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Mattie Thomas

ELED 310
Multicultural Text Set

1. The Butter Battle Book by Dr. Seuss


a. In The Butter Battle Book, two groups, the Zooks and the Yooks, underline their
differences by the way they butter their bread. One group, the Zooks, have their
bread butter side down. The Yooks have their bread butter side up. In this book they
are at a point where the crisis has reached its peak. Each group has come up with
weapon after weapon to keep the other group out. Both groups then have a "Bitsy
Big-Boy Bomberoo" and they are at a standoff. The story ends as the two are ready
to drop the Bomberoo. Dr. Seuss ends the book at a stalemate, never to find out
how the Zooks and Yooks end the whole disagreement. This book would be good for
Third Grade and up. Therefore, 3 key words I would use to represent the themes of
the book would be b. Through this book we can see Dr. Seuss's use of comparison to the United States
and Soviet stalemate during the Cold War. In many ways, Dr. Seuss was just
pointing out how silly the USSR and the U.S were being by comparing it to which
side of the bread the butter should be spread."
c. In using this book for a lesson plan or activity, I would open the book up for
discussion. From what happened in the book - Do the children agree with the ways
in which the two sides tried to fix their differences? Have the experienced anything
like this in their own lives? What might have been a better way to resolve their
issues, and write down your plan.
d. 3.12 Civics The student will recognize that Americans are a people of diverse
ethnic origins, customs, and traditions, who are united by the basic principles of a
republican form of government and respect for individual rights and freedoms.
2. Swimmy by Leo Lionni
a. Swimmy is about a little black fish who lives in the deep in the sea. There he lives
among a happy school of little red fish. As some of his fish friends are eaten by a
much bigger fish, he realizes the many dangers that lie within the ocean. Swimmy
comes across a new school of little red fish and discovers that there is only one way
to fight off the dangers of the ocean -- through ingenuity and team work. For ages 57, this book incorporates teamwork, diversity, and bravery.
b. A Caldecott Honor book, this book promotes acceptance and cooperation.
c. This book could also be used in correlation with Finding Nemo to emphasize
bravery, or used on its own to highlight the diversity and acceptance that in store
for Swimmy. Though he is not like his friends, the red fish, he does not hesitate to
help them in staying out of danger. I would use this book as a means of promoting
cooperation within the classroom as well as using it to segway towards discussion
on diversity. From here I would have the student s describe what makes them
individual and unique, possibly drawling and incorporating these features in a class

mural to showcase everyone's strengths and how they can be cohesive within the
classroom.
d. 1.10 Civics The student will apply the traits of a good citizen by a) focusing on fair
play, exhibiting good sportsmanship, helping others, and treating others with
respect;
3. Chrysanthemum by Kevin Henkes
a. Chrysanthemum is a cute little story about a girl who struggles to find acceptance
by her peers because of her name. Though before she started school she loved her
name, however once she got teased in school about its length and meaning, she
didn't seem to love it any more. It wasn't until their music teacher came in and
expressed her love and appreciation for Chrysanthemum's name, that
Chrysanthemum realized that being individual and having a different name is
something to love and cherish. Ideal for children 5 and up. Book represents themes
on individuality, acceptance, and pride.
b. This book encourages acceptance for who you are no matter what other people say,
to take pride in your origin, culture, ethnicity, and family. Though it took for the
Music teacher to say something, for the classmates and Chrysanthemum to change
their minds, it highlights that adults are the leaders in acceptance and thus should
serve as models for children who face diversity and bullying within school.
c. From this novel I could pull various lesson plans and activities. For example, in
highlighting the difference in Chrysanthemum's name compared to her classmate, I
could touch on differences in cultures around the world, pulling pictures of names
and clothing to showcase to the children so that they gain a better understanding of
the world around them. I would also go deeper as to ask them to ask their families
where their ancestors come from and have the children bring in something or learn
specific facts about that culture to share with the class. Another lesson I could focus
on from the book is bullying and its effects on Chrysanthemum and how such
bullying could affect others, this would further evaluated through class discussion.
d. K.8

Civics The student will demonstrate that being a good citizen involves
a)
taking turns and sharing;
b)
taking responsibility for certain classroom chores;
c)
taking care of personal belongings and respecting what belongs to
others;
d)
following rules and understanding the consequence of breaking rules;
e)
practicing honesty, self-control, and kindness to others;
f)
participating in decision making in the classroom;
g)
participating successfully in group settings.
K.6
Family Life The student will develop an awareness of positive ways in which
family members show love, affection, respect, and appreciation for each other.

4. All the Colors of the Earth by Sheila Hamanaka


a. This sweet book stands to celebrate the various colors of children and the colors of
love. Using positive imagery, such as animals, plants and food, to describe various
skin colors, this novel showcases diversity as well and multiculturalism.
Recommended for ages 4-5. This book represents cultural diversity, individuality,
and globalism.

b. Highlighting the diversity of individuals and cultures, it promotes unity and allows
children to recognize differences in culture while also encouraging acceptance. By
other means, this novel is also a metaphor that humanity is the reflection of beauty
of the natural world. Which then emphasizes the importance of the world around us
and that each thing, animal, and human are beautiful in who they are and where
they come from.
c. To incorporate this into a lesson, children can be taken outdoor to explore the colors
of nature such as the sky, grass, leaves and rocks. Teachers can ask children to
draw such objects and nature and be creative. Another activity could be a game
where children identity their classmates without looking. This will help them
understand the most important things about individuals, such as personality instead
of physical characteristics.
d. K.

Science
Investigate and Understand
a.
observing; classifying and sequencing; communicating;
measuring; predicting; hypothesizing; inferring; defining, controlling,
and manipulating variables in experimentation; designing, constructing,
and interpreting models; and interpreting, analyzing, and evaluating data.

K.4
Family Life The student will recognize that everyone is a member of a family
and that families come in many forms.
5. Susan Laughs by Jeanne Willis
a. Told in rhyme, this story follows Susan through a series of familiar child activities.
She swims with her father, works hard in school, plays with her friends, etc. Cute,
thoughtfully drawn illustrations reveal a portrait of a busy, happy little girl with
whom grade school children can identify. Not until the end of the story is it revealed
that Susan uses a wheelchair. For kindergarten and 1st grade classrooms, this books
highlights ableism in disability, acceptance, and challenging stereotypes.
b. Emphasizing that a disabled child is just the same as anyone else, the book is used
to bring equality to the classroom as well as motivate disabled children to
understand and explore their possibilities. This book helps young children to think
differently about wheelchairs or disabled people and helps motivate acceptance and
positive attitudes to all children around the world or in the community. By
challenging peoples and children's preconceptions about people with disabilities we
can redirect their thinking into a much more positive and cohesive mind set.
c. In using this book, I would encourage a classroom discussion, as a way to promote
tolerance and understanding. Through discussion, our class can identify ways in
which to further include children with disabilities into everyday actions and how
each child personally can relate or accommodate to others in need.
d. K.2

Family Life

The student will experience respect from and for others.

6. William's Doll by Charlotte Zolotow


a. This a book about a little boy who wants a doll. However, when asks for one he is
declined and teased by his brother and the boy next door. His father tries to replace
his want for a doll with a basketball and trains, but this does not keep William from
wanting a doll to play with. When his grandmother comes to visit she buys him a

doll despite the father's wishes. Explaining that William's want for a doll does not
make him less of a boy but rather highlights Williams desire to act like a father
towards the doll, to have something to care for and love, just as his father does for
him. For ages 5-7, this book represents individuality, self-expression, and
acceptance.
b. By defying gender roles and sticking up to bullying and teasing, William's Doll helps
teach children to be whoever they choose to be and like whatever they want to like.
In many ways this books helps promote individualism and cultural identity for
younger children who are still trying to find their place in the world.
c. This novel serves as a great start to class discussion on gender and gender roles;
bullying and teasing; and family communication. My emphasizing and encouraging
acceptance, students will stray away from bullying and begin to understand
differences in gender orientation and their recognition in society.
d. K.1
self.
K.2

Family Life

The student will experience success and positive feelings about

Family Life

The student will experience respect from and for others.

K.6
Family Life The student will develop an awareness of positive ways in which
family members show love, affection, respect, and appreciation for each other.
7. Take Me Out to the Yakyu by Aaron Meshon
a. Take Me Out to the Yakyu is a sweet story that spans over two countries to compare
and contrast a child's experience at a ballgame. Through the story we discover even
though these countries are so far apart they have commonalities - such as pre game
anticipation and post game satisfaction. However, we also are able to distinguish
the differences in souvenirs, food concessions and cheers. Furthermore, by
supplying a English/Japanese glossary the book opens up children to different
cultures and languages. For children 5-9, this book represents diversity, acceptance,
and multiculturalism.
b. This book helps open children up to different cultures which is necessary for
establishing a well rounded environment. By indicating similarities and differences
between the two experiences, children are able to relate as well as discover more
about the world.
c. Through this story children can examine their lives and culture through observation,
interpretation and understanding. In applying this book into a lesson plan, I would
begin with a discussion of what they found interesting or answer any questions they
had. From this point I would encourage the children to find other countries on the
globe that they think share similar sports or activities and what differences are
between the two countries (ex. Soccer vs. FuBball).
d. K.4

Geography

The student will use simple maps and globes to

a) develop an awareness that a map is a drawing of a place to show where


things are located and that a globe is a round model of the Earth;
b) describe places referenced in stories and real-life situations;
c) locate land and water features.

8. The Peace Book by Todd Parr


a. The Peace Book is about promoting hope and peace through short sentences that
younger children can relate to. Using illustrations that are bright and colorful, the
author incorporates the theme of peace in relation to their daily lives, while
highlighting to children "it's okay to be different." I would use this book for ages 6-8,
as to represent peace, love, and diversity.
b. Through this book children can be inspired to what they believe peace is and how it
effects the world around us. This book touches on various topics such as hunger,
multiculturalism, ocean preservation, etc. By highlighting that peace can be
anything, Parr teaches and reinforces lessons of kindness, tolerance, individuality,
and self love.
c. To incorporate this book into the classroom, I would have the children first describe
what they believe peace is before reading the book. After reading, the children
would collaborate on whether their ideas of peace have changed or remained the
same. From their notions of peace I would encourage them to find other ways they
can show peace, ways in which they can be helpful, caring, and kind within their
own communities. In the long run the class could create a fundraiser for a charity or
organization of their choosing that emphasizes the use of peace on a global scale.
d. K.8

Civics
a)
b)
c)
others;
d)
e)
f)
g)

The student will demonstrate that being a good citizen involves


taking turns and sharing;
taking responsibility for certain classroom chores;
taking care of personal belongings and respecting what belongs to
following rules and understanding the consequence of breaking rules;
practicing honesty, self-control, and kindness to others;
participating in decision making in the classroom;
participating successfully in group settings.

9. Each Kindness by Jacqueline Woodson


a. Each Kindness is a story about a girl named Maya, and how a another girl named
Chloe and her friend won't play with her. Maya is different--she wears hand-medowns and plays with old-fashioned toys. Every time Maya tries to join Chloe and
the other girls, they reject her. Eventually, Maya plays alone, and then stops coming
to school altogether because she feels alone and discarded. When Chloe's teacher
gives a lesson about how even small acts of kindness can change the world, Chloe
realizes she's lost an opportunity for friendship, and thinks about how much better it
could have been if she'd shown a little kindness toward Maya. For ages 5-9, this
book represents acceptance, kindness and humanity.
b. Emphasizing the aspects of bullying, this story helps children to understand and
take responsibility for their actions. Also, by not having a happy ending, it highlights
that you only have once chance to be nice, that you may not get that second
chance to make things right. Everyone's feelings are important and thus should be
respected - this a great story to showcase the importance of kindness to children.
c. From this book, the class can learn and interpret their own acts of kindness or
unkindness, and through discussion the class can learn what changes may be made

in their daily lives. At Hugh K. Cassell we often reward children with Kassell Keys
when they perform well or show acts of kindness - however do they still recognize
and exemplify kindness when rewards aren't in place? As an activity I might have
the children write down an act of kindness done by them outside the classroom and
a sentence on an act of kindness they've witnessed. (Depending on age and grade
would determine if students wrote sentences or simply held a discussion)
d. K.8

Civics The student will demonstrate that being a good citizen involves
a)
taking turns and sharing;
b)
taking responsibility for certain classroom chores;
c)
taking care of personal belongings and respecting what belongs to
others;
d)
following rules and understanding the consequence of breaking rules;
e)
practicing honesty, self-control, and kindness to others;
f)
participating in decision making in the classroom;
g)
participating successfully in group settings.
K.2
Family Life The student will experience respect from and for others.
K.3
Family Life The student will become aware of the effects of his or her
behavior on others and the effects of others' behavior on himself or herself.

10.Looking Like Me by Walter Dean Myers


a. Looking Like Me is a joyful, playful and fun children's book that helps children define
who they are. Whether boy, girl, son , daughter, runner, or dancer, whoever you are
is beautiful and wonderful, because you should be whoever you want to be. This
rhythmic story helps children recognize who they are and embrace it through
highlighting individuality, self-expression, and diversity. This is a great story to share
with students ages 5-9.
b. This is a great book to promote individuality and help students to define themselves
in a positive way. Furthermore, Its also good for students to reference this book for
sensory details. Myers does a great job of conveying the personality of the main
character through use of sensory details.
c. Through this book I would align it with a text-to-self connection by having the
children identify themselves. Describe yourself, describe what you would like to
become, what you could describe some of your classmates as, etc.
d. K.1
Family Life The student will experience success and positive feelings about
self.
K.2
History
The student will describe everyday life in the present and
in the past and begin to recognize that things change over time.