You are on page 1of 5

Student: Jessica Lee

School: Riverview Elementary
IWU Supervisor: Professor McCracken Co-op Teacher: Mrs. James
Teaching Date: N/A
Grade Level: 3rd
Lesson Title: The Power of Appreciation
Indiana Wesleyan University
Elementary Education Lesson Plan Template
2007 ACEI Standards
READINESS
I.
Goals/Objectives/Standard(s)
A. Goal(s)— Students will learn the importance that each individual has in a community.
B. Objective(s)—
a. After the writing practice, students will demonstrate the ability to generate a draft by
selecting and organizing ideas relevant to the topic and purpose.
C. Standard(s):
a. 3.W.4 Apply the writing process to –
Generate a draft by developing, selecting and organizing ideas relevant to topic,
purpose, and
genre; revise to improve writing, using appropriate reference materials (e.g., quality
of ideas,
organization, sentence fluency, word choice); and edit writing for format and
conventions (e.g.,
spelling, capitalization, usage, punctuation).
II.
Materials & Management
A. Materials:
i. Paper
ii. Whiteboard and marker
iii. Sample “Thank You” letter
B. Time:
i. Anticipatory Set: 5 minutes
ii. Lesson Presentation: 35 minutes
iii. Closure: 5 minutes
C. Space:
i. Students will begin at their desks.
ii. Students will meet with their partner anywhere in the room that they like.
1. They will return to their seat as soon as they are done.
D. Behavior:
i. I will let students know that I have a high expectation for their behavior
because I have seen the way they can do when they all give their best. Tell
them that I expect them to listen, and follow directions. If they have something
to say, or a question, they can raise their hand.
ii. Students will be expected to work at a level 1.
iii. If students are too loud for me to get their attention, they I will say “If you can
hear my voice clap once.” And only repeat it once. If students continue talking,
I will walk over to them and quietly tell them that we will move on when they
are ready.
E. Technology
i. Document Camera
ii. Overhead projector
III.
Anticipatory Set
A. “Okay class, I want to do a little experiment. But first, I need a volunteer. Andrew,
would you mind sitting outside at the table until I ask you to come back in? Come here
and I’m going to tell you what I want you to do.” Explain to Andrew that he needs to
step out and we’re going to have a quote written on the board when he comes back in
and he has to guess who said it.
B. After Andrew leaves, “Okay class I am going to go around in a circle and I want you all
to be thinking about something nice you can say about Andrew. You have to say
something and you only have 5 seconds when it’s your turn, so, be thinking.” Go

1

around the horseshoe having students each give something. If students run out of
ideas, help them come up with some.
C. “When he comes back in, I want us all to clap for him and cheer, can we do that?”
D. When Andrew comes back in, after we have cheered and he has read the nice things
written on the board. Tell him he can sit down. Then ask how it made him feel.
E. “If I gave you the chance, how many of you would like to get a chance to go out in the
hallway and have us do the same thing for you?”
IV.

Purpose: “Today we’re going to learn how to write “Thank You” letters, and then use those
skills to encourage people who have impacted our lives.”

PLAN FOR INSTRUCTION
III.Adaptation to Diverse Students-- Demonstrate your understanding of the development and
approaches to learning unique to the students in this class as you describe the specific
instructional opportunities provided in this lesson.
A. Remediation: Students who are having difficulty with the structure and purpose of Thank
You letters may require additional one-on-one attention. I will work with them and help
them verbally process why they want to thank the person that they selected. If they need
further help, I will give them directions on how to pre-write their ideas before writing their
letter.
B. Enrichment: Students who complete their assignment early will be paired up to peer-edit
each other’s letters and check for any spelling/mechanics errors.
a. If they still have extra time, they may draw a picture to include in their letter.
C. Exceptional Needs: Students who have difficulty writing will only be required to write 3 or
4 sentence in their paragraph before checking their mechanics.
(ACEI 3.2)
IV.Lesson Presentation (Input/Output)
a. “Saying thank you is a very simply way to let someone feel appreciated and celebrated.
By writing thank you notes, we can tell them why we’re saying thank you. Imagine thank
you notes, as a way of giving a person the applause and encouragement that we gave
Andrew when he walked in the room.”
b. Pause
c. “What do you think would happen, if we each took the time to let the people that we are
thankful for, know just how thankful we are for them?”
d. Talk about how impactful it is when one person chooses to be kind. Then a whole group of
people chooses to be kind.
e. So let’s brainstorm whom we want to write thank you notes for. Some of you may have
someone in mind already. Which is great! But I want us to brainstorm other people that
help us that we can show just how much we appreciate them.”
f. Ask students for their ideas. Some potential ideas include:
i. Lunch Ladies
ii. Secretary
iii. Teacher
iv. Parents
v. Friends
vi. Janitors
vii. Grandma/Grandpa
viii. Bus Drivers
g. Okay now I’m going to give you 30 seconds to pick who you want to write to. Write it
down at the top of your paper and when you’re done, start pre-planning what you want to
thank them for.
h. “Raise you hand if you have ever written a letter. Okay, great! Now raise your hand if you
can tell me how I start a letter.”
i. Possible answers: Hello, Dear_____
i. “Okay now how do we end it?”
i. Students might say: Bye, See ya later, See you soon, signing your name
j. “Those are all great answers but today we’re going to keep it simple and sign out letters
with “Sincerely,” and then your name.

2

o

o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o

(ACEI 2.4)
“Okay so at the beginning of your letter you’ll write what’s called a greeting. This is where
you write “Dear” and then the name of the person you’re writing to. So let’s review
abbreviations for name prefixes. Who would like to come up to the board and show me
how to write Mrs.? Okay, and Mr.? and Miss?”
“Does everyone agree with the way they have written it? If not, how can I help them fix
it?”
“Okay so then you’ll write your body. And then we have the closing. Here you will simply
write, “Sincerely” and then your name. I will keep it up here so you can spell it right on
your letter.”
Students will then write their letters for the next 25 minutes.
Model: Provide example letter on document imaging camera for the students to see how
it will look when it’s all done. Ask students to check their letters for:
Greeting at far left
Comma after greeting
Indented paragraphs
Closing at far right
Comma after closing
Name, first and last

V.Check for understanding.
a. Have students get with their 2’clock clock buddies and read their letter aloud to the other
person.
b. Each student must tell their partner one thing that they really like or did well in their
letter.
c. After students have paired and shared, then they will return to their seats
d. “Okay class, even if you aren’t finished, go ahead and set your pencil down at the top of
your desk and I want eyes up here. Great! When I say go, get with your 2 o’clock clock
buddy and each of you will read through your letter. When your partner has read his or
her letter, then you will tell them one thing that you liked or that they did well. When both
of you have finished sharing, return to your seats. You have 3 minutes to do this.”
VI.Review learning outcomes / Closure
a. Once students have returned to their seats, we will discuss the purpose behind writing
thank you letters and what students learned.
b. “So at the beginning of class, we talked about why we write thank you notes. Who would
like to remind us?”
c. “How did you guys feel while you wrote them?”
d. “When we take the time to make others feel good, just like we did for Andrew, it
encourages us as well. How many of you felt like the whole room was happy in that
moment when we were clapping?”
e. “How many of you, raise you hand, if you found yourself feeling happy writing your letter,
even though you were writing it to thank someone else?”
f. If you didn’t finish, you may have time later today to finish writing them. If you’re finished
and you find time, you could even add a nice picture to the letter.
PLAN FOR ASSESSMENT
While the students are writing, I will be walking around, answering questions and
reading what the students have written to make sure that they understand the purpose and focus
of “thank you” letters. While students are sharing with one another, I will be listening for students
who did not adhere to the purpose of the letter. At the conclusion of the lesson, students will turn
in their lessons if they have completed them. For those students who have trouble understanding
what to write in their letter, I will help them come up with a) the items for which they are showing
gratitude, and b) how to turn those items into sentences.

A. Formative: I will be observing the students as they work on their letters
B. Summative: Students will submit their letters to me. I will evaluate them based on their ability to follow
the purpose, and format of the letter.
.

3

(ACEI 4.0)
REFLECTION AND POST-LESSON ANALYSIS
1. How many students achieved the lesson objective(s)? For those who did not, why not?
2. What were my strengths and weaknesses?
3. How should I alter this lesson?
4. How would I pace it differently?
5. Were all students actively participating? If not, why not?
6. What adjustments did I make to reach varied learning styles and ability levels?
a. Bloom’s Taxonomy
b. Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences
7. Did students seem to understand the bigger purpose behind writing thank you letters?
8. Is there a video, or a book that could enhance their understanding?
Revision Date: August 25, 2015
2007 ACEI Standard

4

Readiness

Goals
Objectives
Standards

Anticipatory Set

Purpose

Plan For
Instruction

Adaptation to
Diverse Students
ACEI Standard 3.2

Lesson Presentation
Social Studies
ACEI Standard 2.4

Lesson Presentation
ACEI Standard 3.3

Check for

Needs Improvement
1
Lesson objectives are
poorly written and/or
have little or no
connection to learning
goals or standards.
Little connection
exists between
objectives and lesson
activities and
assessments.
The anticipatory set is
missing or has little or
no connection to the
goal or content of the
lesson.

Emerging
Competence 2
Lesson objectives are
correlated with
learning goals and
standards. The
connection between
objectives and lesson
activities and
assessments is weak
or unclear.

Competent 3

Outstanding 4

The lesson plan
contains objectives
that connect goals
and standards with
lesson activities and
assessments.

The lesson plan contains
clearly stated content
objectives. Objectives are
logically connected to
appropriate goals and
standards and are
consistent with lesson
activities and assessments.

The connection
between the
anticipatory set and
lesson objectives and
content is weak or
unclear.

The anticipatory set
is clear and direct
and focuses students’
attention on the
lesson.

The statement of
purpose is ambiguous
or worded so
generally that the
connection with the
content of the lesson
is not apparent.

A statement of
purpose is included in
the lesson, but has
little power to
motivate students and
capture their
imaginations.

The statement of
purpose is clearly
connected to the
content of the lesson
and is presented in
terms that are easily
understood by
students.

The anticipatory set
connects the current lesson
with previous and future
learning and focuses
students’ minds and
attention on the day’s
lesson.
The statement of purpose
has the power to capture
the imaginations of
students and motivate
them to accomplish the
expected learning.

Needs Improvement
1
Few or no instructional
opportunities are
included. Any
instructional
opportunities are not
developmentally
appropriate or
adapted to diverse
students.

Emerging
Competence 2
Instructional
opportunities are
provided in this
lesson; however, they
are not adapted to
diverse students.

The candidate’s
lesson plan suggests
that he or she is not
familiar with the
themes, concepts, and
modes of inquiry
drawn from the
academic fields of the
social studies.
The candidate does
not demonstrate
understanding of the
major concepts and
modes of inquiry from
the social studies, and
does not promote
elementary students’
ability to make
informed decisions as
citizens of a culturally
diverse democratic
society and
interdependent world.

The candidate’s
lesson plan suggests
emerging familiarity
with the themes,
concepts, and modes
of inquiry drawn from
the academic fields of
the social studies.
The candidate
demonstrates limited
understanding of the
major concepts and
modes of inquiry from
the social studies, and
minimally promotes
elementary students’
ability to make
informed decisions as
citizens of a culturally
diverse democratic
society and
interdependent world.

The lesson
presentation does not
encourage elementary
students’
development of
critical thinking and
problem solving.

The lesson
presentation includes
little provision for
students’
development of
critical thinking and
problem solving.

Little or no provision is
included to check for
student understanding
or to reteach concepts
that elude students

A guided practice
5
section is included in
the lesson plan, but
the connection with
the lesson

Competent 3
Instructional
opportunities are
provided in this
lesson. The
opportunities are
developmentally
appropriate and/or
are adapted to
diverse students.
The candidate
demon-strates an
under- standing of
the themes,
concepts, and modes
of inquiry drawn from
the social studies in
his or her lesson
plan. He or she
develops experiences
to help elem.
students learn about
major social studies
concepts. The
candidate’s lesson
plan demonstrates an
understanding of the
major concepts and
modes of inquiry
from the social
studies, and enables
stu- dents to learn
about the major
themes that integrate
knowledge across the
social students and
helps them become
productive
participants in a
democratic society.
The lesson
presentation includes
at least one teaching
strategy that
encourages
elementary students’
development of
critical thinking and
problem solving.
The lesson plan
includes a plan and
the means to check
for student
understanding of the

Outstanding 4
Specific instructional
opportunities are provided
in this lesson that
demonstrate the
candidate’s understanding
of how students differ in
their development and
approaches to learning.
The instructional
opportunities are adapted
to diverse students.
The candidate
demonstrates in-depth
knowledge and
understanding of how the
major concepts and
themes of social studies
are integrated across
academic fields in his or
her lesson plan.
The candidate’s lesson
plan demonstrates an indepth understanding of the
social studies and a
significant ability to help K6 students learn the
essential concepts and
become productive
participants in a
democratic society.

The lesson presentation
includes a variety of
teaching strategies that
encourage elementary
students’ development of
critical thinking and
problem solving.
Plans to check for student
understanding of the
content are an integral part
of the lesson, and include
frequent questions and