You are on page 1of 3

Assessment

When I created my unit plan, I used a wide variety of assessments, including preassessments, formative assessments, assessments as learning, and summative assessments. On
this page, I’ve laid out how each lesson plan uses assessment in order to help my students meet
the objectives and goals that I had set for the unit plan and also how some of the assessments that
I chose to use can be applicable students’ daily lives. I’ve also included two rubrics that I used as
I was grading various assessments throughout the unit. Please click on the corresponding lesson
plan tab above to see the ways in which these assessments tie in with each specific lesson more
clearly.
Lesson 1:
Pre-assessment (for learning): Students will write down the ways that they think that plays and books
are similar and different (half of the class will write about similarities, half of the class will write about
differences. Teacher will ask the students to share what they wrote.
Formative (for learning): Students will define and apply various storytelling vocabulary in small groups
and present their assigned word to the class. Teacher will gain an understanding of the students’
familiarity of the vocabulary by the students’ ability to redefine the words using their own words and
their ability to find examples of the word being used in their own lives.
Formative (as learning): Students will move from side to side of the room based on their opinions during
the Motivation section of the lesson. Teacher will ask the students to defend their decision. Also serves
as Pre-assessment (for learning).
Summative (of learning): Before they leave, students will write down an explanation of whether or not
it’s possible for a story to exist without their vocabulary word being used/employed.

Lesson 2:
Pre-assessment (for learning): Students’ responses to the warm-up question
Formative (for learning): Reading Act 1 scene 1
Formative (as learning): Filling out the activity guide during the virtual tour and responding to the
teacher’s questions during the Development section of the lesson.
Summative (of learning): Students’ ability to respond to the exit ticket question in the Closure section of
the lesson by stating their opinion and giving evidence that can defend their opinion on the handout
based on what they saw/experienced during the virtual tour ).

Lesson 3:
Pre-assessment (for learning): Quiz based on the reading (allows the teacher to assess the
students’ comprehension of the text and allows the students to assess their own comprehension
of the text)
Formative (as learning): Completing the activity in which students compare and contrast the diary
entry and the play (encourages students to think about whether or not all texts contain equal
amounts of truth. This concept can be transferred to any subject area in which the students will be
required to do research, and it can also be applied to their everyday reading of texts.)
Summative (of learning): Activity guide for comparing the diary entry and the play

Lesson 4:
Pre-assessment (for learning): Students’ ability to accurately summarize the important events and
relationships presented in Act 1 scene 3 will allow for the assessment of students’ comprehension
of the text thus far.
Formative (for learning): Students will learn more about Anne as they write letters coming from
her perspective.
Formative (as learning): Students will learn about the value of various means of communication
during the Closure section of the lesson as well as completing the activities found in the
Development section of the lesson.
Summative (of learning): Students’ ability to answer the exit ticket question by providing
examples and concrete reasoning to defend their response. (Transferable outcome: Students will
learn how to defend their arguments based on textual facts. This will be applicable in any subject
area where research is required.)

Lesson 5:
Pre-assessment (for learning): Students’ ability to explain their connection to a character in Acts 13 during the Motivation section of the lesson (demonstrates students’ comprehension of the text
by asking them to think about why they feel connected to some characters and not to others’).
Formative (for learning): Reading Act 1 scene 4 aloud
Formative (as learning): During the Development section of the lesson, students will compare Act
1 scene 4 with a diary entry and also comparing this diary entry with a diary entry that they had
read in Lesson 3 (demonstrates students’ comprehension of Act 1 scene 3 as well as their
comprehension of the ideas presented in Lesson 3).
Summative (of learning): Students’ ability to give profound reasoning for whether or not they think
that the play version of Anne’s story contains just ask much truth as Anne’s diary entries do during
the Closure section of the lesson. (Real life application: Students will be encouraged to realize that
not all texts are created equal and that some sources contain more truth than others.)