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Facilitation on Preventing Violent Extremism through Education

Outreach
I)
II)
III)
IV)
V)
VI)
VII)
VIII)
IX)
X)

Outline Agenda (1-min)
Ground Rules (1-min)
Overview of the Problem (1-min)
Facilitation Goal: Identify Threats and Mitigation Measures in Curriculum (1-min)
Individual Problem-Solving Activity (3-min)
Art of Listening: Facilitation Tool (3-min)
Active Listening in Groups (3-min)
Individual Reflection (3-min)
Observations Discussion (10-min)
Key Takes (1-min)

Ground Rules (1-min)

in the interest of time I want to simply emphasize we are all “human”
[cross arms] and say “I’m human [look to either side] and so are they and we make
mistakes, but that doesn’t define our intent”

Overview of the Problem (1-min)



Global increase (by about 60%) of terrorism since 2012
3,400 Western individuals recruited by IS alone to perpetrate political violence
500 individuals from the U.S. were recruited
Some factors that motivate youth to adopt violent extremism include:
o social or economic marginalization
o political disaffection
o loss of personal status
o experiencing of a traumatic life event
o need for a higher purpose
Current national efforts are focused on countering narratives on social media or
utilizing the gang-based model as best practices for mitigating potential terrorist
acts at the local-level
Proposal: preventing violent extremism among U.S. pre-adolescents (8-11 years)
through facilitated experiential learning in the classroom
o foster empathy, tolerance and trust through peer-learning
o cultivate appreciation for diversity through joint-problem solving
o learn strategies to channel anger and grievances

Individual Problem-Solving Activity (3-min)

Review the Appendix B [from the proposal]: Experiential and Reflection Activities in
the Classroom to Constructively Channel Anger and Grievances
Your Task:
1) Fill in the box identifying one potential threat (in other words id a potential
situation/problem/issue that could arise from doing this activity)
2) Identify a potential way to mitigate the threat>write it in the box titled
“Mitigation Measure”
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3) Only have 3-minutes to complete the task, so focus only on the first 3 activities
Goal: Identify Threats and Mitigation Measures in Curriculum
Activit
y

Assumptions

Journali
ng

Letter
Writing

Exercise
and
Breathe

Anticipated
Outcome

Reflective practice
that allows
individual
opportunity to
examine emotions
associated to
perspectives,
values, and
interests
Indirect way for
those who are less
vocal to make their
needs known

Objectively
present and
actively listen
to others’
values and
interests

Diffuse emotion
and release
dopamine

Transparently
demonstrate
perspective
and intent
without
interruption
Channel
energy into
objectively
examining
issues and
look for
bridging
capital

Threats

Mitigation
Measures

Facilitation Tool: Art of Listening (3-min)
By listening to self (i.e. own thoughts), meaning (i.e. content), and depth (i.e. intention,
emotion, intuition) facilitator can learn to listen and help participants listen to each other
to effectively problem-solve and identify common ground. [To conserve time we will only
review the Techniques and Behaviors for Listening]
Techniqu
e
Presence

Comfort
with
Silence

Behaviors for Listening








Concentrate on the conversation
Be aware of breathing and stance
Listen without judgment
Visibly convey warmth and compassion
Kinesthetic learner should hold an object to concentrate
Slow down
Allow more space between thoughts
Be intentional about pausing
“Let’s take a moment to think about this…”
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Working
with
Inner
Voice


Active
Listening



Active
Listening
Techniqu
e
encourag
ing

Be aware when you’re zoning-out during conversation
Notice when the inner voice is helpful vs. when it sabotages
one’s understanding of other
Integrate personal thoughts by forming an inquiry>precipitates
discussion
Assist in checking assumptions
Clarifies your own thoughts
Enables you to understand others

Purpose


Conveys interest
Keeps person taking

Approach

restating


reflecting

summariz
ing


Demonstrates that
you listen and
understand
Helps speakers grasp
the facts
Demonstrates that
you listen and
understand
Communicates to the
speaker you
understand how
(s)he feels
Extract and
synthesize important
facts and ideas
Establish baseline for
further discussion
Acknowledge
progress



Language

Don’t
agree/disagree with
the speakers
Use non-committal
words with positive
tone
Restate basic idea
of the speaker
Put it in your own
words


Reflect speaker’s
feelings
Put it in your own
words



Restate/reflect/sum
marize major ideas
and feelings

I see.
Tell me more
about that.
Go on.

If I understand
you correctly…
In other words…

My
understanding is
that you feel…
You conveyed a
sense of…
You vocalized
concern about…
From what the
group expressed,
these seem to be
the main
thoughts…
The primary
concerns here
are…

Active Listening in Groups (3-min)
Your Task:
1) Get in to a group of three people nearest you.
2) Take the 1st threat and mitigation measure you identified in the “Individual
Problem-Solving Activity” and share it with your group.
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3) Only have 3-minutes to complete the task, so focus only on the first activity so that
everyone has time to share.
Goal: Engage the Techniques and Behaviors for Listening—do not write
anything down
Individual Reflection (3-min)
Your Task:
1) Reflect on the group experience.
2) Were you listening to the words and their meaning? Were you watching the body
language? Were you zoning out? Were thinking of what you were going to say?
4) Only have 3-minutes to complete the task, so focus on your initial reactions.
Goal: Reflect on your own personal listening habits so that you are
cognizant of them.

Observations Discussion (10-min)
Now we’re going to open up these personal reflections to discussion.
Would anyone like to share their experience? What do you believe prompts that
behavior?
[Have participants utilize the Active Listening Language]
Key Takes (1-min)

You learned the facilitation tool—the Art of Listening, which included Techniques
and Behaviors for Listening
You applied them when sharing the threats and mitigation measures you identified
within activities extracted from Appendix B [from the proposal]: Experiential and
Reflection Activities in the Classroom to Constructively Channel Anger and
Grievances
You had an opportunity to reflect on your current listening habits so that you
cognizant of them during a facilitation. If you so choose you can make adjustments
to how you go about listening by engaging Techniques and Behaviors for Listening
outlined on your handout.

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