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TAG Unit Plan by Emily Childs

Properties
Title:

Life Science Exploration TAG Unit

Type:

Instructional Unit

Subject:

Science, Reading, Speaking & Listening

Grade Range: 5th grade


Description:

TAG strategies will be used throughout the study of Life Science. Students
will infer the concepts of heredity through a mystery lesson, study the
differences between vertebrates and invertebrates, as well as defending
the best classification group using the circle of knowledge strategy.

Duration:

6 Weeks

Author:

Emily Childs

Instructional Unit Content


Standard(s)/Element(s)
Georgia Performance Standard#
Science:
S5L2: Students will recognize that offspring can resemble parents in inherited traits and
learned behaviors. (Mystery)
S5L1. Students will classify organisms into groups and relate how they determined the
groups with how and why scientists use classification.
a. Demonstrate how animals are sorted into groups (vertebrate and
invertebrate).
(Compare and Contrast)
S5L1. Students will classify organisms into groups and relate how they determined the
groups with how and why scientists use classification. (Circle of Knowledge)
Reading:
ELACC5RI1: Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly
and when drawing inferences from the text.
ELACC5RI3: Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals,
events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific
information in the text.
ELACC5RI5: Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison,
cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more
texts.
Speaking and Listening:
ELACC5SL1 Comprehension and Collaboration: Engage effectively in a range of
collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners
on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly.
TAG Standards

HO/CTS 1: The student asks probing, insightful, and relevant questions.


HO/CTS 2: The student responds to questions with supporting information that reflects indepth knowledge of a topic.
HO/CTS 3: The student conducts comparisons using criteria***
HO/CTS 4: The students makes and evaluates decisions using criteria***
HO/CTS 5: The students predicts probable consequences of decisions.
HO/CTS 6: The students extrapolates verbal-linguistic (e.g. analogies) and visual-spatial
patterns (e.g. tessellations) to determine relationships (Used to comprehend and
explain Punnett Squares)
HO/CTS 11: The student draws conclusions based upon relevant information while
discarding irrelevant information.
CT&CPSS 3: The student incorporates brainstorming and other idea-generating techniques
to solve problems or create new products.
CT&CPSS 5: The student develops original ideas, presentations, or products through
synthesis and evaluation.
ARS 2: The student formulates original and appropriate questions to test the limits of an
existing body of knowledge.
ACS 1: The student uses written, spoken, and technological media to convey new learning
or challenge existing ideas.
ACS 7: The student responds to contributions of others, considering all available
information.
ACS 8: The student participates in small group discussions to argue persuasively or
reinforce others good points.
ACS 10: The student supports and defends his/her opinions while respecting the opinions of
others.

Summary/Overview
The focus of this unit is for students to grasp the 5 th grade life science standards by
exploring their characteristics. Students will infer the concepts of heredity through a
mystery lesson, study the differences between single-celled organisms and multi-celled
organisms, as well as defending the best classification group using the circle of
knowledge strategy.

Enduring Understanding(s)
At the end of this unit the student will understand that

Heredity is passed down from parents to their offspring using probability. Punnett
squares are used to help scientists help determine probability for a particular
offspring.
There are 5 major kingdoms that have their own traits and qualities for
identification. All organisms can be sorted into these kingdoms once the traits are
known.
Vertebrates have a backbone and invertebrates do not. This distinction helps both
types of organisms function in different capacities.

Essential Question(s)
How are organisms classified? Why are organisms classified?

How can comparing and contrasting vertebrates and invertebrates help differentiate
between the two? Why should we distinguish between the having a backbone and
not having a backbone?
How can you determine which physical attributes are inherited from family
members? Which traits are dominant and recessive?; Could two traits be shown
simultaneously? (2nd question TAG only)

Concept(s) to Maintain
Able to apply characteristics of each kingdom to an unknown organism in order to
identify it
Understanding that all kingdoms are important and have different purposes
Similarities and differences of vertebrates and invertebrates
Differentiating between dominant and recessive traitshow can this affect
outcomes?
Not all traits can be traced back to one specific family member, though traits are
inherited from family members

Evidence of Learning
What students should know:
5 kingdoms, characteristics of each kingdom and why organisms are classified
Organisms are separated into kingdoms based on criteria
Difference between a dominant and recessive gene, which traits are dominant and
which are recessive
What students should be able to do:
The difference between vertebrates and invertebratestheir characteristics
Identify animals as either vertebrates or invertebrates
Distinguish between the 5 different kingdoms, identify specific characteristics
belonging to each kingdom, defend a point of view, and attempt to persuade others
using reasoning.
Correctly complete a Punnett square; explain how traits and behaviors are passed
down through families; trace a trait or behavior to infer where it came from

Suggested Vocabulary

Criteria, vertebrates, invertebrate, classification, kingdom, animals, backbone


Kingdom, classification, animal, plant, fungi, protists, bacteria, persuade
Chromosomes, DNA, genes, Punnett square, offspring, dominant, recessive

Suggested Strategies for Teaching and Learning


Brief Description/Essential Question/Name of Strategy for each Lesson.
Circle of Knowledge:
Students will be grouped to defend a specific kingdom sharing why they think it is the
best kingdom then share their ideas with others to see if they can persuade classmates.
How do the characteristics separate an organism from another kingdom? How are the
kingdoms interrelated? Which kingdom is best? (Last question is a debate starter.)

Compare and Contrast:


Students will research vertebrates and invertebrates culminating in a conclusion activity
and multiple intelligence choice board.
How can the animal kingdom be further divided? How can information and research be
compiled to better explain vertebrates/invertebrates? What can be concluded from
comparing and contrasting vertebrates and invertebrates?
Mystery:
Students will discuss theories for an imaginary persons hair and eye color as they learn
about her family members.
How can you determine which physical attributes are inherited from family members?
Which traits are dominant and recessive? Non-TAG Could two traits be shown
simultaneously?-TAG students
Resource(s) http://www.zephyrus.co.uk/kingdomanimal.html, BrainPop, biology for kids
website, NewsELA, Poster paper, chrome books, Science textbook, think-tac-toe boards,
celery, Celery Lab observation sheet, food coloring, hand microscopes, circle of knowledge
handout, circle of knowledge self-assessment, Ginas mystery sheet for heredity, folders to
distribute Ginas information, Promethean board to teach Punnett squares, Linoit, two cups
for celery lab, Zoo project rubric, colored pencils, pictures of animals and plants to use
Technology:
[QR codes are also used]
BrainPop video on heredity
BrainPop articles on dominant/recessive traits, codominance, and Gregor Mendel
http://www.biology4kids.com/files/vert_main.html
http://www.biology4kids.com/files/invert_main.html
NewsELA.com (selected articles in Compare and Contrast strategy)
http://www.zephyrus.co.uk/kingdomanimal.html (circle of knowledge strategy)
Linoit
Assessment(s)
Circle of Knowledge:
Self-Assessment
Compare and Contrast:
Article Quiz (HW grade)
Conclusion Classwork
Mystery:
Student Packets (Classwork grade)
Performance Assessments
Tic-Tac-Toe board for Compare and Contrast strategy
Class discussion and Classmate persuasion in Circle of Knowledge strategy
Solving Ginas Family Mystery strategy (anchor chart paper explanation and hypotheses)
Zoo Project

Unit by the weeks:


Week One: Introduction of Life science and classification
How can organisms be classified?
-Introduce idea of kingdom, phyla, class, order, family, genius, species (KPCOFGS)
-Science textbook pages p.274-275 with a partner

-Identify different organisms using KPCOFGS


Week Two: Circle of Knowledge on Animal Kingdoms
http://www.zephyrus.co.uk/kingdomanimal.html
How do the characteristics separate an organism from another class (within a kingdom and
phyla)? How are the classes interrelated? Which class (of the animal kingdom) is best?
-Introduce students groups and make search group an animal kingdom
-Then have students share their evidence describing why their kingdom is the best
-Debrief and share with class
Week Three: Compare and Contrast Vertebrates and Invertebrates
Essential Question(s): How can the animal kingdom be further divided? How can information
and research be compiled to better explain vertebrates/invertebrates? What can be
concluded from comparing and contrasting vertebrates and invertebrates?
-Compare and Contrast Activity sheet
-Think-Tac-Toe boards
Week Four: Plants: Vascular and nonvascular
What are the different types of plants? How do plants carry nutrients?
-Celery Lab to observe the vessels within a plant and describe different type of plants as
vascular and nonvascular
-PowerPoint of vascular and nonvascular plants
-Students will now investigate different plants outside to identify and draw into their science
notebooks
Week Five: Zoo Project
Students will combine all their animal and plant knowledge to draw a map of a zoo by
classifying the organisms into groups.

Classification Poster Rubric


Criteria
The student:

Below the
Standard

Approaching
the Standard

Meets the
Standard

Exceeds the
Standard

Does not
include or
includes
incorrect
examples of
invertebrates.

Correctly sorts at
least one
invertebrate
example.

Correctly sorts
two invertebrate
examples.

Correctly sorts
more than two
invertebrate
examples.

Does not
include or
includes
incorrect
examples of a

Correctly sorts at
least one
vascular
example.

Correctly sorts
two vascular
examples.

Correctly sorts
more than two
vascular
examples.

Invertebrates,
Vascular,
Nonvascular
Exhibits
S5L1a
Sorts animal
examples into
invertebrate exhibit
S5L1b
Sorts plant
examples into
vascular exhibit

vascular plant.
S5L1b
Sorts plant
examples into
nonvascular exhibit

S5L1b
Identifies
characteristics for
vascular &
nonvascular plants

Does not
include or
includes
incorrect
examples of a
nonvascular
plant.

Correctly sorts at
least one
nonvascular
example.

Correctly sorts
two nonvascular
examples.

Correctly sorts
more than two
nonvascular
examples.

Does not
include any
plant
characteristics.

Identifies one
characteristic .

Identifies one
characteristics
for each plant
phyla.

Identifies two
characteristics
for each plant
phyla.

Identifies none
or one class of
vertebrates.

Identifies two or
three classes of
vertebrates.

Identifies all four


classes of
vertebrates.

Identifies all five


classes of
vertebrates

Does not
include or
includes
incorrect
examples of
vertebrate
classes.

Correctly sorts at
least one
vertebrate
example in all
groups.

Correctly sorts
two vertebrate
examples in all
groups.

Correctly sorts
more than two
vertebrate
examples in all
groups.

Does not
identify

Identifies one
characteristics for
all vertebrate
classes or some
characteristics for
some classes.

Identifies two
characteristics for
all five vertebrate
classes.

Identifies more
than two
characteristics
for some
vertebrate
classes.

Writing is legible
and neat and
poster is well
thought out and
organized.

Writing is legible
and neat, poster
is well thought
out and organized
and grammar and
spelling are
correct.

Writing is legible
and neat; poster
is well thought
out and
organized,
grammar and
spelling are
correct, and
color/pictures
add to the
posters overall
appearance.

Vertebrates
Exhibit
S5L1a
Identifies all five
classes of
vertebrates
S5L1a
Sorts animal
examples into
vertebrate classes

S5L1a
Identifies
characteristics for
vertebrate classes
S5CS8
Appearance of
poster.

Fact Sheet

characteristics.

Writing is
legible and
neat.

Fact Sheet is
incomplete.

Included 1 -2
characteristics in
MOST exhibits

Included 2
characteristics for
ALL required
exhibits

Included more
than 2
characteristics
in ALL required
exhibits

Week Six: Mystery Lesson on Heredity


How can you determine which physical attributes are inherited from family members?
Which traits are dominant and recessive?
Could two traits be shown simultaneously?-TAG students (codominance)
Why are chromosomes important and how do they effect heredity?-TAG students
Follow directions on mystery lesson plan.