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EDUC 450: PROFESSIONAL CLINICAL PRACTICE

LONG RANGE PLAN -- EARLY CHILDHOOD & ELEMENTARY

Candidate: Rachel Troutman


Grade: 1st
District: Orangeburg County School District 5
Year: Spring 2016
Major: Early Childhood Education

Cooperating Teacher: Mary Pent


Schools: Dover Elementary School
Cognate(s): Social Studies

Section I: Student Information


Describe the student information that you feel will have the most impact on the way you plan
and deliver instruction.
Important Student Information
Factors
(e.g. gender, SES, reading
Description
levels, disabilities,
(of your findings in terms
ethnicity, student
of your students)
interests, and other
relevant factors, etc.)
Reading Levels
As of Winter 2015-2016,
fifty-five percent of the
students ranged exhibited a
low or low average reading
level. Twenty-five percent
had an average reading
level. Twenty percent had a
high average or a high
reading level.

Disabilities

Student Interests

Three of the students are


assisted in a speech class.
Two students are taken out
for a reading class. One of
the students has a shadow
that assists and monitors
the student on a daily
basis.
I observed during centers
that students interests

Sources/Contextual Factors
(e.g. students, community
resources, internet, records, school
personnel, family, etc.)
Student Records(The Northwest
Evaluation)

Student Records

Observations
1

Gender

Ethnicity

determine their participation


in a particular center.
There are nine female
Observation
students and twelve male
students.
There are presently twelve
Teacher Conference
Caucasian students and
nine African American
students.

Reflect on the student Information: Why do you feel that this student information is of
primary importance, and (2) how did and will you use this student information to guide the
development of your long and short range plans?
The student data that I have collected is essential in knowing how to teach my class. Every
aspect of their lives affects the classroom. The students reading levels, disabilities, interests, gender,
and ethnicity all factor in the way that I teach them.
My cooperating teacher, Mrs. Pent, has 21 students in her first grade class. The reading levels
of the students influence all of my instruction. If my students cannot read on their grade level they
may have difficulty learning in other content area. I have noticed that if they cannot read on a first
grade level they will most likely have a difficult time doing tasks such as reading directions on an
assessment. However, twenty percent of my students read on a high average or high reading level,
so I have to find reading material that will not bore them, but help them read on an even higher level.
Disabilities can sometimes hinder a students attention span. A disability could also mean that
a child is lacking in one subject and succeeding in another. A disability could mean that a shadow is
placed with the child to guide them throughout the school day. All of the characteristics I have
mentioned above are present in my classroom. I have students with a wide range of disabilities. I
have found it necessary to monitor and adjust when I notice that a student is struggling in a content
area. The student that is accompanied by a shadow makes impulsive sounds throughout the day. I
have learned that continuing with the lesson is usually the best way to deal with that situation.
Observing students to determine their interests can make a huge difference in planning. I
observed the students in centers to see what they like the best. Many of the students liked working
with Legos, modeling clay, and drawing. I have noticed that many of the students like tactile learning.
So I have incorporated tactile elements into my lessons. When teaching lessons I like to implement a
hands-on learning. I have had the students make moon craters by tossing rocks into a container filled
with cocoa powder and flour. When the students do writings, they illustrate what they are writing.
2

In the class I have nine female students and twelve male students. Because of this, I have to
be careful to not have gender bias. When conducting a lesson and putting students into teams, I am
careful not to group boys with boys and girls with girls. Heterogeneous grouping works better to
ensure no gender bias. Currently in the classroom there are twelve Caucasian students and nine
African American students. I found out this information during a teacher conference. There are two
students in the class that are biracial. Mrs. Pent explained that these students would be the
nationality of their mother. Gender information can be utilized to help determine lesson material.
Since my classroom has different ethnicities I can work to make the classroom one that is
multicultural as a whole. I can achieve this through the lessons that I teach and the classroom
organization.

Section II: Long Range Learning and/or Developmental Goals


Describe the long range learning/developmental goals (standards) that you have established
for your students in each of the four content areas. Make sure that you include goals that
address the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains and diversity for students.
Subject: English Language Arts

Long Range Learning and/or Developmental Goals

Standard 3 Reading: Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding
words.
Standard 3 Writing: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences
or events using effective techniques, well-chosen details, and well-structured
event sequences.

Standard 1 Communication: Interact with others to explore ideas and concepts,


communicate meaning, and develop logical interpretations through
collaborative conversations; build upon the ideas of others to clearly
express ones own views while respecting diverse perspectives.
Reflect on the long range learning and/or developmental goals: Of the long range learning
and/or developmental goals you have established, which goals do you believe are the most
important for all students to achieve, and why?
3

Standard 3 Reading: Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding
words I feel is by far the most important skill or standard that all the students need to master. This is
the most important since reading is all encompassing in our lives. To do well in school and life, we
must master grade level reading to go on to read and learn in higher grades.
Subject: Mathematics

Long Range Learning and/or Developmental Goals


1. MDA.3 Use analog and digital clocks to tell and record time to the hour and half-hour.

1. MDA.1 Order three objects by length comparison using indirectly by using a third object.
1. MDA. 4 Collect, organize, and represent data with up to 3 categories using object graphs,
picture graphs, tallies, and charts.
Reflect on the long range learning and/or developmental goals: Of the long range learning
and/or developmental goals you have established, which goals do you believe are the most
important for all students to achieve, and why?
While all of the math goals are important for the students to achieve, telling time is the one I
would consider to be the most important of the three. Telling time is a skill that will be used every day
for the students as they grow into adults.
Subject: Science

Long Range Learning and/or Developmental Goals

1. E.4A.1 Analyze and interpret data from observations and measurements to compare the
properties of Earth materials (including rocks, soils, sand, and water).
1. E.4A.2 Develop and use models (such as drawings or maps) to describe patterns in the
distribution of land and water on Earth and classify bodies of water (including oceans, rivers and
streams, lakes, and ponds).
1. E.4A.3 Conduct structured investigations to answer questions about how the movement of water
can change the shape of the land.
Reflect on the long range learning and/or developmental goals: Of the long range learning
and/or developmental goals you have established, which goals do you believe are the most
important for all students to achieve, and why?
4

I believe that the first science standard listed is the most important to students futures.
Comparing data, analyzing and interpreting data is needed in everyday situations as students
matriculate through elementary into middle level schooling.

Subject: Social Studies

Long Range Learning and/or Developmental Goals


1-3.1 Describe the fundamental principles of American Democracy.
1-3.2 Identify ways that all citizens can serve the common good, including serving as public officials.
1-3.3 Summarize the contributions to democracy that have been made by historical and political
figures in the United States.

Reflect on the long range learning and/or developmental goals): Of the long range learning
and/or developmental goals you have established, which goals do you believe are the most
important for all students to achieve, and why?
These are all important standards to help students grow into productive citizens, but the most
important, I feel, would be the first one; summarizing contributions to democracy that have been
made by historical and political figures in the United States. I believe this is the most important goal
so that students know about our country and how important it is to contribute to our democracy. We
want students to grow up and be contributors to our country in a positive manner.

Section III: Instructional Units


Describe the instructional units, in sequence, for each content area for your class. Make sure
that you integrate the arts (dance, music, theater, and visual arts), health and physical
education in your units.
Subject: English Language Arts

Unit Topic: Changes, What is changing in our world?

Standards/Instructional Units
Standard 3 Reading: Know and apply grade-level phonics
and word analysis skills in decoding words.

Unit Length
(i.e., approximate number of
lessons/weeks)
This standard is an ongoing standard
that will be taught throughout the year.
We will focus on it for 3 weeks. There
5

Unit 3 Week 1, A Place to Play, Reading Street, South


Carolina Grade 1Scott Foresman
Unit 3, Week 2, Ruby in Her Own Time, Reading Street,
South Carolina Grade 1Scott Foresman
Unit 3, Week 3, The Class Pet, Reading Street
Standard 3 Writing: Write narratives to develop real or
imagined experiences or events using effective techniques,
well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
Unit 3 Week 1, A Place to Play, Reading Street, South
Carolina Grade 1Scott Foresman

are five lessons for each week, so 15


lessons.

This standard is an ongoing standard


that will be taught throughout the year.
We will focus on it for 3 weeks.
There are five lessons for each week,
so 15 lessons.

Unit 3, Week 2, Ruby in Her Own Time, Reading Street,


South Carolina Grade 1Scott Foresman
Unit 3, Week 3, The Class Pet, Reading Street, South
Carolina Grade 1Scott Foresman

Standard 1 Communication: Interact with others to explore


ideas and concepts, communicate meaning, and develop
logical interpretations through collaborative conversations;
build upon the ideas of others to clearly express ones own
views while respecting diverse perspectives.

This standard is an ongoing standard


that will be taught throughout the year.
We will focus on it for 3 weeks. There
are five lessons for each week, so 15
lessons.

Unit 3 Week 1, A Place to Play, Reading Street, South


Carolina Grade 1Scott Foresman
Unit 3, Week 2, Ruby in Her Own Time, Reading Street,
South Carolina Grade 1Scott Foresman
Unit 3, Week 3, The Class Pet, Reading Street, South
Carolina Grade 1Scott Foresman

Reflect on the instructional units: How did you determine your instructional sequence and
the amount of time to be spent on each unit of instruction?

The instructional units are from the Core Curriculum that SC uses for ELA, Reading Street by
Scott Foresman. They are already sequenced and the amount of time is also delineated in the
teacher edition.

Describe ways in which you will integrate the arts, PE and Health in your unit.

Standard
s
1

2
3

ARTS
Students will illustrate
stories after they/we read
them in class.
Students will illustrate their
writings as they write.
Students will use drawings
to help communicate
thoughts, and ideas.

PE

HEALTH

Students will act out their


thoughts on readings.

Stand up and Stretch.

Stand up and Stretch.

Gallery Walk

Gallery Walk

Sing and Dance

Describe the instructional units, in sequence, for each content area for your class. Make sure
that you integrate the arts (dance, music, theater, and visual arts), health and physical
education in your units.
Subject: Mathematics

Standards
MDA.3 Use analog and digital clocks to tell and record time
to the hour and half-hour
Unit Topic 13, Time (en Vision Math, Common Core, Scott
Foresman)

Unit Topic: Measurement


Unit Length
(i.e., approximate number of
lessons/weeks
Two weeks; one week for time to the
hour, and one week for time to the half
hour. 10 lessons.

MDA.1 Order three objects by length using indirect


comparison.
Unit Topic 12, Length (en Vision Math, Common Core, Scott
Foresman)

One week, five lessons.

MDA. 4 Collect, organize, and represent data with up


to 3 categories using object graphs, picture graphs,
tallies, and charts.
Unit Topic 14, Using Data (en Vision Math, Common Core,
Scott Foresman)

Two weeks, ten lessons.

Reflect on the instructional units: How did you determine your instructional sequence and
the amount of time to be spent on each unit of instruction?
The instructional sequence and amount of time to be spent on each unit was determined by
the pacing guide and text that OCSD5 uses. The students understanding of the information also
influenced the amount of time I spent on my lesson.
Describe ways in which you will integrate the arts, PE and Health in your unit.

Standard
s

PE

HEALTH

Students illustrated clocks


and what they would be
doing at these times of the
day.

Students sang and danced


to count by fives song.

Students traced and drew


beanie Babies and then
measured them.

Students used footsteps to


measure objects in the
room.

Students drew which topic


they chose for each class
pictograph.

Students came to the board


to post their interests.

After singing and dancing to


the counting by fives song
the students took deep
breaths to calm themselves
before the next section of
the lesson started.
The students learned that
walking around our
neighborhood helps us to
be healthy.
One of the pictographs was
about sport interests. They
learned that by participating
in sports they will be
healthy.

ARTS

Describe the instructional units, in sequence, for each content area for your class. Make sure
that you integrate the arts (dance, music, theater, and visual arts), health and physical
education in your units.
Subject: Science

Unit Topic: Earths natural Resources, Earth Science

Standards

Unit Length
(i.e., approximate number of
lessons/weeks
2 weeks, 10 lessons

1. E.4A.1 Analyze and interpret data from observations


and measurements to compare the properties of
Earth materials (including rocks, soils, sand, and
water).
Unit B, Chapter 4, Looking at Earth (South
Carolina Science/Macmillan/McGraw-Hill,first
8

grade )
2 weeks, 10 lessons
1. E.4A.2 Develop and use models (such as drawings
or maps) to describe patterns in the distribution of
land and water on Earth and classify bodies of water
(including oceans, rivers and streams, lakes, and
ponds).
Unit B, Chapter 4 and 5, Looking at Earth
(South Carolina Science/Macmillan/McGrawHill, first grade )
1-1.3 Identify various natural resources (e.g.,
water, animals, plants, minerals) around the
world. Unit B, Chapter 4 and 5 Caring for
Earth (South Carolina
Science/Macmillan/McGraw-Hill first grade )

2 weeks, 10 lessons

Reflect on the instructional units: How did you determine your instructional sequence and
the amount of time to be spent on each unit of instruction?
The instructional units and sequence were determined by the South Carolina Science Standards and
the OCSD5 Pacing Guide.

Describe ways in which you will integrate the arts, PE and Health in your unit.

Standard
s

ARTS
The students will sing a
song about the earths
materials.

The students will construct


a model of distributions of
land and water on Earth.

The students will create a


picture of their favorite
animal or plant.

PE
While taking a walk on the
nature trail the students will
make observations of the
different properties of
Earths materials.
The students will move their
arms in a flowing motion as
if they are the waves of an
ocean.
The students will pretend
they are their favorite
animal and imitate that
animals motion and sound.

HEALTH
The students will do a
breathing exercise after
each PE element.

The students will do a


breathing exercise after
each PE element.
The students will do a
breathing exercise after
each PE element.

Describe the instructional units, in sequence, for each content area for your class. Make sure
that you integrate the arts (dance, music, theater, and visual arts), health and physical
education in your units.
Subject: Social Studies

Unit Topic: This is Our Country

Standards
1-3.1 Describe the fundamental principles of American
Democracy.
Unit 5, This is our Country (Social Studies All Together,
grade 1,Scott Foresman)
1-3.2 Identify ways that all citizens can serve the common
good, including serving as public officials. Unit 5, This is our
Country (Social Studies All Together, grade 1,Scott
Foresman)

Unit Length
(i.e., approximate number of
lessons/weeks
2 weeks, 10 lessons

2 weeks, 10 lessons

2 weeks, 10 lessons
1-3.3 Summarize the contributions to democracy that have
been made by historical and political figures in the United
States.
Unit 5, This is Our Country (Social Studies All
Together, grade 1,Scott Foresman)
Reflect on the instructional units: How did you determine your instructional sequence and
the amount of time to be spent on each unit of instruction?
The instructional units and sequence were determined by the South Carolina Social Studies
Standards and the OCSD5 Pacing Guide.
Describe ways in which you will integrate the arts, PE and Health in your unit.

Standard
s

ARTS

PE

HEALTH

The students illustrate what


fair treatment to all means
for them.

The students will distinguish


a healthy way to treat
others fairly.

The students will participate


in a mock election where
they will vote for candidate

The students will air-five


their classmates hands.
(Air-fiving is when a student
brings up their arm as one
would to give a high five,
air-fiving does not require
physical contact)
The students will walk
around the classroom to
view information posted

The students will connect


with the candidates by
considering what they do
10

by illustrating a picture of
the candidate and turning it
in.

The students will recite a


song about a historical
figure in the United States.

about the candidates.

the same as the candidate.


(Brushing teeth, drinking
water, eating healthy
meals).
The students will dance to a The students will learn
song about a historical
about how people took
figure in the United States.
provided for themselves
100 years ago (growing
their own crops for food).

Section III B: Materials and Resources


Make a list of all of the materials that will be needed to teach the unit. As you plan for the use
of technology, make sure that list and explain how you will use software, computer programs,
Smart boards, etc., along with power points that you may use.
List by subject area.
Teacher Materials
English Language Arts
Reading Street, South Carolina Grade 1,
Scott Foresman TA Manual

Mathematics
en Vision Math, Common Core, Scott
Foresman, EN Vision math web site,

Science
South Carolina
Science/Macmillan/McGraw-Hill first grade
TA
Social Studies
Social Studies All Together TA, grade
1,Scott Foresman

Student Materials
Student s, ELA text , Reading Street, South Carolina
Grade 1Scott Foresman, Reading Street leveled
readers, Journals, pencils, paper

Students consumable workbooks, teacher made


worksheets, en Vision Math, Common Core, Scott
Foresman, pencils, paper

South Carolina Science student


text/Macmillan/McGraw-Hill first grade, pencils, paper

Social Studies All Together, student text grade 1,Scott


Foresman, pencils, paper

Section IV: Assessment of Student Performance

11

Describe (1) the major course assessments (include formative and summative assessments),
(2) the evaluation criteria for this class/subject, and (3) the way(s) in which you will report
overall student progress and achievement.
You must present multiple modes of
assessments that address multiple levels of Blooms Taxonomy. Your assessments (or a
detailed description, if authentic) must be attached. On each assessment, indicate the
matching learning goal or standard(s).
English Language Arts

Assessments
(Indicate whether
formative or
summative)
Example:
Unit 1: Weekly Quiz
Pop Quiz
Project
End of Unit
Test

Standard 1: weekly
quiz

Standard 2: weekly
quiz

Standard 3: weekly

Evaluative Criteria

Pop Quiz 5
Questions = 5 bonus
points
Weekly Quiz, End of
Unit Test based on
schools grading
chart: A=
B= ; C= ; D = ; F =

Project Scoring
Rubric Maximum
Points 50
5 Questions
based on schools
grading chart: A=93100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ;
D =70-76 ; F =-70

Student
Progress/Achievemen
t Reporting Method(s)
All progress on the
assessments will be
reported to students
immediately (within 2
days).
Progress will be
reported to parents on
the bi-weekly progress
reports and quarterly
report card.

Matching
Goal/Standard

Goal 1: Determine
central ideas on
themes of a text and
analyze their
development.

Progress will be
reported to parents on
the weekly papers and
quarterly report card.

Know and apply


grade-level phonics
and word analysis
skills in decoding
words.

5 Questions
based on schools
grading chart: A=93100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ;
D =70-76 ; F =-70

Progress will be
reported to parents on
the weekly papers and
quarterly report card.

5 Questions based
on schools grading
chart: A=93-100

Progress will be
reported to parents on
the weekly papers and

Write narratives to
develop real or
imagined experiences
or events using
effective techniques,
well-chosen details,
and well-structured
event sequences.
Interact with others to
explore ideas and
concepts,
12

quiz

B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ;
D =70-76 ; F =-70

quarterly report card.

communicate
meaning, and develop
logical interpretations
through
collaborative
conversations; build
upon the ideas of
others to clearly
express ones own
views while respecting
diverse perspectives.

Mathematics

Assessments
(Indicate whether
formative or
summative)

Standard 1: weekly
quiz
Student Task

Evaluative Criteria

5 Questions
based on schools
grading chart: A=93100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ;
D =70-76 ; F =-70

Student
Progress/Achievemen
t Reporting Method(s)

Matching
Goal/Standard

Use analog and digital


clocks to tell and
record time to the hour
and half-hour.
Progress will be
reported to parents on
the weekly papers and
quarterly report card.

Standard 2: weekly
quiz
Cooperative task

5 Questions based
on schools grading
chart: A=93-100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ;
D =70-76 ; F =-70

Progress will be
reported to parents on
the weekly papers and
quarterly report card.

Order three objects by


length comparison
using indirectly by
using a third object.

Standard 3: weekly
quiz
Students Task

5 Questions based
on schools grading
chart: A=93-100
B= 85-92 ; C= 77-84 ;
D =70-76 ; F =-70

Progress will be
reported to parents on
the weekly papers and
quarterly report card.

Collect, organize, and


represent data with up
to 3 categories using
object graphs, picture
graphs, tallies, and
charts.

13

Science
Assessments
(Indicate whether
formative or
summative)

Evaluative Criteria

Student
Progress/Achievemen
t Reporting Method(s)

Rubric

Standard 1: Student
Performance Task

1=Unacceptable
2= Target
3= Meets

Standard 2: Student
Performance Task

Rubric
1=Unacceptable

Progress will be
reported to parents on
the weekly papers and
quarterly report card.
Progress will be
reported to parents on
the weekly papers and
quarterly report card.

2= Target
3= Meets

Standard 3: Student
Performance Task

Rubric

Progress will be
reported to parents on
the weekly papers and
quarterly report card.

1=Unacceptable
2= Target

Matching
Goal/Standard

Analyze and interpret


data from
observations and
measurements to
compare the
properties of Earth
materials (including
rocks, soils, sand, and
water).
Develop and use
models (such as
drawings or maps) to
describe patterns in
the distribution of land
and water on Earth
and classify bodies of
water (including
oceans, rivers and
streams, lakes, and
ponds).
Conduct structured
investigations to
answer questions
about how the
movement of water
can change the shape
of the land.

3= Meets

Social Studies

14

Assessments
(Indicate whether
formative or
summative)

Evaluative Criteria

Rubric
Standard 1: Student
Performance Task

1=Unacceptable

Student
Progress/Achievemen
t Reporting Method(s)

Matching
Goal/Standard

Progress will be
reported to parents on
the weekly papers and
quarterly report card.

Describe the
fundamental principles
of American
Democracy.

Progress will be
reported to parents on
the weekly papers and
quarterly report card.

Summarize the
contributions to
democracy that have
been made by
historical and political
figures in the United
States.
Summarize the
contributions to
democracy that have
been made by
historical and political
figures in the United
States.

2= Target
3= Meets
Rubric
Standard 2: Student
Performance Task

1=Unacceptable
2= Target
3= Meets
Rubric

Standard 3: Student
Performance Task

1=Unacceptable
2= Target
3= Meets

Progress will be
reported to parents on
the weekly papers and
quarterly report card.

15

Reflect on student performance: (1) How did you determine that your major assessments are
appropriate for evaluating student progress and achievement, and (2) What did or will you do
to help your students and their parents understand (a) the evaluation criteria you have
established for this class/subject as well as (b) the reports regarding the students overall
progress and achievement in the class/subject?
A. Evaluation criteria are set up in the teacher gradebook on Power teacher and are district wide
for 1st through 12th grade. As per District grading policies, Quizzes, and classwork, and
performance tasks are all 60% of a grade, while tests are 40%.

Section IV B: Assessment of Student Performance Record Keeping


Describe your system for maintaining records of student progress and achievement for this
subject. Also, discuss your procedures for disaggregating and displaying the data. Discuss
how you will use the data to make instructional decisions.

A. System for maintaining records of student progress and achievement:


I have determined these assessments are appropriate for evaluating students progress and
achievement. They are aligned with South Carolina curriculum standards and indicators along with
Pacing Guides.
Students work is graded, recorded in the Districts gradebook on Power School, and signed
papers go home with students in their folders weekly. Reading notes are kept in students weekly
folder from small group reading. Progress will be reported to parents on the weekly papers and
quarterly report card. Conferences are held as needed or requested by parents or the teacher.

B. Procedures for disaggregating and displaying data:


When disaggregating students work, students will only have their first name on their papers.
I aim to display all of the students work if possible. Those who completed work with a C or better
will be displayed. In first grade it is important to let all of the students know that their work is important
and their progress is appreciated.

C. How will you use the data to make instructional decisions?


16

I will analyze students on a daily basis to determine instruction. I will monitor and adjust
if needed. Students classwork will also be a good indicator of student learning and it will
determine if I need to stay on a goal. It will also determine if I need to go to the next goal.

Section V: Classroom Management


Describe your expectations for student behavior during instruction and during noninstructional routines. Write your description as if you were explaining these expectations to
your students and their parents. List the rules and consequences, and your procedures for
non-instructional activities.
EXPECTATIONS DURING INSTRUCTION
A. Classroom Expectations
Listen and follow directions the first time.
Raise your hand and wait for permission to speak.
EXPECTATIONS DURING NON-INSTRUCTIONAL ROUTINES
Keep hands, feet, objects, and negative comments to yourself.
Have your supplies and be on time.
Complete and submit all assignment on time.
B. Consequences
If you do not follow our classroom expectations, your color will be
changed. Every student starts the day on green (Excellent). Blue
is Satisfactory. Yellow is Needs Improvement. Red is
unsatisfactory.
C. Rewards
Students will be rewarded for following classroom expectations.
If all of the students are behaving well they will earn rewards for
the entire class such as extra recess.

EXPECTATIONS DURING NON-INSTRUCTIONAL ROUTINES


17

RULES AND CONSEQUENCES

A. Going to the Restroom


Raise two fingers in the air if you would like to go to the
restroom. When I let you know that I see you, you may go to

the restroom.
Only three students may stand in line to the restroom at

once.
There is a stop and go sign on the restroom door. When you

go in turn it to stop. When you come out turn it to go.


B. Sharpening Pencils
Put pencils that need to be sharpened in the need to be
sharpened bin. Sharpened pencils will be in the Sharpened
bin.
For providing information initially, I will send a letter to parents and guardians
explaining my goals and expectations for student learning like the one here:

Reflect on classroom management: What are the most important considerations in managing
the classroom to maximize instructional time, and why do you believe them to be important?
The most important items to consider when managing the classroom are the following: Are all
of my students actively engaged? Are there distractions taking away from my instruction?
I believe these two items to be most important because they guide the instructional time. I
have found that cues help with managing the classroom. Holding your pointer finger in the air after I
do shows that you understand that I need your undivided attention.

Section VI: Parent Communications


Describe your procedures for providing initial information about your goals and expectations
for student learning, plans for instruction and assessment, rules for student behavior to your
parents and overall recommendations for involving your parents with learning at home. How
do you plan to periodically inform your parents about their childs learning and behavioral
progress in your class? Also, discuss how you would involve your parents in home-based
and school-based activities.
Procedures for providing initial information

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Procedures for involving parents with the learning at home

Procedures for Involving Parents With Learning at home

19

For learning at home I will send home a weekly sheet with information about the content
areas. It will be a way for the parents to assist their child in learning as well as know
what is going on in the classroom throughout the week. We also have parent volunteers
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that come and read to students who are not read to at home in the morning for three
mornings a week.
Section VII: Reflecting and Revision Procedures

Reflect on your long range plan and determine what might be, or what you think may be
strengths and weakness. Decide what modifications or adaptations might be needed to your
plan. Decide how often you think you might need to reflect on your teaching practices.

A. Strengths:
I will use this long range plan as a guide for long range plans in the future. My content
areas and their standards follow relevant pacing guides in the district. This helped me gain
experience with pacing guides and following them in a unit format.

B.

Weaknesses
My knowledge of unit planning has expanded by completing this long range plan.
However, I think that with time I will gain further understanding.

C. Time line for evaluating long range plan components.


I will be evaluating long range components on a weekly or bi-weekly basis. The amount
of time to evaluate will depend on the time used to complete the unit.

D. List modifications and adaptations that you think might be needed to improve the
procedures.
In the future I may need to modify and adapt the standards. I may need to change
Common Core Standards to State Standards, or vice versa.
E. Plan for reflecting on your teaching practices.
Teaching practices will be reflected on a needs basis. For example if a lesson I teach is
taught without a flaw I will write a reflection on events from the lesson. Another example would be if
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the students did not understand their assignment for a lesson. I would then write a lesson on how I
could improve my instruction.

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Long Range Plan Scoring Rubric


Name: _______________________________
_________________________

ACEI/
NAEYC

Component

Major: ______________________

Target (3)

Acceptable (2)

Description of
Students

Describes students in-depth according to


ability, learning styles, ethnic group, gender
and special needs, etc.; suggests several ways
to plan lessons to accommodate differences.

Describes students according to


their differences, but is unclear
about ways to accommodate
differences when planning.

Contextual
Factors

Data is collected from multiple sources,


including IEPs, test scores, school records,
student interest surveys, school personnel,
students, etc. Candidate reflects an
understanding of the importance of
collaborative relationships with families, school
colleagues and agencies in the community.

3.1/3a

Learning and
Developmental
Goals

Includes at least four (4) or more standards


which exhibit evidence of objective taxonomy,
skills, and dispositions that support elementary
students development, learning, and
motivation to learn.

3.2/1c

Learning and
Developmental
Goals

Goals clearly reflect sensitivity to the diversity


of students in their development and learning
styles, as well as race, ethnicity, culture and
exceptional needs.

Data is collected from at least


three types of sources and the
candidate shows some
understanding of the importance
of collaborative relationships with
families, school colleagues and
agencies in the community.
Includes at least three (3)
standards which exhibit
knowledge of objective
taxonomy, skills, and dispositions
relevant and meaningful to
specific age groups.
Goals reflect an understanding of
the diversity of students in their
development and learning styles
and reflect at least two of the
following: race, ethnicity, culture
or exceptional needs.

Units of
Instruction
- English
Language Arts

The content area related to reading, writing,


speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills
is comprehensively covered. The timeline of
instructional units reflects knowledge of key
themes, of concepts, and of English language
arts skills. The content is paced so objectives
are covered.

1.0/1a

5.2/2c;
3b

2.1/5a

The content area has 90% of the


key elements covered, reflecting
knowledge of key themes,
concepts and of English language
arts skills. The content is paced
so objectives are covered.

Date:

Unacceptable (1)

Sco
re

Does not include at least five


(5) types of descriptions;
displays minimal
understanding of addressing a
variety of student needs when
planning.
Used primarily secondary
source data (records) to obtain
data. No school or community
data included.
Includes standards, but lacks
appropriate depth of
knowledge of taxonomy, skills,
and dispositions relevant and
meaningful to specific age
groups.
Goals lack sensitivity to the
diversity of students.
The content area is
addressed; however, little
evidence supports the direct
alignment with the knowledge
of key themes, concepts and
of English language arts skills.
The content is not paced so
objectives are covered.

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Units of
Instruction
- Science

The content area related to concepts of


physical, life, and earth science is
comprehensively covered. The timeline of
instructional units reflects knowledge of key
themes, concepts and of skills necessary to
plan appropriate science lessons. The content
Is paced so objectives are covered.

The content area has at least


90% of the key elements
covered, reflecting knowledge of
key themes, concepts and of
skills necessary to plan
appropriate science lessons. The
content is paced so objectives
are covered.

The content area is


addressed; however, little
evidence supports the direct
alignment with the knowledge
of key themes, concepts, and
of science skills. The content
is not paced so objectives are
covered.

Units of
Instruction
- Mathematics

The content area related to concepts of


number and operations, algebra, geometry,
measurement, and data analysis and
probability is comprehensively covered. The
timeline of instructional units reflect
knowledge of key themes, concepts and of
skills necessary to plan appropriate
mathematics lessons. The content Is paced so
objectives are covered.

The content area has at least


90% of the key elements
covered, reflecting knowledge of
key themes, concepts and of
skills necessary to plan
appropriate mathematics
lessons. The content Is paced so
objectives are covered.

The content area is addressed;


however, little evidence
supports the direct alignment
with the knowledge of key
themes, concepts, and of
mathematics skills. The
content is not paced so
objectives are covered.

2.4/5a

Units of
Instruction
Social Studies

The content area related to concepts of


history, geography, and the social sciences is
comprehensively covered. The timeline of
instructional units reflect knowledge of key
themes, concepts and of skills necessary to
plan appropriate social studies lessons. The
content Is paced so objectives are covered.

The content area has at least


90% of the key elements
covered, reflecting knowledge of
key themes, concepts and of
skills necessary to plan
appropriate social studies
lessons. The content Is paced so
objectives are covered.

The content area is


addressed; however, little
evidence supports the direct
alignment with the knowledge
of key themes, concepts, and
of social studies skills. The
content is not paced so
objectives are covered.

2.5/5a

Instructional
Units
Visual and
Performing Arts

Clear integration of visual and performing arts


(dance, music, theater and the visual arts) is
indicated multiple times throughout the units.

Visual and performing key


elements are integrated at least
twice within each unit outline.

Visual and performing arts key


elements are not included in
each unit.

2.6/5a

Instructional
Units - Health

Clear integration of health is indicated multiple


times throughout the units.

Health key elements are


integrated at least twice within
each unit outline.

Health key elements are not


included in each unit.

2.7/5a

Instructional
Units
Physical
Education

PE is clearly integrated several times in each


of the units.

PE key elements are integrated


at least twice within each unit
outline.

Physical Education key


elements are not included in
each unit.

Materials list is adequate to


support units. List represents
variety. Materials list tends to be
general in nature and does not
focus comprehensively on
student characteristics,
enrichment, enhancement, and
students needs. No evidence of
the use of community resources.

Materials list is inadequate


and tends to represent
traditionally supplied
materials. Materials are
general and do not directly
support or enrich curriculum
units. Student needs and
characteristics do not appear
to drive the choices of
materials and resources. No
community resources are
used.

2.2/5a

2.3/5a

1.0/4c

Instructional
Materials &
Resources

Uses a variety of instructional materials and


resources that directly align and support units;
materials/resources clearly support curriculum
enhancement and successful learning
experiences to support and enrich student
development, characteristics, acquisition of
knowledge, and motivation to learn. Evidence
of the use of community resources is provided.

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3.5/4b

4.0/3b

4.0/3b

Instructional
Materials &
Resources

Assessment

Student Records

3.4/1c

Discipline Policy

3.4/1c

Procedures for
NonInstructional
Activities

5.2/2b

Parental
Communications

Technology, to include hardware, software and


assisted support is listed and reflects the use
of such tools to foster inquiry, collaboration
and interaction.

Technology listed includes the


teachers and students uses of
tools to reflect an understanding
of its use as a communication
tool.

Technology listed includes only


the teachers use of
technology for instructional
presentations.

Formative and summative assessments, use


direct and indirect methods, match learning
goals, instructional activities, and represent a
variety of assessment strategies. The
strategies are appropriate for the content to be
covered and the students ability and
developmental levels. Criteria for the
weighting process and evaluating results are
clear, concise and promote intellectual, social,
emotional, and the physical development of
students. Higher level thinking and student
reflection are promoted.

Formative and summative


assessments match learning
goals and the content to be
covered, but the majority are
traditional paper and pencil
types. Criteria for evaluating
results are clear. Assessments
reflect an emphasis on
knowledge and application.

Assessments given do not


match the learning goals, or
no explanations, descriptions,
or assessments are attached.

Procedures for recording, aggregating and


displaying data indicate that records are
organized, well maintained and easy to
interpret; procedures are easy to follow to
plan, to evaluate, strengthen instruction, make
content knowledge decisions, and make
individual progress decisions. Use of data for
differentiated instruction is clear.

Procedures for maintaining


recorded data are clear, with
some strategies for developing,
aggregating and displaying data
for decision making. Some
information is given for using
data to make decisions and to
promote the relationship
between data collection and
reflective decision-making.

Procedures for maintaining


recorded data are somewhat
clear, but little to no plan is
developed for aggregating and
displaying data for decision
making. Plan for using data to
make decisions is unclear. No
relationship between data
collection and reflective
decision-making.

Rules and consequences are age


appropriate, represent support
for a positive learning
environment, and are limited to
5 or less. Instructional
procedures cover most of the
areas that promote minimal loss
of instructional time.

Rules and consequences are


negative in nature and are not
aligned with age appropriate
practices. More than 5 rules
are given. Rules allow for a
loss of instructional time.

Provides adequate directions for


non-instructional activities.

No procedures for noninstructional were given.

Adequate evidence exists that


the candidate plans to establish
an open line of communication
on an initial and periodic basis,
regarding pertinent information
involving students, families, and
the learning community to
enhance learning; sensitivity to
diversity is clear.

Uses minimal, to no attempts


to involve the family in
learning goals at the home or
at school. Fails to provide
specific examples of periodic
communication methods.
Sensitivity to diversity is
unclear.

States explicit expectations of students and


consequences for misbehavior. Rules and
consequences are limited to 5 or less, are age
appropriate, focus on behaviors rather than
students, and support a positive learning
environment. Instructional procedures
represent essential routines for promoting
efficiency and minimal loss of time for
learning.
Offers detailed directions for such activities as
restroom break, emergency drills, school
assemblies, field trips, and other movement in
the classroom and halls.
Clear, consistent evidence exists that the
candidate plans to provide the family
appropriate, culturally sensitive, reader
friendly information concerning goals,
instruction, rules and assessment on an initial
and periodic basis; reflects on decisions and
involves students, families, and the learning
community to enhance learning.

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5.2/2b

5.1/4d

Parental
Communications

Reflections

Plans indicate evidence of collaboration with


the learning community to foster and support
communication; a variety of ways to
communicate and ways that families can be
involved at the school and home are given to
promote the growth and well-being of children.
Plans specifically indicate opportunities for
reflecting on teaching practices to improve the
teaching and learning process.

Adequate collaboration regarding


communication with the learning
community is evident.

No procedures for continuous


communication involving the
learning community.

Some evidence of opportunities


to reflect on teaching practices to
improve the teaching and
learning process.

The candidate does not


provide reflections or suggest
recommendations for
improving the process of
teaching and learning.

OVERALL SCORE
Unacceptable/Developing (1)
Candidate demonstrates a limited
amount of the attributes of the
standard. Performance indicates that
few competencies have been
demonstrated.

Acceptable/Meets (2)

Target/Exceeds (3)

Candidate demonstrates most of the


attributes of the standard. Performance
indicates that the competency has been
demonstrated including examples, extension,
or enrichment.

Candidate demonstrates all of the attributes of


the standard. Performance clearly indicates
that the competency has been mastered,
including examples, extension, and
enrichment.

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