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GOLDSMITH FITZGERALD RECEIVED F yy OEE: OOH & iF ‘Because formance Mater Civit SERVICE COMMISSION STAFF RETENTION SURVEY Requested by ‘civ Service commission Prepared by: ectan Fitzgaraid, Partnor ‘Tracey 01 oncultant j9h, Project consultant ‘connor mi Date: 29 October 1999 '© Goldamih Stzgorals 1999 TABLE OF CONTENTS Contents Page 1. Executve Summary 1 2. Terms of Reteronce & Objectives 9 3. Research Design h 4. Bdings u 41 Trendsin Vacancies sng 6 (2.1.1 Aggregate level of movement: Tumover & 6 4112 Ciesfestion ofl movements ” 11.13 Resgnatian by grade bonds and actos 2 deporiments 4414 Proectedrecrutment volumes n yoor 2000 2 42 How the Ci Senice meets employees work 2 aprons? [ZR Major focton cng resnations % 421.1 Earns & coro progetion % 421.2 Reward &recogation “0 421.3 Toskresponsbty a 1422 Seconday tegration foctos 4 422. Toning & devetopment 4 4222 Comming ne 5) 4223 Management practices 82 4224 Stems innovation % 423 Facton to supper retention # 423.1 Joo secutty # 4232 Progreswve working arongements a 4233 Socal dynamics “6s 4294 Pubte sence commitment o 5. Conclusions ” 6, Recommendations nm Appendices Append 1 Slatsticol Notes: Coleulation & Interpretation of Trend lines ‘Appendix2: Terms of Reference (excerpt ftom contract) ‘Appendix3: Strand One: "Tunover Survey’ sent to Personnel Oticers Appencica: Strand Two: Questionnaire and Focus Group, Non-start Interview & But erview outings ‘Append: Actuol Demographic Distibutions for Strand Two ‘Appendix6: Resignations Trends by Grade for all Offices / Departments participating in the survey ‘Appendix 7: Profies of Detvery Gops for Different Grades & Sub- ‘groups eres aren Tables Page Toble 1: Retention ane Work Aspirations 1.84.76 Toble 2: Designed Demographic Distiouion for Questionnaire Sample 2 Table 3: Staff Movements / Vacancies 6 Table 4: Turnover Rates 18 Table 6: Resignation 2 Table 6: Resignations by Grade 199% -1999 2 Toble 7: Projected Recrutment Volumes in 2000 25 Table 8: Key Grades ond sub-groups 2 Toble ¢: Earnings ond Career Progression -Imporionce by Group 7 Table 10: Earnings and Career Progression - Delvery Gop by Group 38 Table 11: Reword ond Recognition - importance by Group a Table 12: Reward and Recognition - Delivery Gap by Group 2 Table 13: Tosk Responsblty- Importance by Group 45 Table 14: Tosk Responsbilty -Delnery Gap by Group a Toble 15: Length of Tne in Current Postion 48 Toble 16: Tcining ond Development - importance by Group 0 Table 17: Tiiring ond Development - Delivery Gop by Group 50 Table 18: Commuting Time - impertonce by Group 31 Table 19: Commuting Time - Delvery Gop by Group ry Table 20: Management Practices- Importance by Group 53 Table 21: Management Practses- Delery Gap by Group 55 Table 22: Systems ond Innovation - Importance by Group 7 Table 23: Systems ond Innavation - Delvery Gap by Group 58 Table 24: Job Secutty- Importance by Group 9 Tobie 25: Job Secutty- Delivery Gap by Group o Toble 26: Progressive Working Arongements -Imporiance by Group a Table 27: Progressive Working Arrangements - Delivery Gap by Group “8 Table 28: Sociol Dynamics - Importance by Group 6 Table 29: Social Dynamics - Delivery Gop by Group oe Table 30: Public Service Commitment - Importance by Group 70 Table 31: Public Service Commitment - Delvery Gop by Group n Figures Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure § Figueé Figue7 Figuie 8 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figuie 12 Figuie 13 Resignations by Grade 1996 ~ 1999 (of Grade’s 1999) Population) Staff Out ond Stato: 1996 1999 \Voconey and Hing Trends: 1996- 1999 1999 Stoff Movements by Category Stott Movements by Category : 1996 - 1999 Resignations by Grade 1996-1999 (Percentage of Grade’s 1999 Population) ‘Where i's hurting ~ Departments with high % resignations (all staff) Where It's hurting - Departments with high % specialist resignations Shot Stoys Ob of new hires) Outside Hing 1996-1999 Top 5 preferences for diverse work aspiations of top five preferences inclucing fist preference rato - All Stott Current and preferred work opportunities (Gap Overview) ~ Al Stott Poge 21 2 2 28 2% 3 33 Executive Summary i Sorice Commision Stat Reteton Survey Pen ag Introduetion This research was undertaken by Goldsmith Fitzgerald Partnership (GFP) on behalf (oF the civil Service Commission to estabilsh the origins and causes of vacancies arising In general service grades in the Civil Service. ‘The report documents ‘+ The current trends in staff turnover ‘+ What staff aspirations need to be prioritised in formulating responses. ur findings, which are derived from broad-based research, Indicate that the umber of people leaving the Clvil Service tturnaven has Increased rapidly in the last three years and that the Civil Service, Is now operating in an era of employee choice. {A the Clerical Officer level resignations have doubled in three years and are now In the mid-range of levels in the private sector. staff are exercising cholce to enter Jobs which will give them more interesting work, better career ‘development prospects and earnings potential, and will draw on skills they have ‘developed (often through further study. In addition there are particularly ‘dramatic rises in resignation rates In departments, which draw on professionals with significant financial, legal or IT type skills. Generally resignations at Executive officer level are below levels in the private sector. Staff at the Assistant Principal level are least tkely to resign. ‘The report recommendations should enable a measured response to recent Increases in turnover (exits) and help the organisation prepare an effective retention policy For an era oF employee choice. A key driver for an effective retention policy should be the savings achievable on the hidden cost of resignations. These hidden costs include + Loss oF skis + Diminished performance during resignation verlag, ‘+ Recruitment and selection costs, ‘+ Induction and socialisation of new staff. i Serves Commision tt Retention Sarey Inaddition an effective retention policy can potentially mitigate demands for across the board salary Increases Research Objectives and Design ‘The research underpinning our conclusions consisted of two strands. Strand one was designed to establish the current trends In staff turnover, across the organisation. ‘Strand two looked at what staff aspirations need to be prioritised in formulating responses. Strand one involved a “Turnover Survey". This looked at movements of staff both internally and externally In the last three years. This survey was completed by Personnel officers for their own departments and the data was pooled to give an overall picture. Overall Departments and Offices participating In the research covered 91% of the staff in the organisation. We ‘would lke to acknowledge all the support we recelved from personnel officers when undertaking this research, Strand two involved 669 staff across tne organisation completing a detalles ‘questionnaire on thelr work aspirations, and 70 staff participating in focus ‘groups about retention and resignation Issues. Exit interviews were also utilised to gather qualitative information around retention issues. A response rate of 73.5% (669/910) was achieved on the staff questionnaire. The 669 completed questionnaires came from Assistant Principal level and above (14%), Higher Executive Officers (HEO) / Executive Officers (EO) / Staff Officers (SO) level (2996), Clerical level 3696) and specialist level 2496). Conclusions What are the current trends in turnover? ‘The total number of people departing from surveyed departments in the first ‘6 months of this year was 518. This represents an annualised turnover rate (OF 3.7596, This has risen from 2.4% In 1996. Rises in resignations have lunderpinned the rise in turnover. While job sharing rates have risen (i sevice Commision tat Retention Survey incrementally and retirement rates have been stable at below 0.75%, ‘resignation rates have more than doubled in the three years between 1996 ‘and 1999. The current resignation rate Is 1.7436, The 1998 figure was 1.32%, 1997 was 1.31% and 1986 was 0.83%6. There Is no reason to expect a reversal oF ‘the current rise in resignation rates. ‘There Is considerable variation In resignation rates across grades. As shown in Figure 1 below, Clerical grades have the highest resignation rates, This vear the rate is heading for 2.48% of staff within the Clerical grade band, By ‘contrast the 1998 resignation rate for people at Assistant Principal level and ‘above is just 0.49%, The overall resignation rate for Specialists Is 1.7296, but ‘there is huge variation in the makeup of the specialist group, Figure 1: Resignations by Grede 1996-1809 (Percent of Grades 1899 Population) ‘The increase in turnover (exits) at specialist levels can be linked to ‘departments and job roles that draw on I, Financial and legal sil. Some of ‘the increase at HEOIEOISO levels In 1998 can also be linked to a targeting of IT ‘staff within these grades by external organisations. ‘The next section provides the evidence necessary to formulate a measured response to recert increases in turnover. Chi Sorice Commision Sa Ratartian Suey ‘what staff aspirations need to be prioritised in formulating responses? ‘We Identified 11 factors relevant to Civil Service employees in an era of employee ‘choke. ‘Those are in order of importance: + Earnings and career progression ‘+ Task responsiblity ‘+ Reward and recognition + Job security ‘+ Progressive working arrangements + Training and Development + commuting time + Management practices ‘+ systems and Innovation ‘+ Soclal Dynamics ‘+ Public Service Commitment For the top three factors Garnings and career progression, Task responsibility Reward and recognition) there & a yawning gap between individuals aspirations ‘and what the Cull Service Is perceived as delivering. These three factors we have Classified as ‘Malor Factors Driving Resignations. Next we have a group of ‘Secondary Retention Factors. This group includes ‘Tralning and Development, Commuting time, Management practices, Systems and Innovation, These are aso areas in which there are significant unsatisfied aspirations, but they do not have the overarching importance of the ‘Major Factors Driving Resignations. ‘The Clil Service satisfes a reascnable share of Its employees aspirations in four ‘areas Uob Security, Progressive working arrangements, Social dynamics and Public service commitments. We have grouped these factors as ‘Factors to Support Retention’ Table 1 next page) summarises the results of our research on staff aspirations and, how the civil Service satisfies them. The Items which contribute to each factor are listed alongside them. aUca Due aneeUaMens) MAJOR FACTORS DRIVING (QUESTIONNAIRE ITEMS RESICNATIONS Earnings and Career Progression + Career progression ‘= Develop Earnings Reward and Recognition + Reward for effort + Personal recognition ‘Task Responsibility + Varied / interesting work + Challenging work + control own work SECONDARY RESIGNATION FACTORS ‘QUESTIONNAIRE ITEMS ‘raining and Development ‘= Training Opportunities commuting Time + commuting time ‘Management Practices + Participative Management + Develop others’ potential + Direct others ‘systems and innovation + Work with efficient systerns + Invent new ways of doing things FACTORS TO SUPPORT RETENTION ‘QUESTIONNAIRE ITEMS Job Security + Job security Progressive Working Arrangements + Flexible nours Comfortable environment ‘Access to childcare Relocation opportunities ‘Social Dynemics Work in a team, Meet new people ‘Age of colleagues Competitive environment Challenge others Providing public service + Vocational commitment Public Service commitment. Table 1: Retention and Work Aspirations [Ew Senice Commision Stu tenon Suey ‘The findings in Table + (previous page! reflect the picture across the ‘organisation. Nevertheless they can be applied in a reasonably consistent ‘manner across the various groups in the organisation. at the same time the following variations are worth distinguishing. Clerical officers particularly those under thirty, have the highest gaps between their aspirations and what the rote currently delivers. The major factors drivingresignations are all highly relevant for this group. There isa {200d level of satisfaction with flexible working hours for this group and this is likely to act as an effective factor to support retention. Staff at Assistant Principal level and above perceive the least diference between their aspirations and wnat thelr current role delivers. For the Executive Officer! Higher Executive Officer group, the perceived shortfall between aspirstions and what the role delivers in Reward for effort would present a most significant river of resignations. ‘We noted some important patterns for professional staff from high turnover departments. These include. ‘+ Availabilty of Flexible working hours a top 5 work aspiration (this is ‘generally not available) ‘+ Opportunities to work with a participative management style are also a high priority for these professionals. ‘+ No substantive value placed on job security Recommendations rom our research on the reasons underpinning staff resignations we have Identified eleven critical issues that future policy must account for. These researched critical issues can now piay a role in the formulation of an overall retention policy. The formulation of detalled policies must take place within ‘the context of the professionallsation of HR and the ongoing ul process. Within these contexts, structures will be needed to implement and pilot new Initiatives. This will necessitate the allocation of appropriate budgets and resources to achieve desired savings on hidden turnover costsand mitigate demands for across the board salary increases. cn Senice Cammisio Sta Retention Surey ‘Our eleven critical issues are... 0 To differentiate and promote the civil Service's unique seling points (USP's) as an employer oF choice . Our research has identified four factors with potential to support retention. For example progressive working arrangements _are generally seen by employees as an area in which the Civil Service Is delivering. “The organisatlcn's track record on flexible working hours along with recently Introcuced schemes such as term time, provide a strong platform for the civil Service to differentiate itself as a leader In provision of progressive work arrangements and family friendly policies. |W To Identity appropriate structures for mapping career development ‘from clerical level, Career development isthe most important work aspiration For employees.across the organisation. it Is necessary to Identify and recognise ‘employee's need for a sense of personal and career development. one option in thls area Is the establishment of career path structures, e.g. Customer service Specialists, Accounts, Human Resources. (aw) To ensure performance management has credible links to career evelopment for all staff. A performance management system, which does not Comprehensively address this sue, willbe dscredited. aw To tallor aspects of an overall retention policy to address the dramatic rises In resignation rates In departments, which draw on professionals with significant Financial, legal or 1 type skills. Over 60% of our survey sample from high turnover areas are seeking but not getting career progression. For ‘example, It would be useful to prioritise the Implementation of performance ‘management with these groups. A career path plan from recrultment to five ‘years thence would also be attractive. The goal Isto identify the context within ‘which these inaivicuals might deepen their commitment to the civil service. (W To design and implement a user friendly Human Resource Management Information system. A system Is necessary to aid the Implementation of retention policy. This should provide regular reports on turnover and resignations. To achieve success we recommend that it should be administered at local level and interfaced with a central system, (Wn To ensure training Is inked to individuals’ work goats - Responses to strand one suggest 22% of the organisation are in their current postions for less Ci Senice mmission St tention Savey than 18 months. This highlights @ need for efficlent induction training and socialisation at departmental level, Funded training (internal and external should explicitly be linked to individuals career development plans and work ‘goals, Likewise Individuals need to be challenged to apply emerging skils on the job, (uin To delegate task responsibility in a way that respects individuals’ experience. varied/ interesting work Is @ huge Issue for staff. The group Which is most deeply disaffected in this area is experienced clerical level ‘employees. Ways & means must be considered to utilise thelr experience and. ‘win their commitment to how work is assigned. For example, it may be possiole to develop more empowered teams at front line. (uitn To find structures which facilitate personal recognition. This is one Of the blogest challenges facing managers in the organisation. itis necessary to ensure staff recelve regular feedback and support from managers. It would also help if a way could be found to ensure managers have some discretionary resources for recognising special efforts by individuals or a team. (00 To address commuting Issues when making placements. The inclusion of commuting time as an employee work aspiration highlights the need for thls to be addressed when placing individuals. options including piloting of teleworking should be considered for high turnover professional staff. 00 To address people's special interests and skills when making placements. One of peoples greatest work aspirations Isto utilise their skills ‘and talents. one option to facilitate this would be an Increased focus on people's interests when making placement decisions from recruitment panels (0 To explore ways to redress anomalies in relocation policy. Relocation Is avery important issue for one in twenty staff. Many recent. recruits are serving time in Dublin while awalting a transfer. There are significant variations in policy from department to department. Terms of Reference & Objectives (cx Serace Commasen Stat Retenten Suney PMC Ned arsed kel tse Uy ‘he ChllService Commission hes identiied a need to conduct @ “research survey into vacancies axing in general service grades in the CiviSenice.” Consequently the Commision outined clear guidelines 0s to whot this research should om to cover. These terms of reference are outined below with the porticuar section of the report that deals spectically with thot ixue in porentheses (Append 2holds on ‘excerpt of the contract where points 2 to outne the texms of reference), Identity rate of change in the vacancies being notified to the Commission over the past three years ond mes the extent to which the curent levels of requests to fl vacancies i kely fo continue (See section 4.1.1 & 4.1.4) Identity the underlying rectors forthe level of vacancies occuring in| Govemment Deparment ond Offices (see section 4:22 t0 42.8) ‘Ascertain the extent to which newly recruited staff, who have gone through the recruitment process. are not accepting offer of appointment orhaving accepted the offer of appointment, are ether not turning Up for ork or leaving within a very shor ime ond the reasons why (see section 414) ‘Ascertain the extent fo which vaconcles are arising as o esut of staff leaving the Civil Service by resignation, coreer breck etc. ond as ¢ resut cof leokage within the Cl Service to promotion, transfer, deceniratsation, etc. (668 section 4.1.2) Identity the tate at which stat ore resigning trom the Ci Service (see section 4.1.1) Identity the tecsons why staff are resigning by conducting ext interviews with staff resigning (see section 42.1 40 42.12) Identity the foctors which wil old sttf retention (see sections 42.1 10 42.12) cet Sone Commeson Sit Relenton Suey We summarised the thrust of the terns of reference with three speciic questions > What or the curen rend in soft movernent and tunover? > How consistent he pichue across he organisation? > What stat ospirations need tobe prorized in formulating responses? The fers of reference and these three questions became the objectives of he reseorch and the methods used to meet these objectives ore outined in Section 3, Research Design Research Design Ch Sonice Commaon Slot Retenon Survey The terms of reference ond objectives provided a detolled brief for the areas to be coveredin the research, To meet these terns of reference we divided the research Into two stronds. For both strands, 32 main deporimental groupings were identified vi the Apri 99 ‘CEN-SS report. Civi Servant within these departments were sub-) te For Specie i.72% but here shue variation in thermateup of he Specialist group. Fr more detaled information on resignation trends, see [Appendix 6: Resignations trends by Grade forall Departments /orfices participating in the survey. ‘Figure 7: Where is hurting - Departments wi igh % resignations (a stan) BAL Dept % mA Dept 6 Resignations (average 6-99) Figure shows that itis departments with a high complement oF professionat stat? oO ‘who have the highest overall resignation rates. Four departments are conservatively projected to have overall resignation rates of 10% or over In 2000. ‘hu sanice Commision Reterson Suey Report ‘These are the Legal Aid Board, the Office of the Comptroller and Auditor General, the Director of Public Prosecutions, and tne Chief state Solicitors office. Figure 7 includes the 15 departments that trends suggest will experience resignation rates above average. For example the trend line suggests that the Legal Aid Board will experience resignation rates of 13% across all gzdes in the Year 2000. Figure 6 also shows the average rate in the board was 79% between 1996 and 1999. The overall departmental average for the period 1996-1999 Is shown in the ‘All Dept. % Resignations (Average 96-99) column Figure 8 shows that Specialists in some departments are resigning at extraordinary rates. includes the 13 departments which trends suggest will experience resignation rates above average for Specialists. DeptSpecaists % Dept Specaiss % FResignaions (rand Resignations for 2000) (Average 86-9) From the above It can beseen that 7 departments are predicted to have ‘Specialist resignation rates near or above $% In 2000 and that six of these are predicted to have resignation rates above 10%. The critical departmentsioffices are Forelgn Affairs, tne Legal Ald Board, the Civil Service Commission, the ChieF State Solicitors Office, the Office of the Comptroller and Auditor General, Justi Equality and Law Reform - Courts, all above 10%, and Justice, Equality and Law Reform (main) at $96. B hi eves Commision Retention Survey Report ‘Our report conclusions and recommendations are underpinned by the finding ‘that trie most critical problems with retention and employee relations are at ‘Clerical level throughout the organisation and at Specialist level in some ‘departments. Recruitment and contracting procedures in these departments ‘must be prepared to address this level of resignations in 2000. it will be necessary to take remedial action now to normalise the situation in the following years. 4, Projected recruitment volumes in 2000 ‘As graphically illustrated by the trend line In Figure 3, current trends will bring vacancies to new levels in the foreseeable future. This isa reflection of the internal environment and new levels of job mobility. The orgenisation must start ‘adjusting to the reality of higher resignation rates driving vacancy rates in the ‘medium term. tts our view that this reflects the existence of an new era of ‘employee choice where employees nave options over their chosen place of ‘employment. At current rates 1077 hirings are required in the second half of “1999 t0 meet vacancies being created in the survey department and offices. A repezt of hiring levels achieved in the first half of the year wculd signal a net increase of 282 in the number of staff employed by the orgarisation. ‘As mentioned above, the pattern of the first half of the year suggests that. hirings will outpace vacancies for 1999. This assumes that the current momentum: In recruitment is maintained. The Civil Service should prepare to deal with up to 2632 hirings in the year 2000 ifthe current momentum is maintained. These predicted numbers come from analysing the trends in Table 7 (following pagel. 24 (Sonics Commission tenon Savey Report Goce eed 1987 1998 Turnover (exits) Table 7 Tena in vacancies and Hiring 1956-1999 ‘An additional Factor to consider with outside hirings Is the impact oF shart stays. ‘Asis evident in Figure 9 on current trends, 6% of outside hires will vacate their ‘Positions within 3 months in the year 2000, Figure 9: Shot Stays (% of new ies) 199 1997, «1998. = 1999S TREND Last year sawa significant increase in outside hirings at EO/HEOISO level. see Figure 10 on following page). 25 oe i Sanice Commisior Retention Suey Rapat 4.2 How the Civil Service meets employees’ work aspirations? ‘The findings reported in this section deal comprehensively with employees’ ‘work aspirations. 669 Individuals completed a detalled survey of Individuals ‘career aspirations (response rate 73.5%). The questionnaire responses were ‘complemented by focus groups with 70 individuals, exit interviews with $ Indlvidualsand interviews with 15 Individuals who dectined an offer oF ‘employment from the Civil Service Commission (NonStart9.. section 3, Research Design, outlines the intended sample for questionnaire, focus group, ‘exit interview and non-start interview participants, while Appendix 5 outlines the sample provided. In order to get.a balanced picture of which staff aspirations need to be prioritised in formulating responses to the results of strand one. ection 4.0, “The findings n this section wil establish: ‘+ What factors are currently supporting retention and have the potential to ifferentiate the Civil Service as an employer of choice ‘+ What are the secondary factors driving resignations ‘+ What are the primary factors driving resignations ‘+ What are the differences in work aspirations and perceptions of how they are delivered between different groups ‘The findings i this section from strand two will ako address the Following ‘areas in the terms of reference: + Establish the undertying reasons for the level oF vacancies occurring in Government Departments and offices, ‘+ Establisn the factors which will aid staff retention ‘+ Establish the reasons why staff are resigning by conducting exit interviews with staf# resigning a Ci Sanvce Commision Ratnton Suey Report Strand one findings reported in Section 4.1 establish that employee choice Is. the most significant driver of turnover rates and this in turn is precipitating an Increase in overall vacancy rates, We undertook research on staff's work aspirations to determine what actions could be taken by tne Ciull Service to Improve retention and become an employer of choice. ‘Management interviews with members of the steering committee helped ‘focus our attention on 26 Items that could Impact on staff choice. These Items ‘were In tur clustered Into eleven factors: ‘The eleven factors and their component items in no particular order are: ‘= Flexible hours ‘+ Relocation opportunities ‘= Comfortable environment + Access to childcare ‘Social Dynamics ‘= Work ina team ‘+ Meet new people ‘+ Age of colleagues + Competitive environment ‘+ Challenge others ‘= Career progression ‘+ Develop earrings potentiap Public sence commitment ‘+ Providing public service ‘+ Vocational commitments ts ii ‘= Varied/interesting work ‘+ Challenging work + Control own work ‘Sustems.and Innovation ‘+ Work with efficient systems + Invent new ways 1 Pant Participative management. Develop others potential Direct others Reward for effort Personal recognition Training opportunities Job security ‘Commuting time 28 hi Sence Commision Retentian Suny Repo twas also clear from management interviews that in addition to looking at the four grade bands It would also be useful to look at variations in responses from the major grade levels and specific sub-groups In analysing the data. Consequenty, specific sub-groups were also analysed. Table 8 below displays the four grade levels that were analysed In the left hand column and the sub- ‘groups that were analysed are shown on the right. ‘GRADES SUB -GROUPS ‘ASST. PRINCIPAL AND HIGHER (APs) | ALL FEMALES HEoEO!s0 PARENTS OF CHILOREN (<5 YRS) CLERICAL HIGH TURNOVER DEPT. SPECIALISTS ‘Co UNEQUALISED HIGH SALARV/SHORT TENURE SPECIALIST REVENUE COMMISSIONERS OFFICES OUTSIDE OUBLN ‘<18 MONTHS IN CIVIL SERVICE Tabla Grades and sb paps analysed in sa to Guariatve dala ‘The four major grade bands are the same as used in the Turnover Survey’ In strand one. This is the case so that work aspirations and how they are delivered can be mapped onto turnover and resignation rates. The inclusion of high turnover department specialists and the Co (unequalisec) groups sharpens our focus on areas where high turnover and resignation rates were established in strand one (section 4.1), To ensure gender balance and age balance our general clerical group Is equalised because it includes an unrepresentative percentage of older Clerical employess. Differences between aspirations of the Co unequalised and the general Clerical group demonstrated the age sensitivity of a factor within the clerical grade, ‘The females’ sub-group and the parents of children (<' years) were included to see if there might be any targeted initiatives which could ald retention and simultaneously address the equality agenda. The Revenue commissioners were targeted for detailed analysis as the largest single department in the ‘organisation, The other sub-groups in Table 8 were also targeted for detailed ‘anaiysis with a view to identifying niche needs and targeted actions. section 4.2. to 42.3 documents the importance ratings across sub groups item by Item, 2 Cit Serice Commision Retertian Suvey Report Figure 11 shows the distribution of top § preferences forall ofthe 26 items or factors in our questionnaire across the whole organisation. aR a a Pings eee Son tr All stat DChalenging Work intemal ae (IB Fhnible Working Hrs | eens ee ce Teamwork Opportunities “gression {B.Conisol own work. ees - ——s Provide public Service ierosing Weck {B.Comfertable environment ayaa | Dre ar Renee —— |= = = =. sm = ae estan Lenton ao can a cane reece anaganent Se anise Conse Ci Sani Commission Retenton Survey Report From this point on we refer to the rankings in Figure 11 as reflecting an Itern’s 1 overall importance. Thus career progression is the most important item overall with a ranking of 1/26. Varied/ interesting work has an overall ] Importance ranking of 2/26. By contrast opportunities to direct others has an overall importance ranking of 26/26. Figure 12 below represents the same data as In Figure 11 but also shows the total % of top 5 preferences each Item recelved and the ratio of first preferences for each item. | Figure 12: op ve preternces icing ret pefrence ratio Aleta PEPE Lp Hl Yue ile Therefore, for example, In Figure 12 above carer progression opportunities J] wasselectes asa top 5 aspiration by 55% oF al staff. top of column with ark green & ight oreen added togetnen. Whats useful to note is that 16% | ofaitstar ight green part of column ony selected career progression opportunities as their number one or frst preference 3” i Serce Commission eterton Survey Report Hereafter, the % numbers in Figure 12 refer to the 9 of the overall population ho selected the item as important. Thus we say that 4896 of staff selected varied / Interesting work as a top § priority. By contrast 4% of staff selected direct others in thelr top 5 priorities. From an individual performance management perspective itis important not to discount the lower ranking Items because Figure 12 also shows that one in five staff will have one of the bottom four items in their high priorities, Figure 12 shows Job security nas an extremely high ratio of first preferences. Indeed on first preferences itis the single most important Item. Its worth noting four other items with disproportionately high first preference ratios. These Items are likely to be powerful motivators for some staff but relatively insignificant for others. Notable items of this type are flexible working, minimise commuting, relocation opportunities and access to childcare Having established the relative Importance of items, we wanted to benchmark how the clil Service currentiy performs as against people's aspirations. Figure 113 below shows the gap between people's current work opportunities and ‘thelr preferred work opportunities. The gap between people's current and referred work opportunities is called the delivery gap. The comment lines in Figure 13 show how we have classified Items according to whether they have a high, medium or low overall delivery Gaps. High delivery gap Items have a gap of more than one raw score between their ratings on the ‘two four point scales (Le. scale one - current opportunities /scale two ~ preferred opportunities, see questionnaire in Appendix 4. Low delivery gap Items register a gap of less than .75 raw scores. From this point on we refer to the rankings in Figure 13 as reflecting an Item's delivery gap. Thus develop earnings potential has the highest delivery gap. It {san area in which Individuals’ work aspirations are least satisfied. its overall delivery gap ranking is 1/26. Reward for effort has an overall delivery gap ranking of 2/26. By contrast job security has an overall delivery gap ranking of 26726 To promote staff retention and minimise resignations we recommend that the organisation consider both the importance of an item andits delivery gap. Table 1 below (frst shown In Executive Summary) takes account. Of both these issues and summarises the results of our questionnaire across tthe whole organisation. The importance rankings for questionnaire items are shown after each item, these rankings reflect what questionnaire items most. Individuals choose as top 5 priorities note: 1 has most top 5 priorities and 26 ‘has least. The delivery gap refers to whether or not individuals feel these aspirations or important factors are met in the Civil Service. As mentioned, factors with the lowest delivery gaps are consequently groured under the heading, ‘Factors to Support Retention’. Factors with moderate detivery gaps are grouped under the heading ‘Secondary Retention Factors, while factors with high delivery gaps tLe. factors that are critically Important to individuals, but are not being delivered) are grouped as ‘Major Factors Drving Resignations’. We will deal with the variations in aspirations of different. ‘groups in our discussion of each factor in 4.2.1 to 4.2.3. ‘ul sence Commision Ratnton Survey Report aE nena MAJOR FACTORS DRIVING (QUESTIONNAIRE ITEMS RESIGNATIONS Earnings and Career Progression | + Career progression |= Develop Earnings Reward and Recognition + Reward for effort + Personal recognition ‘Task Responsibility + Varied/ interesting work + Challenging work + control own work ‘SECONDARY RESIGNATION FACTORS (QUESTIONNAIRE ITEMS ‘raining and Development | «Training opportunities Commuting Time is Commutingtime ‘Management Practices ‘+ Participative Management + Develop others’ potential + Directothers ‘systems and innovation ‘+ Work with efficient systems + Invent new ways of doing things. FACTORS TO SUPPORT RETENTION QUESTIONNAIRE ITEMS | Job security + Job security Progressive Working Arrangements |+ Flexible hours Comfortable environment Access to childcare Relocation opportunities Social Dynamics Workin a team ‘Meet new peopie ‘Age oF colleagues Competitive environment. Challenge others Public Service Commitment Providing public service + Vocational commitment Tabla: Retention and Work Aspirations s Ch Saice Commision Panton Survey Ropart ‘The main body of our strand two findings follows. Findings are presented ‘according to the format of Table 1 above. Section 42.1 deals with the three malor factors driving resignations across the organisation, Section 4.2.2 deals with secondary resignation factors, while section 4.2.3 deals with factors to support retention. within both sections 4.2.1 and 4.2.2, the questionnaire findings are discussed using tables and this is Followed by relevant information ‘that arose at focus groups, nom-start Interviews and / or exit interviews. Ea Chi Sorice Commision Retentan Suny Report 4.2.1 Malor factors driving resignations: ‘Three factors are grouped in this section as major factors driving resignations. FFactors in this section all have high overall importance. They tend to have ‘extremely high delivery gaps. They are reported relative to their overall Importance. Factors in this section are ‘+ Eamings and career progression ‘+ Reward and recognition ‘+ Task responsiblity 4.2.1.1 Earnings and career Progression Both career progression and opportunities to develop earning potential are top five importance items with high gaps in delivery. They are Important for both retention and employee relations. it was the most frequently quoted reason as.a trigger for departures in focus groups and exit interviews. Asan ‘employee relations exercise, linking the two items together will help package ‘changes in performance management strategy and make them more palatable to a wide audience. Performance related reward and promotion on performance is likely to meet resistance In some quarters as this will mark a sift from Increments and seniority based promotion. Our recommendation is to formulate a new psychological contract that highlights the benefits of becoming an organisation that pays on performance and plans career paths, The research suggests there is overwhelming support for these opportunities. initiatives are however now needed to bulld credibility in these areas. The future vision {s of an organisation that develops talent and promotes from within. ‘The importance of the two factors that make up earnings and career progression to tre four grade bands and subgroups is outiined in Table 9 below and the delivery gap for these two factors for all groups Is shown in ‘Table 10, These tables are discussed below. 'SUB-OROUP DESCRIPTION PROGRESSION POTENTIAL ‘ALL STAFF % “4 "ASST. PRINCIPAL AND HIGHER (AP GRADE BAND) a 2 HEQIEOVSO (GRADE BAND) 5 o (CLERIGAL (GRADE BAND) 6 % (CO UNEQUALISED 6 35 ‘SPECIALIST (GRADE BAND) 2 38 “ALL FEMALES = 38 PARENTS OF CHILDREN (<6 YRS) 7 «6 HIGH TURNOVER DEPT. SPECIALISTS: @ 3 HIGH SALARYISHORT TENURE 3 = "ALL STAFF IN REVENUE: CoMMissionERS. 58 ‘OFFICES OUTSIDE DUBLIN 38 4 LESS THAN 18 MONTHS IN GIL SERVICE 4“ 4“ Career Progression Is ranked 1/26 (Table 1 with 55% of ail Individuals piacing ‘career progression in thelr top 5 (Table 9). This is an mportant issue for people ‘at clerical level particularly the unequalised clerical group oF 20 ~ 30 year olds where 65% of staff Identified It as a top 5 aspiration Table 8). The general clerical _group is equalised and therefore includes an unrepresentative percentage of older clerical ‘employees. 62% of high turnover department specialists rate career progression as a top $ aspiration. Career progression has the fourth highest, delivery gap (Figure 13). The delivery gap is extremely high across all groups (Table 10. Opportunities to Develop Earnings potential is ranked 3/26 in Importance (Table 1) across the organisation with 45% of individuals placing It in their top '5 most important work aspirations (Table 9). The variance within groups in importance are similar to career progression. Again tis most critical for the Uunequalised clerical group of 20 ~ 30 year olds where 55% of staff Identifled It asa top 5 aspiration. Earnings potential has the highest delivery gap of all 26, 3 Chl Savice Conmion Retention Suney Report Items (Figure 13). As with career progression the gap is extremely high across all groups (Table 10) Td 'SUB-CROUP DESCRIPTION ‘CAREER DEVELOP EARNINGS. PROGRESSION POTENTIAL ALL STAFF 755 780 "ASST. PRINCIPAL AND HIGHER (AP GRADE BAND) 138 HEOIEOVSO (GRADE BAND) 1.80 (CLERICAL (GRADE BAND) Bat (00 UNEQUALISED 2a ‘SPECIALIST (GRADE BAND) Zor ‘ALL FEMALES 190 ‘PARENTS OF CHILDREN (<6 YRS) 213 THIGH TURNOVER DEPT. SPECIALISTS 208 HIGH SALARYISHORT TENURE 1.89 ‘ALL STAFF IN REVENUE COMMISSIONERS. ar 190 ‘OFFICES OUTSDE OUBLN 1.68 190 LESS THAN 18 MONTHS IN GIL SERVICE 132 472 {In focus groups, when staff were asked to share thoughts concerning factors that they felt motivated staff to leave, the first response was Invariably “the ‘money’, oras one participant stated, “I take It you are looking to find out IF people are leaving for reasons other than the money" As can be expected, the ‘most vocal expression of dissatisfaction with current salary scales emerged from Clerical officers, Executive Officers with less than 4 years of service and Specialists, specifically those in an LT. function. One participating executive Officer stated “starting private sector wages are equal to what 'm getting and ve been here six years.” Exit Interviews with departing staff members, particularly in the case of those with secretarial and legal secretarial skils, confirmed that they could increase their salary by $0 to 80% when they left ‘the civil service, assistant Principal Officers and grades above confirmed these sentiments, but added that in their own case, “Times were not that good ‘when | started and all things considered, the money isn't bad.” ‘Cl anes Cammison Retention Sure port twas not uncommon for a discussion of career opportunitiesand career progression to emerge from the issue of earnings. A general consensus emerged, with a distinct lack of optimism, that careers would not be progressed within the current grade structure of the Civil Service. An Executive Officer from a decentralised office stated “I cannot see a positive, Clear picture where | could reach a reasonable level and pay." Some Higher Executive officers and Assistant Principal officers expressed concern that while the compensation for thelr grade was not unfalr, their Workload was increasing in tandem with their level of responsbility but that thelr was no opportunity for additional compensation nor litte opportunity for continued career progression. One focus group addressed the Issue of “yellow jacketing” Assistant Principal officers, an emerging practice, whereby ‘Assistant Principals act as Principal officers. They feit that while it was an excellent opportunity to develop skills and accumulate experience, there was ‘a marginal Increase In salary that was not commensurate with the increase in responsiblities. Moreover, there was a sense that the refusal to sanction additional senior management staff, where they felt there was a demonstrated need, did not bode well for increased future progression opportunities. Staff from Administrative Officers to Clerical officers appeared despondent and frustrated about the lack of opportunities avaliable to them. They felt ‘that there were already too many people ahead of them waiting for promotions and that “promotions will be along time coming’. Two additional ‘tangential Issues surfaced in these discussions, one of which was recognition and the other, the lack of ciarity surrounding career paths and opportunities. ‘One Executive officer participant suggested that the grade structure of the Civil service be examined, pointing out that it was originally designed for a dramatically different economic and educational paradigm. The need for appropriately matching new entrants from panels with appropriate positions ‘and work was also a common concern, i Senice Commission Retention Suey Raper Staff In specialist grades, specifically LT. professionals, accountants and solleitors were unanimous in highlighting the gulf between pay in the private sector and the Civil service. Solicitors and accountants generally agreed that staff who had established careers in the Civil Service would opt to remain, however they felt that newer staff never had any intention of remaining, even when they Joined, and that with the exception of significant increases, staff would continue to leave from thelr grades and that recrultment efforts to replace them would encounter stiff resistance. L7. professionals felt that the widening pay gap, and other factors, combined with arising awareness among their colleagues of the LT. shortage in the private sector and the packages employed to entice staff to leave, was creating an Impossible situation for the civil service. 4.2.1.2 Reward and Recognition ‘The reward and recognition factor Includes opportunities to be rewarded for ‘our efforts and to receive recognition for your work. This isan area where action should be taken to improve employee relations and stabilise the fallin retention rates. ‘The Importance of the two factors that make up reward and recognition to the four grade bands and subgroups is outlined in Table 11 below and the ellvery gap for these two factors for all groups Is shown in Table 12. These tables are discussed below. Ci Sane Commision Retention Suny Report ALL STAFF 0 = "ASST, PRINCIPAL AND HIGHER (AP ‘GRADE BAND) 3 « 'HEOIEOISO (GRADE BAND) a “1 ‘CLERICAL (GRADE BAND) 3 = (CO UNEQUALISED o 2 ‘SPECIALIST (GRADE BAND) EI % ‘ALL FEMALES % = PARENTS OF CHILDREN (= 5 YRS) 2 3% HIGH TURNOVER DEPT. SPECIALISTS 28 2 HIGH SALARY/SHORT TENURE. 8 3% “ALL STAFF IN REVENUE. COMMISSIONERS. 4“ 2 (OFFICES OUTSIDE DUBLIN 9 a LESS THAN 18 MONTHSIN CIVIL 8 5 SERVICE Reward for effort is ranked 6/26 in importance across the organisation (Table 1) with 4096 of individuals placing itn their top 5 most important work aspirations (able 1%, It's particularly important for staff In the Revenue ‘Commissioners. Interestingly only 28% of high turnover department ‘specialists selected itin thelr top 5. To put this in context It Is less than half ‘the number that selected career progression (Table 9) and 10% below the umber who selected flexible working hours (Table 110, The gap between ‘what Is currently dellvered and what is aspired to is extremely high across all ‘groups (Table 12). It Just matches “develop earning potential’ as the highest ‘gap and overall the delivery gap ranks 2/26 across the organisation (Figure 13). For clerical staff the gap between what is provided and what is aspired to is haher on this item tran anv other. Personal recognition is ranked 26 in importance across the organisation (able 1) with 38% of inaividuats placing It in thelr top 5 most important work aspirations (Table 11) tis particularly important for staff at AP+ level (able 11, Again a relativety smal 21% of high turnover department specialists a Ci Sence Commission Rtonson Suey Rept selected It n thelr top S. as with reward for effort the gap between what Is currently delivered and what is aspired to Is extremely high across all groups (able 12). Overall the delivery gap ranks 3/26 across the organisation (Figure 118. The fact that rewards and recognition are Items with second andi third highest delivery gaps is also a reflection on day to day performance ‘management In the organisation. Recognition of people's efforts requires fundamental people management Is over and above a change of systems at ‘management level in the organisation. een DELIVERY GAP BY GROUP 'SUB-CROUP DECSCRIPTION REWARD FOR PERSONAL EFFORT RECOGNITION ALLSTAR 189 8 "ASST. PRINCIPAL AND HIGHER (AP+ (GRADE BAND) 188 a7 HEOIEOISO (GRADE BAND) 1a 159 ‘CLERICAL (GRADE BAND) 26 120 (CO UNEQUALISED. 233 10 ‘SPECIALIST (GRADE BAND) 198 16 ‘ALL FEMALES 201 173 PARENTS OF CHILDREN (<8 VRS) 208 474 HIGH TURNOVER DEPT. SPECIALISTS 82 170 HIGH SALAR/SHORT TENURE 195 aa “ALL STAFF IN REVENUE COMMISSIONERS 1.99 1s (OFFICES OUTSIDE OUBLIN 1.98 157 LESS THAN 18 MONTHSIN GIL SERVICE 194 130 From the focus groups, reward and recognition were clearly de-motivating ‘factors for staff at the Clerical and Executive officer level. in the words of one participant, "There is actually a disincentive to work too hard the more work ‘you do, the more work you get, to make up for the guy who isn't doing anything, and at the end of the day, they get the same increment as you, and. If they have enough seniority, they might get a promotion because of their length of service.” Many participants felt that good work should be formally recognised and that the lack of formal recognition prejudiced opportunities Ch Sonic Commision Retention Saney Report ‘for career development and progression. in one group of Executive Officers, a participant complained that SMI was not being Implemented, a comment with ‘which many of the other participants agreed, while in other sessions, there ‘appeared to be little to no awareness of SM. ‘Concerning -ewards, a consistently repeated and emotive Issue was “We don't ‘even get a christmas party.” Participants felt that initiatives such as this would Increase morale dramatically, particularly when friends in the orivate sector ‘were enjoying such benefits. An additional concern was the lack of any ‘financial reward for performance. The awarding of merit bonuses to staff was ‘seen as arbitrary, and many felt that merit bonuses should be“eamned not ‘awarded’. These concerns also led to discussions on the need for formal job ‘descriptions and objective standards against which performance would be ‘measured, Focus group participants also mentioned that awards such as ‘vouchers or similar gestures would greatly boost morale. It was pointed out that if a manager at an Assistant Principal evel or higher ‘would actively engage staff with feedback and dally interaction, a sense that thelr work isnot invisible was created and consequent, staff would develop a greater sense of pride about thelr work. Staff at the assistant Officer level felt that there were simply no “goodies in tthe cupboard! to give to staff at their level, and that their immediate supervisor was working as hard or harder than themselves, so that recognition for thelr efforts was rare. Another participant expressed concern that with the proliferation of “Quangos*, workloads had increased dramatically, and that ‘no proportional increase in staffing had followed. They indicated that they themselves and thelr staff concluded that elther thelr superlars were unaware Of this or were aware and not concerned. in elther case, they Felt that this, “lack of concern” was Indicative of the lack of appreciation for the quality and ‘quantity of work that they performed. 4“ Cin sonice Commission Retention Survey Report 4.2.1.3 Task Responsibility ‘The Task Responsibility factor includes opportunities to do varied and Interesting work, perform challenging work and to organ'se and control your ‘own work. The first two of these is eritically Important for civil servants but there Isa moderate gap in delivery. This gap rises to high for clerical staff and for other groups in which clerical staff are heavily represented. In our recommendations we have targeted action in this area urder the heading of performance management. We belleve that empowerment and control of ‘own work can be an effective mediating variable used to give people a greater sense of task responsibility given that the overall nature of the work cannot bbe changed. This is not so important in people's first 18 months. There Is also evidence that greater linkages can be achieved between peoples Interests and sklls and the work they do. This matter Is addressed In our recommendation for Improved career path planning, ‘The Importance of the three factors that make up task responsibility to the four grade bands and subgroups is outlined in Table 13 below and the delivery ‘gap for these three factors for all groups Is shown In Table 14, These tables are discussed below. Varied and interesting work ranks 2/26 as an important work aspiration across the organisation (Table 1) with 48% of staff selecting It In thelr top 5 {Table 13). The delivery gap Is In the moderatemhigh range for all staff with an ‘overall ranking of 11/26 (Figure 13), However there is considerable variance between groups with clerical staff placing it comfortablyin the high range ‘Table 14. other groups that have a high clerical complement such as Revenue ‘commission staff and people with children under Five also place It in the high range although there is a medium gap for recent recrults (Table 1a. We have recommended that greater empowerment of appropriat2 individuals be pursued and piloted at clerical level. Varied and interesting work is quite Important for high turnover department specialists (Table 12). There isa low livery gap on this Item (Table 14. This appears to be a legitimate benefit to be presented to many staff at this level ‘in Senice Commision RelantonSuvay Report SUB-OROUP DESCRIPTION | VARIED/INTERESTING | CHALLENGING | CONTROL ‘WORK ‘worK | owN WoRK ALL STAFF e @ 8 “ASST, PRINCIPAL AND HIGHER (AP GRADE BAND) s 9 2 HEQIEOISO (GRADE BAND), a “ 0 CCLERIGAL (GRADE BAND) 7 % 8 (CO UNEQUALISED = A 10 sr a 20 “ALL FEMALES 2 4 8 PARENTS OF CHILDREN (= 5YRS) Ed a “ HIGH TURNOVER DEPT, SPECIALISTS: 52 a 8 HIGH SALARVISHORT TENURE “ 2° 2 ‘ALL STAFF IN REVENUE, COMMISSIONERS a 38 ww ‘OFFICES OUTSIDE DUBLIN a 8 1 LESS THAN 18 MONTHS IN 2 Ea 1" NIL SERVICE challenging Work can be viewed In a similar way to varied and interesting ‘work. Again It has high importance across the organisation being ranked 4/26 (Table 1) with 43% of the organisation selecting It as an important work aspiration (Table 13). Again it has a moderate delivery gap (see 25) with similar varlances between groups. The delivery gap Is in the high range for clerical staff and in the low range for high turnover department speciatsts (Table 14. Indeed it may be that the work is too challenging for some high tumover department specialists In this context there may be scope for providing the flexitime so many of these individuals desire as part of the individually negotiated performance contracts recommended. Controlling own work is the third item in this factor grouping, itis ranked 10126 across the organisation (Table 1) being selected in top 5 work aspirations bby 19% of all staff (Table 13) and has a low delivery gap (Table 1@. The delivery 4s (hi Sanice Commission Retention Sivey Report ‘gap is highest amongst clerical staff and lowest amongst high turnover department specialists (Table 14). There is a huge difference in desired locus of control between the high turnover department specialists and staff at the 'AP+ level. n the Former case 8% seek to control own work while In the latter ‘case 30% seek to control own work (Table 13), This may reflect the differences In the type of work these groups engage in. ‘SUE-CROUP DESCRIPTION | VARIED/INTERESTING | CHALLENGING | CONTROL ‘WORK ‘work | OWN WoRK ALL STA 100 092 084 "ASST. PRINGIPAL AND HIGHER (APY GRADE BAND). oss 04s ass HEOIEGISO (GRADE BAND) ase 089 07s ‘GLERIGAL (GRADE BAND) 141 137 090 (00 UNEQUALISED 128 18 280 P 092 om 082 ‘ALL FEMALES 1.05 108 070 ‘PARENTS OF CHILDREN (= BYRS) 12 104 086 HIGH TURNOVER DEPT. SPECIALISTS 050 oa 04s HIGH SALARYISHORT TENURE on 05s 080 “ALL STAFF IN REVENUE ‘COMMISSIONERS. a4 1.05 020 ‘OFFICES OUTSIDE DUBLN 125 zn o7 LESS THAN 18 MONTHS IN CiviL SERVICE: ast ost ase Within focus groups, thoughts concerning varied and interesting work, Challenging work, and control over one’s work were a function of the department the staff member worked in, their role within their department. and the grade they held. Clerical officers, particularly those in departments or sections that perform vast quantities of repetitive or monotonous work, not surprisingly expressed the greatest amount of dissatisfaction. Cit Sarvice Commission Retention Suvey Report Conversely, persons at the level of assistant Principal or higher appeared most. content with the depth and breadth of thelr work. Many at this level indicated that they had found departments or areas within a department that performed work best sulted to thelr interests and skills. The only dissent from thls came from those who felt that the Increasing volume of work curtalled their ability to control thelr work to the level that they previously had. some Executive Officers felt that responsibility nad moved upwards away from them, and consequently they had less opportunity to perform work on more substantive Issues. ‘The comments recelved from solicitors and accountants indicated a ‘reasonably high level of satisfaction with these factors, and they generally, agreed that these were factors that motivated them to remain within the civil Service. one participant stated that they had an opportunity to do work they liked, to work with colleagues they liked and respected, to control their cases ‘and they didn't have to go chasing clients and monitor their biiable hours ~ “That's why ! left the private sector in the first place!" a i Sanice Commision Ratton Sur port 2.2 Secondary Resignation Factors: Four factors are grouped in this section as secondary resignation factors. Factors In this section tend to have moderate averall importance and ‘moderate to high delivery gaps. They are reported relative to thelr overall Importance. Factors in this section are + Training and development + Commuting time + Management practices + systems and innovation 4.2.2.1. Training and Development Im looking at staff movements (section 4.1) we identified the impact vacancy levels has had at departmental level. The table below highlights the fact that over 22% of staff have been in their current positions, in their current departments, for less than 18 months. Ler Ppoer (GrabE BAND) 16 HEOIEOISO (GRADE BAND) 7 ‘CLERICAL (GRADE BAND) 26 (CO UNEQUALISED 28 ‘SPECIALIST (GRADE BAND) 18 ‘ALL FEMALES 25 PARENTS OF CHILDREN (<6 VRS) 8 HIGH TURNOVER OPT. SPECIALISTS 2 HIGH SALARY/SHORT TENURE 2 ‘ALL STAFF IN REVENUE COMMISSIONERS 2 (OFFICES OUTSIDE DUBLIN 25 LESS THAN 1@ MONTHS IN GIL SERVICE 2 overall training and development ranked 9/26 in importance as a work aspiration for all staff Table‘). This placed it ahead of controling your own work, minimising commuting and management style Figure 13). The delivery ‘gap was high across al groups with the highest gaps in delivery amongst, Clerical staff and staff outside Dublin (Table 17. Its also worth noting that there is a willing resource of 8% of the organisation for whom opportunities to develop others would be a priority (Table 20). A means of adaressing this delivery gap would be through work based learning, which would deliver the Whatare the current trends in staff movement and turnover? > How consistent is the picture across grades and departments? > What staff aspirations need to be prioritised in formulating responses? ‘Our conclusions are reflected in the answers to these questions. What are the current trends in staff movement and turnover? ‘The total number of people departing from surveyed departments in the First 6 ‘montis of this year was 518, This represents an annualised turnover rate of 13.75%, This has risen from 2.4% In 1996. Rises in resignations have underpinned the rise in turnover. While job sharing rates have risen incrementally and retirement rates nave been stable at below 0.75%, resignation rates have more than coubled in the three years between 1996 and 1999. The current resignation rate 16 1.74%, The 1998 figure was 1.32%, 1997 was 1.319% and 1996 was 0.83%, ‘There's no reason to expect a reversal of the current rise in resignation rates. A conservative estimation of the trendline through 1996 to 1999 will see I: rise to 4.76% for the year 2000 (see Appendix 1 for notes on the calculation & Interpretation of trendiinesi. ata from the departments suggests vacancies outpaced hirings tappointments) In the period 1996 to 1998 by an aggregate total of 530. This broadly concurs with CCEN-SIS data. Ifthe hiring rates for the first two quarters of 1999 are replicated in ‘the second half of the year, there will be an estimated surplus of 282 hirings over vacancies this year. Projecting hiring rates and vacancy rates into the year 2000, ‘we would estimate a surplus of 232 hirings over vacancies, n (Oh Senice Commision Sa Retention Save How consistent isthe picture across grades and departments? ‘Asmentioned above, the rise in turnover (exits) is underpinned by the rise in resignations. We have therefore focused on resignations in this section, There Is considerable variation in resignation rates across grades. As shown in Figure 1 ‘below, Clerical grades have the highest resignation rates. This year the rate is heading for 2.48% of staff within the Clerical grade band. By contrast the 1999 resignation rate for people at Assistant Principal level and above is just 0.48%. ‘The overall resignation rate for Specialists is 4.72%, but there Is huge variation in ‘the makeup of the Specialist group, Figure 5: Resignations by Grade 1996-1999 ‘The increase in turnover (exits) at specialist levels can be linked to departments ‘and job roles that craw on I, financial and legal skis. Some of the increase at HEO/EOISO levels in 1998 can also be linked to a targeting of IT staff within these. ‘grades by external organisations. 1% Chi Sanice Commision Stat Ratton Saray What staf aspirations need to be prioritised in formulating responses? ‘We Identified 11 factors relevant to Civil Service employees in an era of employee ‘choice, ‘These are In order of Importance: ‘+ Eamings and career progression ‘+ Task responsibility ‘+ Reward and recognition ‘+ Job security ‘+ Progressive working arrangements ‘+ Tralning and Development: ‘+ Commuting time ‘+ Management practices ‘+ systems and Innovation + Soclal Dynamics + Public Service commitment For the top three factors earnings and career progression, Task responsibility Reward and recognition) there Is a yawning gap between Individuals aspirations and what the Civil Service Is perceived as delivering. These three factors we have Classified as ‘Major Factors Driving Resignations. Next we have a group oF ‘Secondary Retention Factors. This group includes Training and Development, Commuting time, Management practices, systems and Innovation. These are also areas in which there are slgnificant unsatisfied aspirations, but they do not have the overarching Importance of the ‘Major Factors Driving Resignations’. ‘The Civil Service satisfies a reasonable share of its employees aspirations in four areas Uob Security, Progressive working arrangements, Social dynamics and, ™ in Senice Commission Sa Rendon Suey Public service commitment), We have grouped these factors as ‘Factors to ‘Support Retention’. Table 4 inext page) summarises the results of our research on staff aspirations ‘and how the civil Service satisfes them. The items which contribute to each factor are sted alongside them. % Lo Serce Commision San etenton Suny Pau en eee cau (MAJOR FACTORS DRIVING RESIGNATIONS Earnings and Career Progression Reward and Recognition ‘Task Responsibility SECONDARY RESIGNATION FACTORS Tralning and Development commuting Time ‘Management Practices systems and innovation FACTORS TO SUPPORT RETENTION 4Jop security Progressive Working Arrangements social Dynamics Public Service commitment. ‘QUESTIONNAIRE ITEMS Career progression Develop Earnings Reward for effort Personal recognition Varied / Interesting work Challenging work Control own work (QUESTIONNAIRE ITEMS ‘Training Opportunities commuting time Participative Management Develop others’ potental Direct others Work with efficient systems Invent new ways of doing things ‘QUESTIONNAIRE ITEMS Job security Flexible hours Comfortable environment ‘Access to childcare Relocation opportunities Work in a team Meet new people ‘Age of colleagues Competitive environment Challenge otners Providing public service Vocational commitment. Tablo 1: Retention and Work Aspirations % it Service Commision Sa Retention Suey ‘The findings in Table 4 (previous page) reflect the picture across the organisation. "Nevertheless they can be applied in a reasonably consistent manner across the various groups in the organisation. at the same time the following variations are worth distinguishing. Clerical officers, particularly those under thirty, have the highest gaps between their aspirations and what the role currently delivers. The major factors driving resignations are all highly relevant for this group. There Is a good level of satisfaction with flexible working hours for this group and this|s likely to act as. an effective factor to support retention. Staff at Assistant Principal level and above perceive the least difference between thelr aspirations and what thelr current role delivers. For the Executive Officer/ Higher Executive Officer group, the perceived shortfall between aspirations and What the role delivers in Reward for effort would present a most significant river of resignations. \We noted some important patterns for professional staff from nigh turnover departments. These include. + Availablity of Flexible working hours a top $ work aspiration (this ls generally not avaliable) ‘+ Opportunities to work with a participative management style are also a high priority for these professionals ‘+ No substantive value placed on job security OF the other subgroups, three other observations are worth noting, People working outside Dublin generally have much lower gaps between their aspirations and what is delivered, For example, they fee! thelr work environment 's significantly more comfortable than any other group. 20% of the sample reported having children under five years old. 12% of this group would make Ita top 5 issue. Our matched sample of females in the organisation did not show ‘marked differences from the mean. Ci Sonie Common Retention Suey Raper Lie From our research on the reasons underpinning staff resignations we nave Identified eleven critical Issues that future policy must account for. These researched critical Issues can now play 2 role in the formulation of an overall retention policy. The formulation of detalled policies must take place within the context of the professionalisation of HR and the ongoing SMI process. within these contexts, structures will be needed to Implement and pilot new Initiatives, This will necessitate the allocation of appropriate budgets and resources to achieve desired savings on hidden turnover costs and mitigate demands for across the board salary increases. ur eleven critical issues are.. (To differentiate and promote the Civil Service's unique selling points (USP's) as an employer of choice . Our research has Identified four factors with potential to support retention. For example progressive working arrangements are generally seen by employees as an area in which the civil, Service Is delivering. The organisation's track record on flexible working hours along with recentiy introduced schemes such as term time, provide a strong platform for the Civil service to differentiate Itself asa leader In provision oF progressive work arrangements and family friendly policies. {an To identify appropriate structures for mapping career development from clerical level. Career development is the most important work aspiration for employees across the organisation, It s necessary to Identify and recognise employee's need for a sense of personal and career development. one option In this area is the establishment of career path structures, e.g. Customer Service Specialists, Accounts, Human Resources. ‘To ensure performance management has credible links to career development for all staff. A performance management system, which does ‘not comprehensively address this issue, will be discredited. na (i Serie Commision Retention Survey Report av) To tallor aspects of an overall retention policy to address the dramatic rises in resignation rates In departments, which draw on professionals with significant financial, legal or IT type skills. Over 603% Of our survey sample from high turnover areas are seeking but not getting career progression. For example, it would be useful to prioritise the Implementation of performance management with these groups. A career path plan from recruitment to Five years thence would also be attractive. The 901 Is to Identify the context within which these individuals might deepen thelr commitment to the civil service, (To design and implement a user friendly Human Resource Management information System. A system is necessary to ald the Implementation of retention policy. This should provide regular reports on turnover and resignations. To achieve success we recommend that it should >be administered at iocal level and interfaced with a central system. (WD To ensure training Is linked to individuals’ work goals - Responses to strand one suggest 22% of the organisation are in their current positions for less than 18 months, This hightights a need for efficient Induction training and socialisation at departmental level. Funded training (internal and external should explicitly be linked to individuals career development plans and work ‘goals, Likewise individuals need to be challenged to apply emerging skills on the job. (vib To delegate task responsibility in a way that respects individuals’ ‘experience. Varied! Interesting work isa huge issue for staff. The group Which is most deeply disaffected in this area is experienced clerical ievel ‘employees. Ways &means must be considered to utilise thelr experience and win their commitment to how work Is assigned. For example, it may be possible to develop more empowered teams at front line. (vuln To Find structures which facilitate personal recognition. This is one Of the biggest challenges facing managers in the organisation. It ls necessary to ensure staff receive regular feedback and support from managers. It would 7” (iSonic Commision Ratnton Survey Report ‘also help if way could be found to ensure managers have some discretionary ‘resources for recognising speclal efforts by individuals or a team. (00 To address commuting issues when making placements. The inclusion ‘of commuting tine as an employee work aspiration highlights the need for ‘this to be addressed when placing individuals. Options including piloting of ‘teleworking should be considered for high turnover professional staf. (00 To address people's special interests and skills when making \placements. one of peoples greatest work aspirations Isto utilise thelr skills ‘and talents. one option to facilitate this would be an Increased focus on people's interests when making placement decisions from recrultment panels. ‘0X0 To explore ways to redress anomalies in relocation policy. Relocation isa very Important issue for one in twenty staff. Many recent. recruits are serving time in Dublin while awaiting a transfer. There are significant variations in policy from department to department, Concluding Remarks ‘The recommencations above are not radical. Our research Is underpinned by the sense that the Civil Service, along witn other organisations, is now ‘operating in an era of choice. This means that in areas where employees are exercising choice a measured response is required. ‘At the Clerical Oficer level resignations have doubled In three years and are ‘now in the mid-range of levels in the private sector. Staff are exercising choice to enter jobs which will give them more interesting work, better career development prospects and earnings potential, and will draw on skils they have developed (often through further study). in addition there are particularly dramatic rises In resignation rates in departments, which draw on professionals with significant financial, legal or IT type skis. Generally resignations at Executive officer level are below levels in the private sector. Staff at the Assistant Principal level are least likely to resign. Recommendations ‘Ci Sren Comision Ratnton Srey port ‘The report recommendations should enable a measured response to recent increases in turnover (exits) and help the organisation prepare an effective retention policy for an era of employee choice. A key driver for an effective retention policy should be the savings achlevable on the hidden cost of resignations. These hidden costs include. + Loss oF sls, + Diminished performance during resignation period, ‘+ Recrultment and selection costs, ‘+ Induction and socialisation oF new staff. It may seem easler to spend money in a criss than to spend money to avert a crisis. However In this case we would recommend that budgets be allocated in support of a retention policy now. This should be seen as an investment to minimise the hidden costs of rising resignation rates. Further an emerging retention policy which addresses the range of Issues above can be used to mitigate demands for across the board salary increases. a Appendices Appendix 1 ‘Stolstical Notes: Colculation & Inlerpretation of Trend Lines |We have used o near frend Ine fo predict Yeor 2000 resignations onghhkes.. A linear frend ine is G best stright ne thot is used with simple Ineor doto sets. ‘Your dota is ineor i the potter in isdota points resembles one. “The Microsoft excel rend function wos used fof @ straight Ene (using the method of least squares) to the known away values, ‘The equation for the tne i: + yemxe Microsoft Excel Syntax TREND (known yssknown_x's.new_x&.const) Known ys the set of y-values you aleady know Inthe relationship y = mv +b. We have omitted known x's as the aay of known_y'sisin 9 single row. Each row cof known sis then interpreted os separate variable. In this cose iis assumed fobe the aay (1.23...) that isthe some size as known. y's. We have not used any constant sob s colculated normally. Example: Suppose o business wants fo purchese a tract of land in Juy, the stort of the next fecal year. The business coleets cos informction that covers the mos! recent 12 months for o typical wact In the dastac area, Known y voluas are in cals B2:B13; the known_y values are $133,890, $135:000, 135.790, $137,300. $138,120 $139,100, $139,900, $141,120, $141,890, $143,280, $144,000, $146,290, In Microsoft excel the folowing formula returns the predicted prices for March ‘TREND (32 +B13) equals (146172) Note: when using the syntax above the most recent data must be atthe beginning of the array. The company con expect o typicaltract of land to cost about $146,172 In March. The preceding formula uses the default oray (12:34:66: 7:89:10.11:12} forthe known x's argument, corresponding to the 12 months of soles dcio, Appendix 2 18) enti the rate of change inthe vacances being notified to the Office over the past ree years and assess the extent to which the curren levels of requests 10 fil vacancies i ikely to 1b) Ieniiy the underlying reasons for the level of vacancies occurring in Government Departments and Offices; ©) Asceriain the extent which and the reasons why newly recruited staf, who have gone trough the recruitment process, ae not accepting offers of appointment of having accepted an offer of appointment, are either not turning up for work or eaving within avery short, time; 4) Ascerain the extent v0 which vacances are arising as result of staff leaving the Civil Service by resignation, career break, etc. nd asa result of leakage within the Civil Service to promotion, transfer, decentralisation, etc; €) Idenity the rate at which stafare resigning form the Civil Service and the reasons why staff are resigning by conducting exit interviews with the staff resigning; 1) Hens the Factors which will aid staff retention In terms of ourpus, the Office is seeking a clearly defined end inclusive" via process of interactive consultation and facilitation. jon plan arrived at ‘The GFP project team wil report to and be supervised by a Steering Group, membership bereunder Ms Patricia O'Grady, Principal, Office ofthe civil Service and Local ‘Appointments Commissioners; Mr Niall Leavy, Senior Psychologist, Office ofthe Civil Service and Local ‘Appointments Commissioners: Ms Mary Doyle, Assistant Secretary, SMI Team, Department of the Taoiseach; Mr Sean Moriarty, Assistant Secretary, Office ofthe Revenue Commissioners; ‘Mr Paul Byrne, Principal, Personnel and Remuneration Division, Department of Finance; 6. Intellectual Property Rights All rights and printed material resulting orm this projec: shall be the property ofthe Office of the Civil Service and Local Appointments Commissioners. 7. Conficts of Interest ‘Any conflicts of interest involving the Goldsmith Fitzgerald Partnership project team must be fully disclosed to the Office parcularly where there i a confit of interests in relation to any ecommengstion or proposal put forward by the Project Team. 8 Legal Framework ‘The consultancy project will be deemed to be carried out in Laws of Ireland land and willbe governed by the 9.Tax Clearance Certificate Appendix 3 STRAND Section A : TURNOVER SURVEY ‘Thank you for your participation in ihe Sta! Turnover / Retention Reseorch Project. Your Contibution is vito o the success of the project. Please note the folowing key dates, Pleose retuin Section A of the Tunover Survey by Thursday, September 9, 1999. Pleose retuin Section B ofthe Tunover Survey by Thursday, September 16, 1999, lf youhave any questions concerning any of the questions or he dota requested, please 60 not hesitate to contact Tracey O'Driscoll or Connor McDonough at GFP at 01 872 6656. The grade clusters equested throughout the survey conform to the folowing groupings! AD Pus ‘Assstont Principal Officers ond all radies above HEO/EO/SO: Higher Executive Oificer. Executive Officer. Staff Officer Cletica! Clerical Oficer ond all grades below Specials Grades: Inclidesbut snot imited to IT functions, accountants, solcitors Section A Tenure {@ueition 1: As of uy 1, 1999, please indicate for each grade how mony sottin your epeximent had been in thee present poston fr: Taaihané | balwoené | botwoon 16 | behwoon'30 | over ‘months ‘ond 18 ‘ond 30 ‘ond a2 months Gevoter | months months ments Jonuay. | deter | Gevofer | Gectier 199) | Jemwayt, | Jona | January 1905) 1997 i ‘AP Pus ro /EO/S0 Species Grades Pleose provide the name of the incvidual who completed thi suvey. Nome ___________ Phone No, Department — Section B January 1, 1999 - June 36, 1999° Hing {Question 1: For the period betwesn Jonucry 1, 1999 and June 30, 1999, pleose indicate how many staf you department hired fiom outside of your depariment oul wihin he Chil Senvice? Spectast AP Pls weoe0/50 | clerical Grodes {Question 2:For the period betwesn Jonuory 1. 1999 ond June 90, 1999, please indicate: how many stat your department hired ftom ouside of the ivi Service? Spoctaet AP Pts wweoye0/so | clerical Graces Shot! Stays {Question 3:For the period betwesn January 1, 1999 and June 20, 1999, please incicate how many stff hired by your depariment resigned after: Specialist ‘AP Pls HEO/E0/S0 torent Grades Tis Fem | aie Femie [aie Fomaie |e Far less hon 1 ‘month toss thon 2 ‘monthe loss thon 6 onthe Departures secton8 Contruse {@usstion 4:For the period between Jonuary 1, 1999 and June 20, 1999, please incicate for ‘20ch gioce the number of staf who left our department for the folowing reasons AP Pius HEO/E0/80 Catieot spectaist ‘Grades 1 Resignation 2, Rote, 3. Promotion 5. Motemty Leave 4 Secondment 7. Career break 8. Job Shaving 9. omer Please specity what "Other" reasons were: Significant Change and Influences ‘Question 5:For the patiod between Jonucry 1.1990 and sune 20, 1990, plaase tell ue he | __ %8080Ns or contibutng factors for any significant change in he level of staffing in your ‘Separment | January 1, 1998 - December 31, 1998 Section Bonus ‘Guestion 6: For tne petiod between January 1, 1998 and Decenber 31, 1996, please Indicate how mony staf your deporiment hited from outside of your department But Wwihin the Chil Service? Specie AP Pus HEO/E0/S0 late Graces Guestion 7: For the petiod between January 1. 1998 and December 31. 1998. please Indicate how many stat your department Fred from outside of fhe Chl Service? Speci ‘Grade APP HEO/EO/SO Clesicat Short Stays ‘Guestion 8: For the petiod between January 1, 1998 and Decerrber 31, 1998, please Indicate how many staff hited by your depariment resigned after: Spectoist APP HEO/E0/50 orieot ‘Grades Mae | Fama | Wa Farle | “Wale Fara | Wale Fama toss thon 6 months Departures {Question 9:For the period between Jonuory 1, 1998 ond December 31, 1998, please ingieate for each grade the number of sla whe lef your department forthe folowing Spectatit nerus | wooo | ciaieat Gradoe 1. Resignation 2. Rotred 3. Promotion 4 Tensor 5. Motori Leave 6. Socondment 18. Job shoring Pleose specily what * Other” reasons were: | seclon cornice | significant Change ane influences Question 10: For the period between January 1, 1998 ond December 31, 1998, please tell 1s the reosons o* contributing factors for ony sgalficont change Inthe level of stating in ‘your department January 1, 1997 - December 31, 1997 Hiring {Question 17: For the petiod between January 1. 1997 ond December 31. 1997. please ingicate how many staff your Gepariment hired from outside of your department but within the Civil Service? Spocioist APPhus EO /E0/50 Claticat ‘Grades {Question 12: For the petiod between January 1. 1997 and December 31. 1997, please inicate how many staff your Geporiment hired from outside of the CivilSenice? Speci AP Pius EO /E0/50 Claticat Grades Shor Stays ‘Question 13: For the petiod between January 1. 1997 and December 31.1997, plecse incicate how many staf hired by your department resgred otter: Specie APP HEO/E0/S0 Cteticat ‘Grados TEE] Fans | Was [renee | Wes [Fess [Wee [Fa toss than 1 ‘month? tess han 2 monte Jess than 6 Secten 8 Gonnuss Departures {Question 14:For the period between Jonuary 1. 1997 ond December 3. 1987, please Indicote for each grade the numberof sof who left your department for the folowing Speciolist AP Pus Heo/EO ISO Clerical ‘Grades 1. Resignation 2. Rotred 3. Promotion 4, Nonstor 5. Maternity Leave |& Secondment 7. Coreer Breck 9. Ofer Preoso specity what " Other” reasons wore: J Secon 8 Contnuect Significant Change ond Influences | Question 15: For the period between Januar 1, 1997 and December 31, 1997, please tell 1s the reasons ot coniibuting factors for any significant change in the level of stating in ] Yourdepariment, 1 1 January 1, 1996 - December 31, 1996 Hing {Qusstion 16:For the period between January 1. 1996 and December 31. 1996. please ingcote how mony staf your department hired from outside of your deporiment ut within the Chil Service? Spectotet PPIs HEO/EO/SO Cleric ‘Grades 1 ‘Question 17:For tne period between January 1. 1996 and December 31, 1996, please Indicate how many staff your department hired from outside of the Civ Service? Specialist AP Pls HEO/E0/S0 Clerical Grodes Shot Slays ‘Question 18:For the period between January 1, 1996 and December 31. 1996 pisase lndicote how many staff hired by your deporiment resigned ater: Spociots AP Pies HEO/E0/S0 Clereat Grad oe Femsie | male Fame | ae Fanaie | Wai Fara less than 1 meni? tees hon 2 ‘menthe lees han & ‘onthe Departures {Question 19: For the period between January 1. 1996 and December 31,1996, please lndicote for each gade the numiber of sioff wr left Your deportment or the folowing APPhus Heoyeqso Clerical ‘Special ‘rages Resignation Retired Transter Moternty Leave, secondment Coreer Beat 8 Job shoring 9, onner Please specity what “Other” reasons were: section 8Contnvest ARPARPARPBBBRBARDAEAEGEREGEEBEBBTAA 1 fSechon8 Corned | signifcant Change ond intuences | uesion 20:Fo he period between Jorwary 1. 1996 anc Decembe 31.1996, peose toll Us the reasons ot contibuting fectors for ony significant change in the level o saffingin your department Please provide the name of he individual who completed ths survey. Nome Phone No. Deportment Appendix 4 Sot uesorrare BACKGROUND INFORMATION Please Complete in BLOCK CAPITALS NAME OF DEPARTMENT: GRADE: LENGTH OF TIME YOU HAVE SPENT INTHE ORGANISATION: ‘YEARS WORK LOCATION (CITY/TOWN): DDISTANCE TRAVELLED TO WORK: MILES (MEANS oF TRANSPORT: JOURNEY TINE: Hours / Minutes) PLEASE TICK APPROPRIATE BOXES YouR AGE Under21 2299 O 2083ys0 34.40 yrs O 4180s O spt mac OQ remaue FAMILY CIRCUMSTANCES Marital statur Pace tcxoney Single Dworced DI widowed Maried/Co-habtingQ — separied How many chiltron do you have Ke) aged 5 years oF uncer {b) betweenthe ages of é Gnd 16 yeors: Pro. era ar kaa ee Re cori seasowo, FRMPRABRBBREBRBRBRBRBREBRORBRBRBBEA wor SIZE OF YOUR WoRK GROUP NUMBER OF COLLEAGUES TRAINING DAYS AVAILABILITY OF JOB SHARING. DO YOU USE Jo SHARING [AVAILABILITY OF FLEXITIME DO YOU USE FLEXTIME ‘ACCESS TO CHILDCARE HAVE YOU BEEN OFFERED [—] DECENTRAUISATION, HAVE YoU ACCEPTED DECENTRALISATION. YEARLY SALARY (PRE TAX Including overime) Yearly eamings trom Overtime ocr RK CONTEXT. PEOPLE TALKED TO. DAILY (Average) Cinusrvear Wie YES oF ‘White YES or No ‘ite YES or Thousand | ousond | pounce Holt unto cont) MOTIVATIONAL ISSUES | Please rate (using he scale below) the exten! fo which your cuent job (Conn A) and your preferred job (Column B) present opportunities to do each ofthe areas (bullel points) below. Then, in ‘Column C please pick five bullet points (rom the lst below) thot represent the “Top 5” most | important areas to you in your job and number thete | to § with 1-as most important RATING SCALE Excellent opportunities Good opportunity Some Opportunities Lite opportunity ‘Carrent Pretowed | “Top Five Minimize commuting et ave toxibie working hours ‘Recess chidear faci Have aecure job Bo voluntary ribcaFeod ‘Werk with collsaguos the some age Enjoy opportuni Tor taining Work in @ comfortable envionment De watled and interesting work 17 Frogiets end develop your career 1 Develop your earning potential 7 Compete wih others 1 Ferorm challonging walk 14 i Be rewarded or your eters hs Receive wacogniin for your work 1 Werk wih a pariipative management vie cs Direct the work of here ‘igor ond contol your own work 7 Challenge other parpecive 2. Werk n team a Most new people Develop athers potential 3. Wari wih efit systoms 24 Tnvent new ways of ding ings Fool you are providing e publie sonics Tullio vocational commitment ‘OTHER Please specly ora rme FOCUS GROUPS OUTLINE Introduction ane context satting. Why joined? \What do you enjoy about the job & ClviService? Get them thinking ‘long the lines ofthe work ise, the organisation, and the ft between the Job ond thei pesonol needs/clicumstances, Why do you think people in your department Ieave? Ist the some. ‘elsewhere in he Cs? NON-START INTERVIEWS OUTLINE 1. Introduction + Whowe ore + Estabish whether i's a convenient time + What we are frying fo achieve ond how (e..Retention Survey... get input from people through ‘Questionnaires ond! focus group). Why them Benefits to others in the future Contidentatty Discussion wil give you a chance to alr views on retention sues How long it wl toke ‘Any questions 2. Reason No! Accept Wry did you decide not to toke the offer having gone through the selection proces? .. Biggest factor * "What ob ore you curently doing? + What does thé fer? Prompts: opportunities, challenges. quay of Ife scary + reais that you id not accept the offer, but hypotheiicaly speoking, what things would hove had fo'change to moke you accept? Most important? 3, Altfaction and retention + Thinkng book to when you fist applied. what tttrocted you to working in he Civ Service ‘+ What ci you tke about potentiatjob?.... Most Important? logtaphical Detals(expIoin why we need!) ‘5, Summary, wish tnem luck ete EXIT INTERVIEWS OUTLINE Initoduction ond context setting. \Whot is/are the main reason(s) for which you are leaving? ~~ prompts ‘What do you plan to do? ‘What do you think the wil offer? (Proms: opportunities, challenges. quality of fe, solary. etc) ‘+ Summatse the main reasons forthe resignation. Attraction ond retention ‘+ Thinking back to when you started, what attracted youto .wetking n the Cri Service? ‘+ What a you ke about the job? ‘+ What kept you there forX long? or Wht would have kept youlnine CvilSevice? Blogrophicol Details (expioin why we need!) Summary and conchsion (wish them luck. etc.) Appendix 5 ‘Apeendix 5: Actual Demographic Distrbutions for Strand 1wo ‘Questionnaire Personnel Officers were provided wilh details of the demographics requited for ‘questionnaire respondents in ther department (as part ofthe larger 912 sample shown In Table 2) ond asked to provide us with the names of individuals who matched these: ‘demographics. In some cases the names provided did not match the demographics requested. Therefore, the actual demographic distibution forthe 908 questionnaires disttouted are os follows: Grade Gender AgeRiange Surveys Distributes As +38 46 APs 192 ape $3 5 ‘co 31 APS 38 10 HEOOISO 294 APs 3 1 SP an co 433 89 co per) 80 7 oO "33 80 a1 co 3 ne HEO/EOISO. +33 5 33+ 585 HEO/EOISO 333 84 3 323 HEO/EGISO 3 39 HEOIEOISO “3 s SP 433 56 SP 33 29 SP “33 38 sp 3 2 (Ofte 908 questionnaites dstibuted, 669 auestionnaites were received before the last HEWYOUETTA (56) 6661 - 9661 oBe10ny suoneub\sey isiievveds iweuvededa (9%) 0002 40 pues | | suoweubisey isyeIoeds wewuedeg co] sepeig liv - (2) e6e1eny suopeub}soy eomeg into HeWYDUERE | (96) SapeD [IY - 6661 - 9661 104 eBeieny suoneub\sey wouneded) (%) S@perD It - 0002 | 4oy pues, suojeubisoy juounsedogm ‘Se AD 0\YO SoNSHEIS [eAUED YN JO} SHeUIYOUER UONEUBISOH (2%) 0002 40} pues, suoneubjsey 1sitejoeds juouuedea o) separ liv - (%) Beery suoneubisoy | ‘Somes INI MeWYOUER (9%) Sepeu9 II - (9%) SepeI IIv - 0002 | 40} pues) suojeubisey jueuedeq my | asyeoads, + (%4) eBe1eny suoneub)soy ‘SOMES IMIO >HeWYOUER| (95) 6661 - 9661 eBe10Ay ‘suojeub}soy Isi/e}9edg juounedeg (9%) 0002 40) pues, suoneubisoy seeds 1ueweded a tv =(64) 6eiony suopeubrson, | SouNeS INO HeWoUEAO | |” (%) S@PBID) II - GBGL - 9BG1 405 | eBeueny suoyeuBise}y juewedeq ml | — (%) Sepes9 IV - 0008 40) pues, SuoneUBisey jueWEdeQ Bl iA RAP eee 20410 SJONDIIOS A1BIS JOD 94) 10} SYeWYOUEG LOWeUB|SOL 7 rsyeroeds ~ (%6) aBz1ony suoneubiseys ‘somes IND MEW | (:4) 6661 - 9661 eBe10Ny suoneubisey is\/e}eds 1ueuedeC m (%) 0002 40) puosy, ‘suoneuBisoy ys\jeloeds jueuedeg o) IV - (%) @Be10Ay suoneubisey eowles IAI HeWYUERE | (76) SopeO Iv - 6661. - 9664.10} eBzieny suojeubisoy jueuneded Bm (2%) sepeso Iv - 0002 40} pues, suoeuBisey tusuedegm | L sjuountuioddy je007 pue uorssiuwoD 010198 HIND 24 J0 2040 94 104 S.EWIYOUER LO} ye19u99 Joypny ¥ Je}}0ndwo9 Bip Jo 89440 24) 10} SjreUILPUEg UONEUBISEK seeds = (%) ebBe1eny suoyeubisay Soni9g IMO HeWIYOUER ) 666} - 9661 aBeeNy ysieoeds yuewyedeq mt (26) 0002 40) Pua ‘suoneuBisey isieloeds juewuedegT) sepeip | aBe1any suoneubisoy somes Ing HeWYOUER = 656} ~ 9661 105 (%) Sepeup ity - 0002 20} puss, suoneudisoy wvounedagm L aouapag Jo 1ueunedag 24) 10) syreUulj9ueg LoNPUBISeY (°%) 6661 - 9661. eB2seny ‘suoneub|sey ysy}e}9eds wewedeq my (2) 0002 40} pues, (2%) SepeID II - BBE} - 9681 10} eBeueny suoneuBisey jueWedeC (%) sepes® ily - 0002 29} puel, suojeuBssey wuewyeded ms | | Seas DoOoooog = ‘suopnoseoid alana yo s019911q 941 0 89Y}O 241 40} syreUySUEG UOHeUBICoLY Leis [| istepoeds ony SUORBUBISOL, 3S HAN MeWYoUSE | | (96) 6661 - 9661 eBeueny | F ‘suoneubisey Isifeoeds juewneded ml (9%) 0002 40} pues, _suoneubisoy isye9edg wweuNedsGa SepeI5) lly - (%) eBe1eAy suoneubisey 5) SepeD IIV - 0002 10} pues, suoNeUB Iso TuEUNEdeC ED eous!9s ® uoleonpa Jo weeded etn 10} syyeuIYoUEg YONeUBISeY - ysyjejoads = (96) eBeseny suoteubsou 2o1NES IAD WEUNOUOR ES (2%) 6661 - 9661 eBeI0ny ‘suopeusisey queweded mt (e4) 0002401 puss, | ‘suopeuBisey isyeIsedg yuowuedegG | sopeip Itv- (24) eB eiony suoneuB sox Somes IN >HeWYIUER TI (s6) SpE ity - 6661 - 9661 40) | ebeieny Suopeubisey jueWEdeC mE (96) sopeso itv - 0002 20) puon, suoneubieoy wouredeO quewfo\duy 79 pel, “esudiowa jo juaWHedeg ay) 10} syrewyouNR LoeUBISOY (20) 6861 - 9681 962100 /suoqeubisey 1syeyeds weuleded (2%) 0002 40} PUuBAL ‘suogeuBisey IsyeIoeds yweuyedeg to) sepe1 lly - (9%) eBe1eny suoneudisoy som9S (Iv HeUUOUERD (9%) SepeID ty - 6661 - 9661 10) eBereny suoreuBisey 1usunedogm sepeu9 I - 0002 40} puoi, suoneubisay weuvedeaes | woUNWeENoD [e007 8 ]UEWUUOWAU Oy} JO JUSUILEdEG OY 0} SZeUYOUEG UONBUBISEY - asijeoads ~ (%) eBeieny suopeubisou ‘somes [II HEWLOUEEE (2%) 6661 - 966} eGeueny ‘suopeubisey ysile9eds jueWedeC wm (6) 000230} puss | |suoyeubseus ysieyads juewpedeg 5 sepei) itv -(¢¢) oBereny suoneuBisoy SoyNog WO >HeMYOUER EI (9%) SaPBAD II - BEBE - 9661 10} eBeiany suoneuBisey jueunedeqm | = ———— I (96) sepeto ii - 0002 20} pues, suofeubisoy weunedegm | sijeroads = (%) eBe1eny suoneubisay Iv ~ (%) @Bereny suoneubisoy ‘eoyas IAI EWYOURAT (2%) SepeID IIV - 0002 40} puaiy suoneubisey weunedege | sureyy UBje104 jo jueUEdeg e4) 10} seWYoUEg UONEUBISEH syepads ~ (9%) oBe1eny suojeubisey S0)N0S IND WEULPUE (6) 6661 - 9661 BtI0ny suoneuSisey ysi}eVeds juewedec m (%) 0002 401 Pues, ‘suoneubisey isieIoeds wewueded Do sopeig liv ~ (%) eBeeny suoneubsoey Somes [MIO >HEWYIUES (6) sepeip ity - 2008 40} pual, suoyeubisey juowpedeg m | | BEBBBBEBEBABGEL c BSEGBB8B808 uoIPIUO 8 YESH JO wsUINEdEG eUN 10} syeWIYOUEG LONEUBISO rsireoeds ~ (%) aBeiony suoneuBisoy e0/ueS IND eUIYOUER EL (%6) 6661 - 9661 @BeI0ny suojeubisey sifeoeds wounedeg m suoneubisey syeioads ywauedagr sepeip liv -(%6) eBeieny suoneubisex somes mid weUYoUEE (9) S@peuD II - 6661 - 9661 40} ‘ebeiony suoneubisey jwewedec ml (9%) S@peID iIV - 000 4oy pues, suoqeubisey juewedegm isje}oeds ~ (%6) aBeiany suoneubisoy BoIMES AID YRUIYOUEE (%) 6661 - 9661 obeI0ny ‘Suopeubisey Is1}e}9eds jwOUNEdEC (9%) 0002.40} pues. suoneubisey isiioads weuedegn | sepeio liv - (%) eBeieny suogeubisey eomueg Ini weuyouegE | (56) S9PB49 IY - 6661 - 9661 10) aBeleny suoeUBIsey jueWuedeQ ml |” (2%) Sepe5 IW = 0002 uuojey me °g Aujenb3 ‘eansne jo juewyedeg ey) 40) syzewyoueg UoHeUB|sey Jo} pues suopeUBisey juowpedegm | TRAPP RAR | a aa no Sunog - unojey me 2 Ayjenb3 ‘eoysne jo juawyedeg eu) 40) srewuyoueg uoyeUB\soH asiewoeds | | + (%) eBeieny suojeubisay | e0mM9S II EUIYOUER EL (2%) 6681 - 966} eBes0ny suopeubisoy isyeioeds ywouedoc a (2%) 000240} pues, | | suoneubisey sijetoads weunedego sepeip | Iv - (%) eBe1eny suoneuBisoy ‘somos II weUyoUeR (2%) S@pBIO Il - 6661 - 9661 40} efeieny suoneubissy juewyedeG my (9%) Sepess liv - 0002 40} puai suoneubjsey wueuedegm [ ‘AysiGy pueT - WHO} ME 'g Aujenbg ‘sonsnr jo jueuedeg ey) 10} syyewyoUDg UONeUBISH iswoeds ~ (94) eBeseny suoneUsIseH 201185 IND >eUILOUER (2%) SuoneLBIseu 1 - 9661 eBkIOAY joeds juowwedog mt (2%) 0002 10) pues. suoneuBisey ysyyelIdeds juewyeded O) sepei liv - (%) ebe1eny suoneubisey somes Into >HEUILOUES st (9%) S@peuO II - BEE} - 9661 40} eBeiany suoneubisoy jewneded m (2) SepeiD ty - 0002 40) pues suoneubisoy juowyedeg Em se seoinosoy eumeN 8 euLeW 24) Jo yweuedeq @4) 10) SYeUIYoUOg LONeUBISOH ysyepeds, + (%) eBeseny suoneubisey 80IN95 IND PULLER (00) 6661 - 9661 eBtzony | suoneubisey IseI0eds jwauedegm | 7 (9) 0002 40} pues, Pf suopeusisey yseIads wewnedeg a sopei liv (%) oBesony suoneutisoE S0IN19S IND >HEULUEED (2%) s9p219 lly - 6684 ~ 9664.40 eBeveny Suojeubisey juewEd (G6) SepeID ily - 0002 40) pus, suojeubisay jeunedegm seeds, ~ (4) eBeseny suoneutisey, S0)0105 AID HEWIUDUOR (9) 6661 - 9661 eB210ny ‘suoneubisey ysyje}veds wwewuede ml (6) 0002 20} pues. ‘suoneubisey ysyeloeds juewuedeq io ‘sepeip IV - (6) @Bereny suoneudisoy Som9g jInIO HeMIYOUER (9%) SopeID IV - 666} - 9661 10} ebzieny suojeubisey JueUILEdeg Em (2%) SepBID IIV - 000z 40} puely suopPUBisoy jUOLIEESC Ey SOM aN JO 894 yreunpuiag LON eUbysey asyeroeds ~ (%) eBe1eny suoneubisey ‘somes IIA HewWYoUER ED | ($6) 6061 - 9661 a6210ny | Suoneubiso4s isie\90dg juewedeC my f (6) 0002 40} puedy ‘suopeubsay isye}9eds juewede o] sopely liv - (%) eBe1eny suoreub}souy somes Ino weMYUERo (9%) Sepeid II¥ - 6661 - 966} 0} eBeieny suoleuBisey 1ueWedeC a (%) sopedt 40) pues, suopeubysoy pevinent ie pUPIAH| AAaing aQURUpIO 10) SyreUJUAG UONaUB,SA -esudie1ug oygnd Jo jueWIedeQ ey) 10} syrewyoUEg UONeUBISOH, er sipped + (%) eBeieny suoneubisoy (%) 6661 - 9664 26zs0ny | | suopeubisoy jsyeweds wounredogmm| | (94) SOPEIO IY - 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