 
3. Sandstone­ a more resistant sedimentary rock due to quartz minerals and aren’t associated with 
karst.  
4. Granite­ a very resistant igneous rock due to the presence of hard minerals. This is not associated 
with karst.   
 
Questions ​
(L= literal, C= critical, Cr= creative, I= implied)​

(L)What are the three rocks associated with karst environments? (L)What mineral do all these rocks have 
in common that makes them so soluble? (L)Caves are examples of what type of chemical weathering? 
(L)What are caves features that seem to be growing from the ceilings and floors of caves?   
Activities: 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
1. Students will share the flowcharts they made the day before to be used as review. They will do this by 
drawing them on the whiteboard. (10 minutes) 
2. Students will be lectured on caves and karst topography with the aid of a video for contextualization 
and real­world application. (15 minutes) 
3. Students will look at several sedimentary rocks, including limestone, dolomite, gypsum, granite, and 
sandstone. The will expose the rocks to hydrochloric acid to see how easily dissolved they are. From 
this they are able to predict which rocks caves are associated with.  (10 minutes) 
4. Students will write a 5 paragraph lab report (quick write) explaining the procedures of the lab, their 
predictions, what they observed, and what that tells them about caves. (10 minutes) 
Materials Needed: 
● Mammoth Cave Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VFLDvzc5P2k 
● Lecture PowerPoint 
 
Check For Understanding: 
Students will complete the quick write as to what the lab tells them about karst topography. 
 
Conclusion: 
Remind students to keep an eye out for caves or sink­holes that are signatures of karst environments.  
  
Reinforcement: 
N/A 
 
Self Evaluation: 
Make sure that students are very careful with the hydrochloric acid. It has been diluted with water, but 
extreme caution should be taken when students are involved. Have them wear gloves and safety glasses.  
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

Aaron Napier 
 
February 10, 2015     45 minutes, 9:00 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. 
 
Lesson Aim For Today: 
To examine caves and karst topography 
 
Student Learning Objective: 
Students should be able to identify the following groundwater features: saturated and unsaturated zones; 
water table; perched water table; aquifer; aquiclude; confined aquifer; cone of depression; and springs. 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include c) relationships between 
groundwater zones, including saturated and unsaturated zones. 
 
Introduction: 
N/A 
 
Review: 
Students will discuss the conclusion of their lab reports from the day before answering the questions, 
“what do the rocks tell us about caves and the type of weathering that takes place to form them?”   
 
Lesson Content:  
PowerPoint Lecture: 
1. Unsaturated zone is layer of rock or sediment that contains both air and water, but can be 
completely saturated during heavy precipitation events. 
2. Saturated zone is layer of rock containing water, but no air. 
3. Water Table is the boundary between the saturated and unsaturated zone. 
4. Aquifer is rock layers that store and transmit water easily; high permeability and porosity. 
5. Aquiclude is rock layers that do not transmit or store water easily. 
6. Confined Aquifer is an aquifer underlying an aquiclude causing the water in the reservoir to be 
pressurized. It is not open to the atmosphere like a normal aquifer. A well tapped into this is 
called an artesian well.  
7. Springs occur where the water table intersect the surface. 
8. Cone of Depressions occur where wells take in groundwater; the water table makes a cone at the 
base of the well. 
*The Mcgraw­Hill Companies Inc. Earth & Space iScience, Teacher Edition Vol. 1. 2012. Ch 17,18   
 
 
Questions ​
(L= literal, C= critical, Cr= creative, I= implied)​

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
(L)What is the boundary between the saturated and unsaturated zones? (C)What type of rock would make 
a good aquifer? (C)Why type of rock would make a good aquiclude? (L)What is the process called when 
water moves through the groundwater?  
 
Activities: 
1. Students will complete a bell ringer answering the question, “which rock is characteristic of karst 
environments, limestone or sandstone? (5 minutes) 
2. Students will share the conclusions of their lab reports from the day before as a review. (10 minutes) 
3. Students will be lectured on  groundwater features: saturated and unsaturated zones; water table; 
perched water table; aquifer; aquiclude; confined aquifer; cone of depression; and springs. (10 
minutes) 
4. Students will be placed into groups of 3, two of which are higher performing students to help a less 
skilled student. They will draw and label all of the groundwater features talked about in class. There 
will be a word wall at the front of the class for the students to refer to. (20 minutes) 
Materials Needed: 
● Colored Pencils 
● Lecture PowerPoint 
● Word Wall (on whiteboard) 
 
Check For Understanding: 
Drawings will be turned in by the end of the class. Every student should have completed their own. They 
will be checked for correct labeling and spelling.  
 
Conclusion: 
Have the students find an article in regards to human impacts on groundwater while in the library and to 
read it.  
  
Reinforcement: 
Remind students that if they were unable to finish their drawings that it becomes homework to be turned 
in on the next day. 
 
 
 
Self Evaluation: 
Show them many different pictures of groundwater diagrams to give them ideas for when they do their 
drawings.  

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

Aaron Napier 
 
February 11, 2015     45 minutes, 9:00 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. 
 
Lesson Aim For Today: 
To examine human impacts on groundwater 
 
Student Learning Objective: 
Students should list 5 human impacts on groundwater (groundwater depletion, pollution, saltwater 
intrusion, surface­water change, and topographical change). 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include c) relationships between 
groundwater zones, including saturated and unsaturated zones 
 
Introduction: 
Students will share the articles they found on human impacts of groundwater for homework the night 
before. This is used as anticipation.  
 
Review: 
Students will complete a bellringer answering the question, “what is a confined aquifer?” 
Lesson Content:  
PowerPoint Lecture: 
1. Groundwater Depletion is simply the excessive use of groundwater by humans quicker than it can 
be recharged. 
2. Pollution is any foreign substance in the reservoir. Common examples include septic fluids, 
chemicals, and gasoline. 
3. Saltwater Intrusion is saltwater that intrudes into freshwater wells due to excessive water intake. 
This mainly occurs near the coast.  
4. Groundwater depletion can cause surface waters to dry up because many streams are fed by 
groundwater, and subsidence (lowering of the elevation) can occur as land settles because of the 
removal of water. 
*The Mcgraw­Hill Companies Inc. Earth & Space iScience, Teacher Edition Vol. 1. 2012. Ch 17,18   
 
Questions ​
(L= literal, C= critical, Cr= creative, I= implied)​

(L)What is groundwater mining? (C)Why do humans use so much groundwater? (C)How does 
groundwater depletion effect surface water and topography? (Cr)What are some ways groundwater can be 
polluted? (I)Where is saltwater intrusion likely to occur?   
 
 
 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
Activities: 
1. Students will complete a bellringer answering the question, “what is a confined aquifer?” This is used 
as review. (5 minutes) 
2. Students will share the articles they found for homework to be used as anticipation for human impacts 
on groundwater. (10 minutes) 
3. Students will be lectured on human impacts of groundwater (groundwater depletion, pollution, 
saltwater intrusion, surface­water change, and topographical change). (15 minutes) 
4. Students will write a 2 paragraph, 10 sentence quick write for the following prompt: Write a story 
about a neighborhood that has detrimental effects on the groundwater. Use at least two impacts 
discussed in class and explain how that might affect surface water, topography, and/or drinking water. 
To be turned in after class to check for understanding. (15 minutes) 
Materials Needed: 
● Whiteboard 
● Lecture PowerPoint 
 
Check For Understanding: 
Students will write a 2 paragraph, 10 sentence quick write for the following prompt: Write a story about a 
neighborhood that has detrimental effects on the groundwater. Use at least two impacts discussed in class 
and explain how that might affect surface water, topography, and/or drinking water.  
 
Conclusion: 
Remind students that we are having a test tomorrow.  
  
Reinforcement: 
N/A 
 
Self Evaluation: 
Draw pictures when trying to explain topographical change and depletion of groundwater. It aids in visual 
learning and keeps them engaged.  
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

Aaron Napier 
 
February 12, 2015     45 minutes, 9:00 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. 
 
Lesson Aim For Today: 
Test Day 
 
Student Learning Objective: 
Students will be tested on development of karst topography; relationships between groundwater zones, 
including saturated and unsaturated zones, and the water table.  
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include, b) development of karst 
topography; c) relationships between groundwater zones, including saturated and unsaturated zones, and 
the water table;  
 
Introduction: 
N/A 
 
Review: 
Students will be allowed 5 minutes to ask any questions they have pertaining to the material examined in 
the period.  
 
Lesson Content:  
Test​
 ​
Questions: 
(L)How does water travel in a cycle?  
(C)What would cause evaporation to increase?  
(C)How are transpiration and evaporation similar?  
(L)What is the world’s largest freshwater reservoir?  
(Cr)Why can’t humans utilize ocean water? 
(L)What are the three rocks associated with karst environments?  
(L)What mineral do all these rocks have in common that makes them so soluble?  
(L)Caves are examples of what type of chemical weathering?  
(L)What are caves features that seem to be growing from the ceilings and floors of caves?  
(L)What is the boundary between the saturated and unsaturated zones?  
(C)What type of rock would make a good aquifer?  
(C)Why type of rock would make a good aquiclude?  
(L)What is the process called when water moves through the groundwater?  
(L)What is groundwater mining?  
(C)Why do humans use so much groundwater?  
(C)How does groundwater depletion effect surface water and topography? 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
(Cr)What are some ways groundwater can be polluted?  
(I)Where is saltwater intrusion likely to occur? 
 
Questions  
N/A  
 
Activities: 
1. Students will be allowed 5 minutes to ask any questions they have pertaining to the material examined 
in the period. (5 minutes) 
2. Students will take a test focusing on the hydrologic cycle; karst topography, including caves; 
groundwater resources and features; as well as human impacts on groundwater. (40 minutes) 
Materials Needed: 
● Test Questions 
 
 
Check For Understanding: 
N/A 
 
Conclusion: 
Remind students that we will be starting identification of freshwater sources next week. (Anticipation) 
  
Reinforcement: 
N/A 
 
Self Evaluation: 
Make sure students are not talking. It would be a good idea to explain that honesty is the best policy and 
cheating is not tolerated.   

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

Week 3: Identification of Sources of Fresh Water 
 
Lesson Aim For This Period:  
 
To examine sources of fresh water including rivers, springs, and aquifers, with reference to the hydrologic 
cycle; as well as dependence on freshwater resources and the effects of human usage on water quality. 
 
February 15, 2015 Objective: 
Students should list  the percentages of the world’s freshwater by reservoir (Ice 97%, Groundwater 1.3%, 
lakes and streams 0.016%, atmosphere 0.003%, and biota 0.0008%). 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include d) identification of sources of fresh 
water including rivers, springs, and aquifers, with reference to the hydrologic cycle. 
 
February 16, 2015 Objective: 
Students should identify the 4 processes that influence a streams discharge (precipitation, transpiration, 
runoff, and groundwater flow) and students should be able to calculate discharge using width x depth x 
velocity. 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include d) identification of sources of fresh 
water including rivers, springs, and aquifers, with reference to the hydrologic cycle; e) dependence on 
freshwater resources and the effects of human usage on water quality. 
 
February 17, 2015 Objective: 
Students should list 3 ways in which humans acquire water from the earth system (wells, salinization 
plants, and irrigation), as well as list 5 reasons why water is so vital. 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include e) dependence on freshwater 
resources and the effects of human usage on water quality. 
 
February 18, 2015 Objective: 
Students should identify 5 human impacts on the earth’s freshwater (pollution, groundwater mining. 
stream damming, global warming, and flooding. 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include e) dependence on freshwater 
resources and the effects of human usage on water quality. 
February 19, 2015 Objective: 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
Students will be tested on sources of freshwater including rivers, springs, and aquifers, with reference to 
the hydrologic cycle; as well as dependence on freshwater resources and the effects of human usage on 
water quality. 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include d) identification of sources of fresh 
water including rivers, springs, and aquifers, with reference to the hydrologic cycle; e) dependence on 
freshwater resources and the effects of human usage on water quality. 
 
Activities: 
 
Day 1 (Feb 15): 
Lecture & Cornell Note­Taking  
 
Day 2 (Feb 16): 
Think­Pair­Share Graphic Organizers 
 
Day 3 (Feb 17): 
Read Aloud & Quick Write  
 
Day 4 (Feb 18): 
Video (Contextualization) & Freshwater Brochure (RAFT) 
 
Day 5 (Feb 19): 
Test Day 
 
*Each day students will explore 2 new words from a word wall. They will define those words at the end 
of the class as an exit slip to check for understanding.  
 
Anticipated Materials: 
● Whiteboard & Markers 
● Text Set: hydrologic cycle in regards to discharge & acquiring water resources 
● Video on human impacts on water 
● Construction paper & Markers 
  
 
   
 
  
 
 

Aaron Napier 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

 
February 15, 2015     45 minutes, 9:00 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. 
 
Lesson Aim For Today: 
World’s Freshwater Resources 
 
Student Learning Objective: 
Students should list  the percentages of the world’s freshwater by reservoir (Ice 97%, Groundwater 1.3%, 
lakes and streams 0.016%, atmosphere 0.003%, and biota 0.0008%). 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include d) identification of sources of fresh 
water including rivers, springs, and aquifers, with reference to the hydrologic cycle. 
 
Introduction: 
Students will explore two words from the word wall, which will be located on the whiteboard for the 
duration of the week: Freshwater & Springs 
 
Review: 
Students will complete a bellringer answering the question, “What is groundwater depletion?” 
 
Lesson Content:  
PowerPoint Lecture: 
1. Glaciers and the polar ice caps make up 97% of all freshwater on earth. 
2. Groundwater makes up 1.3% of all freshwater on earth. 
3. Lakes and streams make up 0.016% of all freshwater on earth. 
4. The atmosphere makes up 0.003% of all freshwater on earth. 
5. Plants and animals make up 0.0008% of all water on earth. 
*The Mcgraw­Hill Companies Inc. Earth & Space iScience, Teacher Edition Vol. 1. 2012. Ch 15,17 
 
Questions ​
(L= literal, C= critical, Cr= creative, I= implied)​

(L)Where is most of Earth’s freshwater? (C)How would water travel from groundwater into a stream? 
(Cr)How could you make a stream lose more water to evaporation? (L)Where do we get our school water 
from?   
 
Activities: 
1. Students will complete a bellringer answering the question, “What is groundwater depletion?” This is 
used as review. (5 minutes) 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
2. Students will explore “freshwater & Springs” from the word wall located at the front of the 
classroom. This is an anticipatory introduction. (5 minutes) 
3. Students will be lectured on freshwater resources within context of the hydrologic cycle and explore 
the percentages of each reservoir.  (15 minutes) 
4. Students will take notes via Cornell Note­taking. In the left column they should list the reservoir 
(atmosphere, streams, etc.) and in the right column they should have the percentage that the reservoir 
makes up on earth, as well as concepts discussed during lecture. (15 minutes) 
5. Students will define the two words examined from the word wall as an exit slip. This is to check for 
understanding. (5 minutes)  
Materials Needed: 
● Whiteboard/ Word Wall 
● Lecture PowerPoint 
 
Check For Understanding: 
Students will define the two words examined from the word wall as an exit slip: freshwater & springs. 
 
Conclusion: 
N/A 
  
Reinforcement: 
N/A 
 
Self Evaluation: 
Thoroughly explain how to do Cornell Note Taking. If you show them an example or take the notes 
yourself and display them on a projector it will help the students learn effective study skills, while 
enhancing literacy skills.   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

Aaron Napier 
 
February 16, 2015     45 minutes, 9:00 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. 
 
Lesson Aim For Today: 
Discharge and Streamflow Influences  
 
Student Learning Objective: 
Students should identify the 4 processes that influence a streams discharge (precipitation, transpiration, 
runoff, and groundwater flow) and students should be able to calculate discharge using width x depth x 
velocity. 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include d) identification of sources of fresh 
water including rivers, springs, and aquifers, with reference to the hydrologic cycle; e) dependence on 
freshwater resources and the effects of human usage on water quality. 
 
Introduction: 
Students will explore two words from the word wall, which will be located on the whiteboard for the 
duration of the week: Discharge & Transpiration. 
 
Review: 
Students will complete a bellringer answering the question, “What is a spring?” 
 
Lesson Content:  
PowerPoint Lecture: 
1. Explaining how to calculate discharge (width x depth x velocity). Usually measured in cubic feet 
per second (cfs). 
 
Text Set: 
1. Precipitation (level 7) 
http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/encyclopedia/precipitation/?ar_a=1 
2. Transpiration (level 11) 
http://water.usgs.gov/edu/watercycletranspiration.html 
3. Runoff (level 9) 
https://water.usgs.gov/edu/runoff.html 
4. Groundwater Flow (level 8) 
http://www.wisegeek.com/what­is­groundwater­flow.htm 
 
 
 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
Questions ​
(L= literal, C= critical, Cr= creative, I= implied)​

(L)What 3 variables must be explored before calculating discharge? (L)What 4 processes affect stream 
discharge and how? (Cr)How do you calculate discharge? (Cr)If a stream has an average depth of 3 feet, 
width of 30 feet, and velocity of 8 feet per second, then what is the discharge?  
 
Activities: 
1. Students will complete a bellringer answering the question, “What is a spring?” This is used as 
review. (5 minutes) 
2. Students will be placed in groups of 3 or 4 based on reading levels (to differentiate). This will be 
realization, during reading. There will be four groups: a group reading content in regards to 
precipitation; a group reading about transpiration; a group reading about runoff; and a group reading 
about groundwater flow. (10 minutes)  
3. Students will be put into groups where each group has students who have read and discussed each 
concept (precipitation, transpiration, runoff, and groundwater flow). These groups will create graphic 
organizers explaining influences on discharge. (15 minutes) 
4. Each group will present their graphic organizers to the class. (10 minutes)  
5. Students will define the two words examined from the word wall as an exit slip. This is to check for 
understanding. (5 minutes)  
Materials Needed: 
● Whiteboard/ Word Wall 
● Lecture PowerPoint 
● Text Set 
 
Check For Understanding: 
Students will define the two words examined from the word wall as an exit slip: discharge & 
transpiration. 
 
Conclusion: 
Remind students that collecting data like discharge in the field is fun, interesting work, but extreme 
caution should be taken when working in and around streams.  
 
 
  

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
Reinforcement: 
Students should answer the following question, “If a stream has an average depth of 3 feet, width of 30 
feet, and velocity of 8 feet per second, what is the discharge?”  
 
Self Evaluation: 
As students are reading move around the classroom and make sure every student is participating. Be there 
to answer any questions they may have of the readings.   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

Aaron Napier 
 
February 17, 2015     45 minutes, 9:00 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. 
 
Lesson Aim For Today: 
Dependence and Human Impacts on Freshwater  
 
Student Learning Objective: 
Students should list 3 ways in which humans acquire water from the earth system (wells, salinization 
plants, and irrigation), as well as list 5 reasons why water is so vital. 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include e) dependence on freshwater 
resources and the effects of human usage on water quality. 
 
Introduction: 
Students will explore two words from the word wall, which will be located on the whiteboard for the 
duration of the week: Wells & Irrigation. 
 
Review: 
Students will complete a bellringer answering the question, “What is discharge?” 
 
Lesson Content:  
Text Set: 
1. Clean Water Crisis 
http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/freshwater/freshwater­crisis/ 
 
Questions ​
(L= literal, C= critical, Cr= creative, I= implied)​

(C)Why is water important? (L)What is desalination? (Cr)What is the best way to irrigate a field of crops 
in a dry climate? (L)How do we get water for drinking? (I)Wells are necessary for collecting water from 
what reservoir? (L)What is an artesian well?  
 
Activities: 
1. Students will complete a bellringer answering the question, “What is discharge?” This is used as 
review. (5 minutes) 
2. Students will be given an article on dependence of freshwater resources and will read silently as the 
instructor reads. Students should also be allowed to read aloud to the class periodically. I will do this 
by going around the room allowing each student to read a paragraph of the text. 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
3. Students will complete a 5 sentence quick write for the following prompt: You just moved with your 
family to (the mountains, the coast, the desert, the Arctic, etc) and you need water to drink. How will 
you acquire this resource? How will you irrigate to grow crops? Use terms discussed during the 
period (desalination, irrigation, wells, artesian well, etc). 
4. Students will define the two words examined from the word wall as an exit slip. This is to check for 
understanding. (5 minutes)  
Materials Needed: 
● Whiteboard/ Word Wall 
● Text Set 
 
Check For Understanding: 
Students will define the two words examined from the word wall as an exit slip: Wells & irrigation. 
 
Conclusion: 
N/A 
  
Reinforcement: 
N/A 
 
Self Evaluation: 
As students read aloud make sure to help them with words they struggle with and explain any vocabulary 
they misunderstand.   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

Aaron Napier 
 
February 18, 2015     45 minutes, 9:00 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. 
 
Lesson Aim For Today: 
Discharge and Streamflow Influences  
 
Student Learning Objective: 
Students should identify 5 human impacts on the earth’s freshwater (pollution, groundwater mining. 
stream damming, global warming, and flooding. 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include e) dependence on freshwater 
resources and the effects of human usage on water quality. 
 
Introduction: 
Students will explore two words from the word wall, which will be located on the whiteboard for the 
duration of the week: Pollution & Flood. 
 
Review: 
Students will complete a bellringer answering the question, “What is irrigation?” 
 
Lesson Content:  
Video (Contextualization): 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4vHq6AgQFI 
 
Questions ​
(L= literal, C= critical, Cr= creative, I= implied)​

(L)What is the difference between point and nonpoint pollution? (L)What is floodstage? (Cr)If a house is 
built within the 100 year flood zone of a river, what is the probability it will flood in a year? (Cr)How is 
global warming affecting the Earth’s freshwater? Cr)Why build dams and how do they affect streams?  
 
Activities: 
1. Students will complete a bellringer answering the question, “What is irrigation?” This is used as 
review. (5 minutes) 
2. Students will view a video on human impacts on freshwater resources.  
3. Students will be put into groups of 3, 2 of which should possess higher reading skills to help students 
with lower reading and comprehension skills. Each group will make a brochure for the general public 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
on how to conserve and protect freshwater resources. It should include a title page, general 
information page summarizing human impacts on freshwater, and a page explaining ways to protect 
freshwater resources.   
4. Students will define the two words examined from the word wall as an exit slip. This is to check for 
understanding. (5 minutes)  
Materials Needed: 
● Whiteboard/ Word Wall 
● Video on Human Impacts 
● Colored Pencils 
● Construction Paper 
 
Check For Understanding: 
Students will define the two words examined from the word wall as an exit slip: Pollution & Flood. 
 
Conclusion: 
N/A 
  
Reinforcement: 
N/A 
 
Self Evaluation: 
Explain to the students RAFT when they are designing their brochures.   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

Aaron Napier 
 
February 19, 2015     45 minutes, 9:00 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. 
 
Lesson Aim For Today: 
Test Day 
 
Student Learning Objective: 
Students will be tested on sources of freshwater including rivers, springs, and aquifers, with reference to 
the hydrologic cycle; as well as dependence on freshwater resources and the effects of human usage on 
water quality. 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include d) identification of sources of fresh 
water including rivers, springs, and aquifers, with reference to the hydrologic cycle; e) dependence on 
freshwater resources and the effects of human usage on water quality. 
 
Introduction: 
N/A 
 
Review: 
Students will be allowed 5 minutes to ask any questions they have pertaining to the material examined in 
the period.  
 
Lesson Content:  
Test​
 ​
Questions: 
(L)Where is most of Earth’s freshwater?  
(C)How would water travel from groundwater into a stream?  
(Cr)How could you make a stream lose more water to evaporation?  
(L)Where do we get our school water from?  
(L)What 3 variables must be explored before calculating discharge?  
(L)What 4 processes affect stream discharge and how?  
(Cr)How do you calculate discharge?  
(Cr)If a stream has an average depth of 3 feet, width of 30 feet, and velocity of 8 feet per second, then 
what is the discharge? 
(C)Why is water important?  
(L)What is desalination?  
(Cr)What is the best way to irrigate a field of crops in a dry climate?  
(L)How do we get water for drinking?  
(I)Wells are necessary for collecting water from what reservoir?  
(L)What is an artesian well?  

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
(L)What is the difference between point and nonpoint pollution?  
(L)What is floodstage?  
(Cr)If a house is built within the 100 year flood zone of a river, what is the probability it will flood in a 
year?  
(Cr)How is global warming affecting the Earth’s freshwater? 
 (Cr)Why build dams and how do they affect streams?  
 
Questions  
N/A  
 
Activities: 
1. Students will be allowed 5 minutes to ask any questions they have pertaining to the material examined 
in the period. (5 minutes) 
2. Students will take a test focusing on fresh water including rivers, springs, and aquifers, with reference 
to the hydrologic cycle; dependence on freshwater resources and the effects of human usage on water 
quality. (40 minutes) 
 
Materials Needed: 
● Test Questions 
 
 
Check For Understanding: 
N/A 
 
Conclusion: 
Remind the students that next week we will be looking at watersheds in Virginia. 
  
Reinforcement: 
N/A 
 
Self Evaluation: 
Make sure students are not talking. It would be a good idea to explain that honesty is the best policy and 
cheating is not tolerated.   

 
 
 
 

 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

Week 4: Major Watershed Systems in Virginia 
 
Lesson Aim For This Period: 
 
To examine the major watershed systems in Virginia, including the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. 
 
February 22, 2015 Objective: 
Students should list the provinces of Virginia in order from east to west for geographical context of the 
major watersheds in Virginia. (Coastal Plain, Piedmont, Blue Ridge, Valley and Ridge, and Plateau.) 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include f) identification of the major 
watershed systems in Virginia, including the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.  
 
February 23, 2015 Objective: 
Students should list the 11 watersheds (Holston, Big Sandy, Clinch, New, Roanoke, James, Chowan, 
Albemarle,York, Rappahannock, Potomac) as well as the three major drainage divides in Virginia 
(Chesapeake, North Carolina Sound, Gulf of Mexico). 
 
 ​
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include f) identification of the major 
watershed systems in Virginia, including the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.  
 
February 24, 2015 Objective: 
Students should list the 6 major tributaries that empty into the Chesapeake Bay (Potomac, James, York, 
Rappahannock, Shenandoah, and Appomattox).   
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include f) identification of the major 
watershed systems in Virginia, including the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.  
 
February 25, 2015 Objective: 
Students should identify the following features on a topographical map in regards to Virginia Watersheds: 
elevation of the headwaters for the Shenandoah River, distance of the James River using a scale, and the 
latitude of Richmond, Virginia. 
 
 
 
 
SOL: ​
ES.1 The student will plan and conduct investigations in which c) scales, diagrams, charts, graphs, 
tables, imagery, models, and profiles are constructed and interpreted; d) maps and globes are read and 
interpreted, including location by latitude and longitude. ES.8 The student will investigate and understand 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
how freshwater resources are influenced by geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts 
include f) identification of the major watershed systems in Virginia, including the Chesapeake Bay and its 
tributaries.  
 
February 26, 2015 Objective: 
Test Day  
 
Activities: 
 
Day 1 (Feb 22): 
Lecture & Map Drawing/ Labeling (graphic organizer) 
 
Day 2 (Feb 23): 
Read Aloud & Map coloring 
 
Day 3 (Feb 24): 
Think­Pair­Share 
 
Day 4 (Feb 25): 
Lecture & Map Literacy exercise  
 
Day 5 (Feb 26): 
Test Day 
 
Anticipated Materials: 
● Maps 
● Colored Pencils 
● Text Sets: Watersheds & Chesapeake Bay 

 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

Aaron Napier 
 
February 22, 2015     45 minutes, 9:00 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. 
 
Lesson Aim For Today: 
Physiographic Provinces of Virginia for Geographical Context  
 
Student Learning Objective: 
Students should list the provinces of Virginia in order from east to west for geographical context of the 
major watersheds in Virginia. (Coastal Plain, Piedmont, Blue Ridge, Valley and Ridge, and Plateau.) 
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include f) identification of the major 
watershed systems in Virginia, including the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.  
 
Introduction: 
Students will be shown a physical map or Virginia to get an idea of the general outline of the state, as well 
as elevation and other prominent features like rivers and lakes. This allows them to anticipate what will 
come out of this lesson.  
 
Review: 
N/A 
 
Lesson Content:  
Powerpoint Lecture: 
1. Coastal Plain contains the youngest rocks in Virginia and is mainly sandy, unconsolidated 
material. 
2. Piedmont is characterized by rolling hills and contains rocks from the Mesozoic Eon. 
3. Blue Ridge contains the oldest rocks in Virginia, Precambrian in age and contain the Appalachian 
Mountains. 
4. Valley and Ridge contain rocks Cambrian in age, mainly carbonates and sandstones. Also contain 
the Appalachian Mountains. 
5. Plateau contains rocks that formed during the carboniferous; coal and sandstone. Also contains 
the Appalachian Mountains.   
*​
USGS Website: Education 
 
 
Questions  
(L)The Appalachian Mountains are in what three provinces? (L)The Piedmont is known for having what 
type of land feature? (I)The Coastal Plain has predominantly what type of soil texture? (Cr)Which 
province would you live in and why?   

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
 
Activities: 
1. Students will be shown a physical map of Virginia. During this time I will ask the students if there is 
anything on the map of interest they would like to point out or any questions about the map. This will 
allow them to become familiar with Virginia (anticipation). (10 minutes) 
2. Students will be lectured on the provinces of Virginia and how they differ. (10 minutes) 
3. Students will be placed into groups of 3 based on reading level to differentiate. They will draw a map 
of Virginia using colored pencils to show the provinces. They should have at least one drawing in 
each province of their map to define what makes the provinces different. (10 minutes) 
4. I will draw a map of Virginia on the whiteboard and each group will have a turn to share what they 
drew in each province on their graphic organizer. (10 minutes)  
5. Students will complete an exit slip answering the question, “What province is our school in?”This is 
comprehension to solidify stuff examined in class, as well as a check for understanding. (5 minutes)  
Materials Needed: 
● Physical Map of Virginia 
● Whiteboard 
● Colored Pencils 
 
 
Check For Understanding: 
Students will complete an exit slip answering the question, “What province is our school in?” 
 
Conclusion: 
Remind students to have their colored pencils with them tomorrow, because we will be coloring in maps.  
  
Reinforcement: ​
N/A 
Self Evaluation: 
When showing them the map of Virginia, do so like a brainstorming session and go around the room so 
everyone participates.   

 
 
 
 
 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

Aaron Napier 
 
February 23, 2015     45 minutes, 9:00 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. 
 
Lesson Aim For Today: 
Physiographic Provinces of Virginia for Geographical Context  
 
Student Learning Objective: 
Students should list the 11 watersheds (Holston, Big Sandy, Clinch, New, Roanoke, James, Chowan, 
Albemarle,York, Rappahannock, Potomac) as well as the three major drainage divides in Virginia 
(Chesapeake, North Carolina Sound, Gulf of Mexico). 
 
 ​
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include f) identification of the major 
watershed systems in Virginia, including the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.  
 
Introduction: 
N/A  
 
Review: 
Students will be given a bellringer, “What three Virginia provinces is home to the Appalachian 
Mountains? 
 
Lesson Content:  
Text Set:  
Major Watersheds in Virginia 
 
http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/ 
Map: http://va.water.usgs.gov/wqday_04/basin_jen.jpg 

 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
Questions  
(I)What watershed do we live in? (C)What do the James and Potomac watersheds have in common? 
(L)What are the three major watersheds in Virginia (places water ultimately empties)? (C)Which 
watershed is most polluted and why? (L)What are the 11 major watersheds of Virginia?   
 
Activities: 
1. Students will be given a bellringer, “What three Virginia provinces is home to the Appalachian 
Mountains? This is used as review. (5 minutes) 
2. Students will each be given the same reading and map on the major watersheds in Virginia. I will read 
every other paragraph and a student from the class will read every other paragraph. Each student will 
have a least one paragraph to read aloud. If the student is having trouble with words, then I will assist 
the student. As we read aloud the students will pause to color on their maps the watersheds we read 
about. By the time the read aloud is finished the map should be completely colored in. Every 
watershed should be a different color. This allows the students to visually remember the content. 
Finally, the students will copy a map that I have already completed by drawing dotted lines to signify 
the three divides in Virginia (Gulf of Mexico, North Carolina, and Chesapeake Bay). (35 minutes) 
3. Students will complete an exit slip answering the question, “What watershed do we live in?” as 
comprehension, after reading and to check for understanding. (5 minutes)  
Materials Needed: 
● Text Set 
● Maps 
● Colored Pencils 
 
 
Check For Understanding: 
Students will complete an exit slip answering the question, “What watershed do we live in?” 
 
Conclusion: 
Remind students to keep their maps with them, because they will be used as review for the test.  
  
Reinforcement: 
N/A 
Self Evaluation: 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
Read slowly and allow them time to color in their maps as you go along. (Active Reading)   

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Aaron Napier 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

 
February 24, 2015     45 minutes, 9:00 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. 
 
Lesson Aim For Today: 
Chesapeake Bay and Coastal Environments of Virginia 
 
Student Learning Objective: 
Students should list the 6 major tributaries that empty into the Chesapeake Bay (Potomac, James, York, 
Rappahannock, Shenandoah, and Appomattox).   
 
SOL: ​
ES.8 The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by 
geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include f) identification of the major 
watershed systems in Virginia, including the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.  
 
Introduction: 
Students will brainstorm focusing on the question, “What do you know about the beach/marsh/swamp and 
other coastal wetlands? This is anticipation, before reading.   
 
Review: 
N/A 
 
Lesson Content:  
Text Set:  
1. Potomac River  ​
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potomac_River 
2. Rappahannock River ​
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rappahannock_River 
3. York River ​
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/York_River 
4. James River ​
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_River 
5. Appomattox River ​
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appomattox_River 
6. Shenandoah River ​
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shenandoah_River 
 
Questions  
(L)What is an estuary? (L)What is the difference between a marsh and a swamp? (L)What are the 6 major 
rivers in Va that empty into the Chesapeake Bay? (C)Why does the Chesapeake Bay, like many Bays 
around the U.S. have pollution problems?   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Activities: 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
1. Students will be brainstorm focusing on the question, “What do you know about the 
beach/marsh/swamp and other coastal wetlands? This is anticipation, before reading. (10 minutes) 
2. Students will be put into groups of 3 based on reading level to differentiate. Each group will have one 
river within the Coastal Bay Watershed to read about and complete a 3 sentence quick write about. 
(15 minutes)  
3. Each group will share their quick writes to the class and every student must include the river and three 
sentence summary in their learning logs as a glossary word. Therefore, they will have 6 new glossary 
words. (10 minutes) 
4. Students will complete a quick write answering the question, why is the Chesapeake Bay heavily 
polluted?” This will be used to check for understanding. (10 minutes)   
Materials Needed: 
● Text Set: Chesapeake Bay 
 
Check For Understanding: 
Students will complete a quick write answering the question, why is the Chesapeake Bay heavily 
polluted?” 
 
Conclusion: 
Remind students that they should keep their glossary terms organized because notebook checks are 
random.  
  
Reinforcement: 
N/A 
 
Self Evaluation: 
Keep track of time during the brainstorming session. It can go on for the entire duration of the class if you 
let it.   
 
 
 
 
 

 
Aaron Napier 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

 
February 25, 2015     45 minutes, 9:00 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. 
 
Lesson Aim For Today: 
Reading a Topographic Map   
 
Student Learning Objective: 
Students should identify the following features on a topographical map in regards to Virginia Watersheds: 
elevation of the headwaters for the Shenandoah River, distance of the James River using a scale, and the 
latitude of Richmond, Virginia. 
 
SOL: ​
ES.1 The student will plan and conduct investigations in which c) scales, diagrams, charts, graphs, 
tables, imagery, models, and profiles are constructed and interpreted; d) maps and globes are read and 
interpreted, including location by latitude and longitude. ES.8 The student will investigate and understand 
how freshwater resources are influenced by geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts 
include f) identification of the major watershed systems in Virginia, including the Chesapeake Bay and its 
tributaries.  
 
Introduction: 
N/A  
 
Review: 
Students will be given a bellringer, “What rivers flow into the Chesapeake Bay? 
 
Lesson Content:  
Powerpoint Lecture:  
1. Latitude is the angular distance from the center of the earth; displayed using horizontal lines on a 
map.  
2. Longitude is displayed using vertical lines on a map and were developed because of time zones.  
3. Elevation is the height of land above sea level.  
4. Scale is used to show distance on a map comparing miles or kilometers to inches or centimeters.  
*Link Elmore, GIS (Fall 2012) & Advance GIS (Spring 2013) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Topographical Maps: 
https://www.topoquest.com/map­detail­preview.php?usgs_cell_id=16513 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

 
Questions  
(L)What is a scale in regards to mapping? (L)What is latitude and longitude? (C)What is the Latitude of 
Richmond, Virginia? (C)How long is the James River, using a scale? (C)What is the elevation of the 
headwaters of the Shenandoah River? (Cr)If you were going to create your own city in Virginia, where 
would you put it (latitude & longitude) and why?   
 
Activities: 
1. Students will be given a bellringer, “What rivers flow into the Chesapeake Bay? This is used as 
review. (5 minutes) 
2. Students will be given a short lecture on how to read topographic maps, including elevation, 
latitude/longitude, and scales. (10 minutes)   
3. Students will be put into groups of 3 based on reading levels. Each group should include at least one 
student with higher comprehension skills to help other students (differentiate). They will be given 
topographic maps of Virginia and have to answer the following questions:  (C)What is the Latitude of 
Richmond, Virginia? (C)How long is the James River, using a scale? (C)What is the elevation of the 
headwaters of the Shenandoah River? (Cr)If you were going to create your own city in Virginia, 
where would you put it (latitude & longitude) and why? The maps should be turned in to check for 
understanding. (30 minutes) 
Materials Needed: 
● PowerPoint Lecture: Maps 
● Colored Pencils 
● Topographic Maps of Virginia 
 
Check For Understanding: 
Students will complete an exit slip answering the question, “What watershed do we live in?” 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
 
Conclusion: 
Remind students that we will be having a test on major watersheds in Virginia tomorrow.   
  
Reinforcement: 
N/A 
 
Self Evaluation: 
Understanding scales on a map can take some time. Use a ruler and show them individually if you have 
to.   

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Aaron Napier 
 

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 

February 19, 2015     45 minutes, 9:00 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. 
 
Lesson Aim For Today: 
Test Day 
 
Student Learning Objective: 
Students will be tested on physiographic provinces and major watersheds in Virginia, including the 
Chesapeake Bay and coastal wetlands; as well as how to read a topographic map to understand freshwater 
resources in Virginia.  
 
SOL: ​
ES.1 The student will plan and conduct investigations in which c) scales, diagrams, charts, graphs, 
tables, imagery, models, and profiles are constructed and interpreted; d) maps and globes are read and 
interpreted, including location by latitude and longitude. ES.8 The student will investigate and understand 
how freshwater resources are influenced by geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts 
include f) identification of the major watershed systems in Virginia, including the Chesapeake Bay and its 
tributaries.  
 
Introduction: 
N/A 
 
Review: 
Students will be allowed 5 minutes to ask any questions they have pertaining to the material examined in 
the period and look at maps they created.   
 
Lesson Content:  
Test​
 ​
Questions: 
(L)The Appalachian Mountains are in what three provinces?  
(L)The Piedmont is known for having what type of land feature?  
(I)The Coastal Plain has predominantly what type of soil texture? (Cr)Which province would you live in 
and why?  
(I)What watershed do we live in?  
(C)What do the James and Potomac watersheds have in common?  
(L)What are the three major watersheds in Virginia (places water ultimately empties)?  
(C)Which watershed is most polluted and why? (L)What are the 11 major watersheds of Virginia?   
(L)What is an estuary?  
(L)What is the difference between a marsh and a swamp?  
(L)What are the 6 major rivers in Va that empty into the Chesapeake Bay?  
(C)Why does the Chesapeake Bay, like many Bays around the U.S. have pollution problems?  
(L)What is a scale in regards to mapping?  
(L)What is latitude and longitude?  
(C)What is the Latitude of Richmond, Virginia?  
(C)How long is the James River, using a scale?  

 
Teacher: Aaron Napier 
Earth Science 9 
Fresh­water Resources 
 
(C)What is the elevation of the headwaters of the Shenandoah River?  
(Cr)If you were going to create your own city in Virginia, where would you put it (latitude & longitude) 
and why?   
 
Questions  
N/A  
 
Activities: 
1. Students will be allowed 5 minutes to ask any questions they have pertaining to the material examined 
in the period and look at the maps they made in class over the duration of the period. (5 minutes) 
2. Students will take a test focusing on physiographic provinces and major watersheds in Virginia, 
including the Chesapeake Bay and coastal wetlands; as well as how to read a topographic map to 
understand freshwater resources in Virginia. (40 minutes) 
 
Materials Needed: 
● Test Questions 
 
 
Check For Understanding: 
N/A 
 
Conclusion: 
Remind the students that the unit on freshwater resources is over and will be moving to oceanography 
next week.  
  
Reinforcement: 
N/A 
 
Self Evaluation: 
Make sure students are not talking. It would be a good idea to explain that honesty is the best policy and 
cheating is not tolerated.