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THE

BRONX COMPASS
INTERNSHIP
GUIDE

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Internships at BxC: An Introduction
The Internship Process: At a Glance

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Part I: Interest Exploration

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Interest Activities + Inventories

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O*NET Interest Profiler

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Reflection - Interest Exploration

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Part 2: Real World Ready

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Build Your Resume

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What’s a Cover Letter?!

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Dress to Impress

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Speak Up!

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Reflection - Professionalism 101

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Part 3: The Internship Scout

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The BxC Internship Database

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“Networking for Dummies”

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The Internet Search

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The Art of Cold Calling

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Writing a Professional Email

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The Informational Interview

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Time to Leave the Building!

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The Truancy Letter

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Out of Building Request Form - Part One

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Out of Building Request Form - Part Two

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Reflection - The Internship Scout

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Part 4: The Shadow Day
Shadow Day Anthropology

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Say, “THANK YOU!”

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Reflection - The Shadow Day

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Part 5: You Got the Internship

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The First Three Weeks

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Internship Anthropology

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The Setup Meeting

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Reflection - You Got the Internship

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Part 6: The Internship Project

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Internship Project Matrix

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Project Proposal

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Internship Project Proposal

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Project Setup Meeting

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Reflection - The Internship Project

Part 7: RWL Exhibition

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Real World Learning Exhibition Rubric

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Prepare Yourself!

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Send Invitations

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Reflection - RWL Exhibition

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The BxC
Introduction

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Allow Us to Introduce Ourselves

Internships at BxC: An Introduction
Our internship program:
At the core of the Bronx Compass High School is a belief in the importance
of real world learning experiences for students. Based on the Big Picture
philosophy and pedagogy, each student learns through pursuing his or her
own interests or passions. Our internship program is a major vehicle for that
pursuit. By establishing an intern/mentor relationship with an adult in the
community who has the same interest or passion and works in that career
field, the student has the opportunity to build skills and knowledge that is
relevant and real. The student’s advisor assists the intern and mentor in
developing project work and supports that bolster skills development back in
school.
Why internships?
The primary purpose of a student’s internship experience is to build
knowledge, understanding and skills in the context of authentic work. By
making the learning process real, students are encouraged to take
responsibility for their own learning. Every student completes project work
that is relevant and useful to the internship site; in this way, the experience
benefits the mentor and internship site as well as providing a real world
experience for the student.

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THE INTERNSHIP

!

The Internship Process: At a Glance

START HERE!
INTEREST EXPLORATION

I HAVE EXPERIENCED A
“DAY IN THE LIFE” OF A
PROFESSIONAL IN MY FIELD
OF INTEREST. I WANT TO
PURSUE AN INTERNSHIP
IN THIS AREA.

YOU GOT AN INTERNSHIP!

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I KNOW MY
INTERESTS AND
HOW THEY ALIGN TO
MY INTERNSHIP
SEARCH

THE SHADOW DAY

I SECURED AN INTERNSHIP IN
MY INTEREST AREA! I
INTERVIEWED MY MENTOR
AND DID MY INTERNSHIP
ANTHROPOLOGY. I
UNDERSTAND THE BXC
INTERNSHIP POLICY. MY
ADVISOR HAS DONE AN INITIAL
SETUP MEETING.

I AM DONE WITH MY PROJECT AND INTERNSHIP, IT’S TIME FOR MY
REAL WORLD LEARNING EXHIBITION!

PROCESS: AT A GLANCE
PROFESSIONALISM 101

I UNDERSTAND THE
SEARCH PROCESS,
CAN COMMUNICATE
PROFESSIONALLY,
+ BEGIN TO
NETWORK

THE INTERNSHIP
PROJECT

I AM CONFIDENT!
I HAVE WHAT I NEED TO
WALK INTO
ANY PROFESSIONAL
EXPERIENCE

THE INTERNSHIP SCOUT

MY ADVISOR HAS DONE A
PROJECT SETUP MEETING.
WITH HELP FROM MY MENTOR
AND ADVISOR, MY PROJECT
HAS BEEN PLANNED AND IS ON
MY LEARNING PLAN.

REAL WORLD LEARNING EXHIBITION
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Boredom Isn’t
an Option

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Part I: Interest Exploration

Let’s Get Started!

Part I: Interest Exploration
WHY ARE INTERESTS IMPORTANT?
According to Big Picture, “Students learn and work best when they are
passionate and interested in what they are doing. Having students explore
their interests is an important step in helping students figure out who they
are and what kinds of work and learning will motivate them. Interest
exploration isn’t just for students who haven’t identified their interests. It is an
ongoing and lifelong process.” It is also critical to finding an internship
experience that can last. This section of the guide will give suggested tools
to help you discover interests, learn from your fellow advisees, and reflect!
TOOLBOX:
Interest Activities
Interest Inventories
O*NET Interest Profile
Don’t forget to REFLECT on this process! Sometimes we have the best
“AHAH!” moments during reflections.

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Interest Activities + Inventories
Before you can find a internship, you need to know what you’re
looking for. For some people, that can be really easy - they know
exactly what they like and what they what to explore. Sometimes, they
might not have a clue what they’re interested in! Or they might like
something but don’t know why that’s matters or how that can be used
to get them further in life. No matter where you’re at in this process,
it’s 100% ok!
The GOAL here is to do some interest exploration activities as
individuals, in small groups or as a whole advisory, so you can learn more
about who you are, what you like, what your assets are as an individual,
and how you want to use them ON THIS PLANET! We want you, your
passions, interests, and assets to be put to good use, because, “HEY,

GOAL OF INTEREST EXPLORATION:

“...learn more about who you are, what you
like, what your assets are as an individual,
and how you want to use them...”
so you can find an AWESOME internship experience!

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Student Activities:
You can do these individually, in pairs, or with your whole advisory!
Conduct Peer Interviews
Break into pairs and interview
advisory members about interests.
Interview Older Students

Read a Biography or
Autobiography
Choose a book about someone
who interests you. How did they
pursue their pas- sions?

Find students with similar interests
to yours and interview them about
how they pursued their interests in
school.

Look Through a College Catalog

Write a Journal Entry

Go to a Bookstore

Make a list of your favorite things to
do – look for common themes.

Find three books that interest you.
Write down the name, author and
topic – these might be new areas to
explore. Look through a magazine
rack to see if anything interests you

Explore the Classifieds
Look through the want ads. Do any
jobs seem interesting to you?
Search the Internship Database
Search the mentor database for
interesting types of work.
Do an Internet Search

What courses look interesting to
you?

Walk Around Your Neighborhood
Break into pairs in advisory. Walk
around and write down all the
organizations you see that interest
you. What else do you notice that is
interesting to you?

What types of websites interest you
the most?

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INTEREST INVENTORY #1
Self Assessment: Circle the qualities that best describe you. If you don’t
know what a word means, look it up!
Alert

Tolerant

Team Player

Calm

Assertive

Versatile

Courageous

Candid

Attentive to Details

Decision-Maker

Creative

Cooperation

Easy-going

Diplomatic

Curious

Expressive

Energetic

Driven

Good Listener

Funny

Enthusiastic

Leader

Helpful

Generous

Open-Minded

Loyal

Honest

Outgoing

Optimistic

Mature

Polite

Patient

Organized

Quick Thinker

Public Speaker

Playful

Self-Controlled

Reliable

Punctual

Tactful

Sincere

Respectful

What qualities did you NOT circle that you want to strengthen?

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INTEREST INVENTORY #2
Self-Evaluation of Skill and Abilities:
Look through the categories and evaluate yourself according to this scale:
1 = No ability at all
2 = Enough ability but need help from others
3 = Some ability on my own
4 = Strong ability

What category do you have the strongest skills in? Run a Job Search for occupations
that highlight those skills.

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O*NET Interest Profiler
!
O*NET Interest Profiler is part of My Next Move, a website that
houses career exploration tools. It is a great resources to help you get to
know yourself and your interests better. This tool can be accessed at the
following link: http://www.mynextmove.org/explore/ip
This is what the first page looks like!

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Go through the process of answering the online questions. Remember,
there are NO RIGHT ANSWERS! This exercise is only meant to give you a
better idea of your interests, skills, and abilities to help you on your
Internship search, and later one, in your job and college search.
When you finish, the program gives you an idea of how your interests can
help your internship search. Check out an example of results below!

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Reflection - Interest Exploration
✦ What did you learn about yourself during this
process? Was there an interest or a skill you didn’t
think you had until you did an inventory?
✦ Who is your favorite person in the world? What
skills or qualities do they have that you want?
Why?
✦ What do you think your most important asset is?
Why is this the most important? How has it helped
you or others?
✦ What is the skill, ability, or quality that you have
been complimented on the most in your life?
Where do you hear this feedback from? How do
you feel when you receive this feedback?
✦ What is one quality, skill, or ability you would like
to work on? What is an appropriate arena to do
this work? Who is someone that can help you
along this journey? Talk to them, they’d love to
help you.

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Choose a prompt and reflect on this part of the experience.

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Professionalism
101

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Part 2: Real World Ready

Are you Ready?

Part 2: Real World Ready
WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE “REAL WORLD READY?”
At BxC, when we say “Real World Ready,” we mean that students can show
up for professional experiences with confidence. This experience could
be a conversation, phone call, interview, internship, job in a professional
setting. We believe the confidence to succeed in this area comes from
having resources and support from students’ advisors, fellow students, their
school community, and those people they depend on outside of school.
This part of the guide is all about building up that confidence and arming
students with the resources they need to excel at these experiences. Bring
your sense of humor! We’re going to make a lot of mistakes!
TOOLBOX:
Build your Resume
What’s a Cover Letter?!
Dress to Impress
Speak Up!

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Build Your Resume
The technical definition of a resume is “a brief written account of personal,
educational, and professional qualifications and experience, as that
prepared by an applicant for a job,” aka a piece of paper that talks about
you and everything you do + you need it to have to get a job.
Depending on what kind of job or internship you are applying to, you might
need to submit a resume. Don’t worry if you have no experience! There
are ways to build resumes that showcase your talents, academic or
extracurricular life. And after just ONE internship, you’ll have experience!
The most important points to include in a resume are:







Personal Information
Objective  
Education
Work and Related Experience
Awards and Honors
Activities/Hobbies
Skills

Before you start to build your own resume, check out the following
examples of resumes built by members of the Bronx Compass community!
See how they included all of the above information. You can also
Google Search examples of how other professionals build their resume as
well! There’s different ways to do it that help you look your best on paper.

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JL
Justine Lockhart
200 West 147th Street New York, New York 10039
C: 212-203-3032 E: Justinelockhart@bronxcompass.org
Objective Creative and personable student seeking an internship in a professional recording studio to

strengthen engineering and production skills.

Experience Recording Experience, Multiple Studios in NYC



05/2013 - Present

Recorded 12 tracks at Daddy’s House, Bad Boy Records, twice during their offered
nighttime sessions
Met and networked with producers, engineers, and artists during my time there
Shadowed an engineer during one of my recording sessions

Childcare Experience, New York, NY

06/2014 - Present

Babysitter, Homework Helper



Helped single mother with her two energetic twin boys
Picked them up from school, took them to their speech classes and karate practice
Responsible for getting them snacks and feeding them meals
Started them on homework until their mother returned home from work

Lehman College, New York, NY

06/2013 - 08/2013

Summer Youth Employee


Kept a clean and organized system for books, magazines, audio books, and library
documents
Performed necessary tasks and services around the offices and building in general
Organized and maintained library archives

Education Bronx Compass High School

September 2012 – Present

1980 Lafayette Ave
Bronx, NY 10473
Activities Fred the Godson and Rob Base Benefit Show, Featured Rapper, 2014
Slick Rick Fundraiser Benefit, Show Opener, 2013
Open Mic Night, Participant
Coursework Advanced Recording
FL Studio Beat Maker Course
Music Production Studio
Skills Proficient in FL Studio, GarageBand and Virtual DJ
Knowledge of all Microsoft Office programs
Creative, clever, and humorous

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KAYLA%SHAUGHNESSY%
179$Kosciuszko$St$#2,$Brooklyn,$NY$11216$
857.719.9020$kaylashaughnessy@gmail.com$
$
OBJECTIVE%
To$use$my$education$and$experience$to$provide$individualized$assistance$to$at$promise$students$of$all$ages$
$
EDUCATION%
Silberman%School%of%Social%Work%at%Hunter%College,$New$York,$NY$$$
$
$
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$June$2011$–$May$2012$$
Masters$in$Social$Work;$concentration$in$Group$Work$
New%York%University,$Silver$School$of$Social$Work,$New$York,$NY$$
$$$
$
$$$$$$September$2007$–$May$2011$
Bachelors$of$Social$Work$
New%York%University%in%Buenos%Aires,$Buenos$Aires,$Argentina$$ $
$$$$$$$
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$February$2009$–$June$2009$
Boston%Latin%School,$Boston,$MA,$High$School$Diploma$$ $
$
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$September$2001$–$June$2007$$
$
EXPERIENCE%
The%Bronx%Compass%School,$Student'Advisor'+'Internship'Coordinator,'Bronx,$NY$$
$
$$January$2013$–Present$$
· Facilitates$a$multiXleveled$advisory$program$for$overXage,$underXcredited$youth$in$a$high$school$setting$
· Together$with$a$teacher$team,$plans$alternative$and$personalized$programs$of$instruction$that$meet$the$individual$
needs,$interests,$and$abilities$of$each$advisee$$
· School$wide,$identifies$internships$for$200+$students,$facilitates$internship$searches,$and$monitors$student$internships$
through$community$based$siteXvisits,$phone$calls,$and$mentor$meetings$
· Provides$professional$development$workshops$both$in$and$out$of$the$school$community$with$a$focus$on$incorporating$
socioemotional$learning$into$the$advisory$setting$
$
Lower%East%Side%Service%Center,$MSW'Social'Work'Intern,$New$York,$NY$$$
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$September$2011$–$April$2012$
· Counseled$opioid$dependent$individuals$and$groups$in$a$residential$longXterm$drug$treatment$facility$$$
· Created$and$facilitated$problemXfocused$programming$and$groups$using$multiXmodal$approaches$
· Worked$closely$with$staff$to$determine$individualized$plans$of$intervention$for$at$risk$clients$$
· Gathered$information$for$and$composed$psychosocial$evaluations$for$residents$in$longXstay$program$$
· Administered$each$stage$of$intake$process,$including$preXadmissions$interview$and$psychological$evaluation$$
$
The%Reading%and%Writing%Center%at%Hunter%College,$Tutor,$New$York,$NY$$
$$$$$$$$$$ September$2011$–$January$2012$
· Worked$one$on$one$with$other$MSW$students$to$refine$their$writing$processes$and$develop$stronger$editing$skills$$$
· Acted$as$a$progressXfocused$peer$supporter,$using$Socratic$method$with$tutees$to$enhance$writer$confidence$
· Recorded$observations,$reactions,$and$common$problems$with$student$process$so$as$to$refine$and$improve$the$Hunter$
College$Reading$and$Writing$Center,$along$with$the$general$writing$curriculum$$$
$
Lower%Manhattan%Arts%Academy,$BSW'Social'Work'Intern,$New$York,$NY$$
$
$$$$$September$2010$–$April$2011$
· Provided$individual$and$group$counseling$for$over$40$mandated$and$atXrisk$inner$city$high$school$students$
· Attended$daily$staff$meetings$to$discuss$student$issues,$monitor$student$progress,$and$create$plans$of$intervention$$
· Researched$outside$resources$and$referred$students$to$community$based$organizations$for$various$services$$
· Provided$crisis$intervention$and$conflict$resolution$during$emergency$situations$within$school$setting$
$
New%York%University%American%Reads%/%America%Counts,$Tutor,$New$York,$NY$$ $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$September$2007$–$June$2010$
· Assisted$New$York$City$public$school$teachers$with$curriculum/lesson$preparation$and$execution$
· Provided$extra$support$for$Special$Education$students$individually$and$in$small$groups$during$class$time$$
· Mediated$student$conflict$both$inside$and$out$of$the$classroom$$
· Engaged$in$a$positive$relationship$with$teachers,$staff,$parents,$and$general$school$community$
$
SKILLS%
· Proficient$with$all$Microsoft$Office$software$(Word,$PowerPoint,$Excel,$Entourage)$
· Experience$with$social$media$sites$as$means$of$communication$and$all$Google$apps$including$Google$Docs$
· Knowledge$of$Spanish$language$

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BUILD YOUR OWN

Start to draft your own here before you type it up!
Personal Information

Objective

Education

Work / Internship / Volunteer Experience

Skills

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What’s a Cover Letter?!
For almost almost any job you apply for, you will need to write a letter of
application aka a cover letter. This letter is sent along with your resume. It’s
an opportunity to explain or highlight anything that is in the resume. Think of
it like this, the resume is an athlete’s statistics, the bio article on
ESPN.com is the cover letter. There are many athletes who have similar
statistics, but their story is different. The cover letter is the story that makes
you “not just another applicant.”
In the cover letter, you introduce yourself, explain why you are writing, and
highlight your job/internship/volunteer history, along with certain skills you
have that would benefit the organization to which you are applying. At the
end, you typically request an opportunity to meet personally with the
potential employer.
IMPORTANT POINTS TO INCLUDE IN A COVER LETTER:
KEEP IT SIMPLE!

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Introductory paragraph - Introduce yourself, get personal

Content paragraph(s) - Sell your skills and qualifications, get specific

Closing paragraph - Ask for an (informational) interview, take action

Example Cover Letter Asking for a Job

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Example Cover Letter Asking for an Informational Interview

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Start to Build Your Own
Headings - Get the proper information needed!

Introduce Yourself + Explain Why You are Writing:

What Skills + Qualifications Do You Have?
ALSO (if asking for an informational interview) what are you trying to learn?

State Action!
What needs to happen now? Do you want an interview? A phone conversation?

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Dress to Impress
“Your first impression is a lasting impression!” In entering a professional
situation - a meeting, interview, internship, Shadow Day - it is always
important to dress appropriately.
Though not all jobs or internships require professional attire, until you
are told what uniform to wear, dress your best! The chart to the right is
suggested guidelines for professional attire - “The Five Levels of Business
Attire.”
For most experiences, a button down shirt and pants that are not jeans or
sweatpants work perfectly!

TIPS FOR MEETING A DRESS CODE:
• When in doubt, wear BLACK!
• If you have to question it, don’t wear it
• Dress for the job you WANT, not the job you HAVE!

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Speak Up!
“In 1967, UCLA professor Albert Mehrabian hypothesized that interpersonal
communications have have three components. Body language and nonverbal communication account for 55 percent, tone of voice and vocal
quality contribute 38 percent, while the actual words amount to only 7
percent of how people communicate.
To improve your speaking skills you must pay attention to the image you
project. Good posture will help you project your voice while demonstrating
more confidence in what you say. Making eye contact shows you are in touch
with the people you are speaking to. Use open hand gestures and avoid
rattling keys or the change in your pockets.”

TIPS TO IMPROVE YOUR PROFESSIONAL SPEAK:
• BODY LANGUAGE - stand up strait, make eye contact, smile
• BE PRESENT - get off your phone, show the other person you are
listening when they are talking
• ENUNCIATE - pronounce each of your words clearly
• WORD CHOICE - refrain from slang and profanity

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Reflection - Professionalism 101
✦ What did you learn about yourself during this
process? Was there one skill that was particularly
challenging? What did you do to strengthen this
skill for yourself?
✦ Was there a particular aspect of this work that felt
intimidating to you? Do you know what part in
particular was intimidating? Talk to your advisor
about ways to get support!
✦ Who is someone you think has all of these skills?
Talk to them about your beginning on this
professionalism pathway.
✦ What was a positive professional experience you
have had? What made it positive? How can you
use that experience as a reference to make your
next professional interaction a positive one?
✦ What was the most interesting thing you learned
during this part of the Internship process? What
made it so interesting to you?

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Choose a prompt and reflect on this part of the experience.

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Make Contact!

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Part 3: The Internship Scout

Starting Your Search

Part 3: The Internship Scout
WHAT COMES FIRST?
The process of finding an internship can sometimes feel overwhelming, but
now that you’re a professional, it will be easier! Still, we’re going to break it
down and make sure you have everything you need to feel successful. Before
we give you the tools, we’re going to introduce a new resource, The BxC
Internship Database. We will give you a brief explanation here and your
advisors and the Internship Coordinator will give you more help one on one.
TOOLBOX:
“Networking for Dummies”
The Internet Search
The Art of Cold Calling
Writing a Professional Email
Asking for an Informational Interview

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The BxC Internship Database
The best way to find an internship is to use your own people. You can
break it down into people closest to you, and then people one and two
steps away from you. These are your families, friends, neighbors, people
in your school community, etc.

Start by filling out the form on the next page entitled “People In My
Life.”  You can bring the forms home and gather the information over
several days.
Once you have the “People In My Life” chart, share the information
with your other advisees, internship coordinator, and/advisor. Then
build out your “People I WANT to Know” chart. You might have an
aunt who does what someone want someone wants to do and
someone might have an uncle who does what YOU want to do!

Definition of Networking:
“interact with other people to exchange information and
develop contacts, especially to further one's career.”
Love,
The Merriam Webster Dictionary
38

39

“Networking for Dummies”
The best way to find an internship is to use your own people. You can
break it down into people closest to you, and then people one and two
steps away from you. These are your families, friends, neighbors, people
in your school community, etc.

Start by filling out the form on the next page entitled “People In My
Life.”  You can bring the forms home and gather the information over
several days.
Once you have the “People In My Life” chart, share the information
with your other advisees, internship coordinator, and/advisor. Then
build out your “People I WANT to Know” chart. You might have an
aunt who does what someone want someone wants to do and
someone might have an uncle who does what YOU want to do!

Definition of Networking:
“interact with other people to exchange information and
develop contacts, especially to further one's career.”
Love,
The Merriam Webster Dictionary
40

MINING YOUR SOCIAL NETWORKS
“People in My Life” Chart
People Closest To You

People 1 Step Away

People 2 Steps Away

(Parents, Grandparents,
Brothers, Sisters, etc.)

(Aunts, Uncles, Cousins, Close
Friends, etc.)

(Neighbors, Other Friends,
Others You Know)

Name:

Name:

Name:

Job:

Job:

Job:

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Name:

Name:

Name:

Job:

Job:

Job:

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Name:

Name:

Name:

Job:

Job:

Job:

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

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“People in My Life” Chart

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People Closest To You

People 1 Step Away

People 2 Steps Away

(Parents, Grandparents,
Brothers, Sisters, etc.)

(Aunts, Uncles, Cousins, Close
Friends, etc.)

(Neighbors, Other Friends,
Others You Know)

Name:

Name:

Name:

Job:

Job:

Job:

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Name:

Name:

Name:

Job:

Job:

Job:

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Name:

Name:

Name:

Job:

Job:

Job:

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

People I WANT to Know
People I Want to Know

People I Want to Know

People I Want to Know

Name:

Name:

Name:

Job:

Job:

Job:

How you know them:

How you know them:

How you know them:

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Name:

Name:

Name:

Job:

Job:

Job:

How you know them:

How you know them:

How you know them:

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Name:

Name:

Name:

Job:

Job:

Job:

How you know them:

How you know them:

How you know them:

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

Phone # (or other way to
contact them):

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The Internet Search
Though you may use ANY form of information to find organizations in your
interest area, the common place to look in 2015 is the internet. Many
students will google “New York City Internships.” Though this CAN lead you
to sites that are great, the point of this search building your contact list
and getting your foot in the door. That means, look for individuals or
organizations that align to your interests, even if on their website nothing is
mentioned of an internship.
For example, if I have an interest in working with pets, I can run a search on
“Pet Care” or “Pet shops in the Bronx” or “Working with Pets in NYC” to see
what comes up. I do not HAVE TO depend on finding something when I
Google “Pet Internships.”

SUGGESTED SITES TO USE:




44

Google
Google Maps
Yelp.com
YellowPages.com
Or simply do a search engine search of your interest and see what
people and organizations come up!

Start to Build Your Contact List
Site Name

Address

Best way to Contact:
Email / Phone

I reached out
to this Site!
(Check It Off)

45

Site Name

46

Address

Best way to Contact:
Email / Phone

I reached out
to this Site!
(Check It Off)

Site Name

Address

Best way to Contact:
Email / Phone

I reached out
to this Site!
(Check It Off)

47

The Art of Cold Calling
Once you’ve developed a list of organizations to call, it is time to reach out
to them. One way of reaching out to sites is through a “Cold Call.” This is
where you actually use the contact information your recorded on your
site list and reach out to them over the phone.
Before you call, write a script for what you want to say. Your script becomes
the beginnings of your “pitch.” Check out the suggested script on the next
page. You should practice cold calling with your advisor, Internship
Coordinator, friends, fellow advisees, anyone who will listen to you! Practice
helps build confidence, because sometimes calling a place when you can’t
see someone’s face can be weird and scary.
IMPORTANT THINGS TO REMEMBER:

48

You should NEVER Cold Call for an internship.  Very few
organizations are willing to discuss internships from someone who
gets their name from a random internet search.  

Cold Calls should only be used to set up Shadow Days and
Informational Interviews. The idea is for you to go to the
organization and talk to an expert about working in the profession.  

SAMPLE COLD CALL SCRIPT
Hello, my name is

and I’m a student at a small  
(insert your name here)

High School in the Bronx. Who is this? (pause for a reply).  

Hello

, I’m doing a project on

(say the person’s name)

.

(insert your area of interest, get
specific, don’t just say “Pets”
say “No Kill Dog Shelters”)

During this project, each student has to do an Informational

Interview that helps us understand the

industry.
(insert your industry)

I’m wondering if there is anyone I could speak to about

(insert your industry)

It would be very helpful for me to have the input of a professional, or
someone who works in this field.

49

Writing a Professional Email
The “Professional Email” in this process is essentially your Cover Letter, so
BOOM, you’re already ahead of the game! In a professional email, you
are doing exactly what you did in the Cold Call, except there is obviously not
another person you need to verbally speak with.
Read some of the example Professional Emails written by senior Bronx
Compass students.
AGAIN, you should NEVER email for an internship.  Very few organizations
are willing to discuss internships from someone who gets their name from a
random internet search.  
SUGGESTIONS FOR MAKING THE PROFESSIONAL EMAIL EASIER:
• Write one solid Professional Email that you can send to many
different contacts from your Contact Sheet
• Use your Cold Call script as a template
• PROOFREAD, nothing worse than a typo on a professional email!

50

Example of Professional Email asking for an Interview

Dear Brian Shimmerlik,
My name is Ruben Martinez and I am a Junior at Bronx Compass High School,
located in the Soundview area of the Bronx. I am doing a project on what it means to be
an entrepreneur today. After reading A Day in the Life of Vengo’s Brian Shimmerlik, the
NYU article about your success in your entrepreneurial ventures, I researched your
company to learn more about your work and your tiny vending machines.  I’m interested in
learning more about entrepreneurship and the everyday life of your company. It’s amazing
how an idea of putting vending machines in taxis grew into a 2 million dollar company.
I know from the article you are very busy and receive thousands of email a day, but
I was wondering if it would be possible for me to come to your LIC office and interview
you about your company and your educational path in order to learn more about
entrepreneurship. I hope to hear back from you at your earliest convenience.  
Sincerely,
Ruben Martinez
rubenmartinez@bronxcompass.org
C. 347-641-7619

51

Example of Professional Email Asking for a Shadow Day
Dear 105.1 Crew,
My name is Justine Lockhart and I am a Junior at the Bronx Compass High
School, located in the Soundview area of the Bronx. I am doing a real world learning
project on the music industry and radio broadcasting in New York City.  
I listen to you guys faithfully every morning on my way to school either if i'm
in the car or even on the tunein app on my phone, I didn’t need to do much research
to know that 105.1 is one of the most popular listened radio stations in NYC. As
someone who is interested in the music world today, I am very much interested in
coming in to experience a day in a life at 105.1, learning more from you about how
you run the radio station as well as balance your personal lives and your careers.  I
hope to have an opportunity to do this myself someday and you seem like someone
who knows the ropes.  
I know you are probably very busy and receive thousands of email a day, but
this being a “real world learning” project means I can come in and interview and/or
spend Shadow Days with you and different organizations throughout the city.  I know
you are all extremely busy, but I would love an opportunity to visit your station and
gain more information from your expertise. I hope to hear back from you at your
earliest convenience.  
Sincerely,
Justine Lockhart
E: justinelockhart@bronxcompass.org
C: 212-203-3032
IG: @size8injays_

52

Start to Write Your Own!

53

The Informational Interview
If someone says, “YES!” to meeting with you, be prepared to interview them!
In the professional world, this is when you ask for an “Informational
Interview.”
An Informational Interview is a conversation with someone who can give
you an insider’s perspective on a specific career, employer, or industry.
It’s also an opportunity to brainstorm with knowledgeable individuals about
your career plans, let others know your interests, and enlist the help of those
in your targeted field. It is NOT a time to ask for a job or an internship.
For a successful interview, you must do so preparation BEFORE you leave the
building. Check out the following worksheets to help you get prepared!!

THINGS TO REMEMBER:
• Most are willing to discuss their jobs and careers with you as long as
you’re respectful of their busy schedules.
• There are no such thing as dumb questions, but there are questions
you shouldn’t ask, especially the ones you can find the answer to
from a quick Google search

54

Start Questioning!
Directions: Do research! Read the following, questions below and create
or select 10-12 questions that you might ask in an Informational Interview
that would would be most helpful for you; do not expect to ask all of
these questions.
Potential Career Questions
• Which jobs and experiences have led you to your present position?
Which have been most helpful?
• Would you describe the tasks or projects that occupy most of your
day?
• Which skills do you use on a daily basis?
• Which particular skills or talents are most essential to be effective in
your job?
• How would you describe your environment and the people with
whom you work?
• From your perspective, what are the challenges of working in this
field?
• Which college courses and experiences have proven most valuable
in your work?
• How important are grades/GPA for obtaining a job in this field?
• What obligations does your employer expect of you outside of the
work week? Are there organizations you are expected to join? Are
there social commitments? How has your job affected your lifestyle?
• How does a person advance in your field? What is a typical career
path in this field or organization?
• What kinds of experiences would you encourage for someone
pursuing a career in this field?

55

More Questions to Consider
Potential Job Search Questions




How did you go about finding your job?
Which strategies would you recommend for getting a job in your
field?
Which sills are the most important to highlight during my job
search?
Why did you decide to work for this organization?
With the information you have about my education, skills, and
experience, what other fields or jobs would you suggest I
research ?

ALSO, always end your interview with these Two “Golden”
Questions!
• Who else should I be talking to?
• If you were in my position what steps would you take?

56

Start to Develop your OWN questions!
#

Questions to Ask During your Interview

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

57

Time to Leave the Building!
There are going to be times during this process when you go out into the
world and leave the school building. Whether you are doing a Shadow Day,
Information Interview, or “Pavement Pound” Internship Scout, you must
follow certain protocol. Whenever you need to leave the building, you MUST
do the following:
1. Explain to your advisor what it is you are doing + get the OK
2. Submit an Out of Building Request form that your advisor will digitally
share you on to leave the building - this is a form that is sent to the
Internship Coordinator (aka Kayla) that keeps a record of where you are
going
3. Fill out the Truancy Letter and print out. It is very important you have
this letter because you might be stopped and questioned by truancy
police.

THINGS TO REMEMBER:

DO NOT FORGET TO FOLLOW THE
PROTOCOL LISTED ABOVE!

58

The Truancy Letter
The$Bronx$Compass$High$School$
Stacy$McCoy,$Principal$

Stevenson!Educational!Campus!
1980!Lafayette!Ave,!2nd!Floor/!Bronx,!New!York!10473!
Phone:!718.828.1206/!Fax:!718N828N3732!
www.!bronxcompass.org!
!

09/2014!
!
To!Whom!It!May!Concern:!
We!have!selected!the!following!student(s),!________________________________________________________,!
to!participate!in!The!Bronx!Compass!High!School’s!Learning!Through!Internship!(LTI)!
Program.!!These!students!have!permission!to!pursue!their!learning!off!of!school!grounds.!
!!!
The!Bronx!Compass!High!School’s!LTI!Program!takes!place!every!Tuesday!and!Thursday,!
from!8!am!to!2!pm.!!Students!in!the!LTI!program!will!spend!at!least!8!half!days!observing!
and!participating!in!the!work!of!the!internship!site.!!All!students!are!responsible!for!
completing!at!least!one!project!while!on!site.!!A!good!internship!project!has!a!real!audience,!
fills!a!real!need!at!the!internship!site,!and!helps!you!meet!one!or!more!of!objectives!for!
working!at!the!site.!!!
!
Today’s!visit!is!just!a!Shadow!Day.!!A!Shadow!Day!is!when!the!student(s)!go!into!the!
worksite!and!spend!a!day!observing!what!an!employee!does!on!a!regular!day!basis.!This!day!
is!at:!
Location!Name:!
!
!
Location!Address:!
!
!
!
If!you!have!questions,!please!call!our!LTI!Coordinator,!Kayla!Shaughnessy,!at!the!school!at!
(718)!828N1206!or!on!her!cellphone!at!(857)N719N9020.!
!
Thank!you,!!
!
!
Kayla!Shaughnessy!
LTI!Coordinator!
The!Bronx!Compass!High!School!
1980!Lafayette!Ave.!
Bronx,!NY!10473!
!
!
!
!
!

59

Out of Building Request Form - Part One

60

Out of Building Request Form - Part Two

61

Reflection - The Internship Scout
✦ What did you learn about yourself during this
process? Was there one skill that was particularly
challenging? What did you do to strengthen this
skill for yourself?
✦ Was there a particular aspect of this work that felt
intimidating to you? Do you know what part in
particular was intimidating? Talk to your advisor
about ways to get support!
✦ Who is someone you think has all of these skills?
Talk to them about your beginning on this
professional pathway.
✦ What was a positive professional communication
you had? What made it positive? How can you use
that experience as a reference to make your next
professional interaction a positive one as well?
✦ What was the most interesting thing you learned
during this part of the Internship process? What
made it so interesting to you?

62

Choose a prompt and reflect on this part of the experience.

63

Watch + Learn

64

Part 4: The Shadow Day

Professionals at Work

Part 4: The Shadow Day
WHAT IS A SHADOW DAY?
A Shadow Day is a day spent at a workplace or with an individual who is a
professional in your interest area. Shadow Days can help you find out more
about your interests and see if the organization and host are a good fit for an
internship. On these days, you conduct an Informational Interview of of
your host and complete a Shadow Day Anthropology.
Before you go on the Shadow Day, you prep for your Informational Interview
questions; during you channel your professional self and learn from the
Masters; after a Shadow Day you ALWAYS send a Thank You card.
Lastly, it isn’t until after a Shadow Day, when you follow up with your host to
say thank you, that you ask about an internships at the sites.
TOOLBOX:
Shadow Day Anthropology
Say “THANK YOU!”

65

Shadow Day Anthropology
Anthropology is “the science that deals with the origins, physical and cultural
development, biological characteristics, and social customs and beliefs of
humankind.” In college, this is a science that some people major in and study
for years to come. On a Shadow Day, it is a worksheet that helps you to
do your own anthropological exploration while out in professional the
world.
The Shadow Day Anthropology worksheet should be completed before
your Informational Interview as you might have questions from doing the
worksheet that you would like to ask during your interview.
Check out the Shadow Day Anthropology worksheet on the next page!

Definition of Anthropology
“the science that deals with the origins, physical and cultural
development, biological characteristics, and social customs and
beliefs of humankind.”

66

The Shadow Day Anthropology
Basic Information
Student Name
Date of Shadow Day
Host Name
Host Job Title
Work Place Name
Address
Phone Number
Things to Look For on Your Shadow Day
What does the work area like? Why do you think it is set up that way?

How do people dress for work in this organization?

67

The Shadow Day Anthropology
How happy do people seem with their jobs?

What is your sense of the work atmosphere here? Is it warm? Friendly? Cold? Very serious? Messy
or organized? What do you see that gives you this impression?

How is diverse is the organization? In age? Gender? Race? How does this suit you?

How do you feel in this space? What reactions do you have? Does it remind you of anything else
you have experienced? What? Make comparisons?

68

The Shadow Day Anthropology
Can you imagine yourself doing an Internship at this site? If so, what do you think you would be
doing? if no, describe why.

Are there any other things you noticed? Use this space for extra notes you have or things you want
to learn more about.

69

Say, “THANK YOU!”
IT IS SO IMPORTANT TO SEND A THANK YOU NOTE OR EMAIL!!!
According to “The Ladders,” a website that focuses on career advice, here are FIVE
reasons why sending a thank you letter is so important:
1. A thank-you letter creates an opportunity to re-connect with employers.
2. Following up keeps your candidacy top of mind.
3. Written correspondence gives you another chance to sell your strengths.
4. The document enables you to address points you neglected to discuss during the
interview.
5. A letter helps develop rapport and increases the employer's comfort level in your
candidacy.

If all went well, ask for the Internship:
Lastly, if you had a good Informational Interview, the Shadow Day
went well, and you shared your Shadow Day Anthropology with
your Advisor, THEN you can ask for an internship. When
requesting, please have advisor send the “Mentor Packet” that
explains the internship policy, roles, + responsibilities.
70

Example of a Thank You Note after an Informational Interview
2720 Euclid Drive
Philadelphia, PA 19110
April 15, ____
James Weston, Assistant Director
American Association of Community Service Organizations
7210 Connecticut Avenue, Suite 223
Washington, DC 20036
Dear Mr. Weston:
Our meeting yesterday was truly informative and extremely useful in helping me
clarify various concerns regarding careers with community service organizations.
Your experience and knowledge of this field is most impressive.
I want to thank you again for taking the time from your busy schedule to meet
with me. Your suggestions for strengthening my resume were very helpful. I am
now revising the resume in light of your thoughtful advice. I will send you a copy
of the revised resume next week.
Following your advice, I will contact Marilyn Plante tomorrow to see if she might
have or know of any opportunities for someone with my interests and
qualifications. I will give her your regards.
I hope to have a chance to meet with you again sometime.
Sincerely,
Sarah Taylor

71

Example of a Handwritten Thank You Letter after a Job Interview

72

Template of a Thank You Letter - Get Started on Yours!

73

Reflection - The Shadow Day
✦ What did you learn about yourself during this
process? Was there one skill that was particularly
challenging? What did you do to strengthen this
skill for yourself?
✦ Was there a particular aspect of this work that felt
intimidating to you? Do you know what part in
particular was intimidating? Talk to your advisor
about ways to get support!
✦ Who is someone you think has all of these skills?
Talk to them about your beginning on this
professional pathway.
✦ What was a positive professional communication
you had? What made it positive? How can you use
that experience as a reference to make your next
professional interaction a positive one as well?
✦ What was the most interesting thing you learned
during your Shadow Day? What made it so
interesting to you?

74

Choose a prompt and reflect on this part of the experience.

75

SCORE!!!

76

Part 5: You Got the Internship

You’re Ready!

Part 5: You Got the Internship
YOU DID IT! NOW WHAT?
Congratulations! You got an internship. Now it’s time to start! The following
tools of this chapter help you to plan a rough outline of the first three weeks
at your new internship site. Just like you did with the Shadow Day, you will
interview your new mentor and conduct an Internship Anthropology.
During that time, your advisor will come to host an Internship Setup
Meeting.
Unless your mentor already has a specific project they want you to work on,
these first three weeks will be your opportunity to start to look for project
ideas to present at the Setup Meeting and then the Project Setup Meeting.
TOOLBOX:
My First Three Weeks
Internship Anthropology
The Internship Setup Meeting

77

The First Three Weeks
The first three weeks at your internship experience will be new, exciting, and
sometimes challenging. For those of you who are entering an internship
experience for the first time, adjusting to this schedule can take some time.
This suggested outline for your first three weeks at internship can help with
this process and provide a smooth adjustment into your internship
experience.
This outline provides suggested times and deadlines for work that is
expected of you during your beginning times at internship. This outline will
of course have to be adjusted due to the student and mentor along with the
demands of the internship site.

Check out the outline of the first three weeks
to help transition you from “classroom
learning” to internship based learning.

78

Suggested Outline of the First Three Weeks
My First Three Weeks:
Week One:
• If you are at a site that is not where your Shadow Day was, complete the
Informational Interview with your Mentor in order to get to know them
more, along with the site or organization.
• Type up your Informational Interview to Publish + Present standards so you
can present it during your Exhibition.
Week Two:
• Do the Internship Anthropology at your new internship site. Even if this
was the same site you did you Shadow Day anthropology, the questions
and purpose of this exercise are different.
• Start to develop questions and ideas for projects that you can do at your
internship site. You will talk more about this at your first meeting with your
advisor and mentor.
Week Three:
• After you have done both the interview and anthropology, your advisor will
come and do the Internship Setup Meeting, during the first three weeks
of your new internship.
• Share the questions and ideas for projects that you can do at your
internship site. The next meeting is when you start to finalize your actual
internship project.

79

Internship Anthropology
The Internship Anthropology is very similar to the Shadow Day Anthropology.
Though on a Shadow Day, the anthropology is a worksheet that helps you in
an anthropological exploration in professional the world, this is an
investigation at your particular internship site. During this exploration, you
are looking for project ideas, inspiration, opportunities.
Check out the Internship Anthropology worksheet on the next page!

The Internship Anthropology is the MAIN tool
to help you, your mentor, and your advisor
define your Internship Project!

80

The Internship Anthropology
Basic Information
Student Name
Date Conducted
Host Name
Host Job Title
Work Place Name
Address
Phone Number
Part One: Overview of the Internship Site
What is the main purpose of this work place/ organization / business?

What different kind of jobs go on here?

81

The Internship Anthropology
Who are the customers or clients OR who is served by this organization?

What is it like for people who work here? What are the start and end times? When do they have
lunch? Is there a dress code? What kind of spaces do they work in?

How many people work here? How is diverse is the organization? In age? Gender? Race? How
does this suit you?

How do you feel in this space? What reactions do you have? Does it remind you of anything else
you have experienced? What? Make comparisons?

82

The Internship Anthropology
Part Two: The Structure
Is this organization broken down into departments? If so, how does the work connect?

If there are different parts of the organization, what are the ways they use to communicate with
each other?

How are decisions made in your part of the organization?

Which part of the organization do you find most interesting? Why?

83

The Internship Anthropology
What kinds of jobs could you see yourself doing at this organization?

Part Three: Assessment
How is work evaluated at your LTI?

Do co-workers critique or review each other’s work? How is this done?

Do people seem to have high standards for their work? How can you tell?

84

The Internship Anthropology
What are 3 to 5 skills or personal qualities that seem to be important for all employees, in order for
them to do quality work and receive a good evaluation?

What skills and personal qualities are important for you to work on in the next few months?

Notes, etc:

85

The Setup Meeting
According to Big Picture Advisor 101 Guide, “For a successful Internship
experience, the mentor, student and advisor should discuss expectations and
responsibilities of each person. An Internship Setup meeting is an
opportunity for the group to exchange contact information, review the
student’s Learning Plan, talk about expectations, and set a time for the next
meeting.”

The Setup Meeting is the first of three meetings
that you, your advisor, and your mentor will have
in order to ensure a successful, meaningful, and
rigorous internship experience.

86

Outline of the Setup Meeting - Advisor Leads

Introductions

Tour of the Site (? – depends on mentors time availability)

Ask mentor if he / she has any questions before the meeting gets going

Advisor Explanation of the Student’s responsibility during the Meeting

Discussion of the “Basic” Logistics:

Share Contact Information

Discuss LTI Schedule (Hours)

Attendance Plan

Ask the Mentor to call when a student does not show up

Explain that if the student is unable to attend, her / his adult is
responsible for calling both the Advisor and Mentor


Dress Code + Lunch Plan

Discussion of the next two – three weeks

Student will continue to observe / help

Student will be writing a long list of questions

Mentor can be thinking of work / projects that the student could take
on (Invite the Mentor to gaze through the Mentor Guide to become
more familiar w/ the school and the Internship)

Discussion of the Project Set-Up Meeting

Goal: Create project(s) for the student that combines interests /
questions of the student and needs of the Mentor / LTI Site

Explain that you, the Advisor, will be a facilitator, and that the best
projects are created when the Student and Mentor engage and
combine each of their needs

87

Reflection - You Got the Internship
✦ What did you learn about yourself during this
process? Was there one skill that was particularly
challenging? What did you do to strengthen this
skill for yourself?
✦ Was there a particular aspect of this work that felt
intimidating to you? Do you know what part in
particular was intimidating? Talk to your advisor
about ways to get support!
✦ Who is someone you think has all of these skills?
Talk to them about your beginning on this
professional pathway.
✦ What was a positive professional communication
you had? What made it positive? How can you use
that experience as a reference to make your next
professional interaction a positive one as well?
✦ What was the most interesting thing you have
learned at your Internship so far? What made it so
interesting to you?

88

Choose a prompt and reflect on this part of the experience.

89

Serving My Site

90

Part 6: The Internship Project

See + Serve

Part 6: The Internship Project
According to Big Picture, “The Internship project is the most important part
of a student’s work at the Internship site and it has real value to the people
who work there. The Internship project is the way for students to get
personally involved in their interest area through hands-on learning.
Every Internship project is included in the Learning Plan and describes how
students will be building skills and knowledge through the project.
The student, mentor and advisor brainstorm project ideas and create a
project that meets the student’s interests and the mentor’s needs. Sometimes
the student can be responsible for a part of a larger project that the mentor
is working on. Often, successful projects are those that the mentor does
not have time to complete, but the student can.”

TOOLBOX:
Internship Project Matrix
Internship Project Proposal
Project Setup Meeting

91

Internship Project Matrix
Planning an Internship Project for the first time can be challenging, but don’t
worry, we’re going to give you the tools you need and some suggested
projects ideas to get you started!
Here is the process:
1. Look through your Internship Anthropology. What were some questions
you had you wanted to explore? What people, places, or things were
you drawn to? What were some problems you’d like to solve?
2. For brainstorming purposes, check out the Project Matrix for different
ideas.
3. Lastly, when you think of an idea, submit a Project Proposal Form to
your advisor. This will be useful at your Project Setup Meeting.

The Internship Project Matrix is a tool to
see suggested project ideas for sites based
on interest areas, job buckets, and/or
potential credits.

92

Internship Project Matrix
Interest
Area
Education

Job
Buckets
Principal,
Teacher,
Paraprofessional
School Support Staff
Heath Educator

Possible
Internship
Locations

Potential
Credits
Health
Living Environment
ELA
Psychology
Physical Education
Any Credit!

Suggested
Projects





Day Care
Children’s Hospital
Schools
After school program
Zoo
Children’s Museum
Arts + Craft Center
TV Station
Children’s Theatre



Help students with
reading, Math
Art Projects
Design and run a
unit specific to the
needs of the group
(nutrition, hygiene,
multiculturalism, oral
history, music)
Beginning Internet
Design Bulletin
Boards
Plan and help on a
trip
Newsletter to
parents
Helping with the
food budget
Immunization
Awareness Clinic
Organize open
house for parents

93

Interest
Area
Animals

Job
Buckets
Veterinarian, Veterinarian
Technician,
Trainer,
Groomer,
Dog Walker

Possible
Internship
Locations
Veterinary Clinic
Zoo
Farm
Horse stable
Horseback riding center
Aquarium
Environmental Org
Field Biologist
Wildlife photographer/
videographer
Pet store
Pet groomer
Dog trainer
Animal Handler/Trainer
Animal Control Officer
Parks Department

94

Potential
Credits
Health
Living Environment
ELA
Physical Education
Art

Suggested
Projects

Create and print
pamphlet about
transitioning a new
cat or dog into your
home.

Writing for and
designing the
organization’s
newsletter.

Creating statistical
reports about the
animals for a shelter
that can be used for
fundraising and
grant writing.

Organize an adopta-pet drive in the
community.

Put together an
educational packet
about spaying and
neutering, rabies
and other common
illnesses, feeding
and care of their
new pet.

Create a short video
documentary about
the life of an animal

Start to Create Your Own!

Interest
Area

Job
Buckets

Potential
Credits

Suggested
Projects

Possible
Internship
Locations

95

Project Proposal
According to Big Picture, “Project proposals can help you clarify your work
and explain it to your mentor and your advisor. The goal, as in all your work,
should be to work toward an authentic and real project that interests you and
challenges you to learn new things.” This project should also benefit the
internship site.
At Bronx Compass, the Internship Project Proposal follows a POBOAR format
which stands for Purpose, Outcomes, Brainstorm, Organize, Act, and Reflect.
The following proposal is available for you to use to start organizing your
ideas about your potential internship project.

REMEMBER
Proofread your proposal first to catch any errors. Have another
student in your advisory proofread it too. Update your next
draft.

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Internship Project Proposal
Purpose
Why are you doing this?

Outcomes
What do you hope to achieve? What is some tangible evidence?

Brainstorm
How can you do this? What products will you create? Let’s brainstorm!

Organize
Let’s make it happen! Make timelines, task lists, etc.

Act
DO IT! Start making stuff happen

Reflect
Choose a Project Reflection Prompt and reflect on this experience

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Project Setup Meeting
It’s been more than two or three weeks of your internship. You’re feeling
comfortable in your internship routines, expectations, etc. Now it is time for a
second meeting, the Project Setup Meeting that addresses and plans
your internship project.
In this meeting, you, your advisor and mentor, look for a project around the
your interests that will benefit the internship site. You also look for ways to
incorporate different learning opportunities based on your Graduation
Tracker to make sure you get the credits to fulfill your graduation
requirements through this internship experience.

The Project Setup Meeting is the second of
three meetings that you, your advisor, and your
mentor will have in order to ensure a successful,
meaningful, and rigorous internship experience.

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Outline of the Internship Project Setup Meeting - Advisor Leads

Introductions + Catch Ups

Ask mentor if he / she has any questions before the meeting gets going

Review your Learning Plan with your mentor and discuss which credits and skills the
student wants to / needs to focus on

Discuss project ideas that student and mentor have - student presents his/her own
Project Proposal

As a group, create a brief project description that incorporates the student’s interests,
the mentor’s needs and the graduation requirements of the student

Make sure the group answers the following questions:

What is the name of your internship project?

What will the product or outcome be?

How will this project be used at the LTI site? Who will use it?

What criteria will be used to decide if the finished project is good enough to be
used at the LTI site? Who will make the final decision?

What is the deadline for the completely finished project?

How often will the student meet formally with the mentor to check in on the
status of the project?

How often will the student meet with the advisor to check in on the project?

How will the student document his or her work?

How will the student and mentor reflect on this work?

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Reflection - The Internship Project
✦ What did you learn about yourself during this
process? Was there one skill that was particularly
challenging? What did you do to strengthen this
skill for yourself?
✦ Was there a particular aspect of this work that felt
intimidating to you? Do you know what part in
particular was intimidating? Talk to your advisor
about ways to get support!
✦ Who is someone you think has all of these skills?
Talk to them about your beginning on this
professional pathway.
✦ What was a positive professional communication
you had? What made it positive? How can you use
that experience as a reference to make your next
professional interaction a positive one as well?
✦ What was the most interesting thing you have
learned at your Internship so far? What made it so
interesting to you?

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Choose a prompt and reflect on this part of the experience.

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Publish + Present

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Part 7: RWL Exhibition

Show Us What You GOT!

Part 7: RWL Exhibition
THE REAL WORLD LEARNING EXHIBITION
At BxC, when we say Real World Learning Exhibition we share the same
meaning as Big Picture: “This type of exhibition is an event at the natural end
of a project. If the project is to cater the mentor breakfast, the breakfast itself
is an exhibition of the work. If the student’s project is to organize a rally, or
present findings at a board meeting, these can also be real world exhibitions.
Students can incorporate a chance to get feedback from participants right
into the event itself. This helps them to assess the success of the
event...These types of exhibitions are usually held in addition to a quarterly
Learning Plan exhibition.”

TOOLBOX:
RWL Exhibition Rubric
Prepare Yourself
Send Invitations

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Real World Learning Exhibition Rubric
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INTEREST SURVEY ONE GOES HERE

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Prepare Yourself!
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INTEREST SURVEY ONE GOES HERE

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Send Invitations
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INTEREST SURVEY ONE GOES HERE

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Reflection - RWL Exhibition
PROMPTS FOR Part II HERE

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Choose a prompt and reflect on this part of the experience.

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