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WTS 1 and 2

Test Anxiety in High School German Students


Alexandra Esser
Saint Marys University of Minnesota
Schools of Graduate and Professional Programs
Portfolio Entry for Wisconsin Teacher Standard 3 & 5
EDUW 694 Classroom Environment
Catherine Anderson, Instructor
April 3, 2016

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Selected Wisconsin Teacher Standard Descriptors


Wisconsin Teacher Standard (WTS) 3: Teachers understand that children learn
differently.
The teacher understands how pupils differ in their approaches to learning and the barriers
that impede learning and can adapt instruction to meet the diverse needs of pupils, including
those with disabilities and exceptionalities.
Knowledge. The teacher understands and can identify differences in approaches to
learning and performance, including different learning styles, multiple intelligences, and
performance modes, and can design instruction that helps use students' strengths as the basis for
growth.
Dispositions. The teacher makes students feel valued for their potential as people, and
helps them learn to value each other.
Performances. The teacher identifies and designs instruction appropriate to students'
stages of development, learning styles, strengths, and needs.

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Wisconsin Teacher Standard (WTS) 5: Teachers know how to manage a classroom.


The teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to
create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in
learning, and self-motivation.
Knowledge. The teacher understands the principles of effective classroom management
and can use a range of strategies to promote positive relationships, cooperation, and purposeful
learning in the classroom.
Dispositions. The teacher values the role of students in promoting each others learning
and recognizes the importance of peer relationships in establishing a climate of learning.
Performances. The teacher analyzes the classroom environment and makes decisions
and adjustments to enhance social relationships, student motivation and engagement, and
productive work.

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Danielson Domain
Domain 2: The Classroom Environment
Component 2a: Creating and Environment of Respect and Rapport
Element: Student interaction

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Pre-assessments
Self-assessment of Instruction Related to WTS and Targeted Student Learning Objective(s)
I am currently in my third year of teaching, and second year of teaching German I-V at
Eau Claire Regis Middle and High School to students in grades eight through twelve. There are
nine students in German I ages 13 and 14, twelve students in German II ages 14, 15, and 17,
eight students in the distance learning German II ages 16 through 18, eleven students in German
III ages 15 and 16, seven students in German IV ages 16 and 17, and eight students in German V
ages 17 and 18.
I rarely encounter problems with discipline in my classes, because I strive to create an
ideal learning environment. An ideal learning environment is one where students have
individual attention from the teacher each day, and where students feel comfortable interacting
with the teacher and collaborating with each other. I believe that the students consequently
reflect a teachers attitude in the classroom, and a teacher should be aware of the attitude he or
she is displaying in the classroom. When I teach, I try to be enthusiastic about the content, and
clearly present new topics. I constantly encourage them when they learn new things and try to
show them that they are capable of whatever I present to them. If I am confident in their
abilities, it is my hope they will also be confident.
If behavior problems arise, disciplinary action should be consistent and predictable, so
students immediately know when to except if they misbehave. I also give and grade assessments
consistently, and do not grade students on material I have not taught, unless for pre-assessment
purposes. When students have consistency and transparency from the teacher, they gain a more
positive learning atmosphere. This is because they do not feel threatened, and allow themselves
to be vulnerable when learning new things. The physical environment of a classroom should be

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inviting to the students. Students should feel comfortable coming in the classroom and enjoy
being in the room as much as possible.
My strengths concerning Charlotte Danielsons Domain 2: The Classroom Environment
fall into subcategories 2c: Managing Classroom Procedures and 2e: Organizing Physical Space.
When students walk into the room, they know they are expected to spit out their gum, leave their
cell phones in their designated phone pockets, and have a seat in their assigned seats. If students
need to use an iPad or dictionary, they know they are allowed to get one during transition or
work times.
My challenges concerning Domain 2 fall into subcategories 2a: Creating an Environment
of Respect and Rapport, 2b: Establishing a Culture for Learning, and 2d: Managing Student
Behavior. When I work one-on-one with a student, the student is always respectful and rarely
seems anxious. In the classroom, students are not always respectful to each other or
understanding when their peers make a mistake, they do not set high expectations for their own
learning or achievement, and many of my German III students behave immaturely or childish on
test days. I hope to improve student interaction with students, particularly when students speak
the target language (TL), German, to help students set their own high learning expectations, and
to monitor students anxious behavior before tests.
Assessment of Student Performance Related to Targeted Student Learning Objective(s)
No students have identified learning disabilities, IEPs, or accommodation needs, and all
students speak English as their first language. From what I have observed, it seems that most
students come from similar cultural backgrounds. All of my interactions with parents have been
positive, and I do not have any helicopter parents this year. Many students have been together
in the same classes since elementary school, and they all get along well together in my classes.

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Although my students do not have identified learning plans or disabilities, I have noticed
that a number of students seem to experience varying levels of anxiety before they take tests.
This is more common with the German II and III students; however, a number of students at each
level appear to experience some test anxiety. The German I students are technically middle
school students, but their German I class counts towards their high school transcript. They are
very concerned with getting the correct answers on their homework, but rarely appear anxious
about tests. The German II students, as freshmen, are worried about what their friends think
about them, and only volunteer to give an answer if they are certain their answers are correct.
Sometimes on test days, students will say things like I am going to fail, or I dont know any
of this, even though these comments have never been true. The German III students are my
most nervous group and never feel comfortable before a test. They insist on going over every
question on their study guides and even ask for more practice questions until they feel that they
cannot get an answer wrong. The German IV and V students are very chatty with one another.
They had my predecessor for two and three years, respectively, before they had me, and often
think they do not have to learn much. These students do not like to work hard, and have more
trouble producing the language than my other classes.
Assessment of Learning Environment While Learning Targeted Objective(s)
Regis Middle and High Schools are both located in the same building, and both schools
operate on the same bell schedule. This makes planning for classes easier for teachers who teach
at both levels. The only scheduling difference between the middle and high schools is when the
students eat lunch. Regis Middle School has 180 total students. Fifteen of these students receive
free or reduced lunch. The dominant ethnicity of the middle school is white with 59.44%,
followed by 2.22% Hispanic, 5.56% Asian, 1.11% black, 2.78% multi, and 28.89% other. Regis

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High School has 220 total students, and 16 of these receive free or reduced lunch. The dominant
ethnicity of the high school is also white with 58.18%, followed by 2.27% Hispanic, 0.45%
Native American, 4.09% Asian, 0.45% black, 1.36% multi, and 33.18% other. A further
breakdown of the ethnicities for each grade level is under Artifact A.
I am able to teach all Regis students, except the distance learning class, in the same room.
My classroom has large windows across the entire east wall, so the room gets natural sunlight all
day. The desks are set up in an arch and face the west wall where the Smartboard projector and
document camera are. I have hung German posters and flags on the entire north wall, and the
rest of the wall spaces have bulletin boards that I have decorated. I think it is important for the
classroom decorations to represent and depict the German culture, because that is not easily
taught in the textbooks. There are also posters of sites the students will experience in March
when we go to Germany, and I want them to recognize these sites when we go. On a bookshelf,
there are outdated textbooks that the public high school gave to my predecessor after they
adopted new curriculum materials. Unfortunately, these books are neither current nor appealing
to my students, so I have chosen not to use them. Instead, I have one student- and one teachercopy of each level from the Portfolio Deutsch series, and am able to scan and photocopy pages
for the students. I also use the document camera every day, and many students have said they
prefer I use the document camera rather than give them each a textbook.
Two other pieces of technology that I have found beneficial are the students individual
Chromebooks (eighth and ninth grade students only), and a set of six iPads for world language
classes use only. The students know they are allowed to use the iPads in class, as they need
them, and are comfortable getting them at appropriate times during a lesson. Students also know

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when it is appropriate for them to use their technology devices, and I rarely encounter any
problems with students using their devices when I am talking.
I recently arranged the students desks in an arch facing the front white board, and
students have given me positive feedback about the new arrangement. The arch also lends itself
well to the communicative nature of the class, and eliminates the front and center desk.
Assessment Conclusion and Essential Question to Guide Research
The self-assessment, assessment of student performance, and learning environment
assessment indicate that a number of younger students experience some anxiety over taking tests.
Unnoticed student interactions with other students and my lack of monitoring these interactions
may play a role in increased anxiety. If one student displays anxious behavior before a test, a
number of other students will do the same. If I can make changes to the learning environment
and manage students behavior immediately prior to tests, I predict fewer students would
experience high levels of test anxiety.
The essential question that will guide my learning in this research is: How can I reduce
test anxiety for high school students learning German?
Research Summary
Students frequently experience a wide range of test anxiety before and during quizzes,
tests, presentations, or exams. In many cases, teachers can clearly observe when students are
experiencing this anxiety, but are not always equipped with the knowledge to reduce or manage
students anxiety in the classroom.
According to Gasparovich (2008), approximately 13% of children and adolescents
experience some kind of anxiety disorder. Although there are many types of anxiety than can
manifest in the classroom, anxiety, in general, is most often identified by three different aspects:

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physiological, psychological, and behavioral (Gasparovich, 2008). In the classroom, these


symptoms may look like a student is withdrawn, have poor or inconsistent attendance, or
complain of a number of physical ailments such as headaches or stomachaches (Gasparovich,
2008, p. 2). These symptoms can often lead to more serious symptoms if not addressed, but
anxiety can typically be managed in the classroom by the cooperation of the students affected,
their parents, and teachers.
In my classroom, I have noticed more girls with test anxiety than boys. Across my five
different levels of German, my German III class of 11 sophomores appears to experience the
highest levels and most frequent bouts of test anxiety. There are two boys and nine girls in this
class. When the German III class has a test, the girls will walk into the classroom talking to each
other about how nervous they are for the test, and what grade they anticipate getting on the test.
Then, at least half of the class will take out their notes and fervently review the notes, study
guides, or mnemonic devices that will be on the test. Surprisingly, every student in this class
currently has an A average for German on a 90-100%=A, 80-89%=B, 70-79%=C, 60-69%=D,
and 0-59%=F grading scale. The lowest grade any student has received this year on a test is a
B. The Anxiety Disorders Association of BC. (n.d.) emphasized, however, that children with
anxiety disorders have higher than average intelligence (para. 4). For this reason, is should not
come as a surprise that this class would appear to display the highest levels of anxiety.
Regarding anxiety in my current professional learning, I would like to know some more
effective strategies for working with students with test anxiety. One of my current strengths for
helping students with anxiety is that I teach students mnemonic devices, songs, or tricks for
remembering difficult grammar topics. I know this is helpful because I hear them saying or
singing what I have taught them right before they take a test, and they usually do well on those

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parts of the tests. I would also like to learn how to effectively manage students test anxiety to
reduce attrition in the German program, and alleviate more serious symptoms of test anxiety
students may experience outside the classroom. Last year, I had one boy and one girl freshman
drop German at the end of the year for reasons both related to anxiety. The boys mother would
email me the day before or of any test in German and explain how much her son studied for the
test and that he was so nervous for the German test that he did not eat lunch. I later learned that
the boy was a basketball player and simply did not want to work hard to maintain good grades,
but he still felt anxious enough about German for his mother to notice. The girls mother told me
at a conference that the girls reading and writing skills were equal to her peers, and that I had
not prepared her daughter well-enough for the German tests that the girl earned a D on. After I
talked to the guidance counselor, I learned that the girl actually had trouble reading and writing
in English, and we were able to arrange for her to take her tests in a different room and have
extra time to finish the tests. This way, she would not feel rushed or pressured to finish when her
peers finished before she did. As a result, her test scores did slightly increase.
Gasparovich (2008) identified the five most common anxiety disorders found in children
and adolescents as generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), separation anxiety disorder, panic
disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and academic anxiety. While the first four types
of anxiety have more serious implications for the classroom, this research will specifically focus
on academic anxiety about tests, and how to reduce and manage test anxiety in the world
language classroom.
Most teachers are well aware that too much anxiety concerning tests can decrease or even
inhibit student performance. Gasparovich (2008) identified a number of strategies for students to
use that can immediately reduce anxiety. These include the use of stress balls or music and

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deep breathing and tension reduction exercise (p. 3). For teachers, Gasparovich (2008)
suggested teaching students about their anxiety, modeling coping strategies, praising positive
behavior and performance, and helping students visualize themselves succeeding.
The Anxiety Disorders Association of BC (n.d.) suggested teaching students positive
self-talk as a way for students to cope with their test anxiety (para. 13). While teachers and
parents alike appear to all want to reduce students test anxiety, it is important to look at why
reducing test anxiety can be beneficial to students. According to Liu and Chen (2015), a
students anxiety in a world language class can negatively affect a students motivation in the
class, and low motivation in class tends to increase students anxiety about learning a language.
Specifically for world language learning, Noormohamadi (2009) found that when students used
different language learning strategies, students experienced lower levels of anxiety. Language
learning strategies are any cognitive, memory, metacognitive, compensation, affective, or social
strategies that students use to acquire, store, or retrieve information (Noormohamadi, 2009). In
Noormohamadis (2009) study, it was not clear whether language-learning strategies decreased
anxiety, or whether reduced anxiety increased the use of language learning strategies; however,
there was a distinct relationship between the two factors. Therefore, Noormohamadi (2009)
suggested it was best to both help students reduce anxiety about learning a world language, and
teach and encourage the use of language learning strategies.
Although reducing students anxiety has a number of benefits, too little anxiety can
actually have the opposite effect on student performance. Gasparovich (2008) noted that
moderate levels of anxiety create the motivation needed to drive academic performance, and
too little anxiety results in a lack of motivation altogether (p. 2-3). Negari and Rezaabadi
(2012) found that students experienced less test anxiety when the teacher told them that their

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writing was not graded, rather than when their writing was graded. As any teacher might
imagine, when students final writing was not graded, students actually did not take the content
as seriously as they should (p. 2585) and their grammar and vocabulary usage scores decreased.
At the end of the study, Negari and Rezaabadi (2012) concluded that if the teacher effectively
managed the students levels of anxiety, rather than always prevented or caused anxiety,
students achievement increased. An example of effective management of anxiety might be for a
teacher to not grade a number of written assignments leading up to the final written assessment,
but make students aware that their final written assessment will be graded, and therefore must be
taken seriously. Based on Negari and Rezaabadis (2012) study, students scores would increase
in all areas of their writing, and not just in grammar or vocabulary usage.
Another way for teachers to manage students test anxiety relates to the types of
questions presented to students on a test. As mentioned before, students will experience more
anxiety if they know a test is graded. If a teacher knows which kinds of questions can reduce
some anxiety during a test, a teacher can manage the levels of test anxiety a student might
experience. The Florida Department of Education (n.d.) proposed a number of types of test
options in a checklist to reduce test anxiety. These include extra time for tests, enough space for
written responses, and clearly formatted tests. The Anxiety Disorders Associate of BC (n.d.)
brochure noted short answer, multiple choice and match type testing might be easier for anxious
teens, whereas producing essays and answers might increase anxiety (para. 8). In another
study, Kurbanolu and Nefes (2015) found that context-based questions as opposed to traditional
questions significantly reduced middle school students test anxiety. Context-based questions
were questions in which the students everyday life and potential experiences or other relevant

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world contexts have been included in their teaching and assessment, rather than questions where
only the crucial information was given (p. 215).
For teachers with students who have test anxiety, it is crucial that teachers first know
their students. Teachers can choose which coping strategies might be best for which students.
These include but are not limited to positive self-talk, visualizing, using stress balls, listening to
music, deep breathing, relaxation exercises, and various language-learning strategies. Teachers
can also structure their grading and test formats to manage students test anxiety. Strategically
grading assignments, essays, and tests, and giving short answer questions will increase students
test anxiety, while context-based, multiple choice, and matching questions will decrease
students test anxiety. For world language teachers, it is also beneficial to teach students
different language-learning strategies, how to recognize preferred learning strategies, and how to
utilize language-learning strategies to recall information on a test.
Research Implications
This research has provided three key actions teachers can take in the world language
classroom. For students who experience expected levels of anxiety, the teacher should teach
students language-learning strategies during implementation of new material, so students can
better recall information on a test. For students who experience higher levels of anxiety, the
teacher should also teach students anxiety-reducing techniques such as deep breathing before
they take a test. For teachers who need to increase or decrease anxiety in order to affect
students performance on tests, teachers should be selective in what they grade and how their
grading will affect a students overall grade. The types of questions a teacher may write on a test
can also increase or decrease students anxiety.

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Research-based Action Plan


Action Plan Summary Outline
1. Design an assignment where students must teach each other 15 vocabulary words from
the current chapter using cognitive, memory, or metacognitive language learning strategies.
2. Teach students anxiety-reducing techniques such as deep breathing, stretching, or
positive self-talk and have students use these techniques before a test.
3. Write context-based questions and other anxiety-reducing questions on the next
chapter test that can directly relate to students lives.
Targeted Student Learning Objective(s)
1. Standardized goal: Students will interact with each other in an environment of
respect and rapport.
2. Targeted learning objective: Students will feel less anxious for the next assessment.
Task(s) and Essential Proficiency Criteria for Targeted Learning Objective(s)
1. Task: Take deep breaths, stretch, and practice positive self-talk to experience
lower levels of anxiety before the test, use language learning strategies to recall
information during the test, and take a survey to self-assess their levels of anxiety.
2. Criteria that Prove Proficiency in Meeting Targeted Learning Objective(s)
a. Students use two to three different language-learning strategies to recall
information during the test.

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b. On a survey, at least 50% of students indicate an anxiety level of 1 or 2


on a scale of 1-5 where 1= not nervous at all, and 5= extremely nervous to take the test or
quiz.

Method(s) to Assess Progress of Proficiency for Targeted Learning Objective(s)


1. Students take a survey after the test and write which language learning
strategies they used to recall information, and rate how useful the language learning
strategies were for them.
2. Students take pre-implementation and post-implementation surveys to selfassess their level of anxiety before the test.
Post-assessments
Instructional Insights Related to WTS and Targeted Student Learning Objective(s)
Through this implementation process, I learned that I first have to have confidence in
the students success and ability to reaching my expectations. About a year ago, I incorporated
language-learning strategies with a different class as a way to increase vocabulary acquisition.
The students at the time did not seem to understand how the language learning strategies could
actually be useful and relied on me to bring them new knowledge. When I decided to
incorporate language-learning strategies again as a way to reduce test anxiety, I admit I was
reluctant to try them again. After I showed students examples of effective language-learning
strategies students have used in the past, the students were easily able to model new strategies
that best complemented their individual learning preferences. A couple students in particular
were able to make the most of the open-endedness of the assignment and surprised me with what
they came up with in their presentations.

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The task I gave myself for designing the post-implementation assessment was to write
context-based questions that would help reduce students test anxiety. Since the majority of the
students in this class like to draw pictures, I had students choose five words from a word bank of
the vocabulary words and draw and label these words in a picture for my context-based question.
Surprisingly, all students scored 100% correct in this section and drew some nice pictures.
Comparison of Student Performance and Student Learning Environment Related to
Targeted Student Learning Objective(s)
Before the post-implementation vocabulary quiz, I gave students two choices that I have
never given together before. These choices were whether to have the vocabulary quiz that same
day, or two days later, and whether this quiz would go into the gradebook after it was graded.
Students chose to take the quiz that same day and not put it into the gradebook. The change I
noticed after students knew the quiz would not to into the gradebook was fewer comments about
failing or not feeling prepared enough.
Although I do not anticipate giving the students both of these options together again, it
was good to know how much less anxiety students showed when that added pressure of the
gradebook gone. I predict I will use the no gradebook option in the future, if I need to
significantly reduce test anxiety with classes or individual students.
In the pre-implementation surveys found under Artifact B, students rated their levels of
test anxiety before they took a chapter test on a scale of one to five where 1= not nervous at all
and 5= extremely nervous to take the test. Out of 11 students, 45.45% indicated their anxiety
levels at 1 or 2, and 54.54% indicated their anxiety levels at 3 or higher. In the postimplementation surveys found under Artifact D that students took before a vocabulary quiz
(Artifact C), 54.54% of the 11 students indicated anxiety levels at 1 or 2, and 45.45% indicated

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their anxiety levels at 3 or higher. There was not a significant difference in the percentage of
students who indicated lower anxiety levels in the post-implementation surveys; however, over
50% of the class indicated an anxiety level of 1 or 2, and that was the goal for the postimplementation plan. A more detailed description and comparison of the students indicated
anxiety levels are found under Artifact E.
On the post-implementation surveys, students were also asked to indicate which
language-learning strategies they found most helpful or useful to recall information for the
vocabulary quiz. The most commonly indicated language-learning strategies were using
keywords, using hand motions, and using full-body movements. The specific strategies each
student wrote are found on the same surveys under Artifact D.
Reflection of Entire Learning Process
The essential question that guided this research was: How can I reduce test anxiety for
high school students learning German? The targeted learning objective was for students to feel
less anxious for the next assessment. The plan for meeting this objective that answered my
essential question was to give students new language-learning strategies to recall when taking a
test, to teach them anxiety-reducing techniques, and design assessments that include contextbased questions or that are strategically graded. I was able to follow through with almost all
parts of this plan and noticed a decrease in students overall test anxiety before they took the
post-implementation vocabulary quiz.
As I mentioned before, this entire learning process showed me that the students are
capable of meeting expectations if a solid foundation is there for students to build upon.
Sometimes that foundation can be as simple as explaining that they are participating in action
research to help me teach them better. When I wanted students to utilize different language

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learning strategies, I had to teach students what strategies there were, demonstrate effective ones,
and give them guidelines to work with in developing their strategies. I know I will use some of
the teaching strategies and assignments I learned from this experience again in the future, and it
is my hope that students learned more about their own learning preferences as a way to reduce
test anxiety during this entire process.
What Worked and Why
1. Having the students come up with their own strategies to learn new vocabulary that
they could teach their peers seemed to work for both the students and me. Students put in
varying amounts of effort at first, because it was something new for everyone. When I repeated
the assignment for my substitute to do with the students and let them work in groups, the
students presentations of the learning strategies improved in both complexity and length.
2. I was surprised how much more willing the students were to take the quiz when I told
them it would not go into the gradebook. The average score on the post-implementation quizzes
was 14 out of 15 points or 93%, so I was also surprised how well the students did on the quizzes
even though it would not count for or against them.
What Did Not Work and Why
1. The timing of this action plan, the vocabulary quiz, spring break, and my being in
Germany with upper-level students was not ideal for producing truly accurate results of the
students test anxiety levels or knowledge of the vocabulary words. Before spring break,
students seemed very confident in knowing the vocabulary words, but then began working on a
vocabulary list for the next chapter before they were able to take the surveys and quiz.
2. It did not work to incorporate deep breathing or relaxing stretches or exercises. This is
probably because we had interrupted bell schedules or shortened classes every day for a week

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and a half during implementation, and I was not willing to use the limited instructional time for
relaxation techniques. In the future, I can see where more exploration of anxiety reducing
techniques might be beneficial.
My Next Steps
1. Since students appeared much less anxious but still did well on the vocabulary quiz
when they knew the quiz would not go into the gradebook, I think I will consider not putting
some assignments into the gradebook in the future. If students can show me theyve learned, but
experience less test anxiety, I would not mind leaving some assignments out of the gradebook.
2. Another option might be to give the students two different quizzes or similar
assignments and give them the choice which assessment they want me to put in the gradebook.
This way, they might experience less test anxiety, but can still be held accountable for
demonstrating that they have learned.

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References
Anxiety Disorders Association of BC. (n.d.). Tips for teachers of anxious students. [Brochure].
Florida Department of Education. (n.d.) Home school checklist. [Brochure].
Gasparovich, L. (2008). Positive behavior support: Learning to prevent or manage anxiety in the
school setting. University of Pittsburgh.
Kurbanolu, N. ., & Nefes, F. K. (2015). Effect of context-based questions on secondary school
students' test anxiety and science attitude. Journal of Baltic Science Education, 14(2),
216-226.
Liu, H., & Chen, C. (2015). A comparative study of foreign language anxiety and motivation of
academic- and vocational-track high school students. English Language Teaching, 8(3),
193-204.
Negari, G. M., & Rezaabadi, O. O. (2012). Too nervous to write? The relationship between
anxiety and EFL writing. Theory & Practice In Language Studies, 2(12), 2578-2586.
doi:10.4304/tpls.2.12.2578-2586
Noormohamadi, R. R. (2009). On the relationship between language learning strategies and
foreign language anxiety. Journal of Pan-Pacific Association Of Applied
Linguistics, 13(1), 39-52.

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Artifact A
This is a more complete ethnic breakdown for Regis Middle and High Schools by grade level.

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Artifact B
These are the anxiety surveys students took before the last chapter test as a pre-implementation
assessment.

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Artifact C
This is a blank copy of the post-implementation Chapter 12 vocabulary quiz students took.

Score:_____/ 15

Name:____________________
Chapter 12 Vocabulary Quiz

Extra Credit: Next to each section or word, describe which language learning strategy or strategies most helped you
recall the words.
I.

Give the English translation for the following German vocabulary words. (6 points)

1.

beobachten - ________________________

2.

besichtigen - ________________________

3.

fallen- ________________________

4.

faulenzen- ________________________

5.

scheinen- ________________________

6.

schlieen- ________________________

II.

Give the German word and article for the nouns pictured below. (4 points)

1.

2.

_____________________________

___________________________

3.

____________________________

4.

________________________

III. Choose 5 of the following vocabulary words and draw a picture that includes each of the 5 words. Be sure to label each
word in your picture! (5 points)
Wortschatz: aufregend, drauen, krass, nass, wahnsinnig, zufrieden, der Himmerl, die Umwelt, die Wiese,
der Spaziergang, die Ruhe

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Artifact D
These are the anxiety and language learning strategy surveys students took after the last Chapter
12 vocabulary quiz as a post-implementation assessment. The score each student received on the
quiz is in the upper right-hand corner. The number of language learning strategies students used
is on the left-hand side.

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Artifact E
This chart compares the pre-implementation and post-implementation test anxiety levels that
students indicated for themselves.
Pre-implementation Survey Results
Post-implementation Survey Results
PreNumber of
Percentage of
PostNumber of
Percentage
implementation
students
students
implementation
students
of students
anxiety level
anxiety level
2
18.18%
4
36.36%
1
1
3
27.27%
2
18.18%
2
2
4
36.36%
2
18.18%
3
3
2
18.18%
3
27.27%
4
4
0
0%
0
0%
5
5