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Assignment 2

Teachers are Committed to Students and Their Learning


1. Based on my students NWEA scores I will put them in ability groups to meet their
individual learning needs twice a week for a math intervention group. During math
intervention groups I will work on specific skills that students are lacking that they will
need to be proficient with in order to master this unit. My district uses the NWEA test
three times a year in order to measure student growth. For the second test students in
fourth grade should score 208.7. I put my students in order from lowest score to highest
score, based on the measurement and data section of their results. Then I grouped them
based on their scores with other students of similar math abilities, so I can focus on
helping them with the skills they need in order to improve their measurement and data
knowledge.

My three students in the lowest scoring group (red) will receive the most intensive
intervention. These students will receive intervention in basic mathematic skills
including: reading measurements with a ruler, reading data on a graph, multiplying,
dividing, adding and subtracting, and adding and subtracting with fractions. My students
in the next lowest scoring group (purple) will also receive intense intervention. These
students will receive intervention in areas including: reading measurements with a ruler,
reading data on a graph, adding and subtracting with fractions, understanding word
problems. My six students whose scores are hovering right around expectations for
fourth grade (blue) will receive interventions in adding and subtracting with fractions and
understanding word problems. My seven students who have exceeded fourth grade

expectations (green) will receive an enrichment education during intervention times.


These students will work on measurement and data projects that are based in real world
situations.
Table 2: Student Winter NWEA Math Scores.
Student
Student 17
Student 10
Student 5
Student 24
Student 15
Student 13
Student 1
Student 6
Student 21
Student 7
Student 14
Student 2
Student 18
Student 9
Student 22
Student 12
Student 23
Student 16
Student 4
Student 20

Score
193
195
197
200
201
203
204
207
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
215
215
216
218
218

2. The Math Expression curriculum has eight lessons in unit 5: measurement and data. The
eight lessons are: measure length (metric system), metric measures of liquid volume and
mass, units of time, customary measures of length, customary measures of weight and
liquid volume, perimeter and area of rectangles, solve measurement problems, and focus
on mathematical practices.

Since I have so many students that struggle with word problems, I know my students will
have a hard time mastering word problems in relation to elapsed time. In order to help
my students with elapsed time I will break the units of time lesson into at least two
lessons. The first day I will focus on the units of time and introduce elapsed time, the
second day I will focus only on elapsed time. When I focus on elapsed time I will give
every student a mini-hand clock. We will literally work out every problem with the clock
so they can see the time pass in order to answer the question correctly. I will assess my
students by calling them up one by one and giving them an elapsed time word problem
and have them show me on their clock how to solve it. If any students are not able to
correctly solve the problem and show me how they solved it on the clock I will pull those
students into a group during intervention time to help them with this skill.

I will also break the perimeter and area of rectangles lesson into two lessons, one day
for perimeter and one day for area. I will teach a lesson on perimeter the first day by
having students figure out the formula. The next day I will teach a lesson on area by
having students figure out the formula. After both perimeter and area have been taught I
will give students two questions. They will need to independently find the area and
perimeter for both given rectangles. If the students are able to solve both problems I will
know they have mastered this skill. If any students cannot solve both problems I will pull
them into a math intervention group to help them with this skill.

3. Table 3: Student Pre and Post Assessment Scores Below

Student

Pre-assessment

Post-assessment

student
1
student
2
Student
4
student
5
student
6
student
7
student
8
student
9
student
10
student
12
student
13
student
14
student
15
student
16
student
17
student
18
student
20
student
21
student
22
student
23
student
24

Score

Points Possible

% Score

Score

Points Possible

% Score

22

23%

20

25

80%

22

23%

16

25

64%

11

22

50%

25

25

100%

22

14%

18

25

72%

10

22

45%

24

25

96%

22

36%

23

25

92%

22

18%

24

25

96%

22

32%

20

25

80%

22

14%

22

25

88%

11

22

50%

24

25

96%

22

23%

22

25

88%

22

36%

21

25

84%

22

18%

23

25

92%

22

32%

23

25

92%

22

23%

14

25

56%

22

27%

19

25

76%

10

22

45%

23

25

92%

22

14%

18

25

72%

22

27%

24

25

96%

22

23%

24

25

96%

22

5%

23

25

92%

As a class, my students made huge gains from the beginning to the end of this unit. The
interventions given in small group settings helped to fill in the gaps that most students
were missing at the beginning of the unit. The only students I feel concerned about are
student 2 and student 17. Student 17 does not surprise me, as this student had one of the
lowest scores for her NWEA math score. Student 2 however is a little more surprising.
Although Im thinking there was an alternate variable influencing student 2 on the day of
the post test, since this student has ADHD, I need to take responsibility as the teacher. If
I were to teach this unit again to these students I would provide individual tutoring for
student 17. Another thing I should have done differently for student 2 could have been to
allow him to take his post-test the next day, since I knew he was having an off day. These
two methods of redesign would hopefully have improved the outcome for students 2 and
17.
Source:
Fuson, Karen C. Math Expressions Common Core. Orlando: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2010.