You are on page 1of 8

Description of Musical Instruments 

By: Lara Fleischhauer, Eva Brandis, Casey Elmhirst, Jessica Stewart, and Emma Reid 
 
Chimes: Rain Sticks 
Adding more nails to our mailing tubes causes a lower pitch. For our chime 
instrument, we created six different rain sticks. We made three 24in rainsticks and three 
36in rainsticks. We filled three with 360ml of garbanzo beans and the other three with 
360ml of pinto beans. We made one small and one large 30 nail rainstick, one small 
and one large 53 nail rain stick, and one small and one large 70 nail rainstick. We found 
that the size of the tube plays no impact on the note or sound it produces, this is 
because the cardboard is so soft it doesn’t vibrate. We also found that  pinto beans 
create a lower pitch than garbanzo beans, because they are bigger and heavier and 
therefore vibrate slower. Also, the amount of nails creates different sounds. For 
example, the 70 nail rainsticks created much lower notes than the 30 nail rainsticks. We 
know that this is true because the nails are vibrating slower. The nails are vibrating 
slower because the beans are going much slower because of all the obstacles (nails) 
and this causes the nails to not be hit with a big force so the nails vibrate slower 
creating a deep note. However we’re not sure why. Ideally after this project we would 
test this by putting a slow motion camera in the bottom. In the end, we figured out that 
adding more nails creates a lower pitch, the tube size doesn’t affect the sound, and the 
pinto beans create lower notes than the garbanzo beans. 

 

 
 
 
ADD PICTURE 

 
 

Depth of Note 

Material Inside 

Number of Nails 

Length (does not 
change deepness 
of note) 

Deepest 

Pinto Beans 

70 

Long or Short 

Deep 

Pinto Beans 

53 

Long or Short 

Medium 

Pinto Beans 

30 

Long or Short 

Medium High 

Garbanzo Beans 

70 

Long or Short 

High 

Garbanzo Beans 

53 

Long or Short 

Highest 

Garbanzo Beans 

30 

Long or Short 

 
Wind: Flute 
The notes created by a wind instrument depend on the placement from the 
embouchure hole.  When blowing into a flute, the sound is created by a splitting of the 
air.  This movement of air creates high pressure at the embouchure, while the end of 
the flute is at atmospheric.  To complete one wave, the pressure, lowers, returns to 
neutral, and rises to above atmospheric once again (see diagram below).  Because only 
¼ of the wave occurs inside the tube, the holes should be ¼ of the wavelength of the 
desired note.  I started by using the ideal measurements, found on ​
this website​
, for a G 
A Bb C D Eb F G scale.  These measurements did not play out in practice, however, 
due to the many variables posed in the real world.  The scale of flute number one is F# 
Eb Db B Bb Ab F#.  One of the main causes was unpredictable movement of air.  I did 
an experiment to see whether embouchure hole placement influenced the note.  I made 
two small flutes, each 32.3 cm long out of ½ inch schedule 40 pipe.  The one with the 
embouchure 4 cm from the end produced an F on the low octave and A on the high 
octave.  The other, with an embouchure 7 cm from the end, played Db on the low 
octave and G on the high octave.  This shows that the hole placement causes an 
inconsistent shift in the wavelength that makes the math imprecise.  The note can also 
be changed by rolling the embouchure in or out.  A small flute with a hole 19 cm from 
the end can play an F by rolling forward and an E rolling inwards.  Lastly, I made 
another flute by shifting the holes slightly.  It was moved towards the embouchure for a 
lower or flatter note and out towards the open end for a higher or sharper note.  This 
worked beautifully, and the new scale was G A Bb C D E(slightly sharp)  F G.  The 
holes further out have deeper notes, because the wavelength is widened, causing a 
lower frequency and pitch.  This can be explained by the equation f(frequency)=v(wave 
speed)/wavelength.  When the wavelength is widened, the frequency must lower to 
balance the equation. 
 
ADD PICTURE 
 
 
High                   neutral                low                 neutral                     high 

 
Flute #1 
note 

ᵰ 
(cm) 

¼ ᵰ 
(cm) 

Distance from 
Embouchure (cm) 

Distance from 
Stopper (cm) 

air flow 

fingering 

G3  

176 

44 

37.2 

40.2 

low 

1­6 

G#/Ab3  

166.1  41.5 

28.7 

31.7 

more 

1­5 

A#/Bb3  

148 

78.5 

26.5 

29.5 

more 

1­4 

B3  

139.7  34.9 

23.8 

26.8 

more 

1­3 

C#/Db4   124.5  31.1 

19.5 

22.5 

more 

1­2 

D#/Eb4  

16.8 

19.8 

more 

15.5 

18.5 

more 

110.9  27.7 

F #/Gb4   93.2 

23.3 

G4  

88 

22 

37.2 

40.2 

medium 

ᵰ 
(cm) 

¼ ᵰ 
(cm) 

1­6 

Distance from 
Embouchure (cm) 

Distance from 
Stopper (cm) 

air flow 

fingering 

F #/Gb3   186.5  46.6 

38 

41 

low 

1­6 

G#/Ab3   166.1  41.5 

30.3 

33.3 

more 

1­5 

A#/Bb3   148 

78.5 

26.3 

29.3 

more 

1­4 

139.7  34.9 

24.5 

27.5 

more 

1­3 

C#/Db4   124.5  31.1 

20.6 

23.6 

more 

1­2 

D#/Eb4   110.9  27.7 

17.6 

20.6 

more 

F4  

 
Flute #2 
Note 

B3  

98.8 

24.7 

15.1 

18.1 

more 

F #/Gb4   93.2 

23.3 

38 

41 

medium 

1­6 

 
Flute #3 
Note 

ᵰ 
(cm) 

¼ ᵰ 
(cm) 

Distance from 
Embouchure (cm) 

Distance from  air flow 
Stopper (cm) 

fingering 

G3  

176 

44 

37.4 

40.4 

low 

1­6 

A3  

156.8  39.2 

28.8 

31.8 

more 

1­5 

26.8 

29.8 

more 

1­4 

Bb/C#3   148 

37 

C4  

131.9  33.0 

23.4 

26.4 

more 

1­3 

D4  

117.4  29.4 

19.5 

22.5 

more 

1­2 

Eb/F #4   110.9  27.7 

17.3 

20.3 

more 

F4  

98.8 

24.7 

15.2 

18.2 

more 

G4  

88 

22 

37.4 

40.4 

medium 

1­6 

 
 
Strings: Ukulele 

The types of materials used to build a ukulele/guitar affect the sound it produces. 
We began by designing a guitar based on the wavelength of the notes.  The length of 
the string should be over ½ of the wavelength of the desired note, then tightened as 
needed.  On our first try, we didn’t pay much attention to the quality of wood.  We had a 
minimal amount of wood that was close to the right size, so we chose a ½ in thick piece 
and started building.  We had the body and neck built and were testing out the strings 
when we realized something was wrong.  Because the wood was soft and thick, it 
muted the sound.  Since we were using fishing line and thicker wood, the high 
frequency of the fishing line wasn’t enough to make the wood vibrate.  Since the wood 
didn’t vibrate, only the small portion of air around the strings was disturbed, causing a 
weak plucking sound.  We noticed our mistake and started on a new, smaller ukulele 
using ¼ inch finished plywood.  We also got thicker strings that would create a better 
vibration.  Both of these changes made a huge difference, and the ukulele played with 
much more volume and resonance.  The second ukulele body was successful in 
creating the right notes at a better volume.  We used half of the wavelength of our 
desired note because the wave goes up and down spanning twice the distance(see 
picture below).  Because the thin, hard wood vibrates with the thick strings, the 
surrounding air is disturbed to make louder notes.  We found that thicker strings vibrate 
slower and therefore have lower pitch.  
String tension, thickness, and length all affect the note produced.  Each of the 
strings are 45 cm with varying thicknesses.  A and G have the same diameter, E is 
thicker, and C is the thickest.  The A and G strings play different notes despite their 
size, because they are pulled to different tensions with the tuning knobs.  The A string 
has a higher pitch, because the high tension reduces the length of the back and forth 
movement.  When there is less tension, the string has more slack and spans a greater 
distance with each vibration.  The C string plays a lower note than the E string without a 
major difference in tension due to the thickness.  This may be because thick strings are 
heavier, causing them to vibrate more slowly.  The last pitch variable is length.  On this 
ukulele, each of the strings will play an octave higher on the 12th fret.  The frets are 
based on the equation y=scale length(0.5^((1/12)x)), with 45 as the scale length (see 
diagram below).  The frets closer to the bridge produce higher notes due to the 
shortened string length, which alters the wavelength. 
 
 
 

DESCRIBE length of string vs note, thickness of string vs note,​
 Tension vs. note