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1916 EASTER RISING

BY AARON FRIEL, MARC CAMPBELL AND


PATRICK DIAMOND

Video of the rising


Watch the video of how life was like during the 1916
Rising.

Images of 1916 rising


This is the ruins of the general post office after being
bombed by the british army. (top right)

This is members of the irish citizens army fighters on a


dublin rooftop during the 1919 rising. (bottom left)

Leaders of the 1916 Rising


These are leaders that were executed during the 1916 rising

Causes of the 1916 rising


Between 1910 and 1914 there was a renewed argument about the Home Rule.
The Lords were no longer able to block Home Rule indefinitely and the House of Commons passed a
Home Rule Bill in 1912.

Causes of the 1916 rising


On the 28th of September 1912 the people started to sign the covenant to protest against Home Rule.
By 1914 Ireland was close to a civil war, the Nationalists copied the Unionists and set up an army to
fight for Home Rule called the Irish Volunteers.

Easter Monday
The rebel headquarters was the General Post Office (GPO) where James Connolly, overall military
commander and four other members of the Military Council: Patrick Pearse, Tom Clarke,
Sen Mac Dermot and Joseph Plunkett were.
After occupying the Post Office, the Volunteers hoisted two Republican flags and Pearse read a
Proclamation of the Republic.

Easter Monday
Early on Monday morning, 24 April 1916, roughly 1,200 Volunteers and Citizen Army members took
over strong points in Dublin city centre.
A joint force of about 400 Volunteers and Citizen Army gathered at Liberty Hall under the command of
Commandant James Connolly.

Casualties
The British Army reported casualties of 116 dead, 368 wounded and nine missing.
Sixteen policemen died, and 29 were wounded.
Rebel and civilian casualties were 318 dead and 2,217 wounded. The Volunteers and ICA recorded 64
killed in action, but otherwise Irish casualties were not divided into rebels and civilians.

Easter Monday
They also failed to take Trinity College.
The British military were caught totally unprepared by the
rebellion and their response of the first day was generally
un-coordinated.

Casualties
All 16 police fatalities and 22 of the British soldiers killed were Irishmen British families came to Dublin
Castle in May 1916 to reclaim the bodies and funerals were arranged. British bodies which were not
claimed were given military funerals in Grangegorman Military Cemetery.
The majority of the casualties, both killed and wounded, were civilians. Both sides, British and rebel,
shot civilians deliberately on occasion when they refused to obey orders such as to stop at
checkpoints.

Tuesday to Saturday
Lord Wimborne declared martial law on tuesday evening and handed over civil power to general William
Lowe
The British commander, Lowe, worked slowly, unsure of the size of the force he was up against.
On Wednesday, 26 April, the guns at Trinity College and Helga shelled Liberty Hall, and the Trinity
College guns then began firing at rebel positions.

Tuesday to Saturday
First it was at bolands mills then they moved on to OConnell Street.
The principal rebel positions at the GPO, the Four Courts, Jacob's Factory and Boland's Mill saw little
combat
Reinforcements were sent to Dublin from England, and disembarked at Kingstown on the morning of 26
April.
Heavy fighting occurred at the rebel-held positions around the Grand Canal as these troops advanced
towards troops.

Tuesday to Saturday
Seventeen Volunteers were able to severely disrupt the British advance, killing or wounding 240 men.
The British eventually took the position, which had not been reinforced by the nearby rebel garrison at
Boland's Mills, on Thursday.
But the fighting there inflicted up to two thirds of their casualties for the entire week for a cost of just
four dead Volunteers.
By the end of the week, the British had taken some of the buildings in the Union, but others remained in
rebel hands.
The third major scene of combat during the week was at North King Street, behind the Four Courts,
where the British, on Thursday, tried to take a well-barricaded rebel position.
The enraged troops broke into the houses along the street and shot or bayonetted 15 male civilians
whom they accused of being rebel fighters.
These instances of British troops killing Irish civilians would later be highly controversial in Ireland.

Tuesday to Saturday
By the end of the week, the British had taken some of the buildings in the Union, but others remained in
rebel hands.
The third major scene of combat during the week was at North King Street, behind the Four Courts,
where the British, on Thursday, tried to take a well-barricaded rebel position.
The enraged troops broke into the houses along the street and shot or bayonetted 15 male civilians
whom they accused of being rebel fighters.
These instances of British troops killing Irish civilians would later be highly controversial in Ireland.

Tuesday to Saturday
The principal rebel positions at the GPO, the Four Courts, Jacob's Factory and Boland's Mill saw little
combat
Reinforcements were sent to Dublin from England, and disembarked at Kingstown on the morning of 26
April.
Heavy fighting occurred at the rebel-held positions around the Grand Canal as these troops advanced
towards troops.

Surrender
The headquarters garrison at the GPO, after days of shelling, was forced to abandon their headquarters
when fire caused by the shells spread to the GPO.
Connolly had been incapacitated by a bullet wound to the ankle and had passed command onto
Pearse.

Surrender
They tunnelled through the walls of the neighbouring buildings in order to
evacuate the Post Office without coming under fire and took up a new position
in 16 Moore Street.

Eamon De Valera
On the 24 April forces commanded by de valera occupied bolands mills
His chief task was to cover southeastern approaches of the city
De Valera was court martialled convicted and sentenced to death
He was the only commandant who was not executed
De Valeras supporters and detractors argue about De Valeras bravery in the
rising

Michael collins
Michael Collins was born on October 16, 1890 in Clonakilty,
County Cork, Ireland.
He was a hero of the Irish struggle for independence and the
first Sinn Fin minister of home affairs.
Best remembered for his daring strategy in directing the
campaign of guerrilla warfare during the intensification of
the Anglo-Irish War, Collins was shot to death by
insurgents in an ambush on August 22, 1922.

Michael collins
Collins has been regarded as a hero of Ireland for several
decades.
The Cooley Distillery in Ireland, which opened in 1987,
produced a famed whiskey named after Michael Collins.