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Daily Lesson Plan

Teacher: Erin Scafone


Class/Periods: Research Writing 2 sessions: Grouped by Readiness
Core
Values:
Rigor
Relevanc
e
Relations
hips
Respect
Responsi
bility

Unit
CC/State/EOC
Standard(s)

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.1
Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive
topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient
evidence.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.7
Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented
in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well
as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.11-12.6
Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific
words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and
listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate
independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when
considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or
expression.

Essential
Question

What makes for effective rhetoric?


-What are some factors that might cause ones reasoning to be
faulty?
-Why might people choose to use a fallacy to make their
argument?
-What are logical fallacies?

AIM/Objective
(I Can)

I can give examples of types of logical fallacies and write statements


that contain them.

Strategie
s
Auditory
Believer/Dou
bter
Fishbowl
Four-Corners
Debate
Literature
Circles
Roundtables
Socratic
Seminars
Teach-Back
Think-PairShare
Read-Aloud
Think-Aloud

Visual
Guided Note
Taking
Flowcharts
Double-Entry
Notebooks
Sequencing
Maps
Concept
Maps
Venn
Diagrams
Foldables
Dioramas
Mobiles
Graphing

Kinesthetic
Gallery Walks
Readers
Theater
Investigation
s
Games
Floor/Wall
Puzzles

Do Now:
Day 1: Remind yourself again what is logos?
(Blooms Comprehension)
Day 2: Remind yourself again what is ethos?
(Blooms Comprehension)
WarmUp: Preparing for lesson.
One day, Janie and her mom are baking a ham. In preparing the ham for the
oven, Janie's mom cuts off the bottom third of the ham before putting the rest of it
in the pan to go into the oven. Janie asks, "Mom, why do you cut off the bottom
third of the ham like that?" Janie's mom replies, "Well, I do it because that's the
way grandma does it." So Janie asks, "Ok, why does grandma do that?" Mom
replies, "I don't know, let's call her."
They call grandma and ask. Grandma says, "I do it because great-grandma did it
that way." So Janie asks, "Why did she do it that way?" Grandma replies, "I don't
know, let's call her." They call great-grandma and ask, "Nana, in our family we
always cut the bottom third of the ham off before putting it in the oven. Why do
we do that?" Great-grandma replies, chuckling, "You know, I never understood
why all you fools keep doing that. I did it because I never had a pan big enough

for a full ham!" Moral of the story: It's not enough to follow the recipe as directed.
You have to know WHY you are directed to do things a certain way.
This is the fallacy of tradition.

Connection: Brief verbal statement connecting WarmUp skills to Objective .


Addresses the WHW of the day--What theyll learn, How they are going to
learn it, Why they are learning it)

Today we are going to learn about logical fallacies. Fallacies are common errors in
reasoning that will undermine the logic of your argument. Fallacies can be either
illegitimate arguments or irrelevant points, and are often identified because they
lack evidence that supports their claim. We are going to learn about this because
when we make an argument, we dont want to be fallacious and we dont want to
support our claim with sources that are fallacious arguments. We are going to
learn about fallacies by:
reading the definitions and reading several examples. (Verbal/Linguistic)

We will also watch videos of several different examples. (Visual/Auditory)


The Beatles are even going to sing to us about logical fallacies hoping to
cement our knowledge. (Musical)

Model/ Teach/ Guided Practice: Provide lesson steps, explanations,


connection to AIM

Have students break into 6 groups. In these groups:

1.Read the definition of the fallacy assigned to you read the example.
(M.I: Verbal/Linguistic)
Struggling Learners: Assign struggling learners logical fallacies that are
more concrete to grasp: False authority, hasty generalization, false
dilemma.
2. Do a readers theater style interpretation of the example for the class.
(M.I: Kinesthetic)
3. When all groups have presented their readers theater, watch the following
videos.
(M.I:Visual/Auditory)
Ad hominem: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWSN2zbydKw
False Dilemma (Either/Or): http://www.southparkstudios.com/clips/151029/
Faulty Cause and Effect: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ewWFWQwlTs (the first
minute)
Bandwagon The onion: New Poll allows pundits to see ratings in real time
http://www.theonion.com/content/video/new_live_poll_allows_pundits_to
Unqualified generalization The Daily show: candidates Generic-Off
http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/tue-september-16-2008/candidates--generic-off
Hasty Generalization Daily Show: terrorball
http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/mon-january-11-2010/fright-club
The Beatles teach Logical Fallacies: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c03GVZXeg6A

(M.I: Musical)
Struggling Learners: Give students a graphic organizer for notes of the
videos, with more examples.
End of first session
1.Read Love is a Fallacy by Max Shulman
(M.I Verbal/Linguistic)
Struggling Learners: Provide students an outline of Max Shulmans Love
is a Fallacy

Active Involvement/ Check-in Assessment: How are you going to check


for understanding?
Readers Theater Presentations
Check in while talking to groups
Questions that students answer independently
Students posts on blog

Work-Time/ Independent or Group Practice: Provide activity steps,


explanations, and connection to AIM

1.Groups will work together to prepare short demonstrations of logical fallacies.


2. Independently, have each student answer the following questions:
-Why might someone decide to use this fallacy?
(Blooms Analysis)
-What makes this fallacy effective? (Or not)?
(Blooms Analysis)
-How would you combat this fallacy?
(Blooms Synthesis)

Day 2
1. Poke on Rhetological Fallacies from the Information is Beautiful.net site or
on Your Logical Fallacy is.com page (URL:
http://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/home)
2.Explore the 24 fallacies that surround the triumvirate of rhetoric--Plato,
Aristotle, and Socrates. (Notice that when you hover over the fallacy icons
an explanation pops up that explains what the fallacy is all about.)
3. Select 3 of your favorite fallacies. from one of those websites
4. Log on to the class blog and in a class post:
Name the selected fallacy
Create (really be creative) a sentence that is an example of it.
(Williams: Flexibility)
So you should have 3 Fallacy names and three good but completely
arbitrary examples of them.

Finally, go into 2 of your classmates list of fallacies and see if you can
respond to at least one of of their sentences with your own fallacious
response using the same fallacy they selected. Everything your write
for this blog post should be fallacious. (Fortunately fallacies feature
frequent fun!)
(Williams: Flexibility)

Closing: Reflecting (Share-out, Journals, Exit Slips)


Exit ticket:
Complete the Matching activity titled Logical Fallacies (Divide it into 2 parts)
(Blooms: Application)

Extension For Learning (Advanced Learner Accommodations): Create


an assignment(s) aligned to the daily objective for students to work on/complete
in the event they finish early. The extensions should BUILD off of the work
completed earlier in the class.

Find examples of politicians committing logical fallacies.


What fallacy is this person committing?
Are they choosing to commit this fallacy or is this by accident?
What is the effect if it is on purpose and what is effect if is by accident ?

Anchor Activities: Develop and prepare a series of options in the event none
of the students have any clue as to what you are talking about. Its always best
practice to prepare an escape in the event your lesson plan goes awry.

1. Read the definitions and examples together as a class, and then watch the
videos. Go through each fallacy one at a time. Definition, example, video.
Definition, example, video. Then do the matching activity. Then do the
Blooms higher order thinking questions.
2. Then on the second day, have the students do the readers theater of the
examples. Then, allow the students to go on the websites to help them write
their own fallacies.

***Homework Assignment (Daily):

Students have regular blog posts and readings they do for homework.

_____________________________________________________________________
Struggling Learner Accommodations:
1. Assign struggling learners logical fallacies that are more concrete to grasp:
False authority, hasty generalization, false dilemma.
2. Give students a graphic organizer for notes of the videos, with more
examples.
3. Provide students an outline of Max Shulmans Love is a Fallacy