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Table of Contents

Course Offering Listing 2016-2017 --- Quick Look-Up ....................................... 2
Philosophy of Education .................................................................................... 5
Planning a Program of Study ............................................................................. 5
Nondiscrimination Policy ................................................................................... 5
Minimum Graduation Requirements .................................................................. 5
Course Levels ................................................................................................... 5
Graduation Requirements ................................................................................. 5
Athletic Eligibility ............................................................................................... 6
Participation in College Athletics ....................................................................... 7
Course Withdrawals .......................................................................................... 7
Course Waiver ................................................................................................... 7
Report Cards .................................................................................................... 7
Grade Point Average/Class Rank ..................................................................... 7
Pass/Fail Option ............................................................................................... 8
Scheduling Timeline ......................................................................................... 9
Mercer County Technical School ...................................................................... 9
Department of Special Services ......................................................................... 10
Freshman and Sophomore Academies .............................................................. 10
Career Academies ............................................................................................ 11
Power School Scheduling for Students ............................................................. 12
Power School Scheduling for Parents ............................................................... 13
Naviance – Family Connection Instructions ....................................................... 14
Course Descriptions
Business Education ............................................................................... 15
English .................................................................................................. 17
Family & Consumer Science ................................................................. 20
Fine & Performing Arts .......................................................................... 22
Mathematics ......................................................................................... 26
Physical Education & Health ................................................................. 30
Science ................................................................................................. 31
Social Studies ....................................................................................... 35
Technology ........................................................................................... 38
World Languages .................................................................................. 40
Option II: Alternative Program of Study ............................................................. 44
Credit Recovery and Remediation ..................................................................... 45
Option II: Non-Traditional Academic Offerings .................................................. 46
Elective Courses 2016-2017 .............................................................................. 48
Important Scheduling Dates............................................................................... 49

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COURSE OFFERINGS 2016-2017 --- Quick Look-Up
Course

Credit

Grade

Page

Prerequisite

Business Education
Computer Applications ...................................................................... 0.5 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 15
Entrepreneurship ............................................................................... 0.5 .............. 11,12 .................. 15
International Business ....................................................................... 0.5 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 15
Marketing Education I........................................................................ 1.0 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 15
Marketing Education II: Cooperative Vocational Education ............... 1.0/3.0 ........ 12 ....................... 15
Honors Financial Accounting............................................................. 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 16 ........ B in Marketing
Principles of Investing ....................................................................... 0.5 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 16
Personal Finance I ............................................................................ 0.5 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 16 ........ Admin Recommendation
Personal Finance II ........................................................................... 0.5 .............. 11,12 .................. 16 ........ Personal Finance I
Sports Marketing and Management I ................................................ 0.5 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 16
Sports Marketing and Management II ............................................... 0.5 .............. 10.11.12 ............. 16 ........ Sports Mk/Mgmt I
Introduction to Social Media .............................................................. 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 16
English
English I, English I Honors ................................................................ 1.0 .............. 9 ......................... 17
English II, English II Honors .............................................................. 1.0 .............. 10 ....................... 17
English III, English III Honors ............................................................ 1.0 .............. 11 ....................... 17
English IV, English IV Honors............................................................ 1.0 .............. 12 ....................... 17
Advanced Placement Language and Composition ............................ 1.0 .............. 11 ....................... 17
Advanced Placement Literature and Composition............................. 1.0 .............. 12 ....................... 17
Dual Enrollment with MCCC: English 101 and English 102............... 1.0 .............. 12 ....................... 17
Contemporary Shakespeare ............................................................. 0.5 .............. 11,12 .................. 18
Gender Studies ................................................................................. 0.5 .............. 11,12 .................. 18
Multi-Ethnic Literature ....................................................................... 0.5 .............. 11,12 .................. 18
Mystery and Adventure ..................................................................... 0.5 .............. 11,12 .................. 18
Poetry ................................................................................................ 0.5 .............. 11,12 .................. 18
Publications/Journalism .................................................................... 1.0 .............. 12 ....................... 18
Public Speaking I & II ........................................................................ 0.5 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 18
Short Stories ..................................................................................... 0.5 .............. 11,12 .................. 19
Beginner ESL .................................................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 19
Intermediate ESL I & II ...................................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 19
Advanced ESL................................................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 19
Academic Support Reading ............................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 19
Graduation Portfolio in English .......................................................... 0.5 .............. 12 ....................... 19
Academic Support Language Arts ..................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 19
SAT/ACT Verbal Skills and Strategies .............................................. 0.5 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 19
Family & Consumer Science
Clothing Fabrics and Construction .................................................... 0.5 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 20
Culinary-Part I ................................................................................... 0.5 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 20
Culinary-Part II .................................................................................. 0.5 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 20 ........ Culinary Part I
Early Childhood Development I ......................................................... 1.0 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 20 ........ Application and Approval
Early Childhood Development II ........................................................ 2.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 20 ........ ECD Part I Grade B
Fashion Design ................................................................................. 0.5 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 20
Interior Design ................................................................................... 0.5 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 20
International Foods............................................................................ 1.0 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 21
Daily Living Skills .............................................................................. 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 21
Promising Teachers of Tomorrow ..................................................... 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 21
Transition Skills for Independence .................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 21
Study Skills........................................................................................ 0.5 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 21
Nutrition for Healthy Living ................................................................ 0.5 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 21
Fine and Performing Arts
Advanced Placement Music Theory .................................................. 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 22 ........ Interview and Recommendation
Contemporary Music Studio .............................................................. 1.0 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 22 ........ Audition
Jazz Studies ...................................................................................... 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 22
Music and the Human Experience..................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 22
Percussion Ensemble........................................................................ 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 22 ........ Experience in Music Class
String Orchestra ................................................................................ 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 22
Concert Band .................................................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 22 ........ Experience in Concert Band
Wind Ensemble ................................................................................. 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 23 ........ Experience in Concert Band
Concert Choir .................................................................................... 0.5/1.0 ........ 9,10,11,12 .......... 23
Ensemble .......................................................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 23

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Course

Credit

Grade

Page

Prerequisite

Fine and Performing Arts (continued)
Madrigal ............................................................................................ 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 23
Piano ................................................................................................. 0.5 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 23
Guitar ................................................................................................ 0.5 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 23
Theatre I ............................................................................................ 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 23
Theatre II ........................................................................................... 1.0 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 23 ........ Theatre I or Teacher Rec.
Stagecraft and Design ....................................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 23 ........ B in Fine Art Course
Advanced Theatre Studies ................................................................ 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 24
Musical Theatre ................................................................................. 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 24 ........ Two years of Theatre/Choir
Advanced Placement Studio Art ........................................................ 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 24 ........ B in Two Fine Art Classes
Commercial Art I................................................................................ 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 24
Commercial Art II............................................................................... 1.0 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 24 ........ B in Com. Art I
Commercial Art III.............................................................................. 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 24 ........ Com. I & II and Approval
Drawing I ........................................................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 24
Drawing II .......................................................................................... 1.0 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 25
Painting I ........................................................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 25
Painting II .......................................................................................... 1.0 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 25 ........ B+ in Painting I
Pottery and Sculpture I ...................................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 25
Pottery and Sculpture II ..................................................................... 1.0 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 25 ........ B in Pottery/Sculpture I
Pottery and Sculpture III .................................................................... 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 25 ........ B in Pottery/Sculpture I
Senior Art Experience ....................................................................... 1.0 .............. 12 ....................... 25
Mathematics
Algebra I ............................................................................................ 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 26 ........ Yes, see course description
Geometry .......................................................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 26 ........ C- in Algebra I
Geometry Honors .............................................................................. 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 26 ........ A+ in Algebra I
Algebra II ........................................................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 27 ........ Geometry or Geometry Honors
Algebra II Honors .............................................................................. 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 27 ........ B in Geometry/Honors
Pre-Calculus...................................................................................... 1.0 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 27 ........ A- in Algebra II
Pre-Calculus Honors ......................................................................... 1.0 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 27 ........ B in Algebra II Honors
Algebra II and Trigonometry .............................................................. 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 27 ........ C in Algebra II
Discrete Math .................................................................................... 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 27 ........ C in Algebra II
Probability and Statistics ................................................................... 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 27 ........ C in Algebra II / Trig
Calculus ............................................................................................ 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 27 ........ B in Pre-Calculus
Calculus Honors ................................................................................ 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 28 ........ A in Pre-Calculus
Advanced Placement Statistics ......................................................... 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 28 ........ B+ in Algebra II H or Pre-Calc
Advanced Placement Calculus AB .................................................... 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 28 ........ B+ in Pre-Calculus Honors
Advanced Placement Calculus BC .................................................... 1.0 .............. 12 ....................... 28 ........ B+ in AP Calculus AB
Academic Support Algebra I .............................................................. 1.0 .............. 9 ......................... 28
Academic Support Geometry ............................................................ 1.0 .............. 10 ....................... 28
Academic Support Algebra II ............................................................. 1.0 .............. 11 ....................... 29
Graduation Portfolio in Mathematics ................................................. 1.0 .............. 12 ....................... 29
SAT/ACT Math Skills and Strategies ................................................. 0.5 .............. 11,12 .................. 29 ........ Algebra I and Geometry
History of Mathematics ...................................................................... 0.5 .............. 11,12 .................. 29 ........ Geometry
Introduction to Computer Programming ............................................ 0.5 .............. 11,12 .................. 29 ........ Algebra II
Physical Education and Health
Health Education ............................................................................... 0.25 ............ 9,10,11,12 .......... 30
Physical Education ............................................................................ 0.75 ............ 9,10,11,12 .......... 30
Teen Prevention Education Program (Teen PEP) ............................. 1.0 .............. 11 ....................... 30 ........ Application and Interview
Lifetime Fitness ................................................................................. 0.5 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 30 ........ C in PE and Health
Fundamentals of Coaching ............................................................... 0.5 .............. 11,12 .................. 30
Science
Biology .............................................................................................. 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 31 ........ Grade 8 Science and Math
Biology Honors .................................................................................. 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 31 ........ Yes, see course description
Chemistry .......................................................................................... 1.0 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 31 ........ Biology/Honors and Algebra I
Chemistry Honors.............................................................................. 1.0 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 32 ........ Yes, see course description
Physics .............................................................................................. 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 32 ........ Bio/H, Chem/H and Geometry
Physics Honors ................................................................................. 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 32 ........ Yes, see course description
Environmental Science...................................................................... 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 32 ........ Biology/H and Chem/H
Advanced Placement Biology ............................................................ 1.2 .............. 11,12 .................. 32 ........ Yes, see course description
Advanced Placement Chemistry ....................................................... 1.2 .............. 11,12 .................. 33 ........ Yes, see course description
Advanced Placement Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism ............. 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 33 ........ Yes, see course description
Advanced Placement Physics C: Mechanics..................................... 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 33 ........ Yes, see course description
Advanced Placement Environmental Science ................................... 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 33 ........ Yes, see course description
Anatomy and Physiology ................................................................... 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 33 ........ Yes, see course description

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Course

Credit

Grade

Page

Prerequisite

Science (continued)
Genetics ............................................................................................ 0.5 .............. 11,12 .................. 34 ........ Yes, see course description
Forensic Science ............................................................................... 0.5 .............. 11,12 .................. 34 ........ Yes, see course description
Science in the Community-Biology .................................................... 1.0 .............. 9 ......................... 34
Science in the Community-Chemistry ............................................... 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 34
Science in the Community-Physics ................................................... 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 34
Social Studies
Modern World Civilizations ................................................................ 1.0 .............. 9 ......................... 35
Modern World Civilizations Honors ................................................... 1.0 .............. 9 ......................... 35 ........ Recommendation
American Civilization I ....................................................................... 1.0 .............. 10 ....................... 35
American Civilization I Honors .......................................................... 1.0 .............. 10 ....................... 35 ........ Recommendation
American Civilization II ...................................................................... 1.0 .............. 11 ....................... 35 ........ American Civilization II
Advanced Placement United States History ...................................... 1.0 .............. 11 ....................... 35 ........ Yes, see course description
Advanced Placement Economics ...................................................... 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 36 ........ Yes, see course description
Advanced Placement Government and Politics................................. 1.0 .............. 12 ....................... 36 ........ Yes, see course description
Advanced Placement European History ............................................ 1.0 .............. 12 ....................... 36 ........ Yes, see course description
Advanced Placement World History .................................................. 1.0 .............. 12 ....................... 36
Contemporary World Studies I .......................................................... 0.5 .............. 11,12 .................. 36 ........ Yes, see course description
Contemporary World Studies II ......................................................... 0.5 .............. 11,12 .................. 36 ........ Yes, see course description
Principles of Economics .................................................................... 0.5 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 36
Economics......................................................................................... 0.5 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 37
History and Film I .............................................................................. 0.5 .............. 11,12 .................. 37 ........ Yes, see course description
History and Film II ............................................................................. 0.5 .............. 11,12 .................. 37 ........ Yes, see course description
Human Behavior................................................................................ 0.5 .............. 11,12 .................. 37 ........ Yes, see course description
Sociology: An Exploration of Cultural Diversity in America ................ 0.5 .............. 11,12 .................. 37 ........ Yes, see course description
You and the Law I ............................................................................. 0.5 .............. 11,12 .................. 37 ........ Yes, see course description
Technology Education
Advanced Architectural and 3D Design ............................................. 1.0 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 38 ........ C in Drafting and AutoCAD
Applied Engineering .......................................................................... 1.0 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 38 ........ C in Inventions/Innovations
Inventions and Innovations ................................................................ 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 38
Introduction to Drafting and AutoCAD ............................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 38
Television Studio ............................................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 38
Introduction to Photography .............................................................. 0.5 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 38
Introduction to Videography .............................................................. 0.5 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 38
Advanced Photography & Editing ...................................................... 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 39 ........ C in Intro to Photography
Robotics and Programming ............................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 39 ........ C in Algebra I or teacher rec
World Languages
French I ............................................................................................. 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 40
French II ............................................................................................ 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 40 ........ C in French I
French III ........................................................................................... 1.0 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 40 ........ C in French II
French IV Honors .............................................................................. 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 40 ........ C in French III
Advanced Placement French Language and Culture ........................ 1.0 .............. 12 ....................... 40 ........ C in French IV Honors
Italian I............................................................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 40
Italian II.............................................................................................. 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 40 ........ C in Italian I
Italian III............................................................................................. 1.0 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 41 ........ C in Italian II
Italian IV Honors ................................................................................ 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 41 ........ C in Italian III
Latin I ................................................................................................ 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 41
Latin II ............................................................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 41 ........ C in Latin I
Latin III .............................................................................................. 1.0 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 41 ........ C in Latin II
Latin IV Honors.................................................................................. 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 41 ........ C in Latin III
Mandarin Chinese I ........................................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 41
Mandarin Chinese II .......................................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 41 ........ C in Mandarin Chinese I
Mandarin Chinese III ......................................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 42 ........ C in Mandarin Chinese II
Mandarin Chinese IV Honors ............................................................ 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 42 ........ C in Mandarin Chinese III
Advanced Placement Chinese Language ......................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 42
Spanish for Native Speakers ............................................................. 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 42
Conversational Spanish I .................................................................. 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 42
Spanish I ........................................................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 42
Spanish II .......................................................................................... 1.0 .............. 9,10,11,12 .......... 42 ........ C in Spanish I
Spanish III ......................................................................................... 1.0 .............. 10,11,12 ............. 42 ........ C in Spanish II
Spanish IV Honors ............................................................................ 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 43 ........ C in Spanish III
Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Culture ...................... 1.0 .............. 11,12 .................. 43 ........ C in Spanish IV

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Philosophy of Education
Education is a lifelong process that neither begins nor ends with the Lawrence Township Schools. It is a cooperative effort
involving home, school and community. Our mission is to provide students with the opportunities to acquire the knowledge
and skills to become responsible lifelong learners in a pluralistic society. We believe our schools must provide a nurturing
environment that fosters active learning and positive student-teacher interaction while respecting the developing nature of the
learner. Central to our mission is the pursuit of excellence. This is achieved through an integrated curriculum that stimulates
intellectual inquiry, promotes an understanding of self and others, and encourages physical well-being and the development
of conscience.

Planning a Program of Study
Planning an appropriate program of study involves a collaborative effort between home and school. A student’s selection of
courses should be based on careful consideration of the student’s aptitudes and abilities , personal interests, and career
aspirations.
In selecting a course of study, it is recommended that the following points be considered:





Courses fulfill both state and local graduation requirements.
Prerequisites for a course have been met or exceeded.
Courses are intellectually stimulating and personally enriching.
Courses are relevant to post-graduate plans.
Courses, not instructors, are chosen. Requests for schedule changes based on personnel issues will not be granted.
Selected courses are discussed with those who can provide valuable insight, such as teachers, subject area
supervisors, and school counselors.

Nondiscrimination Policy
The Lawrence Township Public Schools will not discriminate on the basis of race, creed, color, national origin, ancestry, age,
marital status, affectional or sexual orientation, familial status, or sex, or on the basis of handicap, as defined by and subject
to state and federal laws.

Minimum Scheduling Requirements
It is recommended that every Lawrence High School student carry a minimum of 6.75 credits per year in order to meet the 27
credit requirement for graduation. Semester courses can run first and/or second semester, depending upon the number of
student requests for enrollment.

Course Levels
Course level placement will be based on teacher recommendations with consideration given toward a demonstrated
competency within that discipline of study. These competencies are generally shown through classroom participation, proven
record of academic achievement, successful completion of the prerequisite courses, and demonstrated willingness.

Graduation Requirements
In order for a student to graduate from Lawrence High School and receive the state endorsed Lawrence Township Board of
Education diploma, each student must:
For the classes of 2017-2020, students must satisfy the state requirement of demonstrating proficiency in both English
Language Arts and Math with a qualifying passing score as listed:

(see grid on next page)

5

Mathematics

English Language Arts
PARCC ELA Grade 9 >= 750 (Level 4) or

PARCC Algebra I >= 750 (Level 4) or

PARCC ELA Grade 10 >= 750 (Level 4) or

PARCC Geometry >= 750 (Level 4) or

PARCC ELA Grade 11 >= 725 (Level 3) or

PARCC Algebra II >= 725 (Level 3) or

SAT Reading * >= 400 or

SAT Math* >= 400 or

ACT Reading or ACT PLAN Reading >= 16 or

ACT or ACT PLAN Math >= 16 or

Accuplacer Write Placer >= 6 or

Accuplacer Elementary Algebra >= 76 or

PSAT10 Reading or PSAT/NMSQT Reading** >= 40 or
PSAT10 Reading or PSAT/NMSQT Reading***>=22 or

PSAT10 Math or PSAT/NMSQT math** >= 40 or
PSAT10 Math or PSAT/NMSQT math ***>=22 or

ACT Aspire Reading >= 422 or

ACT Aspire Math >= 422 or

ASVAB-AFQT Composite >= 31 or

ASVAB-AFQT Composite >= 31 or

Meet the Criteria of the NJDOE Portfolio Appeal

Meet the Criteria of the NJDOE Portfolio Appeal

Note: * SAT taken prior to March 2016; ** PSAT taken prior to October 2015; ***PSAT taken after October 2015. The
College Board will establish new ‘threshold scores’ in May 2016 for the new SAT.
B. All students must pass 27 credits of high school coursework to graduate. The course work must include the following
course requirements:
1. English: 4 credits

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.

Mathematics: 3 credits, including content equivalent to Algebra I and Geometry
Science : 3 credits Students must take Biology, Chemistry, and a third year of a lab science.
United States History: 2 credits
World History: 1 credit
World Languages: 1 credit
Physical Education & Health/Driver Education: 1 credit for each year of public high school enrollment in
New Jersey
Visual, Fine or Performing Arts: 1 credit
st
21 Century Life/ Careers or Technical: 1 credit
Financial or Economic Literacy: 0.5 credits
Elective Courses: 6.5 credits

Note: Minimum graduation requirements should not be confused with college/university admission requirements. The general
rule for most four-year colleges/universities is that applicants should have completed a minimum of 16 to 18 academic units
upon graduation. Normally, academic units are considered to be full and half-year courses in college preparatory Math,
Science, English, Social Studies, and World Languages.

Athletic Eligibility
The Lawrence Township Board of Education considers athletics and other competitive extra-curricular activities to be an
integral part of the total educational program. As a result, these activities are under the same administration and control as
other school programs and closely articulated.
Any student who wishes to compete in interscholastic sports must meet the minimum credit requirements established by the
New Jersey Interscholastic Athletic Association. A student must have passed 6.75 credits in the previous year (2015-2016) to
be eligible for participation in the sports offered in the fall and/or winter. To be eligible for sports offered in the spring, a
student must have passed the equivalent of 6.75 credits in the first semester. Seniors may carry less than 6.75 credits in their
senior year, but have to be on track for graduation and must pass all of their current classes to be eligible for athletics, per
NJSIAA.
Transfer Students: All students who transfer from another school district and are interested in participating in athletics must
meet with the Athletic Director and school counselor to determine if eligibility requirements have been met.
In addition to academic requirements, all potential athletes must be district residents, pass a sports physical exam each year,
and complete a permission form / online packet to be eligible to participate and/or tryout.

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Participation in College Athletics
Students interested in participating in college athletic programs regulated by the National Collegiate Athletic Association
(NCAA) must be certified through their Initial Eligibility Clearinghouse. Students must achieve a certain level of academic
achievement in high school in order to participate in college athletics. Division I athletes must have a 2.3 Core Academic GPA
and must earn a combined SAT or ACT sum score that matches the core course grade-point average and test-score sliding
scale. Division II athletes must have a 2.0 Core Academic GPA and must earn combined SAT score of 820 or an ACT sum
score of 68. Division III athletes have GPA, SAT and ACT requirements as well. Interested students should see their school
counselor in order to determine if they will meet the initial eligibility standards. Additional information may also be obtained at
www.ncaaclearinghouse.net. Students can and should register for the Clearinghouse as soon as they consider possibly
playing a college sport, as early as their freshman year. Coaches, parents, and prospective athletes should work closely with
the Guidance Department and the Athletic Department on college admissions.

Course Withdrawals
Students may withdraw from a class within the second week of the first and third marking periods. (Third marking period
pertains to semester courses only). After two weeks, student course withdrawals are recorded as Withdraw Pass (WP) or
Withdraw Fail (WF) on the student’s official transcript.

Course Waiver
Students will progress in the appropriate sequence of courses based on having successfully earned the necessary grade in
the prerequisite course, and by obtaining the recommendation of the current subject area teacher. When a student wishes to
follow a certain sequence of courses without one or both of these requirements occurring, the student may then apply to
waive into a course. The following guidelines must be followed when applying for a course waiver:
1. The student and parent/guardian must confer with the student’s counselor and obtain the course waiver form.
2. Completed waiver forms must be time stamped by the receiving Guidance secretary and submitted to the Supervisor
of Guidance by June 3rd. Any waivers received after this date will not be accepted.
3. Students who choose the Option II path during the summer, forgo the opportunity to apply for a course waiver since
the deadline cannot be met.
Course waivers are subject to the approval of the appropriate high school administrators. The decision to grant the waiver will
be based in part on space availability in the requested course. If the waiver is granted and the student’s schedule is changed,
this change is permanent, and student will not be permitted to withdraw from this course. Therefore, it is expected that the
student will do what is necessary in order to be successful in the class.

Report Cards
Student report cards are issued four times each year. A student’s marking period and exam grades will be used to compute
the final grades. Percentages will be totaled and divided in order to determine the grade for the year. Marking period grades
count as 20% of the total grade and exams as 10% each. The following grading system is used:
A+
A
AB+
B
BC+

= 97-100
= 93-96
= 90-92
= 87-89
= 83-86
= 80-82
= 77-79

C
CD+
D
DF

=
=
=
=
=
=

73-76
70-72
67-69
63-66
60-62
59 and below

Parents and students are encouraged to access grades throughout the school year through the Parent Access on
PowerSchool. Instructions for obtaining a parent account can be found at www.ltps.org.

Grade Point Average/Class Rank
Both weighted and un-weighted grade point averages (WGPAs and GPAs) are calculated. WGPA is based on an openended scale beginning with 0.00 and having no ceiling. Only the final grade achieved in each course is used to compute the
GPA and the WGPA. All graded (non-pass) courses, with the exception of Physical Education, are used in computing the
WGPA. Coursework completed outside the parameters of the LHS academic day do not count towards the WGPA or GPA.

7

The sum of the quality points is divided by the sum of the credits attempted to form the grade point average. Courses are
weighted according to their difficulty per the following quality point values.

Grade

Regular

Honors

Advanced Placement

A+

4.2

4.7

5.2

A

4.0

4.5

5.0

A-

3.8

4.3

4.8

B+

3.2

3.7

4.2

B

3.0

3.5

4.0

B-

2.8

3.3

3.8

C+

2.2

2.7

3.2

C

2.0

2.5

3.0

C-

1.8

2.3

2.8

D+

1.2

1.7

2.2

D

1.0

1.5

2.0

D-

0.8

1.3

1.8

F

0.0

0.0

0.0

The student’s standing in his/her graduating class is determined by the cumulative weighted grade point average (CWGPA).
Class rank is formulated by arranging the CWGPA of all students and numbering them in order from highest to lowest. The
student with the highest CWGPA is ranked number one. If two or more students have the same CWGPA when calculated, the
students will be given the same rank.
Transfer Students: Transcripts of incoming students are reviewed on an individual basis with appropriate credit and weight
assigned to completed courses. An honors (or any other type of) course completed at one school will receive the
appropriate/equivalent weight given at LHS. A student must be in attendance at LHS prior to beginning their senior year for a
class rank to be assigned.

Pass/Fail Option
Students interested in pursuing the Pass/Fail option must first meet with their school counselor to discuss this decision. No
student will be allowed to take a course required for graduation under this option.




Students who wish to take a course Pass/Fail must obtain this form from the Guidance Department. Students must
return this form (with all appropriate signatures) to the Supervisor of Guidance. This option must be chosen prior to
the first day of school.
Students may elect to take one course each semester on a Pass/Fail basis. If a student elects a full-year course, no
other course may be taken under the Pass/Fail option once the Pass/Fail option has been approved and the class has
begun. Students may not request to “change back” to a traditional letter grade.
Students choosing the P/F option for a particular course will receive a P or F for all quarter, semester, exam and final
grades associated with that course.
In order to receive a passing grade, students must fully participate in all aspects of the course, including all
assessments and projects.
Grades of P or F will not be included for computation of the grade point average.

8

Scheduling Timeline

Initial Course Recommendations by Staff

Registration Orientations

February 2, 2016

Students- Classes of 2017-2019
Students- Class of 2020
Parents - Class of 2020

February 8-11, 2016
February 25, 2016
February 25, 2016

Course Selections with Counselor

February-April 2016

Finalized Course Recommendations by Staff

April 29, 2016

Student Course Requests Sent Home

May 20, 2016

Course Waiver Deadline

June 3, 2016

Course Request Changes Deadline

June 3, 2016

Pass/Fail Option Deadline

Prior to the First Day of School

Schedule Appeal Deadline

Two weeks into the course

Mercer County Technical School (MCTS)
Vocational School
In partnership with the educational, business, health care, industrial, cultural and labor communities, MCTS enables students
to acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for career success in the ever-changing technological world. This
shared-time program provides Juniors and Seniors an opportunity to obtain a focused career education while still obtaining
the breadth and depth of coursework offered at Lawrence High School. Course descriptions and applications can be found
online at www.mcts.edu.
The following one- and two-year programs are offered through MCTS:

Arthur R. Sypek Center

Applied Academics
Automotive Collision Technology
Automotive Technology
Automotive Technology at Hopewell Valley HS
Automotive Technology Fundamentals
Baking and Dining Services
Building Maintenance Trades
Business Office Applications & Technology

Cosmetology
Criminalistics and Criminal Science
Culinary Arts
Graphic Arts Technology
Health & Child Care
Landscape Maintenance & Design
Retail Food Marketing

Assunpink Center

Architectural/Engineering Design
Carpentry
Cosmetology
Diesel Technology

Electrical Construction
Health Occupations (1 year)
Health Science Academy (Grades 9-12)
Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning & Refrigeration

Career Prep
Career Prep is a program of the Mercer County Technical Schools in partnership with Mercer County Community College
(MCCC). The program offers high school seniors an opportunity to enroll in courses at MCCC. This is an exceptional elective
opportunity for students to simultaneously earn high school and college credits. College credits can be applied toward MCCC
associate degree programs or transferred to four-year colleges and universities. Students should have a 3.25 GPA and good
attendance for acceptance into the program. Programs include:
Advertising and Design
Business Studies
Communication

Fire Science Technology
Gaming
Hospitality Management

9

Criminal Justice
Culinary & Pastry Arts
Dance
Entertainment Technology: Music Technology
Entertainment Technology: Technical Theater
Exercise Technology
Fashion Apparel Design
Fashion Merchandising

Information Technology
New Media and Journalism
Photography
Pre-Engineering
Radio and Television Production
Theatre
Visual Arts

Department of Special Services
The Department of Special Services offers many options on the educational continuum. The Child Study Team, with input
from students, teachers, parents and guardians, will determine which placement would best address a student’s needs.
Placement options include general education, in-class assistance, and pull out replacement classes. The continuum of
educational placement options will be implemented in the following departments: English, Math, Science, and Social Studies.
Each student’s educational program will be implemented as per his/her Individualized Education Plan (IEP).

FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE ACADEMIES
th

th

The mission of the 9 & 10 grade academies is to provide students with personalized educational experiences and with
career exploration opportunities at Lawrence High School.
The focus of the Freshman Academy is to personalize the educational experience the incoming freshmen and assist them in
adjusting to the high school learning environment. This small learning community within the comprehensive high school links
students to peers and teachers in a disciplined and nurturing environment.
The focus of the Sophomore Academy is to provide character education, spirit activities, and career awareness experiences.
Through character education, sophomores find ways to volunteer for community service organizations. Spirit activities foster a
th
sense of community and pride within the school. Career Awareness experiences help students to transition to the 11 and
th
12 grade career academies as well as navigate the course selection process at Lawrence High School in preparation for
future college planning.
FRESHMAN ACADEMY COURSES
th
Within a school day, 9 grade students are required to take several courses in order to meet New Jersey and local graduation
requirements. In addition, they can select several elective courses to meet their individual interests, and both personal and
academic needs.
th

The typical 9 grade schedule consists of the following courses.





English
Modern World Civilizations
Mathematics
Biology
Physical Education and Health I
Classical or World Language

SOPHOMORE ACADEMY COURSES
th
Within a school day, 10 grade students are required to take several courses in order to meet New Jersey and local
graduation requirements. In addition, they can select several elective courses to meet their individual interests, and both
personal and academic needs.
th

The typical 10 grade schedule consists of the following courses, and may include courses previously identified under the
Freshman Academy heading.





English
American Civilization I
Mathematics
Chemistry
Physical Education and Driver Education
Electives

10

CAREER ACADEMIES
Junior and Senior Students
th

th

Beginning with the 2011-2012 school year, Lawrence High School’s 11 and 12 graders are afforded an opportunity to
participate in one of three career-based academies. Each career academy allows students who share similar interests and
aspirations to collaborate and learn through shared experiences. Coordinated efforts are made to bring in outside resources,
such as guest speakers and real world applications into the classroom.

The Academy of Arts and Humanities
In the Academy of Arts and Humanities, which encompasses the Arts, Communications, Social Studies, and English, students
will learn to be reflective critical thinkers who will use their learning and shared experiences to foster a global perspective in
the areas of communications and the humanities. The curriculum is both broad in scope and comprehensive in content,
focusing on the human experience. The academy provides students with an opportunity to explore the liberal arts through an
intensive, issues-oriented approach.
The Academy of Arts and Humanities provides experiences in a number of college and career paths through the various
programs throughout the year. A sample of future studies and careers include lawyers, journalists, educators, psychologists,
art historians, performing artists, or graphic designers. Juniors will get the opportunity to participate in an Academy Structured
Learning Experience, where they will work in a collaborative project-based setting that will prepare them for future careers.

The Academy of Business and International Studies
The Academy of Business and International Studies seeks to build an educated, competent, competitive, and inspired
workforce to meet the needs of the 21st century. The academy will focus on post-secondary opportunities that feature
business and international studies applications. It strives to provide a global perspective that is responsive to the diversity of
issues in the American and overseas markets. This aim is achieved through curricular implementations, such as the World
Language, Business, and Finance options, along with the exploration of job-shadowing and internship opportunities. The
integration of classroom instruction with engaging and meaningful workplace/post-secondary experiences is critical steps in
preparing students for the demands of a growing global economy.
The Academy of Business and International Studies provides experiences in a number of college and career paths via the
various programs held throughout the year. Relevant post-secondary studies and careers include business administration,
management & administration, finance, hospitality & tourism, accounting, marketing, management, sales and service,
international law, international Not-for-Profit, international outreach careers, anthropology, and sociology. The Juniors and
Seniors involved in the Academy will have the opportunity to meet with professionals from the community, participate in and
plan events aimed at cultivating relationships with the international community, and engage in business themed experiences.

The Academy of Science and Technology
Students in the Academy of Science and Technology will apply their knowledge in science, math, technology, engineering,
and the health sciences to become competent and capable citizens in a technology-dependent society. The Academy of
Science and Technology’s approach includes team-based activities that will immerse students in hands-on, problem solving
learning. Students will have opportunities to create, invent, and solve challenging real-world problems in the fields of math,
science and engineering.
The Academy of Science and Technology provides experiences in a number of college and career paths through their various
programs throughout the year. Students who choose to participate in this academy may aspire to have careers as CISCO
networkers, astronomers, physicists, chemists, electricians as well as other science and technology-based professions.
Juniors will get the opportunity to participate in an Academy Structured Learning Experience, where they will work in a
collaborative project-based setting that will prepare them for future careers.

11

PowerSchool Scheduling For Students
The following guidelines are identified to assist the students in the selection of their high school courses. Be sure to read
and use the Course of Study book for course descriptions and prerequisite criteria, etc.
1. Students should sign in to the PowerSchool Student website the first time with their username (Student ID #) and password
(Student ID#). Having trouble logging on? See your counselor as soon as possible for assistance.
2. From the home page, you should select the “Class Registration” link to see the following (See big arrow below).
3. Next, across from each subject, it says “Click the edit button to request a course”. Follow the arrow all the way over to the
right and you will see a little box with a “pencil” in it. This is the edit button. Click this edit button.
4. Once clicking the “edit” button, you will see the courses in which the student can select from this particular subject area.
Be sure you meet the criteria for the courses you choose (prerequisite). Do this for each subject area needed—very
important.
5. Once selections have been made, the student must click on the “Submit” button. Do not forget this step! If you do not
click “submit” then all of your choices will not be saved nor sent! You are finished!

Note: Teacher recommendations for English, Social Studies, Math, & Science may not be available at this time, however, when
those recommendations do become available, the high school counselors will add them to the students’ list of requests. On
the course selection screen, parents and students should focus on World Languages, Elective choices, and Alternates only at
this time.
If students have any questions or concerns, they can be immediately addressed by the high school counseling staff or building
administrators. Students may also email their (or any) identified High School Counselor:
a.
b.
c.
d.

Mrs. Welsh dwelsh@ltps.org
Ms. Gonzalez agonzalez@ltps.org
Mr. D’Angelo cdangelo@ltps.org
Ms. Cobin mcobin@ltps.org

12

PowerSchool Scheduling For Parents
By using PowerSchool, the district’s student information system, you can access your student’s grades,
attendance, assignments, scheduling, and more in real time!
Here’s how: Go to—

http://pss.ltps.org

---PowerSchool Quickstart Single Sign-On for Parents.

These are instructions for setting up your NEW parent access account in PowerSchool.
these steps, even if you only have one child enrolled.

Note: You must complete

1. From the PowerSchool Student and Parent sign in page:

Click the Create Account tab beside Sign In-- then click the Create Account button again. (Note: Each parent/guardian can
create their own account as long as they have each of their children’s Access ID and Access Password---which is actually
their students ID #’s—for both ID and Password).
2. See Box below and to the left (Create Parent Account) to use as a reference:

Enter your First Name, Last Name, and Email address. (Must be valid email address).

Enter a User Name (Your choice of user name, it must be unique and CANNOT include the @ symbol).

 Enter a Password that has at least 6 characters. Keep your password similar to other passwords you use.
3. See Box below and to the right (Link Students to Account) to use as a reference:

Enter the student’s first name only along with the Access ID and Access Password (student should know this—their
student ID #’s). Please note that this is CASE SENSITIVE. Do this for each child.

Select the “relationship to the student” and then click ENTER.

4. Once your account has been created:

You must log in once again, this time using your newly created User Name and Password.
If you forget your username or password, click on-- Having trouble signing in? -- (located beneath the sign in screen-- see
the box below to use as a reference).

*Please note: PowerSchool access is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. At times throughout the school year, PowerSchool may be unavailable for short
periods of time due to routine maintenance, and/or periods of high volume usage.

13

Naviance - Family Connection

The Lawrence Township Public Schools utilizes Family Connections from Naviance, a web-based service, to assist our
students in making decisions about college and career. From the school counseling office, information that is
collected is tracked and analyzed in order to provide high quality supports and resources pertaining to college and
career plans. All students and their parents are encouraged to utilize this resource throughout their middle and high
school years.
Features:
Resume Building
Learning Styles
ScatterGrams
Student Journals
Course Interests

Career Exploration
Future Planning
Acceptance History
School Surveys
So----------

Career Interest Profiler
College Search
Scholarship Search
Career Academies
Much--------------

Personality Types
College Match
List of Test Scores
Career Events
More! -------------

Logging in to Naviance:

All middle and high school students will be provided with a unique registration code by their school counselor
(via email). If you haven’t had this emailed to you yet, please contact your school counselor immediately to
get one sent to you via email.

The web address for Family Connection for our school district is:

Once you log in, you will then be asked to create a new password of your own, and provide your (valid) email
in order to sign up.

Students and their parents may now explore information related to college and career, receive important
email blasts from the Guidance office, as well as update all of their personal information.

http://connection.naviance.com/ltps

Frequently Asked Questions:
Q: What must you do if you have difficulty logging into your account?
A: See your school counselor. Your user-name and password can be reassigned from their secure login.
Q: How do I access Naviance (as a parent)?
A: Parents may access Naviance by sharing their student's username and password. Parent information can also be
added under the “about me” tab. In this way, parents will also be included on important e-mail blasts.

Stay Connected with Naviance!
14

BUSINESS EDUCATION OFFERINGS
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: Success or failure in a chosen career is not always related to the performance skills one brings
to a job and/or to post-secondary education. Future job success involves an appreciation of the need to master many of the
technological advances relating to business. Business Education today helps prepare students for satisfying careers and
success as working citizens in a complex society. We also strive to emphasize those factors related to job success beyond
the mechanical skills and knowledge so often associated with courses in this area of study. Business Education subjects are
recommended for all students, especially those having an interest in the business world.
Students enrolled in Marketing classes become members of the nationally recognized marketing education youth organization
DECA. Students will participate at the DECA Regional Leadership Conference in the areas of finance, marketing, and
entrepreneurship. By participating in DECA activities, students develop self-esteem, character, leadership and communication
skills.
st

All courses in Business Education fulfill the 21 Century Life & Careers or Technical requirement for graduation.
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
Grades 9-12
0.5 Credit

H65021

MARKETING EDUCATION I
Grades 10-12
1.0 Credit

Semester

H65050

Year

This course is designed to develop computer keyboarding
skills so that students may use the skill in their personal
lives, future educational needs, or as a supportive skill at
their jobs. Early in the course, emphasis will be placed on
keyboard letter and number techniques, as well as
formatting tables, reports, outlines, enumerations,
bibliographies, etc. These skills will be applied to a
variety of hands-on computer experiences utilizing an
integrated software package. Emphasis during this phase
of the course will be on integrating word processing,
database
and
spreadsheet
components
while
incorporating simple graphics. Students will then create,
revise, modify, and print from the three software
components.

This course is recommended for those interested in, and
is preparation for, Marketing Education II. This course
provides a comprehensive approach to the subject matter
suggested for marketing education classes by the
National Marketing Education Association. Included in
this instruction are the areas of economics, global
marketing, market research, product development, and
merchandising.

H65115

H65060

ENTREPRENEURSHIP
Grades 11-12
0.5 Credit

Note: Students enrolled in Marketing I are required to

work a minimum of one day a week in the LHS Student
Store and are responsible for all aspects of store
maintenance.
MARKETING EDUCATION II: COOPERATIVE
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
Grade 12
1.0 or 3.0 Credits

Semester

This course provides a comprehensive program that can
be taken as a 1 or 3 credit class.

This advanced management course is recommended for
students interested in operating their own business. This
course provides a comprehensive approach to the subject
matter suggested for the 21st century in which students
will need to work for themselves, not for someone else.
Included in this instruction are the areas of economics,
market analysis, legal requirements, risk assessment,
finance, and strategies for forms of business ownership.
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
Grades 9-12
0.5 Credit

Year

In the 1 credit class, students receive class instruction
and are members of the national organization DECA.
In the 3 credit class, the course provides a three-pronged
approach (content area, on-the-job training, and DECA) to
the subject matter suggested for marketing education
classes by the National Marketing Education Association.
Students in this course are provided with an opportunity
to attend school and work in the field of marketing.

H65110
Semester

This course teaches the basics of international business
focusing on cultural, political, and social similarities and
differences on a regional basis. Some of the concepts to
be explored will be consumer behavior, market
segmentation, the marketing process, foreign distribution,
advertising and selling, international career planning,
technology in global business, organized labor, and the
challenges of multinational enterprises.

Included in this instruction are the areas of advertising,
visual merchandising, human relations, public relations,
and problems related to their on-the-job training. The
students are employed, where possible, in a job directly
related to their career objective. Students interested in
this program must participate in an application/interview
process.
Students enrolled in Marketing I & II become members of
the nationally recognized marketing education youth
organization DECA. As a member, the student

15

participates in the operation of the Student Store and
competes at various conferences with other marketing
education students around the state in competitive events
such as Marketing, Fashion Modeling, Apparel and
Accessories,
and
Restaurant
Management.
By
participating in DECA activities, students develop selfesteem, character, leadership, and communication skills.
HONORS FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

PERSONAL FINANCE II
Grades 11-12
0.5 Credit

This course is designed specifically for students to
explore practical applications of financial literacy
knowledge. As individuals making financial decisions in
their lives, this course focuses on financial skills such as
consumer credit, investments, budgeting, and housing
through hands-on experiences. Students will expand on
their skills and knowledge in the area of financial literacy
through projects and problem solving activities.

H65132
Year

All businesses must make decisions affecting the
management of a firm’s assets, liabilities and cash flow.
Since virtually all business decisions have a financial
dimension, an understanding of the financial implications
of a decision is crucial for effective management. This
course focuses on financial problem–solving and decision
analysis through a case study approach. Students will
analysis profit and loss statements and other real world
data to make strategic decisions that will maintain a
business’ financial sustainability. Students interested in
the world of business will gain a variety of skills and
experiences to provide them with a strong foundation for
post-secondary studies and a future business career.

Prerequisite: Personal Finance I.
SPORTS MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT I H65090
Grades 9-12
0.5 Credit
Semester
Sports Marketing and Management is a specialized
course for students with a career interest in the business
of sports.
In addition to providing a fundamental
knowledge of the business of sports, this course is
designed to equip students with entry-level competencies
in the areas of sponsorship, promotion, advertising, legal
contracts, agents, event marketing, communications,
management and leadership styles, and the management
of sports organizations. Students will be expected to
compete in DECA Sports Marketing Events.

Prerequisite:

B or better in Marketing or another
Business Education course.
PRINCIPLES OF INVESTING
Grades 9-12
0.5 Credit

H65120

SPORTS MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT II H65100
Grades 10-12
0.5 Credit
Semester

Semester

This course fulfills the NJDOE economics graduation
requirement. This course emphasizes the basic concepts
of investing. This step-to-step approach leads the
students into the fascinating world of financial planning
and investing. Students will learn about stocks and how
they relate to America’s business structure. Students will
also learn about electronic investing. The Stock Market
Game is a supplementary resource to provide realistic
hands-on experiences for students.
PERSONAL FINANCE I
Grades 9-12
0.5 Credit

H90118

Semester

This course is designed specifically for students who are
interested in further exploration in the area of Sports
Marketing and Management, as well as obtaining
practical real-work experience. In addition to reinforcing
the Sports Marketing and Management principles studied
in the previous course, this curriculum is designed to
equip students with competencies in the areas of
promotional methods in sports, media relations, marketing
through endorsements and sponsorships, ethics in sport
administration, and licensing and logos used in the sport
industry. Students will be expected to compete in DECA
Sports Marketing events.

H90117

Semester

This course satisfies the graduation requirement for
financial literacy. All individuals must make financial
decisions in their lives and therefore must have a good
understanding of the everyday finances. Students will
investigate topics such as banking, owning a car,
managing consumer credit, owning credit cards, financial
planning, housing options, investments, getting and
managing a job, insurance, different types of purchasing
and taxes. The goal of this course is to guide students in
building a strong foundation in logical thinking and
problem solving that will enable them to make good
decisions in their daily lives.

Prerequisite: Sports Marketing and Management I.
INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL MEDIA
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit
st

H65055
Year

Social media is a 21 century application that continues to
have a significant impact on society.
This course
explores historical perspective, the language of social
media, the influence of social media on business and
marketing, audience engagement, and media analysis, as
well as legal and ethical considerations of social media
use.

Prerequisite: Administration Recommendation.

16

ENGLISH OFFERINGS
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: The English Program consists of a core curriculum required of all students. These courses
include vocabulary development, research skills, reading, writing, speaking, listening, study skills, and the study of literature.
Each of the required courses addresses the state-mandated core proficiencies. Besides the required courses, students may
select an elective designed to meet their needs and interests.
Prerequisites: Students wishing to take an honors level course must have achieved at least a “B+” in their previous course.
ENGLISH I
ENGLISH HONORS I
Grade 9
1.0 Credit

H10020
H10010

values, beliefs, and emotions are expressed through art
forms and historical and social movements. In addition to
exploring a variety of fiction and nonfiction texts, students
will also view videos, analyze art, listen to music, and
discuss philosophy.

Year

This survey course provides students with a solid
foundation of literary analysis and writing skills that they
will utilize throughout their high school studies in all
subject areas. Students read short stories, novels, plays,
poems, and essays through which critical thinking and
problem solving skills are developed.

Honors: Whereas the English IV course materials are
more contemporary, the Honors course focuses students
upon classical and ancient literature from around the
globe.

Honors:

Students will participate in Socratic seminars
and will be expected to do independent outside research
as part of their class participation.
ENGLISH II
ENGLISH HONORS II
Grade 10
1.0 Credit

ADVANCED PLACEMENT LANGUAGE AND
COMPOSITION
Grade 11
1.0 Credit

H10050
H10040

This course is for 11 grade students wishing to challenge
themselves at the college level and may be taken in lieu
of English III or English III Honors. AP Language focuses
on nonfiction works with a high concentration of writing for
different purposes and audiences, reading complex texts,
elements of rhetoric and linguistics, analyzing effective
text structures for complexity and effect on style. The
texts for this course are nonfiction and include such works
as letters, diaries, histories, biographies, sermons,
speeches, journalism, social criticism, and memoirs will
also be included.

Year

Honors: Students will be expected to do independent
outside research as part of their class participation.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT LITERATURE AND
COMPOSITION
Grade 12
1.0 Credit

H10060
H10070

H10090
Year

AP Language and Composition is recommended, but not
required, for students who wish to enroll in Advanced
Placement Literature and Composition.
Like AP
Language, this course is for students who wish to take a
college course while still in high school and the course
prepares students for the AP examination in May. Unlike
AP Language, which focuses on nonfiction, the focus of
AP Literature is upon fiction. Students will conduct critical
reading and analysis of representative works in American,
British, and world literature.

Year

How has our literary heritage shaped society and
philosophical thought? In their junior year, students will
explore our shared heritage as speakers of English
through discussions of the evolution of the English
language and its role as a reflection of society. Students
will focus on all of the major literary forms including
novels, short stories, drama, poetry, and non-fiction.

Honors:

Students will be expected to write literary
analyses of selected texts.
ENGLISH IV
ENGLISH HONORS IV
Grade 12
1.0 Credit

Year

th

What does it mean to be an American? The goal of this
course is to present an overview of the historical and
diverse cultural background of the American literary
tradition. Students will read a variety of literary forms
including novels, short stories, drama, poetry, and
nonfiction from pre-colonial times to modern day.

ENGLISH III
ENGLISH HONORS III
Grade 11
1.0 Credit

H10095

DUAL ENROLLMENT with MCCC:
ENGLISH 101
ENGLISH 102
Grade 12
1.0 Credit

H10110
H10120
Year

MCCENG101
MCCENG102
Year

This course, offered in conjunction with Mercer County
th
Community College, can be taken in lieu of 12 grade
English. Students will have the opportunity to gain six
th
college credits at MCCC while earning LHS 12 grade
English credit. In English 101, students will work upon
improving their analytical writing skills; this is the

What does it mean to be a global citizen? In their final
year, students will analyze what it means to be a part of
the world community through an exploration of texts from
every continent. Emphasis is placed on how human

17

foundation of their writing for the rest of college,
regardless of major. In English 102, students will read
and discuss works of fiction, specifically short stores,
poetry, and drama. Students enrolled in the course must
take MCCC’s placement test in the spring and will be
responsible for the tuition set by the college.

MYSTERY AND ADVENTURE
Grades 11-12
0.5 Credit

This course deals with universal themes such as crime,
violence, the supernatural, horror, and adventure. The
literature is studied and enjoyed not only for its literary
value, but also for its popular appeal. Addressing all
aspects of language arts, students will write critiques of
the works and conduct research which will culminate in a
formal paper.

Prerequisite:

Students must meet Mercer County
Community College entrance criteria to enroll in this
course.
CONTEMPORARY SHAKESPEARE
Grades 11-12
0.5 Credit

POETRY
Grades 11-12

H10320
Semester

William Shakespeare is alive and well in the 21 century!
th
Themes that he wrote about in the 16 century still make
sense today. As they confront issues of racism, sexism,
madness, friendship and love, his classic characters give
us a glimpse of the past and a spotlight on our own lives.
Providing students with the opportunity to look more
deeply into Shakespeare texts will allow them to find
relevance for their own lives. Through in-class reading
and staging of plays, as well as examination of
Shakespeare on film, students will deepen their
understanding of the impact of his work on contemporary
literature and life. Text reading will take place in class as
students work independently on an array of projects that
include a final filming of a Shakespearean scene.

PUBLICATIONS/JOURNALISM
Grade 12
1.0 Credit

H10345

Semester

H10125
Year

This course is for seniors who wish to be involved in
producing the LHS yearbook—The Chrysalis. Students
must have an understanding of instructional technology
and the internet and should also have an interest in how
publications are produced. Production topics include
flyers, newsletters, brochures, small newspapers and
books. Students will study principles of good design and
layout of these publications as well as appropriate
production operations. Students should possess strong
organizational skills and be willing to work as a member
of a team to produce The Chrysalis. Students should also
have a basic understanding of photography. A variety of
software applications, including Microsoft Word, Adobe
PageMaker, Illustrator, and Photoshop, will be used to
create designs for the yearbook.

H10335

Semester

This course is designed for students who want to take an
interdisciplinary look at gender in literature, history,
philosophy, education, and art across cultures and critical
perspectives. Objectives of this course include:
developing an understanding of basic gender studies
terms and concepts; examining the social construction of
femininity and masculinity and power differences based
on gender; integrating ideas and evidence from diverse
disciplines and points of view; and exploring the
interlocking natures of sexism, racism, classism, ageism,
homophobia and others.
MULTI-ETHNIC LITERATURE
Grades 11-12
0.5 Credit

0.5 Credit

The course examines the structure of poetry, the styles of
various poets and various forms of poetry. Students
express their views in class discussions as well as in
formal, written critiques. A lyrics research project and
presentation is the culminating assignment. The course
helps students appreciate and comprehend the style and
meaning of various poems, making poetry approachable
and even personal.

st

GENDER STUDIES
Grades 11-12
0.5 Credit

H10360

Semester

Prerequisite: Students must apply to be considered for
approval and should be aware that this course frequently
requires work after school and on some evenings.

H10325
Semester

PUBLIC SPEAKING I
PUBLIC SPEAKING II
Grades 9-12
0.5 Credit

This course will focus on analyzing multi-ethnic texts.
Students will be able to discuss the literature, identify
relevant thematic connections, and give insight into
character relationships and moral choices. Class time will
be spent dissecting the literature in an open forum,
discussing the assigned readings, and evaluating student
writing. The writing component will be advanced essay
writing focusing on literature analysis papers and MLA
format. This course will explore the common elements
throughout these texts as they apply them to a multiethnic world through reading, writing, and discussion.

H10140
H10141

Semester

Public Speaking develops students’ oral and verbal
expression. In the first part of the course, students will
develop their interpersonal speaking skills; in the second
part of the course, students will focus upon mass
communications. In both courses, students will learn to
express and develop their ideas in an organized and
coherent manner through speaking. Students are given
opportunities to develop speech techniques vital to
success, and they will learn to speak for the purpose of
information, persuasion, argument, and entertainment.
Students are encouraged to express themselves freely
with confidence in front of a group.

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SHORT STORIES
Grades 11-12
0.5 Credit

H10340

ACADEMIC SUPPORT READING
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

Semester

This course will examine international short fiction as a
literary form. Students read traditional and contemporary
stories by great authors and analyze them through
discussion and writing. It will also focus on cultural
traditions and how they affect the authors’ perspectives,
as well as the stories’ themes. Students will write
Critiques of the stories and analyze their themes and the
author’s styles.
BEGINNER ESL
Grades 9-12

GRADUATION PORTFOLIO IN ENGLISH
Grade 12
0.5 Credit

ACADEMIC SUPPORT LANGUAGE ARTS
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

H10060
Year

1.0 Credit

H10132
Year

This course is designed to benefit students who need
group and individualized instruction to help them build
upon prior knowledge as they move toward mastery of
reading skills. These skills include word attack, literal
comprehension, and reasoning.
Emphasis is on
individual progress as well as building enthusiasm for
reading. Students work with the teacher to choose
appropriate instructional materials of personal interest. A
variety of texts, novels, and reading are available.

Intermediate ESL I & II are for those students who are at
the intermediate levels. Students will continue to improve
their proficiency in English as they develop their skills in
listening, reading, speaking, and writing. Students will be
enrolled in another English class at the same time.
ADVANCED ESL
Grades 9-12

H10131

Semester

This course is designed to provide remediation and
practice exercises to those students identified as Partially
Proficient on the state required PARCC. The focus of the
course will be small group instruction to help students
develop their basic language arts skills, particularly in
reading and writing.

Year

Beginner ESL is an entry-level course for students who
have little or no English. Reading and writing are taught
concurrently. The course meets for two class periods
each day.
INTERMEDIATE ESL I & II
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

Year

ASI/Read 180 is a skill-based course focused on
intensive reading strategies. It helps students to increase
their Lexile scores while also improving writing skills. It is
considered an elective and students enrolled in ASI/Read
180 should also enroll in a corresponding English course.

H10032
1.0 Credit

H10133/H90071

H10110
Year

Advanced ESL is a course for students who have at least
a high intermediate level of understanding, reading, and
writing skills in English. The students improve their
English language skills through the study of non-fiction
and fiction.

SAT/ACT VERBAL SKILLS AND STRATEGIES
Grades 10-12

0.5 Credit

H10190

Semester

No new information is presented in this course. The goal
of the course is to provide students with test-taking skills
for the SAT and ACT exams.

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FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCE OFFERINGS
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: Today’s need for nutritional education transcends all grade levels and academic achievement.
To be physically fit is a major goal for the new century. The phrase “You are what you eat,” has never been more true.
Within the food courses, information about diet and food fads is taught. Students will be encouraged to make personal
health, nutrition, and food decisions based on physical activity, age, and lifestyle. No matter what your choice, shaping up
on the outside starts on the inside. Early Childhood Education not only focuses on the changing family, parenting
responsibilities, and family values, but also explores the field of education as a possible career choice. Fashion and interior
design will provide opportunities for students to also explore these “creative” areas as possible career choices.
st

All courses in Family & Consumer Science fulfill the 21 Century Life & Careers or Technical requirement for graduation.

CLOTHING FABRICS AND CONSTRUCTION
H85060
Grades 9-12
0.5 Credit
Semester

participation in a weekly learning-laboratory experience,
“Toddler Town”. In addition to lessons on development
theory, students plan activities and teach and observe the
development of children three days per week.

This course is a concentrated effort in mastering the skill
of sewing, both by hand and machine. It provides
students with a lifelong skill to enhance other aspects of
their life as well as prepare them for career opportunities
in the textile industry. Practical applications such as
sewing buttons, hems, zippers, button holes, etc. are
taught. Home sewing also offers the opportunity to make
wise consumer choices. The course is designed for the
student who desires independent project-oriented tasks.
All students interested in any aspect of fashion are
advised to take this course because it provides an
understanding of the sewing machine and clothing
construction, both integral parts of the fashion industry.
The student also becomes familiar with the fabric
marketplace.
CULINARY-PART I
Grades 9-12
0.5 Credit

Prerequisite: Application and approval.
EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT II
Grades 11-12
2.0 Credits

H85011
Semester

Prerequisite: A “B” average in Early Childhood I or a “B”
average in Promising Teachers of Tomorrow.
FASHION DESIGN
Grades 9-12
0.5 Credit

H85030
Semester

This course explores the contemporary world of fashion
and its direct impact on our lives. The emphasis is on
three main areas: to improve one’s personal appearance,
to portray a professional look that is crucial in the
corporate world, and to provide an avenue for possible
career choices in the fashion industry. The course
stresses the importance of the “total look,” wardrobe
planning, color and the elements, and principles of good
design. It also elaborates on the history of clothing,
popular fashion designers, clothing styles, and
accessories.
There are a variety of projects are
scheduled throughout the course.

H85012
Semester

This course advances the study of the basic food groups.
It continues with an intense emphasis as it relate to
wellness and consumer choices. Additional topics include
meat, fish poultry and cake decorating. The activities
focus on the laboratory preparations including a holiday
meal and food design.

INTERIOR DESIGN
Grades 9-12
0.5 Credit

Prerequisite: Completion of Culinary Part I.
EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT I
Grades 10-12
1.0 Credit

Year

This course exposes students to the field of education as
a possible career choice. It provides an elementary
classroom experience in addition to guest speakers and
cooperative education classroom activities. Under the
direct supervision of an elementary teacher, students
participate by assisting in assigned classrooms. Details
of each assignment are arranged collaboratively by the
student, the elementary teacher, and the Early Childhood
II teacher. Participating students’ interests play a role in
classroom assignments.

This is an introductory foods course that concentrates on
nutrition, as it relates to diet and health, consumer
choices, safety and sanitation. Students will learn the
basics. Additional topics include careers and quantitative
cookery. The activities focus on the laboratory
preparations including a holiday meal and food design.
Guest presentations are scheduled periodically.
CULINARY-PART I I
Grades 10-12
0.5 Credit

H85080

H85070

H85050

Semester

This is a semester course that offers students the
opportunity to explore their housing environment. Those
enrolled will not only become familiar with exterior styling,
but also concentrate on the aspects of a tastefully
furnished home.
Topics include house styles, the

Year

This course provides introductory opportunities for career
exploration in the fields of Early Childhood Development
and education through instruction, observation, and

20

principles and elements of design, color, furniture styles,
and floor plans. Students will learn to create floor plans
and craft their own home furnishing accessories. This
course has become a stepping stone for those interested
in pursuing design careers.
INTERNATIONAL FOODS
Grades 10-12
1.0 Credit

H85020

Year

H90220
Year

STUDY SKILLS
Grades 9-12

This course is designed for students who need to develop
practical skills and learning that will serve them in the
future as they work toward living independently. The
curriculum focuses on health issues, resources for
independent living, work place awareness, job hunting,
portfolio development, human relations, consumer
awareness, and family life. Students will also work on the
development of their communication skills.
PROMISING TEACHERS OF TOMORROW
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

Year

Strategies for Success: What’s Next? and How to Get
There? This full-year course is designed for motivated
students who are anxious to plan for their futures.
Developing self-confidence and the power of selfdetermination are foremost goals.
Guided selfassessment of learning styles, abilities, and interests will
become the basis for choosing high school courses and
exploring education, career and job opportunities beyond
high school. Study will highlight self-advocacy and legal
rights charting a life path, networking, building a resume,
accessing community resources, and making life
decisions. Students will use technology and develop selfmanagement skills and coping strategies. A wide variety
of current materials will include those actually used by
corporations and colleges. Guest speakers and field trips
will provide career role models and on-site experiences.
Attendance, classroom participation, the individual
student portfolio of selected work, and attitude will be
considered in evaluating performance.

International Foods introduces the student to typical
dishes and meals, spices, and food-related customs of a
wide range of ethnic and national cuisines. This expanded
curriculum reflects the rich cultural and ethnic diversity of
our own student population. Included in this program will
be a survey of the history, geography, and culture of
various ethnic groups and how these factors influence
culinary practices, in addition to preparing typical recipes
of each country. Students will enjoy this entertaining and
revealing look at the why’s, the how- to’s, and the joys of
international cuisine.
DAILY LIVING SKILLS
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

H90250

TRANSITION SKILLS FOR INDEPENDENC
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

H90191
0.5 Credit

Semester

The Child Study Team and/or school counselor, with input
from students, teachers and parents, will determine
whether a student would benefit from a pull out
replacement, Support Skills & Applications class.
Students in grades nine through twelve are eligible to
participate in this class. Support Skills & Applications can
provide a student with pre-teaching, re-teaching, study
skills, organizational skills, career and college preparation
skills, extended time for the completion of assignments
and tests, as well as PARCC preparation in English and
Math.

H85090
Year

Promising Teachers of Tomorrow is offered to students
interested in pursuing a career in education. This
program is designed to encourage teacher candidates
from high school students to the field of education through
exposure to a world-class curriculum and hands-on
experience that focus on teaching.
Students will
experience the profession as they are guided through the
history of education and the functions of schools and
school districts. Additionally, students will experience the
classroom as they become acquainted with teachers and
teaching on a personal and professional level including a
brief internship in a classroom setting.

Prerequisite: CST/Counselor Recommendation.
NUTRITION FOR HEALTHY LIVING
Grades 9-12
0.5 Credit

H85013

Semester

Nutrition for Healthy Living will cover the foundations of
nutrition, including nutrient use and metabolism, with a
focus on areas relevant to high school students. These
topics include supplements, nutrition for athletes, and
links between nutrition and disease, and will follow the
interest of students in the course. Students will learn the
basics of food preparation as they learn to prepare
healthy foods.

Note: Students that complete this course with a “B” or

better will have the option of receiving 3 credits from
Farleigh Dickinson University or Rider University.

21

FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS OFFERINGS
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: The elective arts courses in music, theatre, and visual arts include unique disciplines with
aesthetic, perceptual, reflective, creative, and intellectual dimensions. The arts provide a balance in the high school
curriculum that is necessary in developing thinking and problem solving skills, enhancing self-esteem, and exploring multisensory approaches to learning.
All courses in Fine and Performing Arts Offerings fulfill the -Fine, Visual, and Performing Arts- requirement for graduation.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT MUSIC THEORY
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

H75230

MUSIC AND THE HUMAN EXPERIENCE
Grades 9-12
0.5 Credit

Year

H75200
Semester

This course is designed to develop students’ ability to
recognize, understand, and describe basic materials and
processes of music that are heard or presented in a
score. This class will focus on integrated approaches to
the students’ development of aural, sight singing, written
compositional and analytical skills through listening,
performance, written, creative and analytical exercises.
Note: This course will be offered only in odd numbered
years.

This half-year course will explore music from the Medieval
Era onward. The class will focus on developing critical
thinking skills through analysis, class discussion, and
student presentations. Students will develop knowledge
in the areas of music history, critique, aesthetics, and
philosophy.

Prerequisite: Interview and recommendation.

This is a full-year course open to all students who play
percussion instruments.
This class will focus on
developing percussion specific technique, music reading,
ensemble playing and solo performance. Students will
perform on mallets, concert, marching and auxiliary
instruments and attendance at instrumental music
concerts is mandatory.

CONTEMPORARY MUSIC STUDIO
Grades 10-12
1.0 Credit

PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

H75210
Year

This year-long course is designed for those students
already working in contemporary music or who are
interested in acquiring and refining skills as contemporary
musicians and composers. Weekly class format will
include instruction in music theory and composition as
well as opportunities to perform as a soloist or a member
of an ensemble. This course is open to students by
audition. Note: This course will be offered only in odd
numbered years.

1.0 Credit

Year

Prerequisite:

LMS Concert Band, LHS Instrumental
Music Ensembles, Private Instruction.
STRING ORCHESTRA
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

H75245
Year

This is a full-year course for students who perform on an
orchestral string instrument. The course will focus on
furthering the development of string technique, music
reading and orchestral performance.
Students will
perform a variety of music at two mandatory concerts
each school year. The course is open to string players of
all levels and students will be given opportunities for small
group performance in addition to the full orchestra.

Prerequisite: Audition.
JAZZ STUDIES
Grades 11-12

H75191

H75250

Year

This full-year elective course will present a
comprehensive program of the student of jazz to include
instruction in the following areas: theory, improvisation,
history, performance, critical listening/analysis, and
composition. Students enrolled in this course can expect
to develop a deep understanding of the evolution of jazz
that they can exhibit through their own compositions,
improvisations, and performances.
This course is
designed for the advanced music student who already
has a fundamental understanding of jazz theory and has
significant performance experience. Students will have
the opportunity to premiere and perform their own works
and the music of the legends of jazz in public
performances and showcases throughout the school year.

CONCERT BAND
Grades 9-12

1.0 Credit

H75140
Year

This is a full-year course designed for students who play a
band instrument. The class will focus on developing
techniques specific to concert band instruments, music
reading, and ensemble playing. Students will perform a
variety of music at two mandatory concerts each school
year and are encouraged to perform in honors ensembles
outside of the school day.

Prerequisite: Previous performance in the LMS or LHS

Note: This course will be offered only in even numbered

Concert Band and an audition with the instructor.

years.

22

WIND ENSEMBLE
H75220
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit
Year
This is a full-year course for advanced instrumentalists.
The ensemble will focus on furthering the development of
advanced instrumental technique, music reading, and
ensemble performance. Students will perform a variety of
music that will be performed at two mandatory concerts
each year. Wind ensemble students are expected to
audition for honors ensembles outside of school.

PIANO
Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: Previous performance in the LMS or LHS

GUITAR
Grades 9-12

H75090
0.5 Credit

Semester

Grades 9-12

1.0 Credit

Year

H75080

THEATRE I
Grades 9-12

While EVERYONE is accepted, a short
audition is required for placement.

H75110

Year

Ensemble is a high level choral course that is made up of
qualified students who demonstrate conservable vocal
ability musicality, and motivation. The curriculum focuses
on developing music literacy, vocal independence, and a
high level of technical refinement through performances
of diverse literature. Students in this class must be
prepared to dedicate time each week to practice outside
the classroom and will experience 3 or 4 part treble
harmony and arranging. Students are required to perform
in two evening concerts and are given the opportunity to
perform at other community events.

THEATRE II
Grades 10-12

H75120
1.0 Credit

Semester

1.0 Credit

H75010
Year

1.0 Credit

H75020

Year

This full-year course builds on and reinforces the skills
outlined in Theatre I in terms of trust, risk-taking, and
character creation; however the materials used in the
course are more challenging. Students will use
improvisation skills in the fall Theatre Sports Night and
demonstrate the Italian commedia dell’ arte style in the
winter. Students will also have additional opportunities to
develop directing skills with their peers. A review of one
live performance is required each marking period.
Students will develop characters for monologues and
scene work. A performance for the intermediate school or
middle school as well as scene showcases are
culminating events of the course.

Prerequisite: Audition and recommendation.
MADRIGAL
Grades 9-12

H75310
0.5 Credit

This is a full-year introductory course to acting. Students
will learn the basics of trust and risk-taking through
theatre games. Students also will learn how to create a
character for dramatic and comic monologues and
scenes. Performance of a children’s play and mid-term
and final scene showcases are culminating exercises in
the course.

Prerequisite:

1.0 Credit

Semester

This course will focus on learning fundamentals of playing
basic guitar, reading music, and theory. Students will
perform a variety of pieces including many of their own
choosing. Students will perform in a class recital every
two weeks to show progress and gain performance
experience. This class is perfect for singers who are
looking for a way to accompany their own performances.

Concert Choir is a full-year choral course for vocal
students of all levels. The curriculum covers a wide range
of vocal and musical concepts from music literacy to basic
theory and technique. High levels of effort and teamwork
allow the students in this course to perform a wide variety
of musical literature in many styles.
Students are
required to perform as a group in two evening concerts.

ENSEMBLE
Grades 9-12

H75300

Students enrolled in this course will learn fundamentals of
playing piano, reading music, and theory. Students will
perform a variety of pieces including many of their own
choosing. Students will perform in a class recital every
two weeks to show progress and gain performance
experience. Capacity: 16 students.

Concert Band and an audition with the instructor.
CONCERT CHOIR
Grades 9-12

0.5 Credit

Year

Madrigal is a high level course that emphasizes more
advanced voice culture, music theory, repertoire work,
and interpretation.
Madrigal is open to the most
advanced and motivated vocal students who are prepared
to dedicate time outside the classroom to practice and
review. Members are expected to participate in two inschool concerts and multiple additional performances
throughout the school year.

Prerequisite: Theatre I or teacher recommendation.
STAGECRAFT AND DESIGN
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

H75030

Year

This full-year course explores the behind-the-scenes
aspects of play production. This project-based class is
great for students who already have a strong interest in
theater, but don’t want to act. Students will learn about
the behind-the-scenes topics such as stage managing,
props and scenery, set design, and makeup and
costumes. Each unit culminates in individual projects
which are a mix of working with art supplies and other
people (like actors and fellow designers).
No

Prerequisite: Audition and recommendation.

23

prerequisite, but interest in theater and willingness to
work on art projects is strongly recommended. Students
will gain experience in reading a script for technical and
artistic elements rather than for acting. Students will
research artistic elements for the current production in
school and create a design book each marking period.
Students are also involved in the creation of stage props
and scenery, as well as the use of stage make-up and
tools. Using the current production in school, or plays that
acting courses are working on, students will experience
working on technical elements for a play such as lighting
and sound design. Opportunity to design technical and
design elements for scene showcase will be offered as a
culminating exercise in the course.
ADVANCED THEATRE STUDIES
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

with strong techniques and talent in their area of
expertise. Summer work and sketchbook are required.

Prerequisite:

Completion of two Fine Art courses
receiving “B” or above for final grade and an application
with portfolio review and approval of the Visual Arts
Department.
COMMERCIAL ART I
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

H75040

Year

COMMERCIAL ART II
Grades 10-12
1.0 Credit

H70065
Year

Commercial Art II is a full-year course offering for
students who have successfully completed Commercial
Art I with a “B” or better. Practical design opportunities,
using digital imaging, Photoshop, Illustrator, Word, and
InDesign will be used to design and produce posters,
advertising, logos, promotional materials and school/
community based projects. Web design using
Dreamweaver will be introduced.
Strong desktop
publishing skills are required.

Prerequisite: Theatre I and Theatre II.
H75046

Year

Prerequisite: Commercial Art I with a final grade of “B” of

Combining skills in four disciplines – acting, singing,
dancing, and stagecraft – students have an opportunity to
showcase their talents and discover new ones. This
course will familiarize students with the tools needed to
build key musical theater arts skills and will provide them
with instruction in the history of theater and musical
theater, classic acting training exercises, production
techniques, basic dance, basic voice, and theater
conventions. Students will also demonstrate their abilities
in these skills through integrative performances,
group scene work, solo performance and acting training
activities.

better and approval of the Visual Arts Department.
COMMERCIAL ART III
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

H70073
Year

Commercial Art III is open to qualified students who have
successfully completed Commercial Art I and II with a “C”
or better.
Mastery of Photoshop, Word, Illustrator,
InDesign, and Dreamweaver will be utilized to develop
comprehensive portfolios. All class work is computer
based. Design, layout, typography, photography, and
illustration manipulation will be stressed.
Strong
computer skills are necessary.

Prerequisite: Two years of Theatre or Choir.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT STUDIO ART
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

Year

Commercial Art I is a full-year course introducing students
to basic graphic design and imaging skills. Students will
learn four computer programs, typography, and digital
techniques to produce a series of two- and threedimensional creative projects including:
magazine,
advertising, packaging, newspaper, brochure layout, and
the psychology of color and point-of-sale display.
Creative writing and math skills are recommended.
Strong writing and math skills are helpful. Sketchbook is
required.

This is a full-year advanced acting and performance
course. Students will explore various acting styles from
history such as Shakespeare, acting with an accent, and
play writing. In the fall students will use improvisation skill
to perform during Theatre Sports Night. Students will
continue to utilize character development skills in modern
monologues and scene study. Performance of at least
two public performances, in addition to scene and
monologue showcases, will be culminating activities in
the course. Students will have an opportunity to direct
scenes as well as perform at a drama festival in the spring
of the course.

MUSICAL THEATRE
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

H70060

Prerequisite: Completion of Commercial Art I and II and

H70150

approval of Visual Arts Department.

Year

DRAWING I
Grades 9-12

Students will create an in-depth portfolio for scoring by
The College Board. Student portfolios will be in either
Painting, Drawing, or 2D, and will consist of twenty-nine
original works that demonstrate a systematic investigation
in the areas of quality, concentration, and breadth and
presented for portfolio review based on The College
Board Standard Format. A supportive essay to defend
the concentration is also required. Students are
encouraged to be independent thinkers, inventive artists

1.0 Credit

H70080

Year

Students will interpret what the eye sees and translate
that interpretation to a two-dimensional surface using
various media, such as pencil, charcoal, conte crayons,
pastels, and ink. The types of subject matter rendered
include: object, figure, landscape, and perspective. The
elements of art stressed are line, value, space, shape,
form texture, proportions, composition, and the

24

development of a personal style.
required.

A sketchbook is
POTTERY AND SCULPTURE II
Grades 10-12
1.0 Credit

DRAWING II
H70090
Grades 10-12
1.0 Credit
Year
Drawing II is a full-year course designed for students who
have successfully completed Drawing I. Students will
combine previously learned basic skills with newly
acquired techniques taught. Advanced creative and
interpretive drawings based on themes provided by the
instructor is the basis for this course. The students’
personal style is to be enhanced throughout the course
development.

Historical and contemporary trends in ceramics are
studied through research and in-class presentations.
Students are expected to express themselves through
visual, verbal and written formats. Students interested in a
career in ceramics, industrial design, architecture,
sculpture, Art Education or set design may begin building
a portfolio for continuing study in the arts. The creation of
a digital art portfolio and maintaining a personal
sketchbook is required. Drawing is emphasized
throughout the course. A mid-term and final exam will be
administered.

permission of instructor after portfolio review.
1.0 Credit

H70100
Year

A variety of experiences in watercolor, tempera, acrylic,
and oil will be provided. Students will gain specific skills
and techniques in brush handling, proper use of tools,
color theory, and applying paint on various surfaces.
PAINTING II
Grades 10-12

1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Pottery and Sculpture I with a final grade of

H70110

“B” or better.

Year

POTTERY AND SCULPTURE III
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

Painting II is a full-year course designed for students who
have successfully completed Painting I. Students will
combine previously learned basic painting skills to
develop their personal style and interpretation of assigned
painting projects. Students will enhance their ability to
solve aesthetic and artistic problems through creativity
and the development of his or her artistic style.

H70040

Year

Pottery and Sculpture III is a full-year course open to
students who have successfully completed Sculpture and
Pottery I and II with a B or better, and for students who
plan a career in the Arts.
Thematically based, students will develop and apply
creative techniques and skills in ceramics and sculptural
form in a variety of media. In-depth research and
development of all projects is required. Continued
development of a digital portfolio and maintaining a
personal
sketchbook
is
strongly
emphasized.
Sketchbooks are required to chronicle ideas and
inspiration and to experiment with media and techniques.
Mastering wheel throwing and creating a body of work by
the completion of the course is required. A mid-term and
final exam will be administered.

Prerequisite: Grade of “B+” or higher in Painting I or the
permission of instructor after portfolio review.
POTTERY AND SCULPTURE I
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

Year

Students must successfully complete Pottery and
Sculpture I with a B or better before continuing in level II.
Students are expected to demonstrate growth in problem
solving, controlling the properties of clay to develop
complex forms, strengthening artistic expression and
critical thinking. Advanced hand-building and wheel
throwing will be covered.

Prerequisite: Grade of “B+” or higher in Drawing I or the
PAINTING I
Grades 9-12

H70030

H70020
Year

Pottery and Sculpture is designed to develop skills of
three-dimensional problem solving and allows students to
work in a variety of media. The student is introduced to
basic techniques in ceramics, sculpture installation/ site
specific sculpture, low and high-relief work, assemblage,
and mixed media constructions. The student will have the
opportunity to do individual research on sculpture,
sculpture directions in Art History, art careers, specific
media and techniques that are of particular interest in a
career in 3-D art fields: industrial design, architecture,
interior design, ceramics, stage craft or set design.
Students may begin building a portfolio for continuing
study in the arts from this course.
In Pottery, students will learn basic skills and technical
knowledge of traditional hand building methods: pinched
forms, coil and slab construction and non-traditional uses
of clay, and will use a range of surface decoration and
firing techniques. The creation of a digital art portfolio
and maintaining a personal sketchbook are required.
Drawing is emphasized throughout the course. A midterm and final exam will be administered.

Prerequisite: Completion of Pottery and Sculpture I & II
with a final grade of “B” or better.

SENIOR ART EXPERIENCE
Grade 12
1.0 Credit

H70149
Year

This advanced art course is for seniors who have a
serious interest in art and design, and is designed to
strengthen studio art and design skills and help students
begin an art portfolio. Students will receive studio
critiques of all work as an evaluation of artistic growth,
and will gain exposure to contemporary and classic artist
masters.

Prerequisite: Minimum of two years of art instruction and
teacher recommendation

25

MATHEMATICS OFFERINGS
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: The Mathematics Program is designed to meet the needs of all students in accordance with
the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), which are National Mathematics Standards. The CCSS emphasize college and
career readiness and promote a progression of skills and a solid foundation for application. All students must satisfy a threeyear graduation requirement that includes Algebra and Geometry. The use of technology and the graphing calculator are
emphasized throughout the program.

Prep Level

9th Grade

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade

Algebra 1

Geometry or
Geometry Honors

Algebra II or
Algebra II Honors

Algebra II and Trig. or
Pre-Calculus or
Discrete Math or
Probability/Statistics or
Other elective math

Geometry or
Geometry Honors

Algebra II or
Algebra II Honors

Algebra II and Trig.
Pre-Calculus or
Pre-Calculus Honors or
Discrete Math or
Probability/Statistics
Other elective math

Optional 4th Year

* Algebra II or
Algebra II Honors

Pre-Calculus or
Pre-Calculus Honors

Calculus or
Calculus Honors or
AP Calculus AB or
AP Statistics

Optional 4th Year

College
Preparatory

Honors
College
Preparatory

P

P

Calculus or
Calculus Honors or
AP Calculus or
AP Statistics or
other elective math
course
P

P

AP Calculus BC or
AP Statistics or
Electives

All students must enroll in a math sequence that includes Algebra, if the course has not been completed prior to entering
grade 9. Geometry and Algebra II are required for all students along with the end of year PARCC exams for the course,
which is mandated by NJDOE (New Jersey Department of Education).

Required Calculator: The most appropriate calculator for students enrolled in various levels of math and science classes
at LHS is a Texas Instrument 84+ or 84+C (color screen). The 84+ is the calculator that is embedded in the on-line PARCC
testing. It is the approved calculator for most standardized tests. It is best if students have the same calculator for class and
home to be familiar and proficient with the tool for testing purposes. It is also a calculator that can be used in post-high
school studies in areas of math and science.
ALGEBRA I
Grades 9-12

1.0 Credit

H30010

geometric structures to promote problem solving
throughout the course. Major mathematical concepts such
as proofs, deductions, congruence, parallel and
perpendicular lines, the Pythagorean Theorem, circles,
polygons, similar polygons, regular polygons, area, and
volume are studied.

Year

Algebra I is the traditional college preparatory academic
mathematics course. The study of Algebra builds and
develops problem solving and logical thinking skills. This
is the ideal class for freshman students new to LHS or
those who may need additional exposure to essential
Algebra concepts to build a solid Algebra understanding.
The course work will address sets, variables, sentences,
solution sets, factoring exponents, radicals, Cartesian
Coordinate system, quadratic equations, systems of
equation, algebraic functions, and polynomials.

Prerequisite:

Grade 9: Successful completion of Algebra 1 C- (70%)
Grade 10: Successful completion of Algebra 1
GEOMETRY HONORS
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

or below) and current math teacher recommendation, or
th
successful completion of 8 Grade Math at the Middle
School Level.

H30050
1.0 Credit

Year

Geometry Honors is a more rigorous course that
addresses the study of plane and solid geometry. This
course begins on a formal level and requires that the
student has had some experience in writing proofs in a
logical and systematic manner. Students will write proofs
to demonstrate comprehension. All of the basic concepts
of geometry are included, and some of the content of
trigonometry is used not only to add new content but also
to facilitate a systematic review of the basic algebra skills.

Prerequisite: Algebra I at the Middle School Level (69%

GEOMETRY
Grades 9-12

H30040

Year

The study of Geometry is a necessary college prep math
course. Algebraic concepts are applied to various

26

Only those students who are willing to pursue a rigorous
course of study should take this course.

probability, polar coordinates, and parametric equations.
A graphing calculator is needed.

Prerequisites: (see below)

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of B (83%) in Algebra II

Grade 9: Algebra I (93%), NWEA Score 250, and
recommendation from current math teacher, and approval
from the Instructional Supervisor.

Honors and current math teacher recommendation, or A+
(97%) in Algebra II, NWEA 265 or better, and current
math teacher recommendation, and approval from the
Instructional Supervisor.

Grade 10-12: Algebra I, NWEA Score 250, and
recommendation from current math teacher, and approval
from the Instructional Supervisor.
ALGEBRA II
Grades 9-12

1.0 Credit

ALGEBRA II and TRIGONOMETRY
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

H30080

Prerequisite: C (75%) in Algebra II.

Prerequisite:

Successful completion of Geometry or
Geometry Honors.

DISCRETE MATH
Grades 11-12

H30070

1.0 Credit

H30210

Year

Discrete Math is designed for students who have
successfully completed Algebra II, but do not wish to go
into the Pre-Calculus/Calculus sequence. Discrete Math
includes arithmetic topics covered in Algebra I and
Algebra II, but stresses topic/concept application. Units of
study include, but are not limited to, matrix operations,
election theory, apportionment and fair division,
scheduling models, recursive definitions, cryptology, as
well as counting and probabilities. This course allows
students to use the algorithms and processes learned in
Algebra in real-world situations.

Year

Algebra II Honors covers the same concepts that are
developed in Algebra II, but at a faster pace and in
greater depth with selected additional topics such as
logarithms, circular functions, and trigonometry. This
course is recommended for the advanced math student. A
graphing calculator is needed.

Prerequisite: B (83%) or better in Geometry Honors and

current math teacher recommendation or A (95%) in
Geometry and Algebra I, NWEA score of 260 and teacher
recommendation.
PRE-CALCULUS
Grades 10-12
1.0 Credit

Year

Algebra II and Trigonometry is designed for those
students who wish to study advanced topics in Algebra.
Units of study include coordinate geometry of points and
lines, inequalities, functions, trigonometry, exponentials,
logarithms, complex numbers, and polynomials and their
graphs. A graphing calculator is recommended.

Year

Algebra II examines linear equations and functions, linear
inequalities, quadratic equations and functions, complex
numbers, rational expressions, sequences and series,
matrices, and probability.
A graphing calculator is
needed.

ALGEBRA II HONORS
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

H30085

Prerequisite: Successful completion (70%) of Algebra II.
PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

H30125
Year

H30170

Year

Pre-Calculus covers all of the topics in Algebra II and
Trigonometry with a deeper focus on polynomial and
rational functions and trigonometry including the
fundamental theorem of Algebra and synthetic division.
Successful completion of Pre-Calculus will prepare
students for Calculus or Honors Calculus. A graphing
calculator is needed.

This course has been designed for those students who
have completed Algebra II and who are interested in
becoming familiar with some of the basic concepts in
probability and statistics. Topics will include probability,
frequency, distributions, measures of location and
variation, the normal distribution, confidence intervals,
sampling, and statistical tests. Use of the computer and
graphing calculator is stressed.

Prerequisite: A- (90%) in Algebra II and current math

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II with a C

teacher recommendation or C (75%) or better in Algebra
II Honors and current math teacher recommendation.
PRE-CALCULUS HONORS
Grades 10-12
1.0 Credit

(73%) or better or successful completion of Algebra II and
Trigonometry with a C (73%).

H30120

CALCULUS
Grades 11-12

Year

Pre-Calculus Honors prepares students for advanced
mathematics and college math courses. The ideas
developed include sets, sequences and series, the
concept of limit, analytical geometry concepts with points,
lines, complex numbers, continuity, exponential and
logarithmic functions, circular and trigonometric functions,

1.0 Credit

H30160
Year

This course focuses on strengthening Pre-Calculus skills
before introducing the concept of limits, derivatives of
algebraic functions, applications of derivatives and
integration, and other selected topics.

27

Prerequisite: Successful completion (70%) of Pre-

Prerequisite: B+ (87%) or better in Pre-Calculus Honors

Calculus Honors or B (80%) in Pre-Calculus, or A (93%)
or A+ (97%) or better in Algebra II and Trigonometry,
current math teacher recommendation and approval from
the Instructional Supervisor. A graphing calculator is
needed.
CALCULUS HONORS
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

and current math teacher recommendation or A+ (97%) in
Pre-Calculus, teacher recommendation and approval of
the Instructional Supervisor.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS BC
Grade 12
1.0 Credit

H30155
Year

H30150
Year

Advanced Placement Calculus BC is a course that covers
one semester of college Calculus II. This course covers
derivatives of parametric, polar and vector functions.
Others topics include polynomial approximations and
series including the concept of series, series of constants
and Taylor series. Due to the pace of this course and the
difficulty of this course, it is designed for the very top and
stellar math students. This course prepares students for

Calculus Honors mirrors the entire Advanced Placement
curriculum (reference Advanced Placement Calculus) at a
slower pace. It includes complete development of
derivations and integration of algebraic transcendental
and elementary functions of limits and problem solving.
Students will not be prepared for the AP testing in May,
but the students will have been exposed to most of the
skills and concepts to continue with a higher math course
in college.

the AP Calculus BC Exam offered by College Board.
Graphing calculators are integral to the curriculum.

Prerequisite: Final grade of B+ (87%) in AP Calculus AB,

Prerequisite:

A (95%) or better in Pre-Calculus and
current math teacher recommendation or B (83%) or
higher in Pre-Calculus Honors.

current math teacher recommendation, and approval from
the Instructional Supervisor.

H30175

Year

ADVANCED PLACEMENT STATISTICS
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

ACADEMIC SUPPORT ALGEBRA 1
Grade 9
1.0 Credit

Year

Academic Support Algebra I is a course designed to
prepare students to meet with success in their current
math class and future HS math courses. Students are
instructed in a small group setting to further develop and
strengthen their basic mathematical skills. This program
supports individualized instruction and stresses problem
solving skills, critical thinking skills, improving written
responses to clearly communicate mathematical
understanding and concept application. Students are
identified through local criteria (NWEA) and other
standardized test scores. Students who are considered to
be “at risk” by their performance in the standard math
class can also be enrolled in this course based on staff
recommendation.

The course follows the recommended College Board®
Advanced Placement course description. The purpose of
this course is to introduce students to the major concepts
and tools of collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions
from data.
This course is organized around four
conceptual themes: 1) graphical and numerical
descriptions, 2) planning an experimental or observational
study, 3) anticipating patterns, producing models using
probability and simulation, and 4) statistical inference.
Graphing calculators and computers are integral to this
curriculum. This course prepares students for the AP
Statistics Exam offered by College Board. Graphing
calculators are integral to the curriculum.

ACADEMIC SUPPORT GEOMETRY
Grade 10
1.0 Credit

Prerequisites: Successful completion B+ (87%) or better
in Algebra II Honors or Pre-Calculus Honors, and current
math teacher recommendation or an A- (90%) in PreCalculus and current math teacher recommendation.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS AB
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

H30137

H30132

Year

Academic Support Geometry is designed to help students
meet with success in their current math course and future
HS math courses. Students receive instruction in small
group setting to further develop and strengthen their basic
mathematical skills. Instruction focuses on identified
weaknesses in each student’s mathematical skills to
promote further progress. Problem-solving, critical
thinking, improving written responses to clearly
communicate mathematical understanding and concept
application skills are stressed. Students are identified
through local criteria (NWEA) and other standardized test
scores. Students who are considered as “at risk” by their
performance in the standard math sequence can also be
enrolled in this course.

H30140
Year

Advanced Placement Calculus AB is a course that covers
one semester of college Calculus and includes a
complete development of derivatives and integration of
algebraic, transcendental and elementary functions, of
limits both finite and infinite, problem solving using
derivatives and integrals, and methods of integration.
Other topics include inverse functions, area between
curves, volume of a solid of revolution, and L’Hopital’s
rule of limits This is a challenging course that prepares

students for the AP Calculus AB exam offered by College
Board. Graphing calculators are integral to the curriculum.

28

ACADEMIC SUPPORT ALGEBRA II
Grade 11
1.0 Credit

H30133

will cover a range of math practices, with an emphasis on
problem solving modeling and strategic use of tools.

Year

Academic Support Algebra II is a course designed to
prepare identified students to meet with success in their
current math course and future high school math courses.
Students receive instruction in small group setting to
further develop and strengthen their basic mathematical
skills. Instruction focuses on identified weaknesses in
each student’s mathematical skills to promote further
progress. Problem-solving, critical thinking, improving
written responses to clearly communicate mathematical
understanding and concept application skills are stressed.
Students are identified through local criteria (NWEA) and
other standardized test scores or students who are
considered as “at risk” by their performance in their
standard math sequence can also be enrolled in this
course.

Prerequisite:

HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS
Grades 11-12
0.5 credit

H50275

Semester

Our modern mathematics comes to us along a path that
twists and turns through many different cultures, time
periods, and parts of the world.
Even though
mathematics is vital to the rise and functioning of our
modern society, the story of mathematics and the
mathematicians who created it is little known to those
outside mathematical circles. In this course we will
explore some of the major themes in mathematics:
Calculation, number theory, geometry, algebra and some
th
th
advanced theories of the 19 and 20 centuries, and their
historical
development
in
various
civilizations.
Civilizations will range from the Babylonian and Egyptian
to Classical Greece, the Middle East, and early and
modern Europe. We will see how these earlier
civilizations influence later ones and how the concepts
evolved in the difference times and civilizations. This is a

GRADUATION PORTFOLIO IN MATHEMATICS H30000
Grade 12
1.0 credit
Year

This course is a mandatory full year math class for Senior
students who have not met NJDOE required graduation
requirements: by meeting or exceeding the established

semester elective math class.

proficiency scores on the PARCC or other approved
standardized assessment. Students will need to
demonstrate their proficiency through a portfolio collection
of work in the areas of Algebra I, Geometry and Algebra II
which will be submitted to the NJDOE for review to meet
graduation requirements. See chart on page 6. Students

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Geometry.
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING
Grades 11-12

who have already met graduation requirements above are
not eligible for this course.
SAT/ACT MATH SKILLS AND STRATEGIES
Grades 11-12
0.5 Credit

Successful completion of Algebra I and

Geometry.

0.5 Credit

H30185

Semester

This course will use computer science as a tool to teach
critical thinking skills and problem solving. Students will
be introduced to the key concepts that are used to in most
programming languages. Students will use Java to
explore topics such as primitive data types, variables,
assignments, Boolean expressions, control statements,
and methods. This course will serve as an introduction to
computer science.

H30180

Semester

This semester course is designed to help prepare
students currently taking Algebra II or Algebra II and
Trigonometry for the mathematics section of the SAT I:
Reasoning Test. There is no new content included in this
course. The new SAT will be released in March 2016 and

Prerequisite: Concurrent or successful completion (70%)
of Algebra II/H.

29

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH OFFERINGS
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: Physical Education and Health Education is a well-designed program of activities, experience,
knowledge, and information that provides students with opportunities to grow and mature physically, mentally, and
emotionally. A wide range of physical activities is the foundation for personal development and appreciation of the need for
regular exercise. Health Education materials are focused on critical issues, while fostering a desire for accurate information
and responsible decision making.
HEALTH EDUCATION
Grades 9-12
0.25 Credit
Health 1 – H60020
Health 2 – Driver Education – H60060

Prerequisite: Application, interview, and attendance at a

1 Quarter

two-day workshop during the summer.

Health 3- H60100
Health 4- H60140

Teen PEP will fulfill one
Education/Health requirement.

Health Education is required for all students. Students
are assigned for one quarter during each school year to
Health Education class out of their regular Physical
Education program. Some of the areas of study included
in Health Education are Family Living, First Aid, Personal,
Community and Mental Health, Fitness, and Nutrition.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Grades 9-12
0.75 Credit
PE 1 – H60010
PE 2 – H60050

year

LIFETIME FITNESS**
Grades 10-12
0.5 Credit

of

the

Physical

H60168

Semester

This course will expose students to a combination of
classroom and activity-based learning experiences to
increase their awareness of health behaviors. Personal
and social skills will be developed to enhance healthy
living by recognizing how exercise science principles are
applied to physical fitness. Students will acquire practical
skills to evaluate their present level of physical fitness to
effectively implement a well-balanced and progressive
exercise program to promote a healthy lifestyle.

3 Quarters
PE 3 – H60090
PE 4 – H60130

Physical Education is a required sequence of courses for
all students. A variety of activities is presented with
emphasis placed on a combination of individual and team
activities. Each year swimming units, weight training and
conditioning, and fitness testing units are required.

Prerequisite: Student must have a C or better in their
Health and Physical Education courses the previous year.
FUNDAMENTALS OF COACHING**
Grades 11-12
0.5 Credit

TEEN PREVENTION EDUCATION PROGRAM
(Teen PEP)
H60190
Grade 11
1.0 Credit
Year

H60169

Semester

Fundamentals of Coaching is a semester long course that
utilizes a combination of classroom and activity-based
experiences. The purpose of this course is to provide
students with a blueprint for becoming a successful coach
and mentor. The key coaching principles of leadership,
team management, positive character development, sport
psychology, and skill progression across multiple sports
will be explored in detail. Students will acquire skills
needed to coach including the creation of organized
practice plans, team policies, and a personal coaching
philosophy. Benchmarks for assessment will include
service learning opportunities through coaching in the
community, leadership opportunities within the school and
the school district, and a coaching portfolio.

Teen PEP is a full-year Health elective course, teamtaught by specifically trained Teen PEP facilitator/
teachers. Students are educated in sexual health issues
and trained to facilitate innovative prevention education
workshops and outreach programs. Unplanned
pregnancy, homophobia, sexual harassment, sexually
transmitted diseases, and sexual health concerns are
addressed. Workshops are conducted with peers,
parents, and educators in schools and community
settings. The focus of this course is centered on building
critical skills such as communication with peers and
parents, problem solving, decision-making techniques,
negotiations, refusal skills, and self-management.
Students are required to attend a two-day workshop
during the summer prior to the beginning of class.

**Taking both courses will fulfill one year of the Physical
Education/Health requirement.

30

SCIENCE OFFERINGS
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: The science curriculum provides courses to meet the needs of all students. A full range of lab
courses that include second-year advanced placement courses in biology, chemistry, environmental science, and physics
are offered for highly motivated students who enjoy an academic challenge.
The courses are also designed to prepare students for the End of Course Exam(s) and for future college work.
All students must satisfy a three-year/ lab science requirement for graduation. The suggested course sequence can be
found in the chart below.
Level

th

th

th

th

9 Grade
Freshman
Biology

10 Grade
Sophomore
Chemistry
or
Chemistry Honors

11 Grade
Junior
Environmental Science
or
Physics
or
Physics Honors or
Anatomy and Physiology

Biology Honors

Chemistry
or
Chemistry Honors

Physics
or
Physics Honors
and/or
AP Biology
or
AP Chemistry
or
AP Environmental Science
or Elective

College Preparatory

12 Grade
Senior
th
Optional 4 Year
Physics or
Honors Physics
or
AP Courses
and/or
Elective
th
Optional 4 year
AP Courses
and/or Elective

All full year science courses qualify as lab sciences. Students must take Biology, Chemistry, and a third year of a lab
science to meet LTPS and NJDOE graduation requirements.
*Note: Electives cannot be taken in place of a lab science course to meet graduation requirements
BIOLOGY
Grades 9-12

H40040
1.0 Credit

course should be highly motivated and demonstrate the
ability to problem solve, work independently, and apply
concepts to real world situations. This course moves at an
accelerated pace. It includes additional units of study in
biochemistry, DNA Model, and non-Mendelian genetics.
Modern advances in science are incorporated into the
course to enhance and support units of study and provide
real world application connections. Students enrolled in
this course will take an End of Course Biology exam
mandated by the NJDOE. This course meets the lab
science graduation requirement.

Year

This course is the standard college prep course for 9th
grade/freshman students and meets the lab science
graduation requirement. The major units of study include
biochemistry, cell structure and function, genetics and
reproduction, evolution, classification and ecological
relationships. In today’s world, science knowledge is
always expanding and changing.
To keep current,
modern scientific advances are incorporated into the
course work to enhance topics of study and make real
world connections. Students enrolled in this course will
take an End of Course Biology exam mandated by the
NJDOE (New Jersey Department of Education).

Prerequisite: Grade 8: NWEA Math 250, NWEA Reading
th

225, 8 grade science average of A (93%), successful
completion of a full-year of Algebra I, current Science
Teacher recommendation and approval from the
Instructional Supervisor.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of 8th Grade Science
and Math.

BIOLOGY HONORS
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

CHEMISTRY
Grades 10-12

H40030

Year

H40070
1.0 Credit
th

Year

Chemistry is the standard 10 grade science course and
a required graduation course for all LHS students.

Biology Honors is an accelerated course that is designed
for the superior science student. Students enrolled in this

31

Chemistry is a full-year college preparatory laboratory
science course in which concepts are introduced in the
context of societal issues. Students will be exposed to
theories, evaluate data, and make decisions based on
their knowledge and observations.
Through inquiry
investigations, realistic applications, and real world
scenarios, the topics of matter, energy, properties, atomic
structure, molecular structure and more are explored.

Prerequisite:

scope of this course are designed for the above average
student with a sound understanding of algebra, geometry,
and trigonometry. This is a challenging course that
covers basic topics in physics which includes theories,
techniques, and generalizing principles which is designed
to develop student understanding through problem
solving, qualitative and quantitative reasoning, and
experimental investigation. Topics covered include
mechanics, thermodynamics, vibration and wave,
electricity and magnetism, light and optics, and quantum
and atomic physics. This course meets the lab science
graduation requirement.

Successful completion of Biology/Honors

and Algebra I.
CHEMISTRY HONORS
Grades 10-12
1.0 Credit

H40060

Prerequisite:

Successful completion of Biology/Honors,
a B (83%) or better in Chemistry Honors or A (93%) in
Chemistry, successful completion of Algebra II or Algebra
II Honors, and current Science Teacher recommendation.
A score of 250 on the NWEA Math section may also be
considered.

Year

This honors level course is designed to challenge the
superior and motivated student. Students are expected to
gather and arrange data in meaningful patterns that
reveal regularities in order to introduce principals and
solve problems.
Enrolled students should also
demonstrate the ability to problem solve, think critically,
and work independently. The primary purpose of this
course is an in-depth study of the structure and
characteristics of matter with a focus on the following
topics: atomic theory, the mole concept, kinetic theory,
and atomic structure. This course meets the lab science
graduation requirement.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

(93%) in Biology, B (83%) Algebra I, successful or
concurrent completion of Algebra II, and current science
teacher recommendation. A score of 250 on the NWEA
Math may also be considered.
1.0 Credit

H40110

Prerequisite:

Successful completion of Biology/Honors
and successful completion of Chemistry/Honors and
teacher recommendation.

Year

In this Physics course, emphasis will be placed on
conceptual understanding, real world application, and
formula application to prepare students for future studies
in science. Students should be proficient in algebra and
plane geometry. Physics acquaints students with general
physical principles that explain physical phenomena.
Students will learn essential problem solving skills while
studying classical physics areas such as motion and
forces, mechanical energy, heat, sound, light, electricity,
magnetism, and optics.
Hands-on laboratory work,
demonstrations and classroom discussion are the core
focus for the course and will prepare students for collegelevel physics, as well as meeting the lab science
graduation requirement.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY
Grades 11-12
1.2 Credits

H40021
Year

Advanced Placement Biology prepares students for the
Biology AP Examination offered by College Board®. The
course is designed for the highly motivated student and
serves as excellent preparation for students planning to
attend college, or students who will continue their
studies/career in science. This college-level course
differs from other biology course offerings with respect to
the kind of text used (college level), and effort required of
the student. This course is equivalent to a first-year
college biology course and addresses the same topics
such as Molecules and Cells, Heredity and Evolution and
Organisms and Populations. This course will foster and
assist students in gaining a conceptual understanding and
recognition of unifying themes that integrate major topics
of biology through critical thinking and application of the
biological processes and knowledge.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology/Honors,
Chemistry/Honors, Geometry and the current science
teacher recommendation.
PHYSICS HONORS
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

Year

This course examines the interrelationships between
living organisms and their surroundings. The students will
explore, in depth, the ecological and economical aspects
of current environmental issues. Topics of study include:
ecosystems, natural selection, biodiversity (endangered
species), biomes (land and aquatic – freshwater and
marine), population dynamics, food and agriculture, land
and water resources; waste management and global
impact of energy and resource consumption. There is
also limited field work associated with this lab science
course.

Prerequisite: B (83%) or better in Biology Honors or A

PHYSICS
Grades 11-12

H40120

H40100
Year

Prerequisite: B (83%) or better in Biology Honors or A

This course is excellent preparation for the college- bound
student and those interested in careers in science,
engineering, pre-med, and liberal arts. The pace and

(93%) in Biology, B (83%) or better in Chemistry Honors
or A (93%) in Chemistry, concurrent or successful

32

completion of Physics or Physics Honors, and the current
science teacher recommendation.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY
Grades 11-12
1.2 Credits

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS C: Mechanics

H40091

Grades 11-12

H40051
Year

1.0 Credit

Year

This is a full-year high school calculus-based, collegelevel physics course for students planning to specialize or
major in physical science, pre-med or engineering upon
high school graduation, this is the course most college
prefer. The course explores topics such as kinematics;
Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy and power;
systems of particles and linear momentum; circular
motion and rotation; and oscillations and gravitation.
Students will develop critical thinking and reasoning skills,
allowing them to cultivate their understanding of physics
and science practices.
Introductory differential and
integral calculus is used throughout the course. The AP
Physics C Mechanics course provides the student with an
opportunity either to have an accelerated college program
or to meet a basic science requirement; in either case the
student’s college program may be enriched.
Upon
successful completion of the CollegeBoard® AP Physics
1 exam, students have the potential to earn a semester
(1/2 year) college credits.

This course is designed for students demonstrating high
academic ability and for those who may be planning to
continue their studies in science or Chemistry at the
collegiate level. The purpose of the curriculum is to
prepare students for the AP exam in Chemistry offered by
CollegeBoard®. It is designed to be the equivalent of the
general Chemistry course usually taken during the first
year in college. This course differs from other chemistry
courses with respect to the kind of text used (college
level), the topics covered, the emphasis on chemical
calculations, and lab work completed. In keeping with
the trends from college classes and the CollegeBoard®,
science process skills are emphasized. The course of
study topics include atomic structure, valence bond
theory, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium,
thermodynamics,
electrochemistry,
and
acid
base/titration.
Career exploration opportunities are
explored.

Prerequisite:

Successful completion of AP Physics or
(83%) or better in Physics Honors or A (93%) or better in
Physics, successful completion of Algebra II Honors or A
(93%) in Algebra II, and recommendation of the current
science teacher.

Prerequisite: B (83%) or better in Biology Honors or A
(93%) in Biology, and a B (83%) or better in Chemistry
Honors or A (93%) in Chemistry, concurrent or successful
completion of Physics or Physics Honors, and current
science teacher recommendation.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL
SCIENCE
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS C: Electricity and
Magnetism
H40092
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit
Year

H40125
Year

This is a full-year Advanced Placement science course
that will prepare students to take the Environmental
Science AP Examination offered by College Board®. The
goal of this course is to provide students with the scientific
principles required to understand the concepts and
methodology of the interrelationship in the natural world,
to identify and analyze environmental problems both
natural and human made, to evaluate the relative risks
associated with these problems, and to examine alternate
solutions for resolving or preventing them.

This is a full-year high school calculus-based, collegelevel physics course for students planning to specialize or
major in physical science, pre-med or engineering upon
high school graduation, this is the course most colleges
prefer. The course explores topics such as electrostatics;
conductors, capacitors, and dielectrics; electric circuits;
magnetic fields; and electromagnetism. Students will
develop critical thinking and reasoning skills, allowing
them to cultivate their understanding of physics and
sciences practices. Introductory differential and integral
calculus is used throughout the course. The AP Physics
C Electricity and Magnetism course provides the student
with an opportunity either to have an accelerated college
program or to meet a basic science requirement; in either
case the student’s college program may be enriched.

Prerequisite: B (83%) or better in Physics Honors or A

(93%) or better in Physics, concurrent enrollment into
Calculus or Calculus Honors, OR successful completion
of Pre-Calculus Honors or A (93%) in Pre-Calculus, and
recommendation of the current science teacher. Upon

Upon successful completion of the CollegeBoard® AP
Physics 1 exam, students have the potential to earn a
semester (1/2 year) college credits.

permission, students who have completed Pre-Calculus
Honors with a 93% or better can enroll in this course
without completing prior physics courses.

Prerequisite: B (83%) or better in Physics Honors or A

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

(93%) or better in Physics, concurrent enrollment into
Calculus or Calculus Honors, OR successful completion
of Pre-Calculus Honors or A (93%) in Pre-Calculus, and
recommendation of the current science teacher.

H40151
Year

The Anatomy and Physiology course studies the human
body from the progression of the cell, to tissue, to organ,
and finally to human body system. This course provides
an in-depth and focused study on body systems and is
designed for a student that has an affinity for Biology and

33

interest in studying how the human body works. This is a
full-year course that will incorporate hands-on activities
and dissections to enhance and support the concepts
studied. It is recommended for students interested in
future medical studies. Please note that dissections are a
major course component and that participation in these
activities will not be waived.
There may also be
opportunities for virtual dissection.

and much more. This course is hands-on and driven by
lab activities and experiences.

Prerequisite: Success completion of Biology/Honors with
a 70%, completion of Chemistry/Honors with a 70%. This
course does not satisfy the NJDOE graduation
requirements.
SCIENCE IN THE COMMUNITY-BIOLOGY
Grade 9
1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: B (83%) or better in Biology/Honors and C

(70%) or better in Chemistry/Honors. This course can be
taken to fulfill NJDOE graduation requirements.
GENETICS
Grades 11-12

0.5 Credit

Year

This course will focus on the NJCCCS in life science
while exploring living things in our community. Students
will participate in a curriculum designed to meet standards
in life science and complete hands on activities and
community based instruction designed to bring the
concepts of biology to the real world. Students will
explore various careers involved in the life science arena.
Students will also research the natural processes that
affect their world and environmental changes that are the
results of human impact.

H40160

Semester

This elective course serves as an excellent introduction to
the study of genetics and is designed to expose the
college-bound science student to further investigation of
this specific area of Biological Science.
Genetics
stresses the physical properties of chromosomes, gene
control of cell activity, and both typical as well as complex
patterns of inheritance. Also investigated in this course of
the relationships between genetic principles and current
studies in evolution, eugenics, and cancer research.
Content covered in this course is supplemented by
laboratory experiments and data analysis.

SCIENCE IN THE COMMUNITY-CHEMISTRY
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

H90174

Year

This course will focus on the NJCCS in Chemistry while
exploring physical changes in our world. Students will
participate in an exploration of matter and energy in order
to better understand the physical world. Students will
study systems and conservation of mass; energy changes
and chemical reactions. Students will also research
careers applicable to topics in the physical sciences and
requirements for entry into these fields. Students will use
their community and problem based learning to explore
concepts in chemistry.

Prerequisite:

B (83%) or better in Biology/Honors, or
successful completion of Chemistry/Honors, or concurrent
or successful completion of a third year of lab science.
This course does not satisfy the NJDOE graduation
requirements.
FORENSIC SCIENCE
Grades 11-12
0.5 Credit

H90171

H40170

Semester

SCIENCE IN THE COMMUNITY-PHYSICS
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

This elective course is designed to assist students in
obtaining competencies in communication skills, problem
solving/ critical thinking skills, and scientific and
technological skills. Emphasis is placed on how
fundamental principles of science are applied by forensic
scientists to analyze physical evidence collected in
conjunction with a criminal investigation. In the lecture
and laboratory topics presented are the techniques, skills,
and limitations of the modern crime laboratory. Topics
include evidence collection, profiling, DNA analysis, hair
and fiber analysis, handwriting and forgery, Blood splatter
analysis, dental impression and tire treads, finger printing

H90183
Year

This course will focus on the NJCCS in physics relating to
experiences in the real world. Students will explore
energy and heat conduction while relating these concepts
to the practical real world application. Students will use
their world to study concepts in sports, energy
conservation and engineering.
Students will also
research careers related to the field and use problem
based learning to explore concepts in physics..

34

SOCIAL STUDIES OFFERINGS
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: The Social Studies program consists of a three-year required curriculum and a junior/senior
elective program. Freshmen are required to take Modern World Civilizations and sophomores and juniors take American
Civilization I and II, respectively. This three-year sequence provides all students with an awareness of the interrelationship
of cultures and an understanding of the major events, people, and trends in the development of world and American
civilizations.
Seniors and qualified juniors may elect semester-long social studies courses from a list of electives.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT: The Social Studies Department offers five advanced placement courses as part of the honors
program. AP American History is offered to juniors enrolled in the honors program in lieu of American Civilization II. AP
Macroeconomics/Microeconomics is offered to qualified juniors and seniors. AP European History, AP Government and
Politics, and AP World Studies are offered to qualified seniors who have completed Modern World Civilizations, American
Civilization I, and AP American History. These courses prepare students for AP examinations and, as a result, are
considered college-level courses. To enroll in an AP class, students taking regular courses must have a 93 or better and
students taking honors classes must have an 83 or better.
THE ELECTIVE PROGRAM: Seniors and qualified juniors may elect semester-long social studies courses from a list of
electives. The Elective Program is designed to provide students with opportunities to choose additional social studies
courses as electives and may be taken upon successful completion of the American Civilization program.
MODERN WORLD CIVILIZATIONS
MODERN WORLD CIVILIZTIONS HONORS
Grade 9
1.0 Credit

H20020
H20010

analysis of events and people of the times viewed from
the perspectives of various historians.

Year

AMERICAN CIVILIZATION II
Grade 11
1.0 Credit

Modern World Civilizations is the first part of the threeyear required sequence of Social Studies offered at
Lawrence High School. This course provides an overview
of major world civilizations that flourished in Asia, Africa,
and Europe from the Renaissance to the present. While
focusing on world cultures from a chronological
perspective, contemporary global issues will be studied.
Students will be expected to understand the relationships
between historical and current events.
recommended into the honors program. In addition to
possessing excellent reading, writing, and organizational
skills, students are expected to be able to analyze issues
critically, develop criteria to make rational judgments, and
discuss points of view of various scholars. Students will
analyze and write Document-Based Questions.

Prerequisite: Completion of American Civilization II.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY

H20100

Grade 11

H20050
H20040

1.0 Credit

Year

Advanced Placement United States History may be taken
in lieu of American Civilization II. This course prepares
students for the Advanced Placement United States
History exam in May. Students interpret illustrations,
graphs, charts; they improve their essay writing and
develop a writing style; they apply critical analysis skills to
discussion and written work; they write DBQs.
Requirements include the reading of monographs,
participation in class, analysis of primary sources, and
writing essays in order to prepare for the AP exam.
Students who take the AP United States History exam will
not be required to take a departmental final exam.

Year

American Civilization I surveys important events, people,
and trends in the development of America from colonial
th
times to the early 20 century. The chief emphasis is on
the broader trends in history. Thus, students are able to
gain a better insight into the compelling social, cultural,
economic, political, and military problems of the times.
P

Year

American Civilization II continues the survey of American
History beginning with America’s emergence as a world
power and continues through present-day society. The
development of America and its interrelationship with
other countries are studied through historical analysis and
contemporary perspective. Students are able to gain a
better insight into the compelling social, cultural,
economic, political, and military problems spanning the
twentieth and twenty-first centuries. In addition to daily
class work, students write essays, prepare oral reports
and take a final examination.

Honors: In order to enroll in this class, students must be

AMERICAN CIVILIZATION I
AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 1 HONORS
Grade 10
1.0 Credit

H20080

P

Honors: In order to enroll in this class, students must be
recommended into the honors program. Students are
expected to possess excellent reading and writing skills
as the course is characterized by a large number of
supplemental readings and critical analysis essays, and
writing DBQs. The emphasis in this course is on the

Prerequisite:

Completion of the Honors sequence in
grades 9 and 10, department recommendation and
summer assignment.

35

ADVANCED PLACEMENT ECONOMICS
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

H20200

ADVANCED PLACEMENT WORLD HISTORY
Grade 12
1.0 Credit

Year

AP Economics combines both AP Microeconomics and
AP Macroeconomics and prepares students for the
Advanced Placement exams in both economics. Topics
include the study of the economy as a whole, and
individual groups such as corporations, government, labor
unions, and investors. Emphasis is placed on the
dynamics of capitalism in the United States. Current
literature, such as journals and magazines, is included.
Students who take the Advanced Placement exams in
May will not be required to take a departmental final
examination.

Year

The purpose of this course is to develop greater
understanding of the evolution of global processes and
contacts in interaction with different types of human
societies. This understanding is advanced through a
combination of selective factual knowledge and
appropriate analytical skills. The course highlights the
nature of changes in international frameworks and their
causes and consequences, as well as comparisons
among major societies. It builds on an understanding of
cultural, institutional, and technological precedents that,
along with geography, set the human state. Periodization
forms an organizing principle for dealing with change and
continuity. Specific themes provide further organization,
along with the consistent attention to contacts among
societies that form the core of would history as a field of
study. Students who take the AP World History exam in
May will not be required to take a departmental final
exam.

Prerequisite: Completion of Modern Civilization Honors,
American
Civilization
I
Honors,
recommendation, and summer assignment.

H20115

department

ADVANCED PLACEMENT GOVERNMENT AND
POLITICS
H20120
Grade 12
1.0 Credit
Year

CONTEMPORARY WORLD STUDIES I
Grades 11-12
0.5 Credit

This course is designed to give students a critical
perspective on government and politics in the United
States. This course involves the study of the following
topics: Political Beliefs and Behaviors, Constitutional
Underpinnings of U.S. Government, Political Parties and
Interest Groups, Institutions and Policy Processes of
National Government and Civil Rights and Civil Liberties.
Students are expected to be familiar with the various
institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that make up the
American political tradition. Students who take the AP
Government and Politics Examination in May will not be
required to take a departmental final exam.

H20180

Semester

Honors, AP American History, and/or department
recommendation. There is a summer assignment as well.

Contemporary World Studies I is designed to reflect the
global perspective of the Social Studies curriculum.
Students will study current world problems as they appear
in the geographic areas of India, Latin and South
America, and Africa, focusing on issues such as
overpopulation and food distribution, social justice,
human rights, and relations with the United States.
Resources include the analysis of daily local and world
newspapers, weekly periodicals, news broadcasts, and
Internet research databases. Students are asked to
review problems in global context by understanding the
interdependence of issues facing all the peoples of the
world. This course fulfills the Social Studies core course
requirement for the NCAA.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT EUROPEAN HISTORY

Prerequisite: Completion of Modern World Civilizations,

Prerequisite: Completion of American Civilization I

American Civilization I & II; qualified juniors may apply.

H20110

Grade 12

1.0 Credit

Year

CONTEMPORARY WORLD STUDIES II
Grades 11-12
0.5 Credit

This course prepares students for the Advanced
Placement Examination in European History. It provides
an in-depth analysis of the major themes comprising the
history of Europe from the renaissance to the present.
Goals are to develop an understanding of some of the
principal themes in modern European history and to
develop the ability to analyze historical evidence.
Enrollment is open to seniors who are academically
qualified, highly motivated, and exhibit excellent reading,
writing, and critical analysis skills. Students who take the
AP European History Examination in May will not be
required to take a departmental final exam.

H20190
Semester

Contemporary World Studies II is designed as a
complement to Contemporary World Studies I, studying
the same world issues but focusing on geographic areas
of Asia, the Middle East, and Europe. Students may take
this course without having taken Contemporary World
Studies I. This course fulfills the Social Studies core
course requirement for the NCAA.

Prerequisite: Completion of Modern World Civilizations,
American Civilization I & II; qualified juniors may apply.
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
Grades 9-12
0.5 Credit

Prerequisite: Completion of the Honors sequence in
grades 9, 10, and 11, department recommendation, and
completion of a summer assignment as well.

H20220

Semester

This course fulfills the NJDOE economics graduation
requirement. This course emphasizes analysis of the
American economic system as it relates to the individual.

36

Because all individuals must make economic decisions in
their everyday lives, we need an understanding of
microeconomics. This course provides a survey of many
of the major topics in economic literacy so that the
individual can make informed choices, e.g., banking,
credit, interest rates, etc. Specific units will include the law
of supply and demand, factors of production, and the
business cycle.
ECONOMICS
Grades 9-12

0.5 Credit

HUMAN BEHAVIOR
Grades 11-12
0.5 Credit

Human Behavior provides an introduction to the discipline
of psychology. Students will study the various theories
and concepts of human behavior and apply them to case
studies and a process of personal reflection and selfdiscovery. Students will explore the historical significance
of early psychoanalytic theories as well as the
development of the human mind, including the
examination of the learning process, memory
enhancement, altered states, effects of stress, and
abnormal behavior. The course will conclude with an
analysis of current psychological issues in today’s society.

H20210

Semester

This course fulfills the NJDOE economics graduation
requirement. This course will provide students with a solid
understanding of economic principles, systems, and
activities, in order to fully participate as a citizen in the
U.S. Free Enterprise System. The focus is on the basic
principles concerning production, consumption, and
distribution and services in the United States and a
comparison with those in other countries around the
world. Macroeconomic issues will include money and
banking, monetary and fiscal policy, international trade
and comparative economic systems. We will be touching
on the history of economic thought as well as current
economic issues. Constant changes regarding the
economy make this an exciting and challenging course.
HISTORY AND FILM I
Grades 11-12
0.5 Credit

Prerequisite: Completion of Modern World Civilizations,
American Civilization I & II; qualified juniors may apply.
SOCIOLOGY: AN EXPLORATION OF CULTURAL
DIVERSITY IN AMERICA
H20150
Grades 11-12
0.5 Credit
Semester
“Sociology:
An Exploration of Cultural Diversity in
America” is designed to introduce students to the
systematic study of the socialization process and group
relationships. Emphasis is placed on American culture
and the factors accounting for its unique diversity. The
role of minorities and related social movements are
emphasized together with the forces accounting for
cultural change and resistance to that change. Social
institutions including the family, religion, and education
are also examined. While American culture is
emphasized, students are encouraged to examine other
cultural groups, particularly in the units on cultural
diversity, social problems, the family, religion, and social
stratification.

H20160

Semester

History and Film I examines the development of America
Civilization in a global setting via the medium of film.
Students will draw upon knowledge and experience of
other social studies courses to analyze filmmakers’ pointof-view, historical context, and impact on society. Works
will include films directed by Griffith through Stone.
Formal writing is expected for all major assessments.
This course fulfills the Social Studies core course
requirement for the NCAA.

Prerequisite: Completion of Modern World Civilizations,
American Civilization I & II; qualified juniors may apply.
YOU AND THE LAW I
Grades 11-12
0.5 Credit

Prerequisite: Completion of Modern World Civilizations,
American Civilization I & II; qualified juniors may apply.
HISTORY AND FILM II
Grades 11-12
0.5 Credit

H20130

Semester

H20140

Semester

You and The Law examine the individual’s role in today’s
legal society by focusing on the basic function of the
organization of our legal systems. The course
emphasizes the aspects of law which will increase the
students’ understanding of citizen rights, privileges, and
obligations most fundamental to their future experiences;
i.e., constitutional guarantees, student rights, employment
contracts, etc. In addition to reading court cases and
completing daily work, students will be expected to
present oral reports and projects,

H20170

Semester

History and Film II continues the examination of various
American historical themes in society via the medium of
film. Students do not have to have taken History of Film I
in order to enroll in this class. Formal writing is expected
for all major assessments. This course fulfills the Social
Studies core course requirement for the NCAA.

Prerequisite: Completion of Modern World Civilizations,

Prerequisite: Completion of Modern World Civilizations,

American Civilization I & II; qualified juniors may apply.

American Civilization I & II; qualified juniors may apply.

37

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION OFFERINGS
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: Technology education provides a broad range of hands-on applications in the areas of
architecture, graphic imaging, and technology. Through a variety of innovative experiences, students will acquire skills that
will prepare them for post-secondary education or a satisfying career within a complex technological society. The
department also strives to emphasize those factors beyond job-related skills that will enable them to become productive and
contributing members of society.
st

All courses in Technology Education fulfill the 21 Century Life & Careers or Technical requirement for graduation.
ADVANCED ARCHITECTURAL AND 3D DESIGN
Grades 10-12

1.0 Credit

INTRODUCTION TO DRAFTING AND AUTOCAD

H80035
Year

Grades 9-12

1.0 Credit

H80015
Year

This course builds on the Introduction to Drafting and
AutoCAD experience. During the first semester students
will be introduced to techniques of design and
construction used in residential structures. With a major
emphasis on computer aided drafting, students will learn
and perform skills related to the design of efficient,
functional residential structures. Second semester
students will learn the importance of modeling through the
completion of hands-on activities. Basic modeling
processes such as low relief modeling and structural
modeling will lay the groundwork for more advanced
modeling forms. Design software and 3D printers will lay
the groundwork for more advanced modeling forms.

This course introduces students to multi-view drawing,
pictorial drawing, sketching, size description, and creative
visualization in the solution of design problems. Emphasis
is placed on critical thinking and problem solving
techniques within a learner-centered classroom
associated with the use of drafting tools, materials, and
correct drawing procedures. The introduction of AutoCAD
reflects the use of current technology within the
classroom, but does not in any way diminish the
importance of traditional skills students will need to
pursue a career within the design arena.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Drafting and AutoCAD with a

Year

TELEVISION STUDIO
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

minimum grade of C (75%).

APPLIED ENGINEERING
Grades 10-12
1.0 Credit

LHS recognizes the significance of video communication
skills in our society. Some of the topics covered will
include:
the history and development of television
broadcasting, how to operate a television/ video
production studio, the three stages of production, the
different programming formats, editing techniques in postproduction, assemble and insert editing, and how a sound
trace is created. Students in this course will create a
student-produced show to be broadcast in-house at the
high school.

H80040

Year

This course will reinforce critical thinking and problem
solving skills, develop basic exploratory skills,
technological literacy, and introduce the elements of
safety as we embark on the 21st century. Appropriate
hands-on experiences dealing with past, present, and
future aspects of engineering will be a major component
of this course. Research and development, structures,
aerodynamics, and fluid dynamics are just a few of the
modules to be studied.

INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOGRAPHY
Grades 10-12
0.5 Credit

H80071
Semester

This course will focus on basic mechanical aspects of
photography. Step-by-step procedures illustrate how to
use the camera and its functions. The hands-on projects
presented help students develop basic camera skills, the
activity experiments further refine photographic skills
(e.g., depth of field, white balance), and research
activities apply practical photographic activities.

Prerequisite: C or better in Inventions and Innovations.
INVENTIONS AND INNOVATIONS
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

H80050

H80060
Year

This course explores the nature and elements of
technological change along with its social and economic
consequences. Through a series of hands-on
experiences, students will develop an understanding of
the processes involved in designing and developing new
products and materials and services to satisfy
contemporary wants and needs. Students will learn the
importance of the design cycle and how to use sit as a
tool of innovation. This course is a prerequisite for Applied
Engineering.

INTRODUCTION TO VIDEOGRAPHY
Grades 10-12
0.5 Credit

H80081
Semester

Once students have mastered the skills of still
photography, they will move on to the world of video.
Students will concentrate on all aspects of technical video
production that include recording with mini-camcorders
and editing with (i)movie software. Creativity and

38

innovation will be welcome as students develop
storytelling and plot development skills, as well as the
three phases of production, as they produce their own
videos.
ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY & EDITING
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

The Robotics and Programming course is designed to
explore the current and future use of automation
technology in industry and everyday use. Students will
receive a comprehensive overview of robotic systems and
the subsystems that comprise them. Students will receive
extensive training in ROBOTC programming and Virtual
Worlds simulation software. Students will build
autonomous and remote controlled robots using the
LEGO MINDSTORMS NXT and TETRIX building
platforms and write programs to accomplish various
tasks. Careers in robotics, programming, and engineering
will be discussed. At the end of the course qualifying
students may take an online exam through National
Robotics Engineering Center at Carnegie Mellon
University to become certified in ROBOTC programming.

H80085
Year

This course will give students the opportunity to manually
shoot digital assignments using a DSLR camera.
Students will then bring these projects to fruition by
utilizing sophisticated editing software programs.

Prerequisite: C or better in Introduction to Photography.
ROBOTICS AND PROGRAMMING
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

H40131
Year

Prerequisite: C or better in Algebra I OR

recommendation of math or robotics teacher.

39

WORLD LANGUAGES OFFERINGS
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: The World Language program at Lawrence High School provides students with more than the
basics of language learning. Students in the World Languages program engage in culture, history, literature, art, music, and
current events of our global community.
Although all students must take at least one year of World Language to meet graduation requirements , most universities will
prefer multiple years of study of the same world language. The World Language department offers Advanced Placement
(AP) courses in each of its languages; these courses prepare students for the AP exam in May and are therefore considered
college courses.
The World Language program currently consists of French, Italian, Latin, Mandarin Chinese, and Spanish. Students must
obtain a grade of a “C” or better to take the next level of the course. Those students who have taken Spanish, French or
Mandarin Chinese at the middle school may begin their year with the second level of the language. For Honors, a grade of a
“B” or better is required to move to the next level of Honors or Advanced Placement.
FRENCH I
Grades 9-12

1.0 Credit

H50010

provide flexibility and encourage daily participation and
interaction in a variety of activities.

Year

French I introduces students to the listening, speaking,
reading, and writing concepts of the language. The
vocabulary learned is current. Usable French grammar is
studied in an eclectic approach with visuals, tapes and
music to accompany the text. Students are encouraged to
use the beginning phrases and to adapt them to simple
conversations. The culture learned emphasizes the
activities of young French speakers from the various
French-speaking countries of the world.
FRENCH II
Grades 9-12

1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: B or better in French III.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT FRENCH LANGUAGE AND
CULTURE
H50065
Grade 12
1.0 Credit
Year
This is the Advanced Placement Course geared towards
enabling the students to reach a greater proficiency in the
French language. The course is conducted entirely in
French, and students must use the language exclusively
in class. Listening, reading, speaking, and writing are
continually strengthened as topics relevant to student's
interests are studied. Many contemporary themes taken
from short stories and poetry in French serve as a
stimulus for extensive exploration. Plays and a novelette
in the target language are read and discussed. Students
explore the material presented by reading several pages
on a daily basis and by writing about what has been read
and discussed in class on a weekly basis. Films also
serve as discussion prompts in the target language.
Possible films in French: Nos enfants nous accuseront
and Entre les murs.

H50020
Year

French II reviews grammatical forms and structures
taught in French I and introduces new and more complex
constructions. Contemporary cultural readings and
activities provide the student with an appreciation for the
French-speaking world and its people. Students are
encouraged to use the language as much as possible,
thus continuing to develop their speaking, listening, and
writing skills.

Prerequisite: C or better in French I.
FRENCH III
Grades 10-12

1.0 Credit

H50030

Prerequisite: C or better in French IV.

Year

French III continues the grammatical program of French II
with an emphasis on communication. Oral participation in
the language is expected, and formal compositions are
introduced. French culture throughout the world is
explored, emphasizing the cultural similarities and
differences of the areas studied.

ITALIAN I
Grades 9-12

Year

Italian I introduces students to the listening, speaking,
reading, and writing skills needed for successful
communication in the language. By the end of the year,
students participate in simple conversations and write
simple short paragraphs on a variety of subjects. Aspects
of Italian geography and cultures are presented.

Prerequisite: C or better in French II.
FRENCH IV HONORS
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

H50110
1.0 Credit

H50040

Year

ITALIAN II
Grades 9-12

French IV Honors focuses on individual improvement.
Students explore more complex grammatical structures
and use expanded vocabulary to express personal
opinions and observations through composition and
conversation. Music, poetry, art, films and news articles

1.0 Credit

H50120

Year

Italian II provides a more advanced study of vocabulary,
grammar, Italian geography and culture with a greater
emphasis on oral and written expression. Students will

40

continue to refine their listening, speaking, reading, and
writing skills.

LATIN III
Grades 10-12

1.0 Credit

H50250
Year

Italian III reinforces the skills of listening, reading, writing
and speaking through various stories, dialogues, and
contemporary issues dealing with the culture of Italy. A
greater emphasis is placed on oral and written
expression.

Latin III students read about ancient conspiracies, deadly
intrigue, as they journey to the spa-town of Bath (Aquae
Sulis) and the legionary fortress of Chester, before finally
arriving to Rome, the center of Empire. Latin III will
expand student knowledge of Latin vocabulary and
English derivatives, complex sentence structures, and
advanced reading comprehension. Students will enjoy the
magnificence and grandeur of the architectural
monuments, and the cosmopolitan atmosphere of the
largest city in the ancient world.

Prerequisite: C or better in Italian II.

Prerequisite: C or better in Latin II.

Prerequisite: C or better in Italian I.
ITALIAN III
Grades 10-12

1.0 Credit

ITALIAN IV HONORS
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

H50130

Year

H50140

LATIN IV HONORS
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

Year

The goal of Italian IV Honors is to increase the student’s
fluency in Italian through daily use of the language in a
variety of learning activities including conversation,
composition, advanced grammar, and reading. These
activities are designed around major aspects of Italian
culture such as politics, art and music, current events and
the changing roles of Italian women.

1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: B or better in Latin III.
H50230

MANDARIN CHINESE I
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

Year

Latin I presents readings in the language of the Romans
in a continuous plotline. It travels back almost 2000 years
to AD 79, a time when the Romans controlled much of
Europe. The city of Rome is the center of the Roman
Empire and 125 miles to the south of the capital are the
dormant volcano Mount Vesuvius and the prosperous
town of Pompeii.
Students will examine English
derivatives, words, which have evolved from Latin roots
and the application of Latin prefixes an suffixes to these
roots, Latin vocabulary, language concepts, and
investigate Roman culture.
LATIN II
Grades 9-12

H50300
Year

This course teaches the basic skills of reading, listening,
speaking, and writing in Mandarin Chinese. Emphasis will
be placed first on the tonal system and proper
pronunciation of sounds. Basic grammar, expressions
and basic sentence structure will follow. Class activities
will consist of oral dialogues, pair and small group
activities and presentations, videos and tapes. The
students will gain new understanding to the history,
geography and culture knowledge of China and other
Chinese-speaking countries.
MANDARIN CHINESE II
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

H50240
1.0 Credit

Year

Latin IV Honors focuses on the politics and philosophy of
ancient Rome. Students are presented with increasingly
complex linguistic concepts through guided readings and
primary sources. A thorough review of Latin grammar is
also an integral part of the course. English vocabulary is
increased through the study of Latin-based derivatives.
This course provides an introduction to the Roman
authors Martial, Ovid, and Vergil.

Prerequisite: B or better in Italian III.
LATIN I
Grades 9-12

H50260

Year

H50310
Year

Mandarin II reinforces the listening, speaking, reading,
and typing skills of the language with emphases on
conversations on topics beyond one's immediate
environment (e.g. sports, shopping, and entertainment)
and on more complex sentence structures. Chinese
character writing continues to be reinforced. Provided with
immersion instructions and culture-integrated activities,
students are expected to master the pinyin system, to
comprehend and conduct simple conversations with
improved accuracy, to read selective materials, and to
develop an understanding of Chinese culture.

Throughout Latin II, the aim is to show that, in addition to
knowledge of grammar and vocabulary, an awareness of
world groups and patterns is also essential to the
understanding of the language. Students explore to two
distant Roman provinces, both very different from each
other. Exotic Egypt will be the final destination, but first,
students examine Roman Britannia, a province on the
very edge of the Empire. Latin II continues to build on
English derivatives taken from the context of vocabulary
in Latin readings; language skills include complex
sentence structures, and an awareness of patterns
essential to the understanding of the target language.
The final readings on historical themes introduce
passages from a range of Latin authors.

Prerequisite: C or better in Mandarin Chinese I.

Prerequisite: C or better in Latin I.

41

MANDARIN CHINESE III
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

H50320

SPANISH FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

Year

H50222

Year

This course emphasizes and further advances the
students’ oral and written communicative abilities. Based
on their prior knowledge in Mandarin, students are guided
to study the basic Mandarin grammar in a systematic
manner. Some simple social correspondence, as well as
narrations and descriptions, are the goals for writing.
Cultural awareness focuses on the interdependence of
language, thought and culture.

This course is designed for students who have native
speaking experience in the target language. Emphasis is
placed on achieving proficiency in the grammatical/
writing components of the language. It focuses on the
unique needs of the native speaker. Samples of authentic
literature will be read and analyzed. It is mandatory for
students to speak only Spanish in this class.

Prerequisite: C or better in Mandarin Chinese II.

CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

MANDARIN CHINESE IV HONORS
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

Year

Conversational Spanish I introduces students to the
listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills of the
language. The vocabulary learned and practiced is
current, conversational, and idiomatic. The grammar is
presented using an eclectic approach with many visual
aids, listening CD’s, and numerous practice exercises
provided by the publisher’s ancillary materials which
accompany the text. Students are encouraged to take
learned phrases and develop them into both oral and
written expression. The course emphasizes the culture of
the Spanish-speaking world, both past and present.

H50330
Year

Mandarin IV continues the development of listening,
speaking, reading, writing, and culture study, with training
in reading comprehension, writing composition, and
Chinese typing skills.

Prerequisite: B or better in Mandarin Chinese III.
MANDARIN CHINESE V HONORS
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit

H50160

H50340
Year

SPANISH I
Grades 9-12

This course provides the students with an effective
sequenced review of selected grammatical points using
thematic instruction. Listening, speaking, and critical
thinking skills are enhanced through conversational
practice in Chinese. Students have the opportunity to
engage in classroom discussion and research projects,
which allow them to use the language to explore certain
topics relating to Chinese literature, history, music,
entertainment, and education. Students will develop
language proficiency while broadening their worldview by
comparing Chinese culture with that of their own.

1.0 Credit

H50180

Year

Spanish I presents the language within the context of the
contemporary Spanish-speaking world and its culture.
Spanish I is designed to help each student attain an
acceptable degree of proficiency in the four skills of
listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of
the first year, students will engage in brief conservations,
use appropriate pronunciation, and respond to short
passages, both verbally and in writing.
SPANISH II
Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: B or better in Mandarin Chinese IV

1.0 Credit

H50190

Year

Spanish II presents the more complex structures of basic
Spanish and expands the cultural themes of the first level.
By the end of the year, students will have acquired a
command of key vocabulary and structures necessary for
personal communication as well as an appreciation of the
breadth and variety of the Spanish-speaking world.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHINESE LANGUAGE AND
CULTURE
H50350
Grades 9-12
1.0 Credit
Year
This is a rigorous course designed to refine students’
listening, reading, writing and speaking skills so that they
can demonstrate the ability to communicate fluently and
accurately in Chinese at a sophisticated level. The AP
Chinese Language and Culture course is designed to be
comparable to fourth semester (or the equivalent)
college/university courses in Mandarin Chinese. This
course promotes an appreciation of Chinese society and
culture, both historic and current day. Throughout the
year, students will study advanced literature,
sophisticated vocabulary and advanced grammatical
structures. Candidates for the course must have
advanced conversation and composition skills.

Prerequisite: C or better in Spanish I.
SPANISH III
Grades 10-12

H50200
1.0 Credit

Year

Spanish III continues the grammatical program of Spanish
II with an emphasis on more advanced grammar
constructions. Oral participation is mandatory, and
communication skills are enhanced through a variety of
authentic listening activities and speaking assessments.
Formal writing and structural reading are introduced.
Culture throughout the Spanish-speaking world is
explored, emphasizing similarities and differences of the
areas studied.

NOTE: Students who have been taught at home or
attended weekend Chinese school must be evaluated by
the Chinese teacher for placement at the appropriate
level.

Prerequisite: C or better in Spanish II.

42

SPANISH IV HONORS
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit

H50210

ADVANCED PLACEMENT SPANISH LANGUAGE AND
CULTURE
H50225
Grades 11-12
1.0 Credit
Year

Year

Spanish IV Honors is designed both to refine and expand
the serious language student’s basic knowledge of
Spanish. By focusing on their individual improvement, the
students and the teacher together explore the intricacies
of composition, conversation, and the beginnings of
literary analysis. The course serves as a bridge between
the three basic levels.

This is a rigorous course designed to refine students’
listening, reading, writing, and speaking skills to enable
them to demonstrate the ability to communicate fluently
and accurately in Spanish at a sophisticated level. It is
designed to be comparable to fourth semester (or the
equivalent) college/university courses in Spanish. This
course promotes an appreciation of Hispanic/Spanish
society and culture, both historic and current day.
Throughout the year, students will study advanced
literature, sophisticated vocabulary and advanced
grammatical structures. Candidates for the course must
have advanced conversation and composition skills.

Prerequisite: CB or better in Spanish III.

43

OPTION II: ALTERNATIVE PROGRAM OF STUDY
The purpose of Option II is to provide students with an alternative path to earn high school credit through meaningful and
relevant educational experiences beyond the scope of the current school curriculum. Prior approval is required. A program
model may include, but is not limited to, the following:





College Coursework (see Option II: Non-Traditional Academic Offerings)
Independent Study (see Option II: Non-Traditional Academic Offerings)
Online Coursework
Internships
Community Service/Service Learning Projects
Coursework by an approved/accredited provider (see counselor for details)

The Option II alternative program of study must receive the prior approval of the Option II Committee before a student can
enroll. The Option II alternative program must meet or exceed the standards set forth in the most recently approved state
standards. Upon completion, students must demonstrate satisfactory performance in order for credit to be awarded (See
Option II Pathways chart).
Participation in Option II programs is completely voluntary. It is understood that students, and their parents/guardians, will
be responsible for any and all costs, transportation, and personal safety of students wishing to participate in Option II
programs.
Procedures for Implementing Option II Activities
Application Process
Students and/or their parents/guardians may initiate a request for an Option II program. Students should meet with their
counselors to discuss their Option II ideas, and most importantly should request the Option II Application Packet from their
counselor. All requests must be made by completing the Option II application with submission of the course description or
syllabus. The Option II Committee, which consists of the Supervisor of Guidance, a school counselor, a subject area
supervisor, and the Principal, will review the application.
Requests for Option II activities must be submitted only on LHS - Option II Application forms, which are available in the
guidance office (or from your counselor). They must be submitted prior to the school year or semester in which they are
proposed for implementation. Deadlines for submission are listed on the chart titled “Option II Deadlines” below. Please
note that all Option II Science courses for original credit must include a lab component—No exceptions.
Approval or denial of a requested Option II application will be returned to the student and his/her parents or guardians by the
Option II Committee.
Program Assessment
To assess appropriate program progress, students will be required to submit evidence of program attendance and academic
progress. This may include, but is not limited to, time sheets or grades.
Official transcripts from all approved programs will be collected at the end of each approved course and will be assessed by
the Option II Committee for inclusion in the student’s cumulative records.
If at any time a student fails to comply with or complete the program’s requirements, they will receive a failing grade on their
transcript.
Appeal Process
Students who have had their Option II proposal denied should appeal in writing directly to the Option II Committee within 3
business days from the date/notice of denial. Students will then have an opportunity to resubmit alternate proposals for
consideration as long as this is submitted within 3 business days from the time/notice of denial.
After meeting with the committee, a student’s parents may appeal a denial of the Option II Committee directly to the Director
of Curriculum and Instruction, whose decision is final.

44

Recording of Option II coursework on the LHS Transcript

Option II coursework, once completed, and all pathways met and approved the committee, will be recorded on the
transcript -- but will not count toward GPA or WGPA.
Course Completion/Course Withdrawals: The expectation is that the courses will be completed during the time
specified below and on the approval form. No grade will appear on the student’s transcript until the official transcript
from the approved course vendor is received (which the student is required to provide to LHS). Until the official
transcript is received, a “W” (Withdrawal) will be posted on the student’s LHS transcript.
Students may be required to take and achieve a qualifying score (see Option II Pathways) on the LHS Assessment
as the final step in completing the Option II process. Appointments can be made by calling (609) 671-5515.
OPTION II DEADLINES

If your proposed
coursework will take
place in:

Your application is
due on:

You must submit the
official transcript by:

*If applicable, you
must take the LHS
assessment by:

Summer

June 2

August 31

August 26

August 31

January 6

December 16

January 31

June 2

May 20

(Both 1 / .5 credit courses)

Fall
(Both 1 / .5 credit courses)

Spring
( .5 credit courses only )

OPTION II PATHWAYS

Option II Pathways

Grading Policy

Applicable Fees

Option II Course
Grade

LHS Assessment
Minimum
Qualifying Grade

Original Credit (for a course not
yet taken)

Grade/Course is
recorded on
student transcript,
but not used in
GPA calculations

Fees and transport
are family
responsibility

Grade of D or
better

60% on the LHS
assessment

Grade/Course is
recorded on
student transcript,
but not used in
GPA calculations

Fees and transport
are family
responsibility

Grade must meet
the requirement
needed for
advancementlisted in LHS
Course of Study

78% on the LHS
assessment

Nothing noted on
student transcript

Fees and transport
are family
responsibility

N/A

90% on the LHS
assessment

Course
Advancement/Acceleration
*Note: Algebra I, Algebra II or
Geometry taken for advancement may
include the student taking the NJDOE
end of year assessment (PARCC for that
course prior to the start of the school
year).

Independent Study for
Advancement (no LHS credit)

CREDIT RECOVERY AND REMEDIATION
Students may retake a course for credit recovery or remediation that was taken at LHS, however was not passed.

The course name and grade are recorded on the student’s transcript, but not used in calculations for the GPA.

All fees and transportation are the responsibility of the student/family.

Students are required a grade of “D” or better, and must pass the LHS assessment with a 60% or better.

45

Option II: Non-Traditional Academic Offerings
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: Non-traditional academic programs at Lawrence High School are designed to extend the
learning opportunities beyond courses offered in the standard curriculum and to encourage non-traditional learning
opportunities.
COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY STUDY
Grades 9-12
Semester

1.0 LHS Credit: per 3 College Credit Course

Students have the opportunity to study college level courses at area community, state, and private colleges and universities.
Students are responsible for any and all expenses related to this program, as well as their own transportation. To be eligible
for enrollment in college level courses, students must have successfully completed the high school sequence of courses in
the subject area they plan to pursue and meet the specific requirements as designated by each institution of higher learning.
All applications for a college/university study program must be processed by the guidance office prior to the deadlines
established by the attending college/university and approved by the high school administration.
INDEPENDENT STUDY
Grades 11-12
0.25 LHS Credit: per 35 hours
Independent Study (IS) is available for students seeking additional academic opportunities and in-depth study beyond
current LHS course offerings. It is also for those students who have a desire to study course material not currently offered in
the LHS curriculum. Independent Study course work may not be used to replace current curriculum offerings.
To complete an Independent Study, the following steps are required:
1.

2.

3.

A Lawrence High School faculty member must serve as the IS advisor. In order for a faculty member to serve as an
advisor, they must be certified in the subject area they are supervising. Additionally, faculty members are under no
obligation to serve as advisors and do so voluntarily.
Student and advisor must collaborate on the work to be completed, determination of how work will be graded, and
the total time dedicated to independent study work. An Independent Study Contract must then be completed and
will be kept on file in the Guidance Office until the completion of the IS. It is the student’s responsibility to get the
contract approved and signed. Contracts are available in the Guidance Office and should be completed at least two
weeks prior to the semester in which a student wishes to commence their program.
Credit will be awarded upon completion of the IS course. .25 LTPS credits will be awarded for every 35 hours of
project work or contact time. A time log must be maintained, verified, and presented upon completion. All
evaluations must be reviewed and approved by the IS advisor. A grade of pass or fail will be issued for all
independent studies and is not calculated into the student’s grade point average.

BEHIND-THE-WHEEL TRAINING
Behind-the-Wheel is available to students during the school year and summer of each year. Both a three-hour and a sixhour course are available.
Prerequisites for the six-hour course:
1. Minimum age of 16 years
2. Completion of the 30-hour classroom course
3. Score at least 80% on the New Jersey State Exam
Students desiring to take Behind-the-Wheel courses will be charged a fee set by The Board of Education.
MERCER COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE ON-LINE COURSES
Grades 11-12
1.0 LHS Credit: per each 3 Credit College Course
Semester
In a partnership with Mercer County Community College (MCCC), students may take on-line college courses at Lawrence
High School to earn dual credit, high school and college. Interested students must meet minimum college entrance
requirements and complete the MCCC application for acceptance into the course(s). Enrollment is limited to a minimum of
15 students and a maximum of 25 qualified students per course credit. Course may be cancelled if the minimum (15
students) is not achieved. Once admitted, students are unable to drop the selected course. On-line courses will meet
during a designated class period each day.

46

SOC 101- Introduction to Sociology (3 MCCC credits/1.0 LHS credit)
Semester
An introduction to the sociological analysis of society and culture, including the origin and design of political, economic, and
social institutions such as religion, the family, class and caste, education, values, norms, roles, and sociocultural change.
Students learn to analyze, evaluate, and critique social structures.

Course Outline: http://www.mccc.edu/outlines/soc/soc101.pdf

EDU 102- Introduction to Exceptional Children (3 MCCC credits/1.0 LHS credit)
Semester
Introduction to the field of special education and to exceptionality. Inclusion, an approach to teaching students with special
needs in general education, is emphasized. Topics include historical overview, legislation, consideration of specific
disabilities, instructional techniques and equipment, as well as teaching gifted students and non-native speakers.

Course Outline: http://www.mccc.edu/outlines/edu/edu102.pdf

CMN 101 - Mass Media (3 MCCC credits/1.0 LHS credit)
Semester
Survey of the growth and development of books, newspapers, magazines, film, radio, television, cable, the Internet, and
new media delivery systems. Analysis of the mass media's impact on society and individuals, and whether the media
effectively fulfill their functions as deliverers of information, persuasion, entertainment, and culture.

Course Outline: http://www.mccc.edu/outlines/cmn/cmn101.pdf

CRJ 101- Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (3 MCCC credits/1.0 LHS credit)
Semester
Overview of the systems of criminal justice in the United States, including a survey of the agencies for the administration of
justice and the relationships among them.

Course Outline: http://www.mccc.edu/outlines/crj/crj_101.pdf

PSY 101- Introduction to Psychology (3 MCCC credits/1.0 LHS credit)
Semester
The scientific study of human nature -- facts, principles, and theories concerning the mental, emotional, neurological, and
social dimensions of human experience. Topics include consciousness, learning, thinking, memory, brain structure and
function, motivation and emotion, development, personality, mental illness and its treatment, relationships, and social
influence.

Course Outline: http://www.mccc.edu/outlines/psy/psy101.pdf

BIO 115- Microbiological Science Concepts (3 MCCC credits/1.0 LHS credit)
Semester
Based on the Unseen Life on Earth series developed in conjunction with the American Society of Microbiology. Topics
include microbial cell biology, biotechnological uses of microbes, and microbial evolution and ecosystems. Also explores the
control of microorganisms and relationships between microbes and higher organisms. [Meets science and technology
general education requirement.] Note: This course does not have a lab component, therefore, does not fulfill a graduation
requirement for science.

Course Outline: http://www.mccc.edu/outlines/bio/bio115.pdf

47

Elective Courses 2016-2017
Percussion Ensemble (page 22)
Pottery and Sculpture I-III (page 25)
Senior Art Experience (page 25)
Wind Ensemble (page 23)

st

These Fulfill 21 Century Grad Requirement
Business Education (Year)
Introduction to Social Media (page 16)
Marketing Education I & II (page 15)
Honors Financial Accounting (page 16)

Fine, Visual & Performing Arts (Semester)
Concert Choir (page 23)
Music and the Human Experience (page 22)
Piano (page 23)
Guitar (page 23)

Business Education (Semester)
Computer Applications (page15)
Entrepreneurship (page 15)
International Business (page 15)
Personal Finance I (Required) & II (page 16)
Principles of Investing (page16)
Sports Marketing and Management I & II (page 16)

General Electives: However Do Not Fulfill Grad Requirement
st
For 21 Century/ Technical or Fine/Visual/Performing Arts
English (Year)
Publications/Journalism (page 18)
Academic Support Reading (page 19)

Family & Consumer Science (Year)
Early Childhood Development I & II (page 20)
Promising Teachers of Tomorrow (page 21)
International Foods (page 21)
Daily Living Skills (page 21)
Transition Skills for Independence (page 21)
Study Skills (page 21)

English (Semester)
Contemporary Shakespeare (page 18)
Gender Studies (page 18)
Mystery and Adventure (page 18)
Multi-Ethnic Literature (page 18)
Poetry (page 18)
Public Speaking I & II (page 18)
SAT/ACT Verbal Skills and Strategies (page 19)
Short Stories (page 19)

Family & Consumer Science (Semester)
Clothing Fabrics and Construction (page 20)
Culinary Parts I & II (page 20)
Fashion Design (page 20)
Interior Design (page 20)
Nutrition for Healthy Living (page 21)

Mathematics (Semester)
History of Mathematics (page 29)
SAT/ACT Math Skills and Strategies (page 29)
Introduction to Computer Programming (page 29)

Technology Education (Year)
Advanced Architectural and 3D Design (page 38)
Applied Engineering (page 38)
Introduction to Drafting and AutoCAD (page 38)
Robotics and Programming (page 39)
Television Studio (page 38)
Advanced Photography & Editing (page 39)
Inventions and Innovations (page 38)

Physical Education & Health (Year)
Teen Prevention Education Program (page 30)
Physical Education & Health (Semester)
Lifetime Fitness (page 30)
Fundamentals of Coaching (page 30)
Science (Year)
Environmental Science (page 32)
Anatomy and Physiology (page 33)

Technology Education (Semester)
Introduction to Photography (page 38)
Introduction to Videography (page 38)

Science (Semester)
Forensic Science (page 34)
Genetics (page 34)

These Fulfill Fine & Performing Arts Grad Requirement
Fine, Visual & Performing Arts (Year)
AP Music Theory (page 22)
Concert Choir (page 23)
Concert Band (page 22)
Contemporary Music Studio (page 22)
Ensemble (page 23)
Jazz Studies (page 22)
Madrigal (page 23)
Music and the Human Experience (page 22)
Musical Theatre (page 24)
String Orchestra (page 22)
Theatre I & II (page 23)
Advanced Theatre Studies (page 24)
Stagecraft and Design (page 23)
AP Studio Art (page (page 24)
Commercial Art I-III (page 24)
Drawing I & II (page 24)
Painting I & II (page 25)

Social Studies (Year)
AP Government and Politics (page 36)
AP European History (page 36)
AP Economics (page 36)
AP United States History (page 35)
AP World History (page 36)
Social Studies (Semester)
Contemporary World Studies I & II (page 36)
Economics (page 37)
Principles of Economics (page 36)
History and Film I & II (page 37)
Human Behavior (page 37)
Sociology: An Exploration of Cultural Diversity (page 37)
You and the Law I (page 37)

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Important Scheduling Dates

Initial Course Recommendations by Staff

February 2, 2016

Registration Orientations
Students - Class of 2017-10
Students - Class of 2020
Parents - Class of 2020

February 8-11, 2016
February 25, 2016
February 25, 2016

Course Selections with Counselor

February-April 2016

Final Course Recommendations by Staff

April 29, 2016

Student Course Requests Sent Home

May 20, 2016

Course Waiver Deadline

June 3, 2016

Course Request Change

June 3, 2016

Pass/Fail Option Deadline

Prior to the First Day of School

Schedule Appeal Deadline

Two weeks into the course

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