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Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley


by Veronica Spigner
In this module, students will examine multiple texts and then frame an opinion in an editorial relating to a
current scientific advancement that is morally questionable.
Prior to this module, students have completed a study of Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. This piece of
literature will be the basis of thinking about scientific progress that is possibly "too far."
For this module, students will each choose a topic, or current scientific advancement: nuclear bombs,
drones, cloning, stem cell research, gene altering, cryonics, etc. The students will do research for
informational text on their topic then form an argument in the form of an editorial.

GRADES

DISCIPLINE

COURSE

PACING

12

ELA

Comp 2:

14hr

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British
Literature

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Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Section 1: What Task?


Teaching Task
Task Template A4 - Argumentation
What are the consequences of knowledge? After reading Frankenstein by Mary Shelley and informational texts
on a scientific advancement that is morally questionable, write an editorial in which you argue the effects of
scientific progress on society. Support your position with evidence from the text/s. Be sure to acknowledge
competing views.

Standards
Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies,
Science, and Technical Subjects

RI.11-12.1

Focus

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as
inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

RI.11-12.6

Focus

Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective,
analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness, or beauty of the text.

RI.11-12.7
Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually,
quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.

W.11-12.1

Focus

Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and
relevant and sufficient evidence.

W.11-12.5
Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach,
focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

W.11-12.8
Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches
effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience;
integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.

Texts
Opinion: New technology spurs debate about when to "edit" human genes

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Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Argumentation Rubric for Grade 6-12 Teaching Tasks


Not Yet

Approaches
Expectations

Meets Expectations

Advanced

Addresses prompt
appropriately and establishes
a position but focus is uneven.
D: Addresses additional
demands superficially.

Addresses prompt
appropriately and maintains a
clear, steady focus. Provides a
generally convincing position.

Addresses all aspects of


prompt appropriately with a
consistently strong focus and
convincing position.

D: Addresses additional
demands sufficiently.

D: Addresses additional
demands with thoroughness
and makes a connection to
claim.

Attempts to establish a claim,


but lacks a clear purpose.

Establishes a claim.

Establishes a credible claim.

Establishes and maintains a


substantive and credible claim
or proposal.

Reading/Research
(when applicable)

Attempts to reference reading


materials to develop
response, but lacks
connections or relevance to
the purpose of the prompt.

Presents information from


reading materials relevant to
the purpose of the prompt with
minor lapses in accuracy or
completeness.

Accurately presents details


from reading materials relevant
to the purpose of the prompt to
develop argument or claim.

Accurately and effectively


presents important details
from reading materials to
develop argument or claim.

Development

Attempts to provide details in


response to the prompt, but
lacks sufficient development
or relevance to the purpose of
the prompt.

Presents appropriate details to


support and develop the focus,
controlling idea, or claim, with
minor lapses in the reasoning,
examples, or explanations.

Presents appropriate and


sufficient details to support and
develop the focus, controlling
idea, or claim.

Presents thorough and


detailed information to
effectively support and
develop the focus, controlling
idea, or claim.

Attempts to organize ideas,


but lacks control of structure.

Uses an appropriate
organizational structure for
development of reasoning and
logic, with minor lapses in
structure and/or coherence.

Maintains an appropriate
organizational structure to
address specific requirements
of the prompt. Structure
reveals the reasoning and
logic of the argument.

Maintains an organizational
structure that intentionally and
effectively enhances the
presentation of information as
required by the specific
prompt. Structure enhances
development of the reasoning
and logic of the argument.

Attempts to demonstrate
standard English conventions,
but lacks cohesion and
control of grammar, usage,
mechanics, language and
tone. Sources are used
without citation.

Demonstrates an uneven
command of standard English
conventions and cohesion.
Uses language and tone with
some inaccurate,
inappropriate, or uneven
features. Inconsistently cites
sources.

Demonstrates a command of
standard English conventions
and cohesion, with few errors.
Response includes language
and tone appropriate to the
audience, purpose, and
specific requirements of the
prompt. Cites sources using
appropriate format with only
minor errors.

Demonstrates and maintains a


well-developed command of
standard English conventions
and cohesion, with few errors.
Response includes language
and tone consistently
appropriate to the audience,
purpose, and specific
requirements of the prompt.
Consistently cites sources
using appropriate format.

Attempts to include
disciplinary content in
argument, but understanding
of content is weak; content is
irrelevant, inappropriate, or
inaccurate.

Briefly notes disciplinary


content relevant to the prompt;
shows basic or uneven
understanding of content;
minor errors in explanation.

Accurately presents
disciplinary content relevant to
the prompt with sufficient
explanations that demonstrate
understanding.

Integrates relevant and


accurate disciplinary content
with thorough explanations
that demonstrate in-depth
understanding.

Attempts to address prompt


but lacks focus or is off task.
Focus

Controlling Idea

D: Attempts to address
additional demands but lacks
focus or is off task.

Organization

Conventions

Content
Understanding

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Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Background for Students


One of the primary themes of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is science and scientific progress, which we've
discussed in class multiple times. Keeping in mind these discussions, you will now choose a topic, or specific
modern scientific advancement. You will read your research, informational texts, to learn about the opposing
views related to the morality of your topic of choice. At the end of this unit, you will write an editorial in which you
explain a scientific advancement that is morally questionable and argue one side of the debate, using evidence
from the texts. Also, make sure to adress the counter argument.

Extension
Not provided

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Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Section 2: What Skills?


Preparing for the Task
TASK ENGAGEMENT: Ability to connect the task and new content to existing knowledge, skills,
experiences, interests, and concerns. Gain interest, intrigue, and motivation.
ACTIVATING PRIOR KNOWLEDGE: Discuss background knowledge of the monster of Frankenstein.
Ability to connect literature with time period in which it was wrote.
TASK ANALYSIS: Ability to understand and explain the task's prompt and rubric.
ESSENTIAL VOCABULARY:
READING OF THE RUBRIC:

Reading Process
TEXT SELECTION: Ability to identify appropriate texts.
ANNOTATION: Demonstrate deep reading and critical thinking through annotations to improve
comprehension.
NOTE-TAKING: Ability to select important facts and passages for use in one's own writing.
CITING EVIDENCE:

Transition to Writing
SEMINAR:
PREPARING FOR WRITING: Ability to begin linking reading results to writing task.

Writing Process
ESTABLISHING THE CONTROLLING IDEA: Ability to establish a claim and consolidate information
relevant to task.
OUTLINING THE WRITING:
INTRODUCTORY PARAGRAPH:
BODY PARAGRAPHS:
CONCLUDING PARAGRAPH:
REVISION: Ability to refine text, including line of thought, language usage, and tone as appropriate to
audience and purpose.
FINAL DRAFT: Ability to submit final piece that meets expectations.

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Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Section 3: What Instruction?


PACING

SKILL AND
DEFINITION

PRODUCT AND
PROMPT

SCORING GUIDE

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Preparing for the Task


15 mins

TASK
ENGAGEMENT:
Ability to connect the
task and new content
to existing knowledge,
skills, experiences,
interests, and
concerns. Gain
interest, intrigue, and
motivation.

WATCH VIDEO
While watching the video
as a class, take notes.

Student takes 8-10 notes.

1. Introduce the purpose of the video.


2. Set expectations for active engagement.
3. Explain expectations for note-taking during the
video.

Standards:
SL.11-12.3 : Evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links
among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.
Additional Attachments:
Frankenstein Part 1: Crash Course
40 mins

ACTIVATING PRIOR
KNOWLEDGE:
Discuss background
knowledge of the
monster of
Frankenstein. Ability
to connect literature
with time period in
which it was wrote.

KWL CHART
1. Fill in the K part of the
KWL chart with what
you know already and
the W part of the chart
with what you want to
know.

Meets expectations if:


Students complete the
chart with at least one
thing that they know."
Students ask at least
three questions that they
"want to know."

1. Have students fill out KWL chart individually


and then share out answers either in small
groups or as a whole.
2. Ask students to identify similar responses.
3. Prompt students to provide a source for the
information they know.

Standards:
CCR.W.4 : Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose,
and audience.
20 mins

TASK ANALYSIS:
Ability to understand
and explain the task's
prompt and rubric.

MAKING SENSE OF
ESSENTIAL
QUESTIONS
PRODUCT: Completed
student handout and
participation in
partner/small group work.
PROMPT: Read the
Essetial Question and
complete the following
sentence starters.

Product meets expectation


if students write initial ideas
to one or more of the
sentence starters in the
prompt and engage in the
sharing/listening of their
ideas with a partner or
small group

Students may read a short text or text excerpt


that raises the EQ or that attempts to answer it, or
perhaps the teacher asks students about their
personal experience with [topic of the EQ].
Lesson:
1. The teacher has the EQ posted on a PPT (or
written on the blackboard).
2. The preliminary thinking prompts are written
under the EQ.

____(Essential QuestionEQ)?

3. Teacher might say, For the next [duration of


time] we will be studying [EQ topic]. We will be

The ____[answer to
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The Set Up:

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EQ] is ___
because___.

reading articles and developing our knowledge in


___. Take a few minutes now to record some
preliminary ideas you have about [EQ topic]. Ill
write with you. Lets write for ___(10 minutes). If
you finish your thoughts on one prompt, then try
to respond to more prompts.

When I think about


[EQ]___ what seems
important to consider
is ____ because
____.

4. When time is finished (or teacher sees


students are finished), then share with a partner
and debrief some ideas as a class.

What seems important


about [topic of EQ]
___ is _______
(because ____)

Hudson Valley Writing Project @ SUNY New


Paltz

The _[Topic of EQ]___


is ________ [put it in
own words].
Standards:
CCR.R.1 : Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence
when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
Additional Attachments:
Essential Questions Student Handout
10 mins

TASK ANALYSIS:
Ability to understand
and explain the task's
prompt and rubric.

BRAINSTORM TOPIC
IDEAS
Use prior knowledge to
start brainstorming as a
class topic ideas that fall
within the prompt of
the template.

Participation Points
3 - Input at least three times
in class discussion
2 - Input a two-three times
in class discussion
1 - Input only once in class
discussion
0 - No participation

Use the template task the the discussion on


essential vocabulary to then go into this
conversation.
As a class, brainstorm topic ideas related to
"morally questionable scientific advancements."
These should be modern sciences that are
related to the events that occur in Frankenstein
by Mary Shelley. Prior knowledge will need to be
activated for this.
Make the list and keep it visible throughout the
module to refer to often.
Examples: nuclear bombs, drones, cloning, stem
cell research, genetic engineering, cryonics, etc.

Standards:
RI.11-12.4 : Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical
meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison
defines faction in Federalist No. 10).
RI.11-12.3 : Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and
develop over the course of the text.
5 mins

ESSENTIAL
VOCABULARY:

DEFINE ESSENTIAL
VOCABULARY
After reading the template
task, discuss as a group
to determine the essential
vocabulary in the task
and define them.

Participation Points:
3 - input at least three times
in class discussion
2 - input less than two-three
times in class discussion
1 - input only once in class
discussion

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After introducing the template task, as the class


for input on the essential vocabulary of the prompt
to start picking it apart. These will be important
words and concepts for the students to
understand throughout the module.
The students should determine the essential
vocabulary and define them through class
discussion, with the teacher's guidance.

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Frankenstein by Mary Shelley


0 - no participation in class
discussion

For this task, the essential vocabulary will include


"morally questionable," "scientific advancement,"
"editorial," and more.

Standards:
RI.11-12.4 : Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical
meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison
defines faction in Federalist No. 10).
50 mins

READING OF THE
RUBRIC:

MAKING SENSE OF
THE RUBRIC
You will use the
Preparing for the Task
Organizer to analyze a
rubric and identify
essential features for
success in your writing.

Work meets expectations if:


Students have identified
at least 3 features that
should be included in the
product
Students are able to
identify at least 1 feature
that could take the
product to the next
scoring level
Students are able to
identify at least 2
features that should be
avoided
Students are able to
share their responses
with the class to create
whole-class criteria

Direct Instruction
Part One: Must-Haves Meeting Expectations
Break students into cooperative teams of
between three and four students.
Give each team a copy of the Preparing for
the Task Organizer.
Give each member of the team a copy of the
Rubric.
Direct students to the section on the rubric
that states Meets Expectations and show
them how this will be the section for them to
gather information for the Essay Must-Haves
on the sheet. You should model this with one
or two sections of the rubric.
Have the teams finish this and check-in with
you when they think they have it complete.
Part Two: Added Bonus Moving to Advanced
Direct students to second box on sheet:
Added Bonus.
Explain how they are to use the information
from the Must-Haves box and the information
from Advanced section of the rubric to
identify things that would take their work to the
next level.
You may need to model this for students
before letting them go back to their group.
Once again have students check-in when
finished with this section.
Part Three: The "NO" Zone
Refer students to the section of the rubric Not
Yet.
Tell them to use this section to identify those
things they must not do and place in the "NO"
Zone.
Part Four: Class discussion
Practice: This will take about half the time
compared to teaching this technique.
Assign students to cooperative teams.
Distribute one copy of the Preparing for the
Task Organizer to each group.
Distribute a scoring rubric to each student.
Permit students to think/share ideas within
their groups for 15 minutes.
Encourage students to refer to the scoring
rubric when identifying features of a good

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response to the prompt.
Clarify misconceptions regarding the rubric as
they arise.
When time is up, permit students to dictate
expectations.
Use chart paper/poster to create a class set of
expectations for the essays.
For each item that is suggested, ask students
to show agreement by holding up one finger
and disagreement by holding up 2 fingers.
If students disagree, permit them to explain
their rationale.
As the teacher, make a judgement call as to
whether those items should be included in the
class expectations for the essay.

Standards:
SL.11-12.4 : Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners
can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance,
and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.
SL.11-12.1 : Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with
diverse partners on grades 1112 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and
persuasively.
W.11-12.9 : Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
W.11-12.4 : Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose,
and audience.
RI.11-12.1 : Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn
from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Additional Attachments:
LDC InfoExplanatory Rubric
LDC Argumentation Rubric
Preparing for the Task-Identifying Essay Expectations Sheet
Reading Process
50 mins

TEXT SELECTION:
Ability to identify
appropriate texts.

SOURCE EVALUATION
(OR "USE / DON'T
USE")
Using one of the texts
provided by the teacher,
evaluate it for:
1. Readability: are you
able to understand it?
2. Publisher/author: is
this a .com, .you, .org,
etc
3. What is their
reputation/ what is
their authority?
4. Accuracy: can this
information be
supported by other
reputable sites?
5. Currency: is it recent

Literacy Design Collaborative

Student is able to:


- Justify whether text should
be used or not, evaluation
-Summarize the texts main
points (text-complexity is
appropriate for that
particular student)

1. Teacher or librarian models evaluation of


texts. Does think aloud to explain whether to
use or not use, will use at least 2 texts: 1 that
fails to meet criteria and 1 that meets criteria
2. Students complete evaluation, answering all
seven questions.

-Identify author/publisher
and their authority
-Identify when published or
updated
-Identify bias when
applicable

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enough for a science
paper?
6. Is it a primary source
for a history paper?
(as opposed to 20/20
hindsight)
7. Bias: is it pro/con
something? Is there
an agenda? Besides
the stance youre
taking on the paper.
i.e. a pro gun essay
written by Smith and
Wesson
Standards:
CCR.W.5 : Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
CCR.W.7 : Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of
the subject under investigation.
CCR.W.8 : Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and
integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.
Additional Attachments:
Evaluating Sources
1 hr and
30 mins

ANNOTATION:
Demonstrate deep
reading and critical
thinking through
annotations to
improve
comprehension.

ANNOTATE A TEXT
What are the essential
components of the text
that help us answer the
essential question? Show
your thinking and
understanding through
annotations.

Students will meet


expectations if there are 5-7
annotation marks on each
page of the text.

1.
2.
3.
4.

50 mins

NOTE-TAKING:
Ability to select
important facts and
passages for use in
one's own writing.

NOTE-TAKING
On your handout:

Work Meets Expectations If:

Before reading the article, students will record the


title of it at the top of the page in order to avoid
plagiarism.

Literacy Design Collaborative

From each text, make


a list of the elements
that look
most important for
answering the prompt.
Do what you need to
do to avoid plagiarism.
Read the text/article
and complete the
following Sentence
Frames.
What strategies will
you use to discern
credible sources?
What implications can
your draw?
Why is it important in
the process of inquiry
to identify gaps or
unanswered
questions about the

Identifies relevant
elements.
Includes information to
support accurate citation
(for example, page
numbers for a long text,
clear indication when
quoting directly.

Circle all of the whos and whats


Square all of the whens and wheres.
Underline the whys.
Write any other thought processes, questions,
etc. in the margins.

Intentional Whole Group Instruction:


As a class, we will conduct a close reading of an
article. Students will then complete the Sentence
Frames that follow, identifying essential elements
about the author's argument. We will discuss their
responses as a whole group.
Notes:
Sentence Frames were found on R-Group
Space. The skills included in this mini-task
support skills that students need to construct their
own arguments. So not only are they reading the
informational texts for information, they're also
analyzing the ways in which the author creates
his argument.
Accommodations and Interventions:
Students needing extra support will benefit from

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topic?

the close reading.

Standards:
CCR.R.10 : Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.
CCR.R.2 : Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and
ideas.
CCR.R.1 : Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence
when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
Additional Attachments:
Note-Taking Handout
1 hr

CITING EVIDENCE:

CITING AND
JUSTIFYING EVIDENCE
Find evidence within the
text that answers the
essential question
(purpose for reading) and
support the evidence
through justification. After
all evidence is collected
and justified, evaluate to
ensure that both evidence
and justification are
relevant.

Student work shows


evidence of:
Textual evidence
(citations) that
answer the essential
question
Explanations,
justifications and support
that connects the
evidence with the
purpose
Problem Solving Skills
found in student work
should reflect:
Abstraction
Drawing
Conclusions/Justifying
Solutions
Identifying
Relevant/Irrelevant
Information
Generating Ideas

In this lesson, you will be teaching students


thinking processes for analytical thinking. In
particular, you will model how to monitor
thinking to ensure students understand what
they are learning and that they are aware of the
learning strategies they are using.
Introduction: Communicate to students the
purpose of reading today, "Today we are going to
read to find information/evidence about
__________________ to answer our essential
question. We will be looking for evidence
(citing) in the text that supports the answer to
__________________________ (insert the
essential question). Once we find that evidence,
we are going to explain why that evidence
supports the answer to the question."
*Give them the information in the blanks specific
to your module.
Model/Teach Analytical Thinking:
I Do: Teacher does the first column with the
Think Aloud
1. "Before I read, I must first make sure that I
understand the purpose of reading. Today, my
purpose is to find evidence that I need to answer
our essential question. I am looking for
information about _________."
2. "I am going to begin reading the first section.
As I read, I ask myself if there is any information I
can use to answer the question." (EVIDENCE)
Locate that information. Write it on your note
taking sheet.
"Does the evidence help me answer the
question?"
3. "Now that I have identified the information I
need to support the answer, I have to ask myself
WHY that information supports the answer. My
justification is partly my own thoughts and partly
what details I read that explain my evidence. It is
a combination of ideas from text and my
understanding. On my note taking sheet, I am
going to write my reason for choosing that

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evidence."
Justification- "This means that...because...
(explain how it answers a part of the question.)
Write it on the note taking sheet. "
"How do my explanations explain why that
evidence answers the question?"
4. "Now that I have my evidence and my
justification, I need to re-evaluate the connection
and relevancy of the two. Looking at my note
taking guide, I am going to look at my evidence
and explanation and ask myself...
"Does the evidence help me answer the
question?"
"How do my explanations justify why that
evidence answers the question?"
5. "Now I need to provide MY OWN example,
NOT one that was shown in the text, that shows
the connections I made between the concept and
my explanation. I need to ask myself how my
example helps my audience make the connection
and supports answering the question. I can use
the text AND my understanding to create an
example that supports my explanation. I
can check myself by asking..."
"Do my examples support the evidence
used AND the answer to the question?"
Guided Practice:
Teacher monitors, questions, supports/Students
practice and apply strategy
We Do: Teacher supports this as students
work through the second column. IF students
are on the right track, go to the YOU DO, IF
not, repeat the WE DO until students have the
concept.
1. Have students read a small section of the text
(independently or in pairs).
2. After reading, each student will discuss what
they read, identifying 1-2 pieces of evidence they
feels supports the answer. (Students may discuss
in pairs or as a group.)
3. Have students share their evidence AND why
they think that evidence answers the question.
4. Once you are sure that the evidence is
relevant, have them write the justification.
5. Once you ensure that the the justification
supports their evidence, have students record
their evidence and justifications on their note
taking forms and have them include an example
from the text that connects to the evidence and
answer to the essential question.
6. Repeat this process of reading the text in

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chunks, stopping to discuss relevant evidence
and having students justify their citations until all
of the text has been read.
Independent practice:
Teacher circulates, monitoring for mastery.
You DO: Students will work on columns 3, 4...
on their own as you circulate and question as
needed.
Circulate as students read, discuss and record
their evidence. Question to prompt responses.
Ask students what thinking processes they used
when reading, citing and justifying their
responses (this assesses student awareness of
metacognition,) as well as questions asked
during the Think Aloud. This will ensure that
students are on the right track and that their
evidence, justifications and examples support the
answer to the essential question.
"Does the evidence help me answer the
question?"
"How do my explanations justify why that
evidence answers the question?"
"Do my examples support the evidence used
AND the answer to the question?"
Reading and Writing Connections
This will be used as students write their claim,
cite evidence and justify in their writing product.
**If your students are overwhelmed, or you
anticipate difficulty, eliminate the final row
("example") and have students focus solely
on the text (see "Citing Evidence and
Justifying Evidence to Answer Essential
Question Version 2" below under student
handouts).
Standards:
RI.11-12.1 : Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn
from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
RI.9-10.1 : Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn
from the text.
Additional Attachments:
Citing Evidence PPT.pptx
Citing Evidence and Justifying Evidence to Answer Essential Question.docx
Citing Evidence and Justifying Evidence to Answer Essential Question (Version 2).docx
Transition to Writing
1 hr

SEMINAR:

Literacy Design Collaborative

SOCRATIC SEMINAR APPLICATION OF


CLOSE READING
The Socratic Method,

Meets Expectations if:


Students come to class
prepared for the Socratic

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A Socratic Seminar is a discussion based on the


close reading of a text, with the goal of answering
an essential question. In the seminar itself,
students use evidence from the text to discuss

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or Socratic Debate, is
named after the classical
Greek philosopher,
Socrates. It is a form of
inquiry and discussion
between individuals,
based on asking and
answering questions to
stimulate critical thinking
and to illuminate ideas.

Seminar
Text read/annotated
Completion of
Socratic Seminar
Outline
Students actively
participate in the
Socratic Seminar
Earn a total of 5
Discussion Points

Purpose:
There are no right or
wrong answers, as long
as you can prove your
arguments with evidence
from the text.

and answer a series of questions related to the


essential question. This deep engagement with a
text, applied to a group discussion, allows
students to analyze various aspects of the text,
as well as collectively gain a deeper
understanding than they would be able to achieve
by simply reading the text.
Instruction In preparation for a Socratic Seminar, students
must complete a close reading of a text that
focuses on an essential question.
I ask students to annotate the text and read
for particular information that will be the focus
of the discussion (see examples in teacher
resources).
For more scaffolding and accountability, I
sometimes give students a Socratic Seminar
Outline to complete while they read in
preparation for the seminar (see example in
student handouts).

We will always begin


with an essential question
to invite thoughts, ideas
and questions regarding
the topic.

**This process often takes a class period before


the seminar itself**
To set up for a Socratic Seminar, I arrange the
classroom into large circles of approximately 10
desks each. In smaller classes, one circle is fine.
In larger classes, there are sometimes 3-4
discussions taking place at once.
To hold students accountable for the
discussion, I select a group leader to keep
track of participation using a form called
Discussion Points (see attached in teacher
resources).
Students can only get a discussion point if
they:
Reference a specific passage in the text
Ask a question that references a specific
passage in the text
Give specific evidence when
agreeing/disagreeing with another student
The Socratic Seminar itself:
Will only be successful if norms are
understood and followed (see Socratic
Seminar Expectations)
Only one student may speak at a time
Students may defend their argument but
may not attack others
Always begins and ends with an essential
question
Progresses through the text based on
discussion topics pre-selected by the teacher
(see Seminar Example)
Often based on themes, connection to
content, topics in text, etc.
I use animations in powerpoint to move
through these topics as students are ready
for them

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Must be rooted in the TEXT
Students may make connections and
identify real-life examples, but should be
redirected to the text if the conversation
moves off topic
Should end back where it started - with the
essential question
Based on learning and insight gained
during the discussion, students should be
able to clearly answer the essential
question and support with evidence from
the text

Standards:
CCR.R.1 : Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence
when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
CCR.SL.1 : Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on
others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
CCR.SL.4 : Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the
organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
Additional Attachments:
Text Annotation Key.pdf
Socratic Seminar Outline - Jackson.pdf
Discussion Points.docx
Socratic Seminar Expectations.pdf
Sample Text - Andrew Jackson's Shifting Legacy.pdf
SS Video 9.mp4
50 mins

PREPARING FOR
WRITING: Ability to
begin linking reading
results to writing task.

IDENTIFY PARTS OF
AN EDITORIAL
Understand what makes
an effective editorial.
What is the purpose of
editorials? What types of
topics are covered in
editorials?

Completion of partner
discussion and group
presentation of ~3 minutes
that shows critical thinking.

In pairs, students read an example of an editorial


provided by the teacher. They discuss the
purposes of the editorial. Groups report their
finding to the class, including the topic and
purpose of the editorial. Compile a student
generated list of common characteristics of
editorials.

Standards:
SL.11-12.1 : Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with
diverse partners on grades 1112 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and
persuasively.
RI.11-12.6 : Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style
and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness, or beauty of the text.
Additional Attachments:
ASNE's Editorial Writing Action Plan
Editorials for Students
30 mins

PREPARING FOR

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DECONSTRUCTING A

Complete responses to the

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You will work in pairs to find an advertisement in

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WRITING: Ability to
begin linking reading
results to writing task.

PRINT
ADVERTISEMENT
Deconstruct an
advertisement in terms of
image, target audience,
and appeal of the
product.
Identify the rhetorical
techniques used in the
advertisement and
evaluate their efficiency.

given questions regarding


the advertisement.
Group presentation
indicating understanding
and critical thinking.
Complete responses to the
given questions regarding
other groups'
advertisements.

a magazine.
Next, you will respond to the following provided
questions on a separate sheet of paper.
Lastly, as a pair, you will prepare a brief
presentation about your advertisement. The
image should be displayed through projection on
the doc cam.
After each presentation, individually you will
position yourself as a consumer of this
product and answer the provided questions.

Standards:
SL.11-12.1 : Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with
diverse partners on grades 1112 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and
persuasively.
RI.11-12.5 : Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including
whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.
Additional Attachments:
Deconstructing a Print Advertisement.docx
30 mins

PREPARING FOR
WRITING: Ability to
begin linking reading
results to writing task.

INTRODUCE LOGICAL
FALLCIES
What are logical fallacies
and how do they help or
harm your argument?

5-10 notes taken during


introduction.

Briefly introduce logical fallacies. Students should


take notes during teacher's explanation.

Create a 10 question quiz


and answer key to give to a
partner. Complete partner's
quiz.

Students visit two websites to develop an


understanding of the types of logical fallacies.
Then, students will create a 10 question quiz and
answer key. When finished, switch with a partner
and take the quiz.

Have students choose a topic from the


previously made list of ideas related to the
template task.
Have students develop a "working" controlling
idea.
In at least one paragraph, have students
explain their controlling idea in clear words.
Share with a partner.

Additional Attachments:
The Nizkor Project Fallacies
Logical Fallacies Stephen's Guide
ASNE's Editorial Writing Action Plan - Day 7-8
Writing Process
15 mins

50 mins

ESTABLISHING THE
CONTROLLING
IDEA: Ability to
establish a claim and
consolidate
information relevant to
task.

SHORT CONSTRUCTED
RESPONSE
In at least one paragraph,
develop a strong
controlling idea that will
anchor your response to
the prompt using your
topic choice of a scientific
advancement that is
morally questionable.
Briefly explain your topic
choice and opinion.

Student meets expectations


if he/she does the following:

OUTLINING THE
WRITING:

OUTLINE FOR WRITING


AN ARGUMENT
Create an outline based

Work Meets Expectations If:

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Controlling idea
addresses all aspects of
the task and relates to
the selected texts.

Creates an outline or
organizer.

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Provide and teach one or more examples of


outlines or organizers. Pass out the Argument
Outline Handout. Invite students to generate

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on your notes and
reading in which you
state your
claim, sequence your
points, and note your
supporting evidence.

Supports controlling
idea.
Uses evidence from
texts read earlier.

questions in pairs about how the format works,


and then take and answer questions.
Students complete Argument Outline Handout.
Mini-conferencing with students while they
work. Approve completed outlines and take home
to read if needed.
Notes:
The Argument Outline is an LTF adapted
template for writing the persuasive essay.
Earlier in the year it would be helpful to read
several articles during which you dissect ALL
elements of an argument and counter-argument.
In addition, students should analyze all
components of an argument by reading exemplar
models written by published authors (the
informational texts included in this module).
Accommodations and Interventions:
Students needing extra support will benefit from
the format of the Outline. More advanced
students have the option to be more creative with
their writing and don't necessarily have to follow
the outline perfectly.

Standards:
CCR.W.5 : Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
CCR.W.2 : Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through
the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
CCR.W.1 : Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and
sufficient evidence.
Additional Attachments:
Outline for Writing an Argument
30 mins

INTRODUCTORY
PARAGRAPH:

INTRODUCTION
PARAGRAPH
Develop an effective and
engaging introduction
paragraph for your essay
incorporating a hook,
explanation, and thesis.

Meets expectations if:


Hook is engaging and
relevant
Explanation sucessfuly
bridges hook and
argument.
Thesis is specific, well
articulated, and the
actual topic of the paper.

*This tool should be used with students who


already know their thesis, not as a tool to
develop one.
1. Using the handout, do a think aloud in which
you walk through the steps to develop an
introduction paragraph. Think about several
hooks, and chose the best one (emphasizing that
the first idea isnt always the best).
2. Allow students to complete the handout
independently.
3. Finish with a share, either class wide or
between partners.

Standards:
CCR.W.5 : Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
CCR.W.4 : Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose,
and audience.

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Additional Attachments:
Intro Handout

1 hr

50 mins

BODY
PARAGRAPHS:

INITIAL DRAFT (LDC


PROTOTYPE)
Write an initial draft
complete with opening,
development, and
closing; insert and cite
textual evidence.

CONCLUDING
PARAGRAPH:

CONCLUSIONS: TEXTTO-TEXT, TEXT-TOSELF, TEXT-TOWORLD


Use graphic organizers,
journal entries, and input
from others to begin
organizing information for
your concluding
paragraph.

Provides complete draft


with all parts.
Supports the opening in
the later sections with
evidence and citations.

Meets Expectations if
student:
Organizer is complete
and thoughtful.
Journal entry
demonstrates deep
thinking about essay.
Is engaged in discussion
with groups.

Encourage students to re-read prompt


partway through writing, to check that they are
on track.

Procedure
1. Preparation. Students need a copy of their
essay for this activity. You might also want to
prepare a graphic organizer for them to do this
activity. Or they could answer the questions in
a notebook or journal.
2. Active Reading with Text-to-Text, Text-toSelf, Text-to-World. Below are sample
directions and prompts you can use with this
strategy:
Text-to-TextHow do the ideas in your
essay remind you of another text (story,
book, movie, song, document, etc.)?
Text-to-SelfHow do the ideas in your
essay relate to your own life, ideas, and
experiences?
Text-to-WorldHow do the ideas in your
essay relate to the larger worldpast,
present, and future?
3. Debrief and Journal Writing. Students gain
a deeper understanding of their essays, their
classmates, and the world around them when
they have the opportunity to discuss their
responses with peers. Students can share
their responses with a partner, in small
groups, or as part of a larger discussion.
Possible journal prompts include:
What ideas are on your mind now about
how to conclude your paper?
Of all the ideas you recorded, which one is
the most interesting to you? Why?
Rationale
In the conclusion of an essay, students help
the reader understand how the ideas in the
essay connect to other events in the past and
present. This helps the reader appreciate why
the ideas in the essay matter. Text-to-Text,
Text-to-Self, Text-to-World is a strategy that helps
students develop the habit of making these
connections. It can be used to help students
prepare for writing a conclusion, after they have

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written the body paragraphs of their essay.
Standards:
WHST.11-12.1.E : Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented.
CCR.W.2 : Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through
the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

Additional Attachments:
Connections to Conclusion.pdf
Connections to Conclusion.docx
Facing History and Ourselves
Facing History & Ourselves: Common Core Writing Prompts & Strategies (Strategy #25)
50 mins

REVISION: Ability to
refine text, including
line of thought,
language usage, and
tone as appropriate to
audience and
purpose.

GROUP PEER REVIEW


1. Assign the following
roles to each group
member for peer review:
Clarity Crusader,
Proofreader, Structure
Czar, and Example
Exemplar.
2. Read each
others' papers in your
assigned role; giving
feedback to help improve
each others' writing.

Meets Expectations if
Student:
Provides specific
examples that will
improve their peers'
writing.
Offers feedback to their
peers that is respectful.
Reflects on the feedback
received to their own
paper and plans
revisions.

3. Respond to the closing


question: How did
this process help to
improve your paper? Be
sure to include specific
details in your response.

Note to Teacher: Attached are a set of student


handouts (see Peer Review Roles under Student
Handouts) to help students with this process.
This can be done using the Peer Review
Roles handouts or in a number of other ways:
Have students come to class with four copies
of their essay. Each student gets a copy of the
essay and makes comments directly on their
copy of the essay.
Have each student bring a single copy of their
essay to class. Each student has a different
color of a highlighter and a pen and make
comments on the single copy of the essay.
Project a copy of the student handout on the
board.
Have each student bring a single copy of their
essay to class and photocopy a full class set
of the Peer Review Roles handout. Students
get different colors of highlighters and make
comments linked to highlighted parts of the
essay on the handouts provided.
Direct Instruction: Review each of the roles for
students. If students are not familiar with these
roles, direct instruction may be necessary. This
would probably take a single class period.
1. Present each of the roles to the class.
2. Give the students a sample copy of a paper
for them to edit.
3. Focus on one of the roles. Together, with you
modeling and then students giving their ideas,
go through the paper in this role.
4. Do the same for each of the roles.
5. Ticket out the door: Students write on a 3 x 5
card or small slip of paper about how this
process helped to improve their paper.
Remind the students that it is important to
include specific details during this closing
writing activity.
Practice:
1. Students move to groups of four students and
receive the Peer Review Roles handout.

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2. Based on strengths, students will assign roles
within their groups
3. Students will pass their papers to each of their
group members until each student has
reviewed all three papers.
4. Ticket out the door: Students will write on a 3
x 5 card or small slip of paper about how this
process helped to improve their paper.
5. Homework: Students will make necessary
changes to their work based on their peers'
feedback.
Standards:
CCR.W.5 : Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
Additional Attachments:
Peer Review Roles.docx
10 mins

FINAL DRAFT:
Ability to submit final
piece that meets
expectations.

FINAL PIECE (LDC


PROTOTYPE)
Turn in your complete set
of drafts, plus the final
version of your piece.

Fits the Meets


Expectations category
in the rubric for the
teaching task.

None

Standards:
CCR.W.10 : Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single
sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Instructional Resources
No resources specified

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Section 4: What Results?


Student Work Samples
No resources specified

Teacher Reflection
Not provided

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