You are on page 1of 10

The Importance of Reconfiguring Medical Supply Waste 

 

 

Kerri Schopf
 

Engl 138T

11, Apr. 2016 

1. Introduction 
 
Hospitals requires countless amounts of surgical tools, gowns, and gloves in order to 
successfully save lives. Much of these materials are thrown away after their use. The operating 
1​
room generates 20­30% of a hospital’s waste which contributes to overflowing landfills​
. There 
are cost­effective alternatives to the disposable, one­time­use instruments that could lower the 
medical supply waste coming from hospitals. Policies should exist that require hospitals to 
recycle materials and to use reusable materials in the operating room in order to decrease the 
amount of waste that will be added to landfills.  
 

1.1 History 
Before the 1980’s, hospitals widely used tools that were durable and permanently reusable. The 
instruments were manufactured from glass, metal, or rubber which made them relatively simple 
to resterilize. The methods used were simply wiping down the tools and dipping them in 
2​
disinfectant​
. This practice changed in the 1980’s due to the outbreak of HIV. AIDS was just 
widely spreading across the country, and they knew it was affecting mostly gay men but they did 
not know why. It was a very confusing and frightening time for many people, so they took many 
precautions to make sure this disease would not spread. Since they were unsure whether 
sterilization techniques would effectively kill the disease, disposables were used to ease 
3​
everyone’s minds​
.  
 

These disposable tools are called single­use devices (SUDs) and are intended for a one time use 
to prevent transmission of diseases from patient to patient. Sterilization techniques of today are 
proven to kill the HIV virus, but SUDs still remain. This is just an example of an outdated 
system that has not been reconfigured to the standards upheld today. The sterilization techniques 
in the past were clearly not rigorous and would not be up to today’s regulations but there are 
newer, safer ways to reprocess surgical instruments. SUDs are coming back to the forefront of 
discussion today due to the rising concerns about waste and the effect it has on the environment. 
 

1.2 Proven Inefficiency 
At this time, there is no organization that is tracking medical supply waste, but in 1990 it was 
4​
estimated that the U.S. produced 2 million tons of medical waste per year​
. This number is due 
largely to the use of disposable tools, surgical kits that have unnecessary items, and the use of 
5​
disposable gowns. This makes hospitals the second largest waste producers in the U.S.​

 
Items that are being thrown away include plastic, metal, and glass materials. This represents 20% 
6​
of a hospital’s waste; the others being paper and organic waste​
. Most of these tools are 
recyclable and could be saved for reuse. Many hospitals actually do recycle paper and organic 
products, but the medical tools are slipping through the cracks. “Only about a quarter of hospitals 
7
in the United States used at least one type of reprocessed medical device in 2002.”​
 
 

2. Waste Disposal Issues 
 
Medical waste is disposed of in one of two ways: incinerators and steam cleaning. When waste is 
incinerated it is placed into a chamber with temperatures as high as 2,000 degrees F which 
causes combustion of the materials. In the second chamber the waste is converted to carbon 
dioxide and water and then steam. Once this process is complete the ashes are considered 
sanitary and can be placed in a landfill. 
Steam cleaning uses autoclaves to apply heat and pressure to the waste. In this process the steam 
sterilizes the waste by killing off any microbes. The instruments then undergo a process called 
shedding. This is when the machine compacts the instruments so they are not recognizable and 
are not reused after being taken to the landfill. Autoclaves are used for many purposes but that 
8
includes sterilizing medical equipment to go to landfills.​
 
 
The majority of medical waste must already be treated in order to go to a landfill because it has 
the potential to infect others. If left untreated, the tools could leak their contents into local water 
supplies or into the ocean. Since the tools are already being treated it is logical to simply 
resterilize them and repackage them for hospitals. This way, they are still being treated, but they 
are not contributing to global waste. 
 
Global warming and climate change in general is at the forefront of world issues, therefore, 
waste is constantly being reevaluated. Most of that two million tons of medical waste goes 
straight to landfills. Landfills release greenhouse gases into the environment which are known to 
be a leading cause of global warming. Specifically, landfills release carbon dioxide, methane, 
volatile organic compounds, and hazardous air pollutants. Methane is of particular concern 
9​
because it is able to trap 25 times the heat of carbon dioxide.​
 Medical supply waste is such a 

concern because most of this waste is completely unnecessary. A Johns Hopkins research team 
10
estimated that there was $15 million dollars worth of ​
unused​
 material that was thrown away.​
 
This draws attention to the fact that there are other things that can be done to manage the waste, 
including reconfiguring surgical packs and recycling materials that are both used and unused.  
 
 

3. Alternative­Short Term 
 
A portion of this unused material could go to hospitals in third world countries who never have 
enough materials to get by. That unused material could be diverted from landfills and save lives 
by getting surgeons materials that they do not have the resources to obtain. There are multiple 
agencies that collect unused medical supplies and pack them up to be shipped to hospitals.  
One such agency is known as REMEDY which stands for Recovered Medical Equipment for the 
Developing World. This program was inspired by Dr. Kanzaria, a scholar of the Robert Wood 
Johnson Foundation. He noticed all of the opened but unused medical supplies being thrown in 
the trash and knew the desperate need for that equipment in other countries. Though all of these 
medical supplies are not legally usable in the US, they are gratefully accepted in third world 
11​
countries.​
 Other larger scale programs include MedShare, EQUIP and Medical teams 
international. All of these organizations have the goal of taking the unwanted medical supplies 
from hospitals that are still functional in other countries. 
 
Another way to reduce waste is in recycling products rather than only using them once. Now that 
sterilization techniques have been verified they could become increasingly useful in lowering 
medical waste. There are many companies that 
recycle products and return them to the 
hospital repackaged as if brand new. These 
companies have strict regulation by the FDA 
to ensure that their sterilization techniques are 
just as sound as the methods used by the 
12
original devices.​
  
 

3.1 FDA Regulations 
According to the FDA regulations updated in 
2015 the FDA requires that original 
manufacturers very clearly label the devices so 
hospitals know exactly what the processing 
rules are for that particular device. One thing 
that is taken into account when designing the 
medical tools is the fact that they may be 
reprocessed. For this reason, all manufacturers 
must design the product to “ facilitate easy and 
effective cleaning, as well as any necessary 
13​
disinfection or sterilization by the users.​
” 
This is to ensure that there are no devices that 

have pieces that may be missed during the sterilization process. 
 
Before reprocessing the FDA defines a series of steps that must be taken to ensure the device is 
successfully sterilized. Close to the point of use steps must be taken to remove any initial 
contaminants that could become caked onto the tools. The next step is to thoroughly clean the 
devices. Many hospitals have facilities of their own that can perform this step and others use 
third party cleaners. Materials outlined by the FDA that do not need to be sterilized are 
considered ready for use after this step. The materials that do need sterilized must continue onto 
that step before they are suitable for reuse. This would include any materials that have come into 
14
contact with blood or other bodily fluids.​
 
Original manufacturers, hospitals, and reprocessors all are under the same guidelines according 
to the FDA which ensures safe products at all levels.There are three categories of devices under 
these guidelines and each category is under distinct regulations. Devices that fall under each 
class have different requirements on the cleaning process that become more involved as the 
device is considered higher risk. Each step of the process is also validated by the FDA to ensure 
quality cleaning from the time it is used to the time of reuse. 
 
 
  

3.2 Concern with Safety 
Despite the FDA regulations many still felt uneasy about repackaging used tools. Some surgeons 
and other concerned parties brought up the issue of durability of SUDs. They argue that SUDs 
are specifically made for one time use and that if they are reprocessed it could compromise the 
integrity of the instrument. This is a valid concern and one that the FDA specifically looked into. 
The FDA found 464 out of 300,000 reports of complications that could have arisen due to faulty 
reused instruments. After thorough investigation into the reports they found “no pattern of 
15​
failures with reused SUDs that differs from patterns observed with the initial use of SUDs.​
” 
This provides proof towards the fact that reused devices are just as sound as they are originally. 

 
16 
Below is a list of some commonly reprocessed materials as defined by the FDA.​
 
● Surgical Saw Blades 
● Surgical Drills 
● Laparoscopy Scissors 
● Orthodontic (metal) Braces 
● Electrophysiology Catheters 
● Electrosurgical Electrodes and Pencils 
● Respiratory Therapy and Anesthesia Breathing Circuits 
● Endotracheal Tubes 
● Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty Catheters 
● Biopsy Forceps 
 
Invariably some of these devices now have parts that are more complex and that may be more 
17​
difficult to properly sterilize.​
. Many of these devices contain long lumens, fragile pieces, or 
electronic portions that cannot be submerged. This makes it difficult to clean which is why there 
were concerns expressed regarding the safety of those types of devices. 
 
In order to investigate this concern there was a study done by a graduate student at Hopkin’s 
along with two post docs. Specifically looking into infections caused by reused devices, they 
found no evidence that patients were harmed due to the use of recycled tools and a report was 
18
released by the Government Accountability Office that announced those findings.​
 
 
 

3.3 Reconfiguring Medical Supply Packs 
For those who are still unconvinced about the safety of recycled materials, another initiative that 
is being started is reconfiguring medical supply kits. Many medical supply kits are large and 
contain many tools that end up unused at the end of the surgery. According to regulations they 
must be thrown out because they were opened and could be contaminated. There have been 
many “Green OR” initiatives that work to lower the waste in these packs. Dr. Andrade worked 
with a nurse at the University of Minnesota Medical Center to reconfigure one hospital pack that 
originally contained 44 items. They were able to lower that number to just 27 items which also 
19 ​
saved the hospital $50 per procedure.​
Using this new pack, every time that surgery is performed 
the hospital saves 17 instruments. This strategy is being picked up by other hospitals as they 
notice the success of that strategy.  
 

4. Long Term 
 
Reprocessing SUDs is a great strategy to divert waste from landfills but eventually the tools will 
begin to break down and must be disposed of. Due to this, Dr. Andrade, a thoracic surgeon at 
University of Minnesota Medical Center stressed that the long term goal of hospitals should be to 
20​
convert back to using permanently recyclable materials that will not break down.​
 These devices 
would be manufactured from more durable materials that will be able to withstand the constant 
cleaning and sterilization processes. 

 
All of these reprocessing strategies are extremely cost effective for hospitals. When products are 
21​
repackaged they are sold for 40­60% less than original products.​
  The Hospital Corporation of 
America began recycling  in 2009 and was able to recycle 94 tons. This saved them $82 million 
22​
in just the first half of 2009 which represents a 25% increase in savings.​
 Repurchasing recycled 
materials will actually save the hospitals money as well as lower waste in landfills. Despite this, 
only about half of hospitals recycle even some of their medical waste. 
 
5. Root of the Problem 
 
Many hospitals probably do not take the initiative to start a program because they do not want 
the headache of figuring out logistics. Getting the program started will not be easy. It takes time 
to reconfigure surgical packs to individual hospital needs, and it will take coordination to have 
collection bins for materials to be recycled. It will take effort to find a recycling company and 
manage the recycling of old materials with the purchasing of new materials. This program will 
not run itself which is probably the reason some hospitals have not started the initiative. This is 
why legislation is necessary. It will give hospitals the push they need to begin a “Green OR 
program.” 
 
23​
A business known as Waste Management Incorporated.​
 gives suggestions on how to begin a 
successful recycling program. The steps are outlined as follows 
 

Perform an audit. 

The company explains that the hospital needs to first evaluate the current recycling 
situation. They should determine what kind of waste is most common and where the 
proper disposal containers should be located. It is also essential that they are up to date on 
the policies of recycling materials and the guidelines on how to properly do so.  

Identify local resources. 

The hospital needs to identify third party processors that deal with medical waste and 
determine the cost of those companies.  

Establish goals. 

A plan must be established that determines the number of receptacles and where they will 
be located for maximum efficiency. 

Maximize the value of materials. 

Hospital staff should strive to properly segregate all materials in order to maximize the 
returns.  

Educate staff. 

It is important that the whole team is aware of the protocol on what to recycle and where 
to recycle it. Sending out newsletters and emails regarding the procedure can be 
important so the staff feel confident about the new requirements. 

Monitor and measure.  

This final step is an ongoing process because the recycling program must adapt to the 
needs of the hospital as they change. When the program is first implemented the needs of 
the hospital may be misinterpreted or the hospital waste flow could evolve over time. For 
this reason, hospitals need to periodically reevaluate the success of their system. 

 
Manufacturers are also a large barrier to the reprocessing programs in hospitals. Original 
manufacturers dislike the reprocessing companies because that is costing them business. Every 
time a tool is reprocessed instead of thrown away, a manufacturing company has to make one 
less tool. While this is propitious to the environment, the manufacturing companies are simply 
looking to maintain their profits. Manufacturing companies will sometimes add a piece of plastic 
to the tool so it is unfit for reprocessing in an autoclave. Hospitals commonly have autoclaves on 
site so any tools that cannot be sterilized with this method will most likely be thrown away. 
 

6. Policy Changes 
 
In light of all of this information it would be beneficial to give hospitals that are initiating 
recycling and repurposing programs a tax deduction. This would provide hospitals the incentive 
to lower their waste because they would be compensated for their efforts. There may be different 
regulations on how this tax deduction will affect public funded hospitals versus private hospitals, 
but the overall goal should be the same. This policy change is necessary because most hospitals 
are not taking the initiative to begin these programs. Hospitals need to be educated on the 
importance of recycling the tools, and the benefits it will give them. If hospitals are given the tax 
break it will likely give them the nudge they need to institute their own recycling program. 
 
7. Concerns  
 
Hospitals are concerned that this will add a headache to regular routines and will result in 
confusion and improper recycling. It can be difficult to keep track of the regulations surrounding 
different tools. Some tools must be wiped down immediately after use and promptly cleaned and 
sterilized, while others need a simple cleaning and are ready for reuse. The hospitals express 
reasonable concerns which is why each staff member needs to be given specific instructions on 
the proper protocol. The initiation of the system will be difficult, but once staff members begin to 
adjust to the new rules, they will find it to be very manageable. Many other hospitals are 
providing a good example of the success of such programs. There are even many websites that 
provide tips to hospitals that are just beginning their programs. 
 
The benefits of the program far outweigh the costs. Hospitals that begin recycling SUDs and use 
reusable materials experience drastic savings. One hospital simply reconfigured a supply pack 
24​
for their operating room and saved ​
$104,658.​
 ​
Banner Health in Phoenix began recycling and 
saved $1,494,050 from reprocessing operating room devices, and reconfiguring other materials 
25​
in a period of 12 months.​
 The success of other hospitals, along with the tax break should give 
the skeptics the motivation to begin their own system. 
 

8. Communication 
 
The number one goal of programs such as the American Hospital Association should be to 
inform hospitals about reprocessing. All of the concerns that hospitals hold, whether it be with 
safety, implementation of a recycling program, or cost should be addressed in order to get as 

many hospitals on board as possible. The biggest obstacle in getting more hospitals to go green is 
simply lack of knowledge. 
 
It is also important that all hospitals are aware of the tax break that is offered if they begin 
recycling. The policy will only work if the information is available to hospitals that they will be 
compensated for their efforts. Once the policy is in effect every hospital should be sent an 
announcement that outlines the main ideas behind the policy, and how to take advantage of the 
tax break. The announcement could explain the importance of lowering waste, and how it will 
benefit the hospitals. Then it should give detailed descriptions of how the hospitals can receive 
the tax break once they begin recycling. 
 

9. Summary 
 
As more people become aware of the changing climate and the effects it has on humans, and 
animals there is more of a focus on changing bad practices. Waste in landfills is a huge cause of 
global warming because it releases greenhouse gases into the atmosphere which in turn trap heat. 
Hospitals generate an extremely large portion of that waste due to their use of single use devices 
and throw away paper products in the operating room and elsewhere. Using medical devices only 
once is unnecessary because there are manageable ways of reprocessing and sterilizing those 
devices for reuse. It may be difficult to begin a recycling program but it is important in order to 
preserve the environment. In order to convince hospitals to lower supply waste there should be a 
policy enacted that provides a tax break to hospitals that have a reprocessing program. 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Endnotes 
1. "Study Documents Millions in Unused Medical Supplies in U.S. Operating Rooms Each 
Year." ​
Johns Hopkins Medicine​
. N.p., 27 Oct. 2014. Web. 7 Apr. 2016. 
<http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/news/media/releases/study_documents_millions_in_u
nused_medical_supplies_in_us_operating_rooms_each_year>  
2. Feigal, David W., M.D. "Testimony on Re­use of Medical Devices." ​
Department of 
Health & Human Services​
. Assistant Secretary for Legislation, 27 June 2000. Web. 10 
Apr. 2016. <http://www.hhs.gov/asl/testify/t000627b.html> 
3. Nastu, Paul. “Half of Hospitals Recycling At Least Some Medical Waste.” 
Environmental Leader​
. 7 July 2010. Web. 10 April 2016. 
<http://www.environmentalleader.com/2010/07/07/half­of­hospitals­recycling­at­least­so
me­medical­waste/> 
4. Chen, Ingfei. "In a World of Throwaways, Making a Dent in Medical Waste." ​
The New 
York Times.​
 N.p., 5 July 2010. Web. 7 Apr. 2016. 
5. Kwakye, Gifty; Pronovost, Peter M.D., Ph.D. “Going green in the hospital: Recycling 
medical equipment saves money, reduces waste and is safe.” ​
Science Daily​
. 26 Feb. 
2010. Web. 10 Apr. 2016. 
<http://journals.lww.com/academicmedicine/Fulltext/2010/03000/Commentary__A_Call
_to_Go_Green_in_Health_Care_by.10.aspx> 
6. Lee, Linda Dr., Turpin Bill. “Waste Not.” Health Facilities Management. 1 January 2011. 
Web. 10 Apr. 2016. 
<http://www.hfmmagazine.com/display/HFM­news­article.dhtml?dcrPath=/templatedata/
HF_Common/NewsArticle/data/HFM/Magazine/2011/Jan/0111HFM_FEA_enviro> 
7. Kwakye, “Going Green.” 
8. “Treatment of Medical Waste”. ​
Basura Medical Waste​
. Web. 10 Apr. 2016  
9. "Public Health, Safety, and the Environment." ​
Environmental Protection Agency​
. EPA, 
31 Mar. 2016. Web. 10 Apr. 2016. 
10. <http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/news/media/releases/study_documents_millions_in_u
nused_medical_supplies_in_us_operating_rooms_each_year> 
11. “Reducing Waste, Enhancing Health”. ​
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation​
. 3 July 2013. 
Web. 10 April 2016.  
12. "Guideline for Disinfection and Sterilization in Healthcare Facilities, 2008." ​
Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention​
. CDC, 29 Dec. 2009. Web. 10 Apr. 2016. 
13. Food and Drug Administration. “Reprocessing Medical Devices in Health Care Settings: 
Validation Methods and Labeling” 17 March 2016. PDF file. 
14. Ibid.  
15. Ibid. 
16. Ibid.  
17. <http://www.hhs.gov/asl/testify/t000627b.html> 
18. Chen, “In a World.” 
19. Ibid.  
20. Ibid. 
21. <http://www.environmentalleader.com/2010/07/07/half­of­hospitals­recycling­at­least­so
me­medical­waste/> 

22. Ibid. 
23. <http://www.hfmmagazine.com/display/HFM­news­article.dhtml?dcrPath=/templatedata/
HF_Common/NewsArticle/data/HFM/Magazine/2011/Jan/0111HFM_FEA_enviro> 
24. <http://www.environmentalleader.com/2010/07/07/half­of­hospitals­recycling­at­least­so
me­medical­waste/> 
25. Kwayke, “Going Green.” 
 
Images 
1. MeSI. Procedure Set. Digital image. ​
MeSI Italia​
. N.p., 2015. Web. 10 Apr. 2016. 
<​
http://www.imesi.it/wp­content/uploads/2015/05/set­procedurale­aperto­062.png​
>  
2. Food and Drug Administration. “Reprocessing Medical Devices in Health Care Settings: 
Validation Methods and Labeling” 17 March 2016. PDF file. 
3. Emergo. Medical Device Classification. Digital image. ​
Emergo Group​
. N.p., n.d. Web. 
10 Apr. 2016. <http://www.emergogroup.com/resources/usa­process­chart> 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10