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Rita Riley

ECD 200
April 6, 2016

Developmental Area: Cognitive

Age: Mobil infant

Developmental Characteristics Description:


Places objects on their outlines.
Observes objects closely.
Shows curiosity and the need to investigate/explore anything new.
Asks questions (Who? What? Where? Or Why?).
Play with sustained interest
Play and interact with another child
Physical Environment Description:
May enjoy some large wooden blocks, balances boars, planks boxes,
ladders for building
Sensory table
Objects to sort
Provide space for personal possessions
Unit blocks and accessories to go with them
Social Environment Description:
Allow plenty of choices
Begin to encourage sharing and cooperative play
Encourage children to use toys and materials in creative ways
Encourage interaction among children
Help children get involve and stay involved in play activities by
preventing interruptions by other children
Insert experience and reference source
Mobile infants building and sorting blocks
Reference
https://www.google.com/search?
q=photo+of+mobil+toddlers+in+block+play&rlz=1C1CAFA_enUS670US670
&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=815&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved
=0ahUKEwiD65TFwunLAhUCOCYKHU7cBOYQsAQIGw#imgrc=7X8qQYMBnkX
beM%3A

Age-Yes; blocks continue to be favorites of children everywhere. Appropriate toys and


materials encourage children to build muscle control, strength interest in concepts like
same/different, patterned/planned, classifying, and sorting.

Individually- Yes; some two-year-olds will be able to match shapes, first


with same size and orientation, then with different sizes and orientation
(e.g., matches simple shapes in form boards and puzzles, sorts simple
shapes in a sorter box. A two year old can sort shapes, complete puzzles with
eight pieces or less, and stack a set of rings on a peg by size. By taking toys
apart, it will increase cognitive development; increase language and
communication skills; to increase sensory motor skills.
Culturally Appropriate Evaluation- Yes; by me working collaboratively
with families to ensure that children are offered optimal learning
experiences. I will provide families with the information they need to support
childrens learning and development. I will also create opportunities to learn
about each familys expectations for their child, as well as cultural
differences and values.
Physical Environment Evaluation:
May enjoy some large wooden blocks, balances boars, planks boxes,
ladders for building
Sensory table
Objects to sort
Provide space for personal possessions
Unit blocks and accessories to go with them
Social Environment Evaluation:
This can give children every opportunity to discover for themselves.
Teachers need to introduce play themes, provide materials, and help
children expand on their ideas.
By helping children when planning roles, encouraging children to talk
to peers, posing open ended questions, and becoming involved in play,
the teacher extends and enhances learning.
Respectful, Responsive, Reciprocal Evaluation:

Respectful- The toddler is learning that her interests are important


and will be respected. I can teach the child how to use self-control and selfrespect by modeling.
Responsive- It is important for me to use developmentally and individually
appropriate strategies that take into consideration childrens differing needs,
interests, styles, and abilities. I will let children know they I care about them
through warm, responsive, physical contact such as giving pats on the back,
hugging, and holding young children in their laps.
Reciprocal- I will acknowledge children for their accomplishments and
effort.
Professional References:
Milestone moments: Learn the signs early. (2012). Atlanta, GA: Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention, [National Center on Birth Defects and
Developmental Disabilities, Division of Birth Defects.

Petty, K. (2010). Developmental milestones of young children. St. Paul, MN:


Redleaf Press.

Miller, K. (2001). Ages & stages: New & revised developmental descriptions
& activities: Birth through eight years. S.l.: Gryphon House.
Gonzalez-Mena, J., & Eyer, D. W. (2012). Infants, toddlers, and caregivers: A
curriculum of respectful, responsive, relationship-based, care and education.
New York: McGraw-Hill