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Assignment #3 Analysis of a Lesson

Assignment #3 Analysis of a Lesson

Amanda Hanley-103499488
Nicole Paterson- 103313988

University of Windsor
Psychology in Education 0580203
Dr. Cam Cobb

December 15, 2015

Assignment #3 Analysis of a Lesson

The lesson we chose to focus on for this assignment was for a grade 5 FSL class, in
which the theme was Halloween, and the students had the task of describing the physical
characteristics of a Jack O Lantern in French. The students were introduced with an example of a
wacky pumpkin with purple hair, a purple mustache, with a big mouth and sharp pointy teeth.
This was done to show students that they can be as creative as theyd like with their assignment.
Once their description was done and corrected, the students were to take their description, and
demonstrate their texts understanding by drawing their Jack O lantern based on their description,
and introduce it to the class. The outcome of the assignment amazed me, some of the most
creative designs came from students who were normally very shy and timid. Some students
chose to showcase their creativity by designing very colorful pumpkins using cyan, different
shades of green, and even rainbow. Many students opted to create creepy, and very detailed
pumpkins, however others chose to make a very traditional Jack o lantern with triangular eyes,
the big mouth and of course colored their pumpkin orange. Because this was the first practicum,
I did not know the students very well, so the activity was a great opportunity to get to know the
students different personalities. The great aspect of this assignment, was the fact that students
who would normally require accommodations to their work did not need any for this assignment.
The activity was so open, it allowed everyone to complete the work to their ability and to their
liking, and when it came time for the corrections, if a student needed more description or lacking
in some aspect of the assignment, we would take the time to guide that student individually. This
allowed students to be able to really enjoy their work and truly succeed with their end result.
This activity allowed the learners to showcase their personalities and allowed all types of
learners to participate.
When analysing this lesson, it is clear that Howard Gardners theory of multiple
intelligences was at play since it allowed all types of students to participate. Gardners theory is
conceived around the premise that every human being maintains eight different types of
intelligences. (Aborn. P.83. 2006) These intelligences include: visual spatial, linguistic,
naturalistic, bodily kinesthetic, musical, logical/mathematical, interpersonal and intrapersonal.
According to Gardners theory, The multiple intelligence theory can be used to develop the
skills of all students. Gardners framework changes the competitive, Stanford-Binet model of
how smart are you?, into the question of how are you smart? (Aborn.p. 84. 2006). The
pumpkin activity allowed the inclusion of many types of intelligences seen within Gardners
theory such as, linguistic, visual spatial, logical, interpersonal and intrapersonal. By changing
the way teachers approach their methods and by incorporating Gardners theory, lessons can
become more inclusive, and may create a warmer and connected learning environment for the
students. In planning lessons around the different types of learners in the classroom, students will
become more engaged in the content, more enthusiastic about their work, therefore guiding them
towards success, which was the result during the pumpkin activity.
In an article written by Sharon Sweet, she discusses the benefits of using Gardners
theory, its benefits for students, and how it allows them to improve in other areas academically,
while learning in a way which is geared towards their style of learning. One student, she said,
who benefitted from Gardners theory, says the lesson was allowing him to show his
understanding in his own way challenged and improved his verbal-linguistic intelligence, his
weakest intelligence. This was a very similar situation observed in the grade 5 class, in the case
of one of the students who suffers from severe anxiety and is a student of higher needs, Brayden.
Normally very shy and quiet, Brayden completed his work, meeting all the requirements on
paper and in his drawing. He received a level 4 on his assignment and was very proud of himself

Assignment #3 Analysis of a Lesson

and showed his work to everyone. This is an example of the benefits in gearing assignments and
lessons towards students specific interest and multiple intelligences, because by doing so the
students can improve in areas which they are not as strong in.
A particularly beneficial factor of the theory of multiple intelligences is that it allows
educators to become more aware of their own students types of intelligences, which in turn
helps them to further understand and recognize their students needs. By simply being aware of
the multiple intelligences in a classroom, educators can help differentiate lessons and make them
geared to the type of students in the class. According to an article titled, The first seven.. the
key steps to utilizing Gardners theory is bottom line a deep interest in children and how their
minds are different from one another, and in helping them use their minds well (Checkly. p.11.
2002.) By better understanding students and the different personalities within a classroom,
teachers can design more efficient and resourceful lessons and assessments that vary across all
the different intelligences, giving every student a chance to be successful in classroom, while
helping them improve areas where they may be struggling. By investing time in contributing to
students learning, it demonstrates an educators commitment to their students, and their
dedication towards teaching. However, according to Checkly, its very important that a teacher
take individual differences among kids very seriously. You cannot be a good MI teacher if you
dont want to know each child and try to gear how you teach and how you evaluate to that
particular child. (p.11. 2002.) Because Gardners theory relies so much on the teacher taking
initiative in taking the time to observe and understand their students, this teaching method can be
considered very time consuming. This suggests that if a teacher is not willing to put in the effort
in observation, the students may be hindered if the educator still attempts to implement the
theory within the classroom, which can be considered another drawback to Gardners theory.
Although it may include several types of intelligences, Gardners theory may pigeonhole
a students aptitude by not factoring in the fact that children are able to have more than one type
of intelligence. Gardners categories are broad and some students may not fit the criteria of any
of the intelligences. This becomes problematic within a classroom if teachers is focusing on
specific types of learners and not others, this can cause students to fall behind. Another factor to
take into consideration when using Gardners theory is the question of where do the students
with learning disabilities fit in? Some children are accommodated or have severe learning
disabilities, and it is unclear how the learning process be extended to those students during a
lesson, when a teacher had planned a lesson surrounding the larger types of learners seen within
the classroom. Gardners theory has the goal of helping educators meet the needs of different
types of learners, however it does not include learners of high and lower functioning students. It
is difficult to define intelligence and whether some of Gardners intelligences fit that definition
or whether they are just character traits and talents that a person can have is questionable when it
comes to his theory.
To conclude, although there are some drawbacks to Gardners theory, such as its lack of
inclusion to students of lower functioning intelligence and broad terms, the theory itself is
incredibly useful in a classroom setting. It not only allows educators to better understand their
students and help them create an inviting learning environment, but it allows students of all
learning types to participate actively within the classroom. When it comes to educating students,
the learning process is often comparable to plants, Although plants look similar, each grows in
its own way. Just as a gardener identifies the heath of the plants, a teacher must identify the
strength of the logical-mathematical, linguistic, musical, spatial, kinaesthetic, naturalist,
interpersonal, and intrapersonal intelligences of the students.

Assignment #3 Analysis of a Lesson

Reference list
Aborn, M. (2006). An intelligent use of belief. Education, 127, 83-85. Retrieved from
http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ765804
Sweet, S. (1998). A lesson learned about multiple intelligences. Educational Leadership,
57, 50-51. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/educationalleadership/nov98/vol56/num03/A-Lesson-Learned-About-Multiple-Intelligences.aspx
Checkley, K. (1997). The first sevenand the eight: A conversation with Howard
Gardner.
Educational
Leadership,
55,8-13.
Retrieved
from
http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/sept97/vol55/num01/The-FirstSeven.-.-.-and-the-Eighth@-A-Conversation-with-Howard-Gardner.aspx