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MENS COLLEGIATE
BASKETBALL
Injury Prevention Plan
December 14th, 2015

http://www.idahopress.com/blueturfsports/basketball/high-flying-webb-leads-boise-state-past-northern-arizona/article_74b34fc2-f8e2-55c2-b92a27a9e27730a9.html

Group Info Page


Hand, Mckenna:
Cover Title/Page
Purpose statement
Injury Concerns
Pre-Participation Health Screening
Protective equipment
Injury Prevention Program
References

Reynolds, Kyle:
Table of Contents
Injurie Concerns
Nutrition Plan
Protective equipment
Injury Prevention Program
References

Rogers, Dakota:
Injury Concerns
Medical Conditions
Emergency Action Plan
References
Formatting

-Table of Contents Purpose Statement4


Basketball Injury Concerns .5
- Sprained Ankle
- Achilles Tendonitis
- Finger Jam
- Sprained Knee
- Plantar Fasciitis
- Concussion
- Fractured Nose
Common Medical Conditions.9
- Sickle Cell Trait
- Hypoglycemia
- Asthma (exercise-induced)
Pre-Participation Health Screening11
Protective Equipment- Required & Recommended14
Injury Preventative Exercise Program16
Game-Day Nutrition Plan26
Emergency Action Plan29
Reference Page34

Purpose Statement
The purpose of this injury prevention program is to help prevent injury in the sport of
basketball. It gives the Athletic Health Care Team (ACHT) a list of common injuries and good
ways to treat the injury upon occurrence. It also gives a basic overview of good stretches and
exercises to recover from the injuries. The program goes over the medical tests and history
needed as part of the pre-participation exam (PPE). It gives equipment requirements and
recommendations. The team will also have the knowledge and instructions of medical
emergencies and the proper way to evacuate the injured player from the premises. It lists
everyone involved, on and off the ACHT.
This program is designed to prepare the Athletic Health Care Team for the entire season and
career of any player.

COMMON BASKETBALL INJURIES


1) Sprained Ankle:
Mechanism: Hyper-Inversion or eversion of the ankle. This causes the ankle to roll and cause
the ligaments to be damaged. Can result in ligament tear. 80% of sprained ankles are on the
lateral aspect of the ankle. They are classified into 3 different grades.
Signs and symptoms: Ankle pain, loss of function and mobility. Unable to bear much weight on
the ankle. Bruising, swelling and tenderness will occur. There three different grades of ankle
sprains are as follows:
Grade 1- Slight stretching and minor damage to the ligament, little laxity, little/no swelling
Grade 2- Partial ligament tear, laxity, mild/moderate swelling
Grade 3- Complete ligament tear, loss of function,
moderate/severe swelling
Management: Athlete usually can walk off the court using
their own power but assistance may be needed to leave
court. Ice is used to help reduce swelling and pain in the
ankle. Taping and braces will then be used as the athlete will
recover from the injury. Use of crutches may be required as
the athlete should not put much weight on ankle. Physical
therapy may be required depending on severity. Athlete may
begin light exercising within a matter of days but return to
play may be a matter of weeks to months.

2) Achilles Tendonitis:
Mechanism: Results from overuse of the Achilles tendon. Increased stress and intensity of the
Achilles tendon causes exhaustion and inflammation of the tendon.
Signs and symptoms: Pain below the calf muscle in the Achilles tendon region. Swelling,
warmth, and thickness of the Achilles tendon will show that
it is inflamed. Athlete will exhibit pain in motion as well as
attempts to jump or in dorsiflexion.
Management: Lots of rest and ice to help with the
inflammation and pain of the injury. Athlete should take
time away from exercising in order for the tendon to heal.
May be placed in an ankle brace of have taping done on the
tendon to prevent motion that would cause pain. Athlete

will be able to resume activity in a matter of days to weeks. Cortical steroids may be used to help
to reduce pain and inflammation.

3) Jammed Finger:
Mechanism: Occurs when compressive forces are place on the finger due to coming in contact
with another athlete or with the ball. May also be caused when athlete falls to the ground
compressing the thumb or finger. Very common injury.
Signs and symptoms: Pain will occur to the effected finger. Followed by bruising and swelling.
Hard for the athlete to grip and flex the finger.
Management: Athletes generally will tape the finger
order to continue to play. Ice must be used to reduce
inflammation and swelling. Keeping the finger
protected will allow it to heal correctly. P.R.I.C.E
should be used. Finger swelling and pain should
reduce in a matter of days. Full finger Range of
Motion will come back in a matter of days to weeks.

in

4) Knee Ligament Sprain:


Mechanism: Hyper-extension of the knee due to stop and go motions. Also can be affected
when stress or force be placed upon it. Twisting of the knee joint or direct blow to the knee on
the front, back or side aspect of the knee.
Signs and symptoms: Painful flexion and extension of the knee. Painful pop that can be heard
and felt. Swelling and/or bruising. Inability to place weight on knee. Knee buckles or gives out
as injured athlete tries to walk.
Management: Assist injured athlete off the court and into the locker room for further evaluation.
Physical examination to look for pain and swelling.
Athletic Trainer checks for mobility of knee and if pain is
involved. P.R. I. C. E. applied. Athlete will be given a
knee brace and crutches to limit mobility of the knee for
further evaluation. Could also be given elastic bondage,
splint brace or cast. Athlete also given pain medication
such as ibuprofen. Physical therapy may be needed. Close
monitoring and cautious exercises may be used. Surgery
only used if there is significant ligament damage.

5) Plantar Fasciitis:
Mechanisms of injury: Overuse injury caused by repetitive impact activity such as running,
jumping. Causes much pain on the bottom of the foot.
Athlete can be injured from wearing shoes that do not have good arch support or have soft soles.
Signs/Symptoms: Foot pain, toward the heel of
the foot. Extreme pain with first footsteps in the
morning. Inability to place much weight on the
foot. Inability to stop, plant and cut without
exerting much pain.
Treatment: Rest from athletic activity. Ice 3-4
times a day to reduce pain in the foot. Calf
stretches and plantar fascia stretch. Physical
therapy may be needed. Pads may be placed in
shoes to help reduce pain of injury. Rest will
require athlete to discontinue play for 7 days to
possibly multiple months, depending on severity.

6) Concussion:
Mechanism: Occur from suffering a blow to the head. Such as being hit by another, by the ball
or hitting the ground.
Signs/Symptoms: Athlete may be slow to get on their feet and may be wobbly when walking.
Loss of consciousness may occur. Athlete will exhibit neck, and head pain and pressure.
Especially being dizzy. They may also be confused and may have amnesia.
Treatment: Once a suspected concussion has occurred and if the athlete is unconscious on the
floor. ATs must act as if there is also spinal damage. May be boarded and carted out then sent to
the hospital for MRIs. If positive, the athlete will be prohibited to play until they do not exhibit
symptoms anymore. May take from 7
days to many weeks, depending on
severity. The athlete will be allowed
light exercising. For the most part he
will need rest. Return to Learn must
take priority over Return to Play.
Then follow Return to Play protocol.
May return with specialized head
equipment as well.

7) Broken Nose:
Mechanism: Direct physical contact to nose which fractures the nose. May happen between
athletes or athlete with the floor or ball.
Signs/Symptoms: Immediate nasal bleeding,
from both inside the nose and fracture on the
outside of the nose. Swelling is very common.
Abnormal alignment/ deformation of the nose
is an obvious sign. Discoloration and swelling
around nose and eyes will occur. Athlete will
exhibit dizziness, headache, confusion and
obvious pain.
Treatment: Immediate treatment includes
checking for head injury such as a concussion
or spinal injury. Stop bleeding by applying gauze to the affected area. Keeping their head tilted
forward, so that blood rushes out of nose and not into throat. Take to ER, they may have their
nose repositioned by a doctor or ENT specialist. ENTs will check for need of surgery or further
injury. Athlete may return to play with clearance from physician only to return using a protective
face guard to reduce further injury. Should wear face mask for at least 6weeks.

Medical Conditions
Sickle Cell Trait (SCT) - Its a condition inherited from ones parent(s), and during intense
exercise can cause serious illness and even death. SCT causes red blood cells to become
abnormally shaped, which leads to them blocking blood flow through vessels, depriving
organs and muscles of oxygen.
Signs and Symptoms- SCT can be hard to diagnose because the signs are very similar to
those of heat stroke, asthma and someone with poor conditioning.
Who has SCT- SCT is more common with people who have ancestors from Africa,
South or Central America, India, Saudi Arabia and Caribbean and Mediterranean
countries.
Disqualification- the NCAA states that those will SCT will NEVER be disqualified from
participation, as precautions can be put into place and managed.
Hypoglycemia- Low blood sugar, less than 70 mg/dl, can happen to anyone, but is more
commonly found in those competing in events longer than an hour. If left untreated it
can lead to Seizures, coma and death.
Signs and Symptoms- nervousness, impaired vision, Headaches, Dizziness/ light
headed, confusion, emotional, fatigue, trouble speaking.
Disqualification- Hypoglycemia doesnt warrant being DQed as communing 15-20g of
simple carbohydrates will help raise blood sugar levels. Most college teams have planned
meals before events to help prevent it from happening, but some may still want to eat a
snack at halftime.
Exercise Induced Asthma- Is triggered by physical exertion or prolonged exercise. People who
do not have chronic asthma can still develop signs and symptoms of asthma. Symptoms
generally occur within 5-20 min of starting exercise or up to 10 min after completion.
Signs and Symptoms- Coughing, Chest tightness, Fatigue while exercising, Shortness of
breath, Airway Restriction.
Who has Exercise Induced Asthma- Mainly occurs in people with chronic asthma, but
those without asthma can still develop symptoms.
Disqualification- Exercise Induced asthma can be controlled with an inhaler so
disqualification is not necessary. Its suggested that when using an inhaler take 10 min
prior to exercise and when symptoms occur.

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Sources:
Sickle Cell Trait. NCAA
(2015, July 1). Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Glucose). Diabetes.org
(2014, April 11). Exercise-Induced Asthma. Webmd.com

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Pre-Participation Exam
In order to compete, a pre-participation medical evaluation must be completed by each
student-athlete upon entrance to the institutions athletic program. The exam must be performed
by a licensed Medical Doctor (MD) or a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO), and they must be
in good standing. The first evaluation should include a complete medical history examination,
immunization history defined by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, and a deep
assessment of neurological, cardiovascular, and musculoskeletal systems. Afterwords, the exams
should be completed annually. No further assessments of the pre-participation evaluations are
necessary unless warranted by an update history of the student athlete, or the student medical
condition changes.
Required Documents:
I.
Medical History
I.
A record of illnesses, injuries, current medications and allergies, and operations.
All operations must be included, including both those during the season and
offseason.
II.
Referrals and feedback from consultation, treatments, and rehabilitation.
III.
Subsequent care and clearances
IV.
A comprehensive entry-year health-status questionnaire, and a health-status
questionnaire updated every year after the initial.
V.
Immunizations. Also, it is recommended but not required that the athlete be
immunized for the following:
i.
Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR);
ii.
Hepatitis B;
iii. Diphtheria, tetanus (and boosters when appropriate);
iv.
Meningitis; the seasonal influenza (flu).
II.
Written Permission
This form is to be signed annually by the student-athlete. It authorizes the release of medical
information to others. This permission should include and specify all people to whom the
student-athlete authorizes the information to be released. The consent form should also specify
which information can be released and to whom it can be released to.
Equipment Needed and Possibly Used
I.
Gloves
II.
Goggles
III.
Ophthalmoscope and Otoscope
IV.
Penlight
V.
Reflex hammer
VI.
Ruler
VII.
Sphygmomanometer
VIII.
Stethoscope
IX.
Tape measure
X.
Thermometer
XI.
Tongue blade

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XII.
XIII.
XIV.
XV.

Tuning fork
Vision chart
Goniometer
Skinfold calipers

Staff involved and Credentials


I.
Team Physician(s)
i. Must be a doctor of medicine (MD) or a doctor of osteopathic medicine (DO)
with a current license in good standing to practice medicine in the state
which the institution is located. Athletic experience is a plus. Also, the team
physician will oversee all medical services for injuries and illnesses
incidental to a student-athletes participation in athletics.
II.
Athletic Trainer(s)
i. Must comply with the Board of Certification (BOC) for Athletic Trainers at
all times otherwise known as the National Athletic Trainers Association
Board of Certification. Completion of a Commission on Accreditation of
Athletic Training Education (CAATE)-accredited Athletic Training
education program is also required. It is also required that the Athletic
Trainer(s) be certified in the state of the institution.
III.
Sports Dietitian
i. Should certified by the Board of Certified Sports Dietetics (CSSD) or by the
Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND).
The Sports Dietitian should also have a bachelor's degree and be a Registered
Dietetic Technician (DTR) or Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN).
IV.
Sports Psychologist
i. The Sports Psychologist should have a master's, or doctorate in Sport's
psychology. A bachelor's degree may also be accepted, but usually higher
education is preferred. They should also be endowed with higher degrees in
psychology and counseling.
V.
Strength and Conditioning Coach(es)
i. Should be a certified strength and conditioning specialist (CSCS)

Examinations and Tests


I.
Drug Test
i. All members and participants of an NCAA program must comply with
NCAA drug testing program requirements. (see NCAA Drug Testing
Program book, NCAA bylaws, and Appendixes A and B)
II.
Neurological, Musculoskeletal, and Cardiac
i. The American Heart Association recommends cardiovascular screening as
part of the required pre-participation exam.
ii. Other investigations can be done by percussion, auscultation, palpation, and
further inspections.
III.
Baseline Concussion Test
i. SCAT2

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IV.

Sickle Cell Solubility


i. All new collegiate athletes and sport participants are required to submit a
Sickle-Cell solubility test upon arrival at the institution. These include all
athletes in Division I, II, and III programs. Previous test results must be
shown. If the test is declined, a declination waiver must be signed by the
athlete.

Sources:
Equipment Used During the Physical Assessment. (2007). Retrieved November 22, 2015, from
http://wps.prenhall.com/wps/media/objects/2791/2858109/toolbox/Table6_1.pdf
"NCAA Drug Testing Program 2013-14." Drug Testing Program Book (2013): 1-16. NCAA Files. Web. 23
Nov. 2015.
Klossner, David. "2013-14 NCAA Sports Medicine Handbook." 2013-14 Sports Medicine Handbook 24
(2013): 5-14. NCAA Files. Web. 23 Nov. 2015.
NCAA Academic and Membership Affairs Staff. "2015-16 NCAA Division I Manual." Division I Manual
(2015): n. pag. NCAA Publications. Web. 23 Nov. 2015.
"Get Certified." National Athletic Trainers' Association |. National Athletic Trainers' Association, 2015.
Web. 23 Nov. 2015.
"Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education Update." Commission on Accreditation of
Athletic Training Education Update 6 (2007-08): 4. Print.
Board of Certification, comp. "Compliance Requirements for Maintain in BOC Certification." Certification
Maintenance for Certified Athletic Trainers (2015): 3. BOCATC Files. Web. 23 Nov. 2015.
Stay Informed. (2015, April 1). Retrieved December 4, 2015, from
http://www.eatrightacend.org/ACEND/content.aspx?id=6442485469
SCAN - Sports, Cardiovascular, and Wellness Nutrition - a dietetic practice group of the American Dietetic
Association. (2015). Retrieved December 4, 2015, from http://www.scandpg.org/
Sports Psychology Careers. (n.d.). Retrieved December 4, 2015, from
http://careersinpsychology.org/becoming-a-sports-psychologist/

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Protective Equipment
The NCAA does not require any
equipment be worn by any of the
basketball players.
There are many pieces of equipment
that are recommended. They include
the following:
-Fitted/Custom Mouth Guard: To protect
mouth and teeth from
being damaged due
to being hit by other
athletes or the
basketball.
-Ankle braces: To prevent ankle from
hyper- inverting and causing ankle sprain.
Provides ankle stability.
High-Top Basketball Shoes: To prevent
ankle from hyper-inverting and causing
ankle sprain. Provides ankle stability.
-Supported Knee Padding: Reduce burn
and damage done when athlete falls to the
ground.
-Padded Arm Sleeves: Add extra support to
arm and elbow when athlete falls to the
ground. Prevents skin burns on the floor.
- Plastic Protective Face Mask: Used for
athletes who have experienced nose
fractures. Provides protection against nose
being damaged further.
- Prescription Athletic Eyeglasses: Used
for athletes that need to wear glasses while
playing basketball.
-Protective Athletic Eyeglasses: Used for
athletes that have had injury to the eye or is

wanting to protect the eyes from being


poked or damaged.

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Sources:
Ncaa Sports medicine Handbook

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Injury Prevention Program


There are many injuries in College Basketball. The following exercises and stretches are
great way to prevent some of the most common injuries from happening. If, however, the athlete
does end up with any of the injuries listed above (see Injury Concerns), the athlete can go
through these exercises to recovery and regain use of whatever may be injured. The exercises
and stretches listed below will have the injuries that correspond to the exercise listed above each
exercise or stretch.

Plantar Fasciitis
I.

Equipment Needed: Tennis Ball


Exercise Type: Massage, Flexibility

Instructions: Start by stepping on a tennis ball with the heel of the foot. With the foot on
the ball, roll the foot backwards while applying pressure to the ball, going all the way to the ball
of the foot, then reverse and roll back to the heel.
Duration: 1-2 minutes (1 set)
Repetitions: 3 sets per day. Can also be done as needed to reduce pain.

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II.

Equipment Needed: Wall


Exercise type: Stretch

Instructions: Put both hands on the wall and lean forward. Keeping one leg out and one
leg at a bent position closer to the wall. Keeping the back leg stretched and the heel to the floor,
lean forward and hold the stretch. It is important to keep the knee extended throughout the
duration of the stretch.
Duration: 10 seconds on, 10 seconds off
Repetitions: 20 per leg

(The following can also be rolled-ankle strengthening)


III.

Equipment Needed: Resistance band


Exercise Type: Strengthening
Instructions: There are a few different ways to perform this exercise to work the different

areas.
i.

ii.

Wrap the band around the bottom of the foot and hold each end. Next, plantar flex
the foot against the resistance of the band. Hold it for one-two seconds, and then
slowly bring the foot back to a neutral position.
Have a partner wrap the band around the top of the foot, and hold each end. In
this case, dorsiflex the foot against the resistance, hold it for one-two seconds, and
then slowly bring the foot back to a neutral position.

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iii.

Wrap the band around either side of the foot. Next, abduct or adduct the foot
against the resistance, hold for one-two seconds, and slowly bring the foot back to
a neutral position.

Sets, Repetitions: 3 sets of 10-15 each leg

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IV.

Equipment Needed: 1-foot Block or Step. Something to hold on to for balance.


Exercise Type: Strengthening
Instructions: Step on to the block or step. Using a partner or a wall, stand on the block on
the ball and toes of the foot. Next, slowly put the feet in to dorsiflexion, lowering the
body down. Go as far down as the ankle will allow without pain. Then, put the feet in to
plantar flexion, raising the body up. Raise until the toes are pointed.
Repetitions: 15-20 per leg. Can do more if there is no feeling of slight burning in the
calves.
Sets: Two times a day.

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Ankle Sprain
V.

Equipment Needed: None


Exercise Type: Strengthening, Stretching
Instructions: Starting with the foot at dorsiflexion, roll the ankle around in a circle
covering abducting, plantar flexion, and adducting. Go in each direction in a constant
motion. Another way to do this exercise is make the ABCs with the foot, tracing each
letter.
Repetitions: 26 rolls or a full set of the ABCs is a good amount for each foot.
Sets: 2 times a day. (Pictures Below)

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ACL

VI.

Equipment Needed: Foam Roller


Exercise Type: Stretching

Instructions: There are two ways of doing this. A good way to start this is by rolling the
outer leg on a foam roller. This can help loosen up the tissue for easier stretching.
i.

ii.

Cross one leg over the other. Then, keeping the feet flat on the ground,
bend over and extend the arms. Slightly protrude the hip outward while
bending to allow the IT band to really stretch.
Sit on the ground and bring one knee forward, the leg should be at a 90
degree angle. Next, lean forward. There should be a stretch felt on the
lateral part of the knee.

Sets: Hold these for 1-2 minutes for each leg. Do this two times a day or until the IT band
feels nice and stretched.

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VII.

Equipment Needed: Weights


Exercise Type: Strengthening
Instructions: With or without weights, and keeping the back straight, bend the knees and
lower into a squatting position. The best way (to avoid possible injuries) is to squat below
the knees. This will give a solid strengthening of the legs.
Repetitions: 10-15 reps at maximum intensity
Sets: Three sets

(pictures below)

VIII.

Equipment Needed: Resistance band that can be wrapped around ankles comfortably
Exercise Type: Strength and Stability

Instructions: Step in to a resistance band so that it is wrapped around the ankle. Then, abduct the
legs while flexing the knees (into a squatting position) and pull the band tight. Be careful not to pull too
far as knee or ankle injury is possible. Pull the band and legs to a comfortable position while squatting.
Hold the squat for 3-4 seconds, and then stand back up. If possible, take side steps back and forth while
doing this.
Repetitions: 5-10
Sets: 3-4 at 50% intensity

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Sources:
Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injury Exercises. (2014). Retrieved December 8, 2015, from
http://www.summitmedicalgroup.com/library/adult_health/sma_anterior_cruciate_ligament_sprain_exercises/
Husney, A., & Blahd M.D., W. (Eds.). (2015, May 22). Sprained Ankle: Rehabilitation Exercises.
Retrieved December 8, 2015, from http://www.cigna.com/healthwellness/hw/medical-topics/sprained-ankle-te7604
Plantar Fasciitis. (2015). Retrieved December 8, 2015, from
https://www.aofas.org/footcaremd/conditions/ailments-of-the-heel/Pages/Plantar-Fasciitis.aspx

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Team Game-Day Nutrition Plan


Away games will be played against home team @ 4pm.
We dedicate ourselves in not only having the best athletes off the court but also on the court. A
good game day starts with waking up and eating a hearty breakfast to begin fueling for the day.
-Breakfast, Lunch and post-game dinner is outlined below. In it, it details a proper nutrition plan
that our players should follow in order to know how much they should eat and what proper foods
they should eat before and after games.
-Proper Hydration throughout the day is KEY to making sure that you are properly hydrated when
game time comes around. You all MUST stay hydrated during the game as well.
-Because Basketball is an intense sport of continuous running, moving and jumping. This means
that each athlete must eat enough to have fuel to go all 4 quarters.
-We have established in our program that you athletes should eat between 2,500 kCal-3,100 kCal
on Game day.
We will have all team meals together as we are one united team.
Meals will be as follows:

Breakfast@8am
Lunch(Pre-game)@ 12pm
Pre-game Snack @2pm before shoot-around
-Game @4pmDinner(Post-game)@7pm

STAY HYDRATED!

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Nutritional Plan Game Day
Sport____Mens-Basketball___

Food
Cinnamon
Raisin Bagel
1% Lowfat
Milk
Low Fat Cream
Cheese
Grilled Ham
Apple
Hash Browns
Kcal Total
823.3 kCal
Food
Grilled Chicken
Whole Wheat
Pita
Cherry
Tomatoes
Banana (eaten
for Snack)
Raspberry
Sorbet
Before Game:
8oz of water
with Lime Juice
and Salt
Powerade
(during game
Kcal Total
616 kCal
Food
T-Bone Steak
Brown Rice
Quinoa
Steamed
Brocoli
Steamed Carrots
Mashed Sweet
Potato
1% Lowfat
Milk
Powerade

Caloric Goal__2600kCal__

Breakfast
Serving Size
1 (89g)

Kcal per item*


243

Meal Time:
CHO g.
49.1

Fat g.
1.5

Protein g.
8.7

1 cup (8oz.)

102.5

12.2

2.4

8.2

2 tbsp.

60.4

22.4

4.6

2.4

100g
182g
Cup

124
94.7
198.7

3.88
.3
9.1

20
.5
2.3

Non-water Oz.

Water Oz.

24

Kcal per item*


124
170

42.1
21%
Meal Time:
CHO g.
2
35.2

Fat g.
3.1
1.6

Protein g.
24
5.2

27

.4

1.6

1 Large Banana
(about126g)
Cup

110

29

120

31

8oz.

16oz.

65

17.5

Pregame - Lunch Totals


Fat g. Fat%
Pro g.
Pro%

Non-water Oz.

Water Oz.

6.1

16

16

Kcal per item*


200
354
159
55

34.8
22%
Meal Time:
CHO g.
0
75
29.3
11.2

Fat g.
8.3
2.7
2.5
.6

Protein g.
29.4
6.4
5.6
3.7

Cup
1 Cup

4.5
142

1
28.7

0
3.1

.2
1.6

2 Cups (16oz)

204.5

24.4

4.8

16.4

8oz (1Cup)

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CHO
CHO%
g.
138.1
56%
Pregame - Lunch
Serving Size
4 oz.
1 Pita (About
80g)
60g

CHO
CHO%
g.
121.7g 69%
PostGame-Dinner
Serving Size
4oz.
1 Cup
Cup
1 cup

3
25.1
26.3
Breakfast Totals
Fat g. Fat%
Pro g.
21.7

23%

9%

Pro%

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Kcal Total
1,151 kCal
Kcal Total

CHO
g.
178.6g

CHO%

PostGame-Dinner Totals
Fat g. Fat%
Pro g.
Pro%

Non-water Oz.

Water Oz.

62%

22

24

24

16%
63.3
22%
Daily Total-Averages
Fat g. Fat%
Pro g.
Pro%

CHO
CHO%
Non-water Oz.
Water Oz.
g.
2,590kCal
438.4
63%
49.8
16%
140.2
21%
48
64
*calculate kcal based on grams of carbohydrates, fat and protein (not from published item information)

Sources.
MyFitnesspal.com

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Emergency Action Plan:


All personal are required to be certified in their professional fields as well as in the following:
CPR, first aid, AED use, and prevention of disease transmission. Note: A team physician
may not always be present.
Personal:
Head Coach
Assistant Coaches
Athletic Trainers
Student trainers
Team Physicians
EMT (Emergency Medical Technicians)
Other:
Manger/Athletic Director
Security Personal

Equipment needed:
Spine Board/Collar

Gloves

AED

Crutches

CPR Mask

Tape

First aid kit

Cleaning solution

Splinting materials

Batteries

Phone and communication:


All personal will carry be required to carry either a phone or radio.

Off campus:
Boise police: (208) 570-600

Sheriff (208) 377-6790


Boise Fire Dep. (208) 570-6500

30

Boise paramedics (208) 287-2962

University president (208) 426-2430

Poison Control 1(800) 222-1222

Administrator:
Dr. Philip Ford (208) 426-

On Campus:
Security (208) 426-6911

4278

Environmental safety issues:


Fire: In the event of a fire, fire alarms will sound and everyone will be evacuated towards
the nearest/safest exits. -Boise fire Dep. Will be contacted immediately
Earthquake: Stay in your seats and cover your head with arms. Dont try to escape until
shaking is over. After be aware of objects that still may fall.

Map and Direction:


Taco Bell arena:
Address: 1401 Bronco Ln, Boise, ID 83725
Phone number: (208) 426-1900
Directions:
To Arena: From I-184 to Boise State University / Eastbound (i.e. From Meridian):
1. Take Vista Ave. Exit #54
2. Proceed North on Vista Ave.
3. Turn East on University Dr.
To Hospital (St. Lukes) from Arena:
1. Take Bronco Ln to W University Dr. (0.3 mi),
2. Take S Broadway Ave to E Bannock St (0.9 mi),
3. Turn right onto E Bannock St.
Note: In the case of emergency and an ambulance is not present. The ambulance will turn onto
W University Dr. Then right onto Bronco ln and proceed towards arena. Security will make sure
there is a clear lane to the front of arena.

31

Map of Taco Bell Arena:

32

Injury Response Flow-Chart


Athlete Is Injured

First Responders
(ATs)

Primary Survey

Responsive

Vitals/Responsiveness

Initial Assessment

Secondary Survey

Becomes
Responsive

HOPS

No head/Spinal

Stabilize Injury

Remove from
Court

Continue to
Monitor

Unresponsive

Possible
head/Spinal

Stays
Unresponsive

Call 9-1-1, EMT

Spine Board/ Collar

Transport to
Hospital

33
Sources:
Emergency action plans. Nata.org
Southern California earthquake center.earthquakecountry.info
Emergency action Plan. aamusports.com

34

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