Find us 'on Facebook

"Where you always get the help yo 11 need"

~'NATIVE PLANT GARDENS*

May 8th, 2010

Presented By:

David' Smitfi

1051 US Highway Rt. 202, Ringoes NJ, 08551 (908) 788-2600

Helping the Environment:

Why grow native plants In your garden and landscaping? First off, native plants are better adapted to your area. This means that they require less maintenance and less water. They are also more resistant to pests and diseases. That translates to water savings and reduced use of pesticides and fertilizers. AdditIonally, native plants attract native wildlife and native beneficial insects. You don't have to plant 100 percent natives to make a difference, consider just planting a few to start.

When you grow native plants, you help blend your landscaping with the native landscapes you find outside of your town or city.

Using native plant material(s) in your landscape is a great way to be patriotic as well. By doing this, you are helping restore a piece of America's natural beauty. More and more today, our native habitats are being destroyed.

THINK GLOBALLY, ACT LOCALLY

Destruction of Natural Habitats

Animals depend on particular habitats for their survival. For example, many North American songbirds escape winter's food shortage by flying to tropical forests; and tadpoles develop only in healthy ponds and streams. When these places vanish, the

animals that depend on them die out. Today songbirds, frogs, and many other species are threatened as tropical rainforests and North American wetlands are destroyed.

Why is habitat destroyed?

There are many causes of habitat destruction, including logging, mining, oil drilling, and exploiting other natural resources; clearing land for agriculture and cattle ranches; development for residential areas; and roads for people to do all these activities.

An acre of tropical forest disappears every second

Half of the planet's plant and animal species live in rainforests. Less than 2.5 billion acres of tropical forest remain from the four billion acres on Earth just a few hundred years ago. That translates to a huge loss of habitat, and the likely extinction of untold species. 1'10st of the deforestation has occurred in the last few decades. If the present rate of destruction continues, today's forests will be gone by the year 2081. Most of the U.S. tropical forests+in Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and other terrttorles+have been destroyed or severely damaged.

Wetlands are vanishing

Wetlands are increasingly under threat lin the United States. They often disappear in bits and pieces as developers fill in small ponds or parts of swamps and deltas. The cumulative effect, however, can be devastating for wildlife and people. In some states, more than 90 percent of wetlands have vanished. Wetlands not only support wildlife but also filter the drinking supply humans rely on.

Habitats near you

Of course, habitat loss isn't something that happens in wetlands and tropical forests. Prairies, temperate forests, deserts, coastal regions, coral reefs, manqroves=these are just some of the ecosystems in the United States at risk. There may be wild places near your home that are threatened.

What can you do to combat habitat loss?

• Get involved with habitat issues in your community.

• Maintain your own backyard so that it benefits animals and plants. Learn about the -i> National Wildlife Federation's Backyard Wildlife Habitat program.

• P·lant native trees and bushes across your lawn. See NWF's website to learn what's native to

your area.

Reduce or eliminate the use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides.

I,

Question: What do people mean when they say native plant? Answer: A native plant is one that has evolved naturally in a site (in our case- North America), without the aid or interference of

. people. -

Question: Why should 1 use native plants? What are the benefits? Answer: By growing native plants to the region where we live, we help retain some of the natural diversity that once ex!sted.

*Native Plants Save Energy

Native plants have evolved and adapted to local conditions over thousands of years. They are vigorous and hardy and can survive our winter cold and summer heat. Once established, they

. require no irrigation or fertilization. They are resistant to most pests and diseases. Thus, native plants suit today's interest in "low-maintenance" gardening and landscaping.

*Native Plants Stay Put

Each native plant species is a member of a community that includes other plants, animals and microorganisms. The natural balance keeps each species in check, allowing it to thrive in conditions where it is suited, but preventing it from running amok. Thus, native species rarely become invasive, as plants introduced from other areas can be.

*Native plants provide familiar sources of food and shelter for wildlife. As natural habitats are replaced by urban and suburban development, the use of native plants in landscaping can provide essential shelter for displaced wildlife. Land managers can use native plants to maintain and restore wildlife habitat. Native wildlife species comprise a majority of the game and nongame animals we manage habitat for, and they evolved with native plant species. Although alien species are often promoted for their value as wildlife food plants, there is no evidence that alien plant materials are superior to native plants.

Question: Where can 1 find native plants for my garden/landscape? Answer: RlGHT HERE AT RUTGERS NURSERY!!! @

. -Rutgers Nursery offers a wide range and variety of native plant material. Ask ·one of our staff for assistance or look into our 'NativePlant List' as a guideline.

PLANNING YOUR LANDSCAPE DEIGN:

,.._, THE FOLLOWING ARE SOME·THOUGHTS TO CONSIDER~

1* '1RINK BIG'- Consider the OVERALL landscape. There are many different views and angles of your property. Take a step back and observe your house and property. Take Photo's and make notes. After that, focus on a specific area. "How do I want this specific area to look?" Early on, you'll want to develop an overall plan that will achieve the total landscape look you want. However, by doing smaller specific designs and plans, you can work on one or two areas at a time.

2* SITE ANAL YSIS- Get familiar with your landscape! Consider:

-Exposure: (Northern Winds and Southern Exposure)

-Soil: (More than likely if you live in the surrounding areas here, you probably have a high clay based soil). Ifin doubt, conduct a soil sample test.

-Circulation patterns: Consider how people will walk through your landscape. Create a 'sense of place'. IN'S and OUT'S in your landscape will

make it that much more effective. .

- Views: Consider the different views around your house. Don't like the view of yow' neighbor's garage? You may want to create a screen to help soften or screen the view. Like the view from your kitchen window out to the playground area for your ldds?Make it a point then not to plant anything too tall in front of your window .

. ~ Wet and Dry Areas: Observe where water tends to flow on your property.

In areas where it's more excessive, you may want-to consider 'Wet Tolerant' plant species. On the other hand, if you have an area where it hardly gets any water, . consider 'Drought Tolerant' Species. Sounds pretty basic, but many people do not take this into consideration!

**DON'T RUSH YOUR PLANIDESIGN**

-Landscape is a lifetime investment!

-Be proactive! Think 2,3,5 years down the road from now: "What will my landscape look like?"

-Don't overplant. It is a very common mistake that designers and homeowners make. Grow with your plants! They will grow and fill in space overtime. It is always easier to ADD plants to your landscape, then it is to REMOVE overgrown plants!

**REMEMBER: YOUR LANDSCAPE IS AN ARTWORK,SO MAKE SURE IT'S A MASTERPIECE! THERE ARE NO 'BOUNDARIES' OR 'RULES',FOR YOU LANDSCAPE, HOWEVER- DO CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING:

-Foundation plantings

-Different Layers and textures

- TREES! TREES! TREES! Tress 'increase property value! Consider planting a shade or flowering tree of a comer of your home.

-Consider the seasons. If you live in your house all year found, you may want interest all (4) seasons. If it's summer house, think: of summer flowering species.

THE FOLLOWlNG ARE NATIVE PLANT SPECIES TO CONSIDER INCORPORATING INTO YOUR LANDSCAPE:

"Remember- Even though these are native plants, if the right plant isn't in the right location, you run a risk of it not thriving or evert surviving. Conduct . a Site Analysis beforehand!

Foundation Plants: Consider INKBERRY

ORNAMENTAL GRASSES: Consider SWITCH GRASS

PERENN1ALS: (These are just a small handful to consider)

"Indicates DEER RESISTANT (NOT DEER PROOF I !!)

-Cardinal Flower

-Stoke's Aster

-Black Eyed Susan

*Purple Coneflower * Joe Pye Weed "Coreopsis -Butterfly Weed *BeeBalm

*Aster

"Blanket Flower -Garden Phlox

" .

NATIVE SHADE TREES:

*Indicates DEER RESISTANT (NOT DEER PROOF!!!)

-Red Maple'

-Sugar Maple

-Tulip Tree'

*R.iver Birch -Sweettlum

-Oak (Pin.Red.Swamp White)

- Honeylocust

-Green Ash

NA TIVE FLOWERING TREES:

* Redbud

* Serviceberry -FringeTree

- S weetbayMagnolia

* Washington Hawthorne

NATIVE SHRUBS:

"Surnmcrsweet Clethra (also called Pepperbush) *Vibumum (Arrowood, Blackhaw)

- Mountain Laurel

-Swamp Azalea

*Itea

-Oakleaf Hydrangea

-Annandale Hydrangea

* Inkberry -Fothergill a

* Spicebush *Witchazel -Highbush Blueberry

*Hypericum Species/St.John's Wort

Serviceberry:

20-30'

Wit ite Flower in Spring Edible Fruit

Orange to Ref/ Fall Color

Eastern Redbud

20-30'

"Heart Shaped" leaves Pink flower in Spring Yellow to brown Fall Color

Black Gum

Shade 01' Street Tree 50'

Orange to Red Fall Color